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Encyclopedia > Bruce Catton

Bruce Catton (October 9, 1899August 28, 1978) was a journalist and a notable historian of the American Civil War. He won a Pulitzer Prize for history in 1954 for A Stillness at Appomattox, his study of the final campaign of the war in Virginia. October 9 is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in Leap years). ... 1899 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... August 28 is the 240th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (241st in leap years), with 125 days remaining. ... 1978 was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... A historian is a person who studies history. ... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the United States – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ... Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-04-13, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... 1954 was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner (D) Official languages English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ...


Catton was known as a narrative historian who specialized in popular histories that emphasized the colorful characters and vignettes of history, in addition to the simple dates, facts, and analyses. His works, although well-researched, were generally not presented in a rigorous academic style, supported by footnotes. In the long line of Civil War historians, Catton is arguably the most prolific and popular of all, with Shelby Foote his only conceivable rival. Oliver Jensen, who succeeded him as editor of American Heritage magazine, wrote: "There is a near-magic power of imagination in Catton's work that seemed to project him physically into the battlefields, along the dusty roads and to the campfires of another age." Narrative is a term which has several and changing meanings. ... Shelby Foote (November 7, 1916 – June 27, 2005) was a noted author and historian of the American Civil War. ...

Contents


Life

Bruce Catton was born in Petoskey, Michigan, but spent most of his boyhood in Benzonia. He was the son of a Congregationalist minister, who accepted a teaching position in Benzonia Academy and later became the academy's headmaster. As a boy, Bruce first heard the reminiscences of the aged veterans who had fought in the Civil War. Their stories made a lasting impression upon him, giving "a color and a tone," Catton wrote in his memoir, Waiting for the Morning Train (1972), "not merely to our village life, but to the concept of life with which we grew up ... I think I was always subconsciously driven by an attempt to restate that faith and to show where it was properly grounded, how it grew out of what a great many young men on both sides felt and believed and were brave enough to do." This article is about the town; for the type of rock, see Petoskey Stone. ... Benzonia is a village located in Benzie County, Michigan. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation indepedently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... A minister can mean several things: A government minister is a politician who heads a government ministry A minister of religion is a member of the clergy A minister is the rank of diplomat directly below ambassador This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that...


Catton attended Oberlin College, starting in 1916, but he left without completing a degree due to the outbreak of World War I. After serving briefly in the U.S. Navy during the war, Catton became a reporter and wrote for various newspapers: the Cleveland News (as a freelance reporter), the Boston American (192024), and the Cleveland Plain Dealer (1925). From then until 1941, he worked for the Newspaper Enterprise Association (a Scripps-Howard syndicate), for which he wrote editorials, book reviews, and served as a correspondent from Washington, D.C. Students passing through the Oberlin Memorial Arch in front of Peters Hall on the Oberlin College campus Oberlin College is a small liberal arts college in Oberlin, Ohio. ... 1916 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January-February January 1 -The first successful blood transfusion using blood that had been stored and cooled. ... World War I was primarily a European conflict with many facets: immense human sacrifice, stalemate trench warfare, and the use of new, devastating weapons - tanks, aircraft, machineguns, and poison gas. ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... 1920 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. ... 1924 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1925 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1941 was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Scripps Center, the corporate headquarters in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Washington, D.C., short for the District of Columbia (locals know the city as the District, DC,—or, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United States of America. ...


At the start of World War II, Catton was too old for military service and, starting in 1941, he served as Director of Information for the War Production Board and later held similar posts in the Department of Commerce and the Department of the Interior. This experience as a federal employee prepared him to write his first book, War Lords of Washington, in 1948. Although the book was not a commercial success, it inspired Catton to leave the federal government in 1952 to become a full-time author. i know i can, be waht i wanna be. World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrinations, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons like the atom bomb World War II, also known as the Second World War, was by far the bloodiest, most expensive, and most significant war in... 1941 was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The War Production Board (WPB) was established in 1942 by executive order of Franklin D. Roosevelt. ... The United States Department of Commerce is a Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with promoting economic growth. ... The United States Department of the Interior (DOI) is a Cabinet department of the United States government that manages and conserves most federally-owned land. ... 1948 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1952 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


In 1954 Catton was one of four founders of American Heritage magazine, and served initially as a writer, reviewer, and editor. In the first issue, he wrote: 1954 was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

We intend to deal with that great, unfinished and illogically inspiring story of the American people doing, being and becoming. Our American heritage is greater than any one of us. It can express itself in very homely truths; in the end it can lift up our eyes beyond the glow in the sunset skies.

