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Encyclopedia > Bruce Sterling
Bruce Sterling

Bruce Sterling at the Ars Electronica Festival
Pseudonym: Vincent Omniaveritas (in fanzine Cheap Truth)
Born April 14, 1954 (1954-04-14) (age 53)
Occupation Writer, Speaker, Futurist, Design Instructor
Nationality Flag of the United States American
Writing period 1970s-present
Genres Science fiction
Subjects Cyberpunk
Literary movement Cyberpunk
Influences J. G. Ballard, Alfred Bester, Samuel Delany, Chad Oliver
Influenced Charles Stross, Alastair Reynolds [1]
Website Mirrorshades

Michael Bruce Sterling (born April 14, 1954) is an American science fiction author, best known for his novels and his seminal work on the Mirrorshades anthology, which defined the cyberpunk genre. In 2003 he was appointed Professor at the European Graduate School where he is teaching Summer Intensive Courses on media and design. In 2005, he became "visionary in residence" at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. Bruce Sterling is the name of: Bruce Sterling (born 1954), American science fiction author Bruce Foster Sterling (1870-1946), U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania Category: ... Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 232 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A pseudonym (Greek: , pseudo + -onym: false name) is an artificial, fictitious name, also known as an alias, used by an individual as an alternative to a persons legal name. ... A fanzine (see also: zine) is a nonprofessional publication produced by fans of a particular cultural phenomenon (such as a literary or musical genre) for the pleasure of others who share their interest. ... Cheap Truth was a free series of one-page newsletters published in the 1980s. ... April 14 is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 261 days remaining. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about work. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Berlins Sony Center reflects the global reach of a Japanese corporation. ... ... James Graham Ballard (born 15 November 1930 in Shanghai) is a British writer. ... Alfred Bester (December 18, 1913 - September 30, 1987) was a science fiction author and the winner of the first Hugo Award in 1953 for his novel The Demolished Man. ... Samuel Ray Chip Delany, Jr. ... (Oliver, Chad (Canada, 1985 - )) For gay love and affection, email: oliverf@uwindsor. ... Charles David George Charlie Stross (born Leeds, October 18, 1964) is a writer based in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Alastair Reynolds (born in 1966 in Barry, South Wales) is a Welsh science fiction author. ... April 14 is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 261 days remaining. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Note that this partial list contains some authors whose works of fantastic fiction would today be called science fiction, even if they predate, or did not work in that genre. ... Mirrorshades Korean cover Mirrorshades: A Cyberpunk Anthology is a defining cyberpunk short story collection, edited by Bruce Sterling; ISBN 0-441-53382-5 (1986) The Gernsback Continuum by William Gibson Snake-Eyes by Tom Maddox Rock On by Pat Cadigan Tales of Houdini by Rudy Rucker 400 Boys by Marc... Berlins Sony Center reflects the global reach of a Japanese corporation. ... The European Graduate School (EGS) in Switzerland is a privately funded graduate school founded by the non-profit European Foundation of Interdisciplinary Studies. ... Photo of Art Center during the night. ... Pasadena is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ...

Contents

Writings

Sterling is, along with William Gibson, Tom Maddox, Rudy Rucker, John Shirley, Lewis Shiner, and Pat Cadigan, one of the founders of the cyberpunk movement in science fiction, as well as its chief ideological promulgator, and one whose polemics on the topic earned him the nickname "Chairman Bruce".[citation needed] He was also one of the first organizers of the Turkey City Writer's Workshop, and is a frequent attendee at the Sycamore Hill Writer's Workshop. He won Hugo Awards for the novelette "Bicycle Repairman" and the novella "Taklamakan". For other persons named William Gibson, see William Gibson (disambiguation). ... Tom Maddox is an American science-fiction writer, known for his part in the early cyberpunk movement. ... Rudy Rucker, Fall 2004, photo by Georgia Rucker. ... John Patrick Shirley (born February 10, 1953) is an American science fiction and horror writer of novels, short stories, and television & film scripts. ... Lewis Shiner (December 30, 1950, Eugene, Oregon) is an American writer. ... Pat Cadigan (born 1953) is an American born science fiction author, whose work is sometimes described as part of the cyberpunk movement, although she does not classify herself in that way. ... An ideology is a collection of ideas. ... Look up Polemic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A peer-to-peer, professional science fiction writers workshop in Texas modeled after the east coast Milford Writers Workshop. ... Sycamore Hill Writers Workshop is a workshop for science fiction writers located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ...


