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Encyclopedia > Brunswick, Georgia
Brunswick, Georgia

Seal
Nickname: Gateway to the Golden Isles
Location in the state of Georgia
Coordinates: 31°9′32″N 81°29′21″W / 31.15889, -81.48917
Country United States
State Georgia
County Glynn
Government
 - Mayor Bryan Thompson (R)
Area
 - City 25.2 sq mi (65.2 km²)
 - Land 17.2 sq mi (44.6 km²)
 - Water 8 sq mi (20.7 km²)
Elevation 33 ft (10 m)
Population (2000)
 - City 15,600
 - Density 906/sq mi (349.8/km²)
 - Metro 67,568
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Website: http://www.brunswickga.org/

Brunswick is a city in Glynn County, Georgia, United States. It is the principal city of the 'Brunswick, Georgia Metropolitan Statistical Area' which encompasses all of Brantley, Glynn and McIntosh counties of Georgia, and has a combined population of 98,433. The city's population was 15,600 at the 2000 census. Image File history File links Brunswick_Seal. ... // A nickname is a name of a person or thing other than its proper name. ... Image File history File links Adapted from Wikipedias GA county maps by Seth Ilys. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states, which are... Georgia is divided into 159 counties. ... Glynn County is a county located in the state of Georgia. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Basic Definition In geography, the elevation of a geographic location is its height above mean sea level (or some other fixed point). ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The metre or meter is a measure of length. ... Population density by country, 2006 Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... Metronome, a public art installation showing the time in New York City The Eastern Time Zone (ET) of the Western Hemisphere falls mostly along the east coast of Northern America and the west coast of South America. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to: In North America, Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC − 4 hours. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Glynn County is a county located in the state of Georgia. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas, which are organized around county boundaries. ... Brantley County is a county located in the Georgia. ... Glynn County is a county located in the state of Georgia. ... McIntosh County is a county located in the state of Georgia. ...


The city is an important port city on the Atlantic Coast and is the county seat of Glynn CountyGR6. Plans for the city's streets and squares were laid out following Georgia's founder James Oglethorpe's Savannah Plan in 1771. Brunswick was incorporated on February 22, 1856. The city was once called The Shrimp Capital of the World, due to the many wild shrimp harvested in its local waters. Seaport, a painting by Claude Lorrain, 1638 The Port of Wellington at night. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Glynn County is a county located in the state of Georgia. ... General James Oglethorpe James Edward Oglethorpe (22 December 1696 – 30 June 1785) was an English general, a philanthropist, and a founder of the state of Georgia. ...


Brunswick is home to the Brunswick Golden Isles Airport, which is served by Delta Air Lines. Brunswick Golden Isles Airport (IATA: BQK, ICAO: KBQK), formerly known as Glynco Jetport, is a public airport located 5 miles (8 km) north of the city of Brunswick, in Glynn County, Georgia, USA. The airport has a single runway. ... Delta Air Lines, Inc. ...

Contents

Geography

Brunswick is located at 31°9′32″N, 81°29′21″W (31.158777, -81.489252)GR1.


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 65.2 km² (25.2 mi²). 44.6 km² (17.2 mi²) of it is land and 20.7 km² (8.0 mi²) of it (31.68%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


The Intracoastal Waterway passes between Brunswick and St. Simons Island, utilizing the South Brunswick River and the Mackay River. Tug and barge on the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway Navigation on the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (GIWW), where it intersects with Bayou Perot, in the vicinity of New Orleans The Intracoastal Waterway is a 4,800-km (3,000-mile) recreational and commercial waterway along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the... St. ...


Demographics

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 15,600 people, 6,085 households, and 3,681 families residing in the city. The population density was 349.8/km² (906/mi²). There were 6,952 housing units at an average density of 155.9/km² (403.8/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 59.81% African American, 36.41% White, 0.27% Native American, 0.35% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 1.73% from other races, and 1.40% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.82% of the population. 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 6,085 households out of which 29.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 31.4% were married couples living together, 24.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.5% were non-families. 33.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 3.13. This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 27.3% under the age of 18, 10.1% from 18 to 24, 27.1% from 25 to 44, 20.2% from 45 to 64, and 15.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 88.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.8 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $22,272, and the median income for a family was $28,564. Males had a median income of $26,172 versus $18,602 for females. The per capita income for the city was $13,062. About 25.2% of families and 30.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 43.9% of those under age 18 and 21.7% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Early history