In 1959 Catton was named senior editor of American Heritage, a post he held for the rest of his life. 1959 was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Bruce Catton died in his summer home at Frankfort, Michigan. Frankfort is a city located in Benzie County, Michigan. ...


Major works

Army of the Potomac trilogy

These three books have recently been bound into a single volume reprint titled, inappropriately, Bruce Catton's Civil War. 1951 was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... Generals Burnside, Hancock, Couch, Ferro, Patrick, Wilcox, Cochrane, Buford and others. ... George McClellan George Brinton McClellan (December 3, 1826 – October 29, 1885) was a Major General of the Union Army during the American Civil War. ... Map of the events of the campaign. ... Union soldiers at the Orange & Alexandria Railroad The Northern Virginia Campaign, or the Second Bull Run Campaign, was a series of battles fought in Virginia during August and September, 1862, in the American Civil War. ... The Battle of Antietam (known as the Battle of Sharpsburg in the South), fought on September 17, 1862, near Sharpsburg, Maryland, part of the Maryland Campaign, was the first major battle in the American Civil War to take place on Northern soil. ... 1952 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Battle of jo mama Conflict American Civil War Date December 11–15, 1862 Place Spotsylvania County and Fredericksburg Result Confederate victory The Battle of Fredericksburg, fought on December 13, 1862 between General Robert E. Lees Army of Northern Virginia and the Army of the Potomac commanded by Maj. ... The Battle of Gettysburg (July 1–3, 1863), fought in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, as part of the Gettysburg Campaign, was the largest battle ever fought in North America, and is generally considered to be the turning point of the American Civil War. ... 1953 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1954 was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ulysses S. Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was a Union general in the American Civil War and the 18th President of the United States (1869–1877). ... 1864 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ...


Centennial History of the Civil War

The Centennial of the Civil War was memorialized from 1961 to 1965 and the publication of Bruce Catton's trilogy highlighted this era. Unlike his previous trilogy, these books focused not only on military topics, but on social, economic, and political as well. A centennial is a 100-year anniversary of an event, or the celebrations pertaining thereto. ... 1961 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... // Events January-February January 4 - United States President Lyndon Johnson proclaims his Great Society during his State of the Union address. ...

  • The Coming Fury (1961) — Explores the causes and events leading to the start of the war, culminating in its first major combat, the First Battle of Bull Run.
  • Terrible Swift Sword (1963) — Both sides mobilize for a massive war effort and the story continues through 1862, ending with the Battle of Fredericksburg.
  • Never Call Retreat (1965) — The war continues through Vicksburg, Gettysburg, and the bloody struggles of 1864 and 1865 before the final surrender.

1961 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... The First Battle of Bull Run, referred to as the First Battle of Manassas in the South, (July 21, 1861), was the first major land battle of the American Civil War. ... 1963 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Battle of jo mama Conflict American Civil War Date December 11–15, 1862 Place Spotsylvania County and Fredericksburg Result Confederate victory The Battle of Fredericksburg, fought on December 13, 1862 between General Robert E. Lees Army of Northern Virginia and the Army of the Potomac commanded by Maj. ... // Events January-February January 4 - United States President Lyndon Johnson proclaims his Great Society during his State of the Union address. ... The Battle of Vicksburg or Siege of Vicksburg was the final significant battle in the Vicksburg Campaign of the American Civil War. ... The Battle of Gettysburg (July 1–3, 1863), fought in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, as part of the Gettysburg Campaign, was the largest battle ever fought in North America, and is generally considered to be the turning point of the American Civil War. ... 1864 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ...

Ulysses S. Grant trilogy

Catton wrote the second and third volume of this trilogy, following the publication of Captain Sam Grant in 1950 by historian and biographer Lloyd Lewis, making extensive use of Lewis's historical research, provided by his widow, Kathryn Lewis, who personally selected Catton to continue her husband's work. 1950 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...