His first novel, Involution Ocean, published in 1977, features the world Nullaqua where all the atmosphere is contained in a single, miles-deep crater; the story concerns a ship sailing on the ocean of dust at the bottom, which hunts creatures called dustwhales that live beneath the surface. It is partially a science-fictional pastiche of Moby-Dick by Herman Melville. Air redirects here. ... Tycho crater on Earths moon. ... Animated map exhibiting the worlds oceanic waters. ... The word pastiche describes a literary or other artistic genre. ... Moby-Dick book cover Moby-Dick - the official title of the first edition - is a novel by Herman Melville. ... Herman Melville (August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and poet. ...


From the late 1970s onwards, Sterling wrote a series of stories set in the Shaper/Mechanist universe: the solar system is colonised, with two major warring factions. The Mechanists use a great deal of computer-based mechanical technologies; the Shapers do genetic engineering on a massive scale. The situation is complicated by the eventual contact with alien civilizations; humanity eventually splits into many subspecies, with the implication that many of these effectively vanish from the galaxy, reminiscent of The Singularity in the works of Vernor Vinge. The Shaper/Mechanist stories can be found in the collection Crystal Express and the collection Schismatrix Plus, which contains the original novel Schismatrix and all of the stories set in the Shaper/Mechanist universe. Alastair Reynolds identified Schismatrix and the other Shaper/Mechanist stories as one of the greatest influences on his own work. [1] The Shaper/Mechanist universe is the setting for a series of science fiction short stories (and the novel Schismatrix) written by the author Bruce Sterling. ... This article is about the Solar System. ... Kenyans examining insect-resistant transgenic Bt corn. ... “Green people” redirects here. ... Central New York City. ... For other uses, see Galaxy (disambiguation). ... When plotted on a logarithmic graph, 15 separate lists of paradigm shifts for key events in human history show an exponential trend. ... Vernor Steffen Vinge (IPA: ) (born February 10, 1944) is a mathematician, computer scientist and science fiction author who is best known for his Hugo award-winning novels A Fire Upon the Deep and A Deepness in the Sky, as well as for his 1993 essay The Technological Singularity, in which... Alastair Reynolds (born in 1966 in Barry, South Wales) is a Welsh science fiction author. ...

Bruce Sterling at the Open Cultures conference (5 June 2003)
Bruce Sterling at the Open Cultures conference (5 June 2003)

In the 1980s, Sterling edited a series of science fiction newsletters called Cheap Truth, under the alias of Vincent Omniaveritas. He wrote a column called Catscan, for the now-defunct science fiction critical magazine, SF Eye. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cheap Truth was a free series of one-page newsletters published in the 1980s. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


Projects

He has been the instigator of three projects which can be found on the Web -

  • The Dead Media Project - A collection of "research notes" on dead media technologies, from Incan quipus, through Victorian phenakistoscopes, to the departed video game and home computers of the 1980s. The Project's homepage, including Sterling's original Dead Media Manifesto can be found at http://www.deadmedia.org
  • The Viridian Design Movement - his attempt to create a "green" design movement focused on high-tech, stylish, and ecologically sound design.[1] The Viridian Design home page, including Sterling's Viridian Manifesto and all of his Viridian Notes, is managed by Jon Lebkowsky at http://www.viridiandesign.org. The Viridian Movement helped to spawn the popular "bright green" environmental weblog Worldchanging. WorldChanging contributors include many of the original members of the Viridian "curia".
  • Embrace the Decay - a web-only art piece commissioned by the LA Museum of Contemporary Art in 2003.[2] Incorporating contributions solicited through The Viridian Design 'movement', Embrace the Decay was the most visited piece/page at LA MOCA's Digital Gallery, and included contributions from Jared Tarbell of levitated.net and co-author of several books on advanced Flash programming, and Monty Zukowski, creator of the winning 'decay algorithm' sponsored by Bruce.