Brunswick was founded in 1771 and named for the duchy of Brunswick-Lueneburg in Germany, the ancestral home of King George II of Great Britain. Many of the street and square names reflect the city's English heritage - Gloucester, Newcastle, Norwich, London, Halifax, and Hanover are examples of such. The streets and squares of the town themselves were laid out in the grid style before the American Revolution by the Royal Province of Georgia in 1771, following James Oglethorpe's Savannah Plan. In 1789, George Washington proclaimed Brunswick as one the five original ports of entry for the Colonies. In 1797 the Georgia General Assembly transferred the county seat of Glynn County from Frederica on St. Simons Island to Brunswick. Brunswick-Lüneburg was an historical state within the Holy Roman Empire. ... George II (George Augustus; 10 November 1683 – 25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen Colonies that... Georgia Colony, as specified in the 1732 grant The Georgia Colony was one of the Southern colonies in British North America. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate Casey Cagle, R since November 7, 2006 Speaker of the House Glenn Richardson, R since November 7, 2006 Members 236 Political groups (as of November 7, 2006 elections) Democratic Party Republican Party Meeting place Georgia State Capitol Web site...


Locals and environs

In addition to being the second largest concentration of historic structures in Georgia, Brunswick and the surrounding area is also a year-round resort community. Because the city limits of Brunswick are relatively small (the majority of the city's metro-area population is located outside the city limits) the city has a small town feel. Located in Glynn County across from mainland Brunswick and the area's famous marshes are the Golden Isles of Georgia, which include St. Simons Island, Sea Island, Jekyll Island and Little St. Simons Island. Jekyll Island was the winter retreat for such wealthy families as the Rockefellers, Vanderbilts, Morgans, and Goodyears beginning in the late 1800s. The islands' beaches, resorts, shops, and historic sites continue to attract visitors from around the world annually. In 2004, Sea Island was the site of the G-8 summit of world leaders hosted by U.S. President George W. Bush. An Atlantic coastal salt marsh in Connecticut. ... The Golden Isles of Georgia are a group of barrier islands on the coast of Georgia. ... St. ... Sea Island is an isolated resort island in Glynn County, Georgia. ... Driftwood Beach on Jekyll Island Jekyll Island is an island off the coast of the U.S. state of Georgia, in Glynn County; it is one of the Sea Islands and one of Golden Isles of Georgia. ... Virtually untouched for centuries, Little St. ... G-8 work session; July 20-22, 2002. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


The Port of Brunswick is one of the nation's most productive ports on the Atlantic Coast. Besides handling such products as wood pulp, paper products, wheat, soybeans, and heavy machinery, it is the primary U.S. port of import and/or export of numerous automobile manufacturers including Jaguar, Landrover, Porsche, Mitsubishi, Volvo, Ford, GM, and Mercedes. The port is operated by the Georgia Ports Authority, which operates all four ports in the state. Overview The Georgia Ports Authority is the administrative agency of the U.S. state of Georgia responsible for the development, maintenance, and operation of sea and inland ports in the state. ...


Another landmark of the city is the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC), which brings in thousands of students monthly. It provides training for eighty-one federal agencies, in addition to providing services to state and local governments as well as several international organizations. This article needs cleanup. ...


The Brunswick area is rich in live oak trees, particularly the Southern live oak. Such is the quality of the live oak trees in the Brunswick and the Golden Isles area that Revolutionary warships such as the USS Constitution (nicknamed Old Ironsides) were clad in St. Simons Island oak planks. Brunswick has a famous live oak named Lover's Oak (located on Albany Street). As of 2005, it is approximately 900 years old. Local legends and American Indian folklore say that Indian lovers would meet under the majestic tree. Southern live oaks on Skidaway Island, near Savannah, Georgia Live oak is a general term for a number of unrelated oaks in several different sections of the genus Quercus that happen to share the character of evergreen foliage. ... Binomial name Quercus virginiana Mill. ... “ Old Ironsides ” redirects here. ...