1960 was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... --204. ... The Battle of Fort Donelson was fought February 12–16, 1862 in the American Civil War. ... Battle of Shiloh Conflict American Civil War Date April 6-7, 1862 Place Hardin County, Tennessee Result Union victory The Battle of Shiloh, also known as the Battle of Pittsburg Landing, was a major battle in the American Civil War, fought April 6–7, 1862, in southwestern Tennessee. ... The Vicksburg Campaign was a series of battles and maneuvers in the American Civil War directed against Vicksburg, Mississippi, a fortress city that dominated the last Confederate-controlled section of the Mississippi River. ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... The third Battle of Chattanooga (popularly known as The Battle of Chattanooga) was fought November 23–25, 1863, in the American Civil War. ... 1863 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Robert Edward Lee, as a U.S. Army Colonel before the war Robert Edward Lee (January 19, 1807 – October 12, 1870) was a career army officer and the most successful general of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. ...

Other Civil War books

  • U. S. Grant and the American Military Tradition (1954) — There have been over 600 Grant biographies written, and this is considered one of the best short ones (under 200 pages).
  • Banners at Shenandoah: A Story of Sheridan's Fighting Cavalry (1955) — A book for juveniles about Union cavalry commander Philip Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley in 1864.
  • This Hallowed Ground (1956) — This history, told from the Union perspective, was reviewed as the best single volume history of the war at that time and received a Fletcher Pratt award from the Civil War Round Table of New York in 1957.
  • America Goes to War (1958) — A study of how the American Civil War became one of the first total wars.
  • The American Heritage Picture History of the Civil War (1960) — Catton wrote the narrative portion of this book, which also included over 800 paintings and period photographs. It received a special Pulitzer citation in 1961.
  • Two Roads to Sumter (1963) — Written with his son, William, this book recounts the 15 years leading up to the war, seen through the vantage points of the two leading politicians involved in the conflict: Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis.
  • Gettysburg: The Final Fury (1974) — A slim volume on the Battle of Gettysburg, dominated by photographs and illustrations.

1954 was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1955 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Union Army refers to the United States Army during the American Civil War. ... Philip Sheridan Philip Henry Sheridan (March 6, 1831 – August 5, 1888), a military man and one of the great generals in the American Civil War. ... Canoeing on the Shenandoah River near Winchester, Virginia. ... 1864 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1956 was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1957 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1958 was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A US poster produced during World War II Total war is a 20th century term to describe a war in which countries or nations use all of their resources to destroy another organized countrys or nations ability to engage in war. ... 1960 was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1961 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1963 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th President of the United States (1861–1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... Jefferson Davis (June 3, 1808 – December 6, 1889) was an American soldier and politician. ... 1974 is a common year starting on Tuesday (click on link for calendar). ... The Battle of Gettysburg (July 1–3, 1863), fought in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, as part of the Gettysburg Campaign, was the largest battle ever fought in North America, and is generally considered to be the turning point of the American Civil War. ...

Other books

  • The War Lords of Washington (1948) — An account of Washington, D.C., in World War II, based on his experiences in the federal government.
  • Waiting for the Morning Train (1972) — Catton's account of Michigan in his boyhood.
  • Michigan: A Bicentennial History (1976)
  • The Bold & Magnificent Dream: America's Founding Years, 1492–1815 (1978)

1948 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1972 was a leap year that started on a Saturday. ... 1976 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1978 was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ...

Other honors

Catton received an award for "meritorious service in the field of Civil War history" in 1959, presented by Harry S. Truman. He received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1976 from Gerald R. Ford. 1959 was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884–December 26, 1972) was the thirty-fourth Vice President (1945) and the thirty-third President of the United States (1945 – 1953), succeeding to the office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. ... The Presidential Medal of Freedom The Presidential Medal of Freedom is one of the two highest civilian awards in the United States, considered the equivalent of the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor. ... 1976 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ...


Catton received 26 honorary degrees in his career from colleges and universities across the United States, including one in 1956 from Oberlin College. 1956 was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Students passing through the Oberlin Memorial Arch in front of Peters Hall on the Oberlin College campus Oberlin College is a small liberal arts college in Oberlin, Ohio. ...


References

  • Cleveland Public Library description of Catton
  • American Heritage magazine golden anniversary issue
  • National Book Foundation

  Results from FactBites:
 
Bruce Catton - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1195 words)
Bruce Catton (October 9, 1899 — August 28, 1978) was a journalist and a notable historian of the American Civil War