The Dead Media Project is a collection of research notes by Bruce Sterling on dead media technologies, from Incan quipus, through Victorian phenakistoscopes, to the departed video games and home computers of the 1980s. ... For other meanings of Inca, see Inca (disambiguation). ... Inca Quipu. ... A phenakistoscope disc by Eadweard Muybridge (1893). ... Computer and video games redirects here. ... The Viridian design movement is a Green movement tying together ecological design aspects with some love for high-tech gadgets, and some global awareness. ... Jon Lebkowsky is an author and activist who was cofounder of FringeWare, Inc. ... WorldChanging is a bright green environmentalist blog which covers ecological, humanitarian and design issues through solutions-based journalism covering tools, models and ideas for building a better future and eschewing traditional news and criticism. ...

Neologisms

Sterling has a habit of coining and popularizing neologisms to describe things which he believes will be common in the future, especially items which already exist in limited numbers.

  • In the December 2005 issue of Wired magazine, Sterling coined the term buckyjunk. Buckyjunk refers to future, difficult-to-recycle consumer waste made of carbon nanotubes (aka buckytubes, based on buckyballs or buckminsterfullerene).
  • In December 1999 he coined the term Wexelblat disaster, for a disaster caused when a natural disaster triggers a secondary, and more damaging, failure of human technology.
  • In August 2004 he coined the term Spime, for a type of technological device that, through pervasive RFID and GPS tracking, can track its history of use and interact with the world.
  • In the speech where he offered "Spime", he noted that the term "blobject", with which he is sometimes credited, was passed on to him by industrial designer Karim Rashid. The term may originally have been coined by Steven Skov Holt.

The Icosahedral Fullerene C540 C60 and C-60 redirect here. ... A Wexelblat disaster is a disaster caused by the interaction of natural phenomena with human technology. ... The subject of this article may not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... A Blobject is most often a colorful, mass-produced, plastic-based, emotionally engaging consumer product with a curvilinear, flowing shape. ... Karim Rashid (born 1960) is a contemporary thinker and industrial designer. ...

Personal

Sterling at Robofest '94, displaying a fondness for the mullet lifestyle choice.
Sterling at Robofest '94, displaying a fondness for the mullet lifestyle choice.

In childhood, Sterling spent several years in India, and today has a notable fondness for Bollywood films. He lived in Belgrade with his second wife, Serbian author and film-maker Jasmina Tesanovic [3] for several years. In September 2007 he moved to Turin, Italy. [4] He also travels the world extensively giving speeches and attending conferences. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 798 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (938 × 705 pixels, file size: 153 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The content of this image was reviewed by Astrojunta and afterwards uploaded by FlickrLickr. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 798 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (938 × 705 pixels, file size: 153 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The content of this image was reviewed by Astrojunta and afterwards uploaded by FlickrLickr. ... Robofest Logo Robofest is a competition for 5-12 graders where a team of up to 5 members builds and programs 2 robots to complete multiple missions in 2 minutes autonomously. ... Contemporary example of a business-oriented mullet hairstyle. ... Bollywood (Hindi: , Urdu: ) is the informal name given to the popular Mumbai-based Hindi-language film industry in India. ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... Jasmina Tesanovic (March 7, 1954- ) is a feminist, political activist, translator, publisher, and film-maker. ... For other uses, see Turin (disambiguation). ...


In his hometown of Austin, Texas, the author was known for throwing a large South By Southwest party (though he did not have one in 2006), and for participating in his block's annual Christmas lights display, to which Sterling added digital art. Austin is the capital of the U.S. state of Texas and the seat of Travis County. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Downtown Austin, Texas, where SXSW is held each spring Bloc Party performing at Stubbs BBQ in 2007 Carrie Rodriguez, a SXSW 2007 performer Morrissey at SXSW 2006 South by Southwest (SXSW) is a set of interactive, film, and music festivals and conferences that have taken place every spring in... Christmas lights (also sometimes called fairy lights, twinkle lights or holiday lights in the United States) are strands of electric lights used to decorate homes, public/commercial buildings and Christmas trees during the Christmas season. ... Computer-generated image created by Gilles Tran using POV-Ray 3. ...