Residents of Brunswick lay claim to their city as being the origin of the famous Brunswick stew (Brunswick County, Virginia also lays claim to this title.) A plaque on a pot at the Brunswick Visitors Center states that the first Brunswick stew was cooked in it on July 2, 1898, on nearby St. Simons Island. Brunswick stew is a traditional dish from the southeastern United States. ... Brunswick County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ... St. ...


Brunswick is also home to historic Glynn Academy, Georgia's second oldest public high school, founded in 1788 under the public education provisions of the Northwest Ordinances. The county's other high school, Brunswick High School- http://www.glynn.k12.ga.us/BHS/, is located outside the city limits. The Glynn Academy is the second-oldest high school in Georgia, older than all except for the Academy of Richmond County in Augusta. ...


The Marshes of Glynn

In 1878, poet and native Georgian Sidney Lanier wrote his world-famous poem The Marshes of Glynn about the marshes in Glynn county as he sought relief from tuberculosis in Brunswick's climate. A major bridge near the marshes of Glynn is named the Sidney Lanier Bridge. There is a historical marker overlooking the marshes of Glynn commemorating Lanier and the poem, and a live oak tree near the marker is named the Sidney Lanier Oak.(located in the median of Glynn Avenue/Highway 17) Sidney Lanier (February 3, 1842 – September 7, 1881) was an American musician and poet. ... The Marshes of Glynn is one of poet Sidney Laniers many poems. ... This article is about marsh, a type of wetland. ... The Sidney Lanier Bridge is a cable-stayed bridge that spans the South Brunswick River in Brunswick, Georgia. ...


The original Sidney Lanier Bridge was a vertical lift bridge on U.S. Highway 17 crossing over the South Brunswick River and was opened June 22, 1956. On November 7, 1972 the ship African Neptune struck the bridge, causing parts of the bridge to collapse, taking cars with it. Ten deaths were caused by the accident. On May 3, 1987 the bridge was again struck by a ship, this time by the Polish freighter Ziemia Bialostocka (ziemia Białostocka). In 2003 a new cable-stayed bridge with the same name was opened to allow larger ships to enter the port and to eliminate the need for the drawbridge on U.S. highway 17. It is the longest-spanning bridge in Georgia. The elevation at the top of the support towers is 480 feet. A lift bridge over the Erie Canal at Lockport. ... MAJOR JUNCTIONS JUNCTION POSTMILE {{{junction}}} Legend BROWSE STATE HWYS {{{browse}}} United States Highway 17 is a north-south United States highway. ... A cable-stayed bridge is a bridge that consists of one or more columns (normally referred to as towers or pylons), with cables supporting the bridge deck. ...


Liberty ships

During World War II, Brunswick boomed as over 16,000 workers of the J. A. Jones Construction Company produced ninety-nine Liberty ships and "Knot" ships (Type C1-M ships which were designed for short coastal runs, and most often named for knots) for the U.S. Maritime Commission to transport war matériel to the European and Pacific Theatres. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Liberty ships were cargo ships built in the United States during World War II. They were cheap and quick to build, and came to symbolize U.S. wartime industrial output. ... Type C1 ships were small cargo ships built for the U.S. Maritime Commission before and during World War II. The C1 types were the smallest of the 3 original Maritime Commission designs. ... Some knots: 1. ... The US Maritime Commission was created as an independent agency by the Merchant Marine Act of 29 June 1936, to further develop and maintain a merchant marine for the promotion of United States commerce and defense. ... Matériel (from the French for equipment or hardware, related to the word material) is a term used in English to refer to the equipment and supplies in military and commercial supply chain management. ... Animation of the WWII European Theatre. ... The Pacific War (1937–1945) is not to be confused with the War of the Pacific (1879–1884) in South America. ...


The first ship was the SS James M. Wayne (named after James Moore Wayne), whose keel was laid on July 6, 1942 and was launched on March 13, 1943. The last ship was the SS Coastal Ranger, whose keel was laid on June 7, 1945 and launched on August 25, 1945. The first six ships took 305 to 331 days each to complete, but soon production ramped up and most of the remaining ships were built in about two months, bringing the average down to 89 days each. By November 1943, about four ships were launched per month. The SS William F. Jerman was completed in only 34 days in November and December 1944. Six ships could be under construction in ways (shipways or slipways) at one time. Justice Wayne, in an 1855 photograph by Matthew Brady James Moore Wayne (1790 - July 5, 1867) was an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Georgia. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ...


The United States Navy stated that they would require six ships from each shipyard for the month of December 1944. The workers guaranteed the delivery of not six, but seven ships. For the first eleven months of 1944, an average of 4.27 ships were launched per month. Up to this point the shipyard had never produced more than five ships in a calendar month, except for August 1944, in which six ships were launched. However, the first ship of August 1944 was launched on August 1 and the last one on August 31, and only three ships had been launched in July and only four ships were launched in September. So a ship that might well have been launched in July was actually launched on August 1. The workers fulfilled their promise of completing seven ships in December 1944 by working overtime, including working on Christmas day. Apart from the ships launched in December 1944, only one ship was completed in under 43 days. With the extra work, all of the ships launched this month were completed in 34 to 42 days (which included the SS William F. Jerman mentioned above). Furthermore, the workers asked that they not be paid for their extra work. Each worker endorsed their time-and-a-half paycheck over to the government. They never produced more than five ships in a calendar month again, although a full five ships had been launched in the previous month of November and five more were launched the next month, January 1945. By March 1945 production of ships started to decline. The last ship launched was the SS Coastal Ranger, launched on August 25, 1945, shortly after the war ended. {{ USN redirects here. ... Christmas is an annual holiday that celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Most of the Liberty ships from Brunswick were assigned to U.S. shipping companies and most of them were named after famous Americans (starting with U.S. Supreme Court Justices from the South). However, numbers 19, 29, and 31–40 went to Great Britain (Ministry of War Transport) under the Supplemental Defense Appropriations Act of 1941 (see Lend-Lease) and were given one-word names starting with "Sam" (e.g. Samdee). Number 73 went to the Norwegian government. Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) is the highest judicial body in the... In the United Kingdom, the Department for Transport is the government department responsible for the transport network. ... The Lend-Lease program was a program of the United States during World War II that allowed the United States to provide the Allied Powers with war material without becoming directly involved in the war. ...


An iron cut-away scale model (approximately 1:20) of a Liberty ship had been built for employee training. Sometime after the end of World War II this was put on display in Brunswick, at the end of F. J. Torras Causeway, near the shipyards. Unfortunately, it was not maintained and after twenty years it rusted badly and was scrapped. In 1987 efforts were started to build and display a new model. This 23-foot scale model was unveiled on August 23, 1991 in Mary Ross Park. It is very similar to the original scale model except that it is not cut away to reveal the inner decks. A new park (called Liberty Ship Park) is being built near the site of the original Sidney Lanier Bridge and the model is to be moved there. is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ...


1991 plane crash

An Atlantic Southeast Airlines Embraer EMB 120 plane crashed in Brunswick on April 5, 1991 due to propeller control failure[1] . The crash claimed the lives of all twenty-three people on board, including former U.S. Senator John Tower of Texas and astronaut Sonny Carter. Atlantic Southeast Airlines (ASA) is an American airline based in Atlanta, Georgia, USA flying to over 150 destinations as a Delta Connection carrier. ... Embraer, the Empresa Brasileira de Aeronáutica S.A. is a Brazilian aircraft manufacturer. ... The EMBRAER EMB 120 Brasilia is a twin-turboprop commuter airliner. ... April 5 is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... John Tower John Goodwin Tower (September 29, 1925 – April 5, 1991) was the first Republican United States senator from Texas since the Reconstruction after the Civil War. ... Official language(s) No Official Language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Astronaut Bruce McCandless II using a manned maneuvering unit outside the U.S. Space Shuttle Challenger in 1984. ... Manley Lanier Sonny Carter, Jr. ...


Superfund sites

The Hanlin Group, Inc. maintained a facility named "LCP Chemicals" in Glynn County, just outside the corporate limits of Brunswick, which was convicted of dumping 150 tons of mercury into Purvis Creek, a tributary of the Turtle River and surrounding tidal marshes between the mid-1980s and its closure in 1994. Two executives were sentenced to prison time over the incident. General Name, Symbol, Number mercury, Hg, 80 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 12, 6, d Appearance silvery Standard atomic weight 200. ...