Bibliography

Novels

  • Involution Ocean (1977) - A science fiction version of Moby-Dick, set in a deep crater filled with dust instead of water, featuring an impossible romance between the protagonist and an alien woman.
  • The Artificial Kid (1980) - A novel about a young street fighter who continuously films himself using remote controlled cameras.
  • Schismatrix (1985) - The twenty third century solar system is divided among two human factions: the "Shapers" who are employing genetics and psychology, and the "Mechanists" who use computers and body prosthetics. The novel is narrated from the viewpoint of Abelard Lindsay, a brilliant diplomat who makes history many times throughout the story.
  • Islands in the Net (1988) - a view of an early twenty first century world apparently peaceful with delocalised, networking corporations. The protagonist, swept up in events beyond her control, finds herself in the places off the net, from a datahaven in Grenada, to a Singapore under terrorist attack, and the poorest and most disaster-struck part of Africa.
  • The Difference Engine (1990) (with William Gibson) - A steampunk alternate history novel set in a Victorian Great Britain in the throes of a steam-driven computer revolution.
  • Heavy Weather (1994) - Follows a high-tech storm chasers in a midwest where greenhouse warming has made tornadoes far more energetic that the present day.
  • Holy Fire (1996) - Set in a world of steadily increasing longevity (gerontocracy), a newly rejuvenated American woman drifts through the marginalised subculture of European young artists while dealing with the implications of posthumanism.
  • Distraction (1998) - A master political strategist and a genius genetic researcher find love as they fight an insane Louisiana governor for control of a high-tech scientific facility in a post-collapse United States. Winner of the 2000 Arthur C. Clarke Award. US editions: ISBN 0-553-10484-5 (hardcover), ISBN 0-553-57639-9 (paperback).
  • Zeitgeist (2000) - A girl group ala the Spice Girls tours the Middle East under the direction of trickster Leggy Starlitz. Explores a world in which postmodernism and deconstructionism were actually true in their postulation of reality as a malleable major consensus narrative.
  • The Zenith Angle (2004) - A techno-thriller (or very near-future SF, looking at some of the gimmicks) about a cyber-security expert who goes to work for the U.S. government fighting terrorism after 9/11.

The Artificial Kid is a science fiction novel by Bruce Sterling, published in 1980. ... Schismatrix is a science fiction novel by Bruce Sterling, originally published in 1985. ... This article is about negotiations. ... Islands in the Net, a 1988 science fiction novel by Bruce Sterling, offers a view of an early 21st century world apparently peaceful with delocalised, networking corporations. ... For other uses, see Corporation (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Terrorist redirects here. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... The Difference Engine is an alternate history novel by William Gibson and Bruce Sterling. ... For other persons named William Gibson, see William Gibson (disambiguation). ... For the comic book, see Steampunk (comics). ... Alternate history fiction - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her accession to the Throne, 20 June 1837) gave her name to the historic era The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... Heavy Weather is a science fiction novel by Bruce Sterling, first published in 1994, about a group of storm chasers in a world where global warming has produced incredibly destructive weather. ... NSSL vehicles on Project Vortex. ... The greenhouse effect first discovered by Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier in 1824 is the process by which an atmosphere warms a planet. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... Holy Fire is a 1996 science fiction novel by cyberpunk writer Bruce Sterling. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... In sociology, anthropology and cultural studies, a subculture is a set of people with a set of behaviors and beliefs, culture, which could be distinct or hidden, that differentiate them from the larger culture to which they belong. ... The definition of an artist is wide-ranging and covers a broad spectrum of activities to do with creating art, practicing the arts and/or demonstrating an art. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... The Arthur C. Clarke Award is a British award given for the best science fiction novel first published in the United Kingdom during the previous year. ... Girl group UC3 sing The Star-Spangled Banner for U.S. troops in Afghanistan A girl group is a musical group featuring several young female singers who generally harmonize together. ... The Spice Girls are an English all-female pop group, formed in London in 1994. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... The trickster figure Reynard the Fox as depicted in an 1869 childrens book by Michel Rodange. ... Postmodernism is a term applied to a wide-ranging set of developments in critical theory, philosophy, architecture, art, literature, and culture, which are generally characterized as either emerging from, in reaction to, or superseding, modernism. ... The term deconstruction is often used in a loose way as a synonym of critical analysis, especially the kind of uncooperative critical analysis that subjects a work or a text to close scrutiny in order to expose contradictions, poor logic or unwelcome affinities with other works or cultural objects. ... The expression major consensus narrative was coined by Bruce Sterling in his book Zeitgeist as an explanatory synonym for truth. ... The Zenith Angle is a science fiction novel by Bruce Sterling, first published in 2004, about a pioneering expert in computer and network security with a traditional hacker personality named Derek Vandeveer. ... The date that commonly refers to the attacks on United States citizens on September 11, 2001 (see the September 11, 2001 Attacks). ...

Short story collections

  • Mirrorshades: A Cyberpunk Anthology (1986) - defining cyberpunk short story collection, edited by Bruce Sterling; ISBN 0-441-53382-5
  • Crystal Express (1989) - a collection of short stories, including several set in the Shaper/Mechanist universe; ISBN 0-87054-158-7
    • Swarm
    • Spider Rose
    • Cicada Queen
    • Sunken Gardens
    • Twenty Evocations
    • Green Days in Brunei
    • Spook
    • The Beautiful and the Sublime
    • Telliamed
    • The Little Magic Shop
    • Flowers of Edo
    • Dinner in Audoghast
  • Globalhead (1992, paperback 1994); ISBN 0-553-56281-9
    • Our Neural Chernobyl
    • Storming the Cosmos
    • The Compassionate, the Digital
    • Jim and Irene
    • The Sword of Damocles
    • The Gulf Wars
    • The Shores of Bohemia
    • The Moral Bullet
    • The Unthinkable
    • We See Things Differently
    • Hollywood Kremlin
    • Are You for 86?
    • Dori Bangs
  • A Good Old-fashioned Future (1999); ISBN 1-85798-710-1
    • Maneki Neko
    • Big Jelly (with Rudy Rucker)
    • The Littlest Jackal
    • Sacred Cow
    • Deep Eddy
    • Bicycle Repairman
    • Taklamakan
  • Visionary in Residence (2006); ISBN 1-56025-841-1
    • In Paradise
    • Luciferase
    • Homo Sapiens Declared Extinct
    • Ivory Tower
    • Message Found in a Bottle
    • The Growthing
    • User-Centric
    • Code
    • The Scab's Progress
    • Junk DNA
    • The Necropolis of Thebes
    • The Blemmye's Stratagem
    • The Denial

Mirrorshades Korean cover Mirrorshades: A Cyberpunk Anthology is a defining cyberpunk short story collection, edited by Bruce Sterling; ISBN 0-441-53382-5 (1986) The Gernsback Continuum by William Gibson Snake-Eyes by Tom Maddox Rock On by Pat Cadigan Tales of Houdini by Rudy Rucker 400 Boys by Marc... The Gernsback Continuum is a short story by William Gibson, collected as part of his Burning Chrome anthology, about a photographer who has been given the assignment of photographing old, futuristic architecture. ... Tom Maddox is an American science-fiction writer, known for his part in the early cyberpunk movement. ... Pat Cadigan (born 1953) is an American born science fiction author, whose work is sometimes described as part of the cyberpunk movement, although she does not classify herself in that way. ... Rudy Rucker, Fall 2004, photo by Georgia Rucker. ... Marc Laidlaw (born 1960) is an American writer of science fiction and horror and also a computer game designer with Valve Software. ... Front cover of Burn (2005). ... Gregory Dale Bear (born August 20, 1951) is a science fiction author. ... Lewis Shiner (December 30, 1950, Eugene, Oregon) is an American writer. ... Paul Di Filippo is a science fiction writer born October 29, 1954 in Providence, Rhode Island. ... This story from William Gibsons Burning Chrome collection of short fiction is set in an alternate future where the Soviet Union controls most of the Earths resources, especially oil. ... Crystal Express is a collection of Science fiction and fantasy stories by cyberpunk author Bruce Sterling. ... The Shaper/Mechanist universe is the setting for a series of science fiction short stories (and the novel Schismatrix) written by the author Bruce Sterling. ... Hackers (ISBN 0-441-00375-3) is an anthology of short stories edited by Jack Dann and Gardner Dozois. ...