The LCP facility had been declared a Superfund site when it closed in 1994 and was already under scrutiny by the EPA when Service biologists discovered mercury poisoning in endangered wood storks on St. Simons Island. Fish, shellfish, crabs, and shrimps taken in coastal waters as well as other bird species also contained the toxic metal. The Service traced the source of the contamination to the LCP plant and documented the extent of the damage to wildlife resources–an effort that resulted in the addition of Endangered Species Act charges to those that would be brought against Hanlin and its officers. Link to EPA information Checking the status of a cleanup site Superfund is the common name for the United States environmental law that is officially known as the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), 42 U.S.C. §§ 9601 to 9675, which was enacted by the United States Congress on December 11... EPA redirects here. ... A biologist is a scientist devoted to and producing results in biology through the study of organisms. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Mercury_toxicity. ... Binomial name Mycteria americana Linnaeus, 1758 The Wood Stork (Mycteria americana) is a large wading bird in the stork family Ciconiidae. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


Other Superfund sites in the area are

  • Brunswick Wood Preserving EPA link
  • Hercules 009 Landfill EPA link
  • Terry Creek Dredge Spoil Areas/Hercules Outfall EPA link

Trivia

  • Scenes from the films Conrack, The Longest Yard, and The View From Pompey's Head were filmed in Brunswick.
  • On March 13, 2006, Brunswick's mayor Bryan Thompson appeared on the game show Deal or No Deal on NBC. Thompson turned down an offer for $198,000 in the game, and afterward received lower offers. Later though, he was offered a deal of $202,000, which he took. Thompson decided that he would split the money between himself and his town. During the show, Thompson's constituents were on a monitor via satellite, and he looked to them for guidance.
  • There are two independent record labels based in Brunswick. Still Movement Records, founded in 2005, and Enslave Records, founded in 2006.

Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ... Conrack is a 1974 film based on the 1972 autobiographical novel The Water Is Wide by Pat Conroy, directed by Martin Ritt and starring Jon Voight. ... The Longest Yard is a 1974 movie about inmates at a prison who play American football against their guards. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... “Quiz show” redirects here. ... Linda de Mol host of Miljoenenjacht (and the sister of Endemols founder), enters the game shows set. ... NBC (a former acronym for National Broadcasting Company) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... The concept of an independent record label is a record label operating without the funding of one of the major record labels, which are generally defined to be the handful of media corporations which have recently dominated the recorded music industry in the West. ... Still Movement Records is an independent record label located in Brunswick, Georgia. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Enslave Records is an independent record label, based out of Brunswick, Georgia, that was founded in 2006 by Jeremy McGuire. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

References

  • Brunswick Georgia and the building of Liberty Ships, brochure published by Brunswick and Golden Isles Convention and Visitors Center

External links

Wikisource has an original article from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica about:
  • Brunswick and Golden Isles website
  • Sidney Lanier Bridge
  • Coastal Georgia Community College
  • Historical markers in Glynn County
  • Liberty ship marker and model
  • Maps and aerial photos for 31°09′32″N 81°29′21″W / 31.158777, -81.489252Coordinates: 31°09′32″N 81°29′21″W / 31.158777, -81.489252
    • Street map from Google Maps, or Yahoo! Maps, or Windows Live Local
    • Satellite image from Google Maps, Windows Live Local, WikiMapia
    • Topographic map from TopoZone
    • Aerial image or topographic map from TerraServer-USA

  Results from FactBites:
 
Brunswick, Georgia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2101 words)
Brunswick was founded in 1771 and named for the duchy of Brunswick-Lueneburg in Germany, the ancestral home of King George II of Great Britain.
In 1797 the Georgia General Assembly transferred the county seat of Glynn County from Frederica on St. Simons Island to Brunswick.
Brunswick is also home to historic Glynn Academy, Georgia's second oldest public high school, founded in 1788 under the public education provisions of the Northwest Ordinances.
New Georgia Encyclopedia: Brunswick (833 words)
Brunswick is the major urban and economic center in the southeast corner of Georgia.
Brunswick is on a peninsula bounded by the Brunswick River on the south and by the East River and Turtle River on the west.
Brunswick is home to Glynn Academy, one of the oldest public schools—and the second-oldest high school—in Georgia, chartered by the state in 1788.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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