Non-fiction

The Hacker Crackdown: Law and Disorder on the Electronic Frontier is a book written by science fiction writer Bruce Sterling in 1992. ... This article is about computer hacking. ... Steve Jackson Games (SJG) is a game company that creates and publishes role-playing, board, and card games. ... Operation Sundevil was a 1990 nation-wide Secret Service crackdown on illegal computer hacking activities. Along with the Chicago Task Force and the Arizona Organized Crime and Racketeering Bureau, they conducted raids in Austin, Cincinnati, Detroit, Los Angeles, Miami, Newark, Phoenix, Pittsburgh, Richmond, Tucson, San Diego, San Jose, and San... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... Futurology or futures studies (called futurism in the United States) is the study of the medium to long-term future, by extrapolating present technological, economic or social trends, or by attempting to predict future trends. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ... Gizmo is a placeholder name for any small technological item. ... The subject of this article may not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... An EPC RFID tag used for Wal-Mart Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is an automatic identification method, relying on storing and remotely retrieving data using devices called RFID tags or transponders. ... The Earth Day flag includes a NASA photo. ... MIT Press Books The MIT Press is a university publisher affiliated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Ernst Jünger Ernst Jünger, (March 29, 1895 – February 17, 1998) was a German author of novels and accounts of his war experiences. ... WorldChanging is a bright green environmentalist blog which covers ecological, humanitarian and design issues through solutions-based journalism covering tools, models and ideas for building a better future and eschewing traditional news and criticism. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Alastair Reynolds, Essay: "Future Histories", Locus, Vol. 57, No. 5, Issue 550, November 2006, p. 39; also included as afterword to Galactic North; "...I owe an equally obvious debt to Bruce Sterling, whose Shaper/Mechanist sequence blew my mind on several levels... Read Schismatrix if you haven't already done so: it will melt your face."

Locus Magazine is subtitled The Magazine Of The Science Fiction & Fantasy Field. It reports on the science fiction writing industry, including comprehensive listings of new books published in the field. ... Galactic North cover Galactic North (ISBN 057507910X, published by Gollancz) is a collection of short stories by the science fiction author Alastair Reynolds. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Bruce Sterling
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Bruce Sterling
Persondata
NAME Sterling, Bruce
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Sterling, Michael Bruce
SHORT DESCRIPTION American writer, speaker, futurist, and design instructor
DATE OF BIRTH April 14, 1954 (1954-04-14) (age 53)
PLACE OF BIRTH
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
Bruce Sterling - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1309 words)
Michael Bruce Sterling (born April 14, 1954) is an American science fiction author, best known for his novels and his seminal work on the Mirrorshades anthology, which defined the cyberpunk genre.
Sterling is, along with William Gibson,Jeff Noon, Tom Maddox, Rudy Rucker, John Shirley, Lewis Shiner and Pat Cadigan, one of the founders of the cyberpunk movement in science fiction, as well as its chief ideological promulgator, and one whose polemics on the topic earned him the nickname "Chairman Bruce".
In the late 1970s onwards, Sterling wrote a series of stories set in the Shaper/Mechanist universe: the solar system is colonised, with two major warring factions.
The Bruce Sterling Online Index: Who's Bruce? (1009 words)
There Bruce became involved with a group of other science fiction fans and writers who called themselves the Turkey City Writer's Workshop, and with their encouragement began writing science fiction more seriously.
Sterling's original aim was to organize a research project that would culminate in a book on dead media written collaboratively by the members of the mailing list.
The movement was developed in a series of speeches given by Sterling in 1998 and 1999, and officially declared by a manifesto of January 3rd, 2000.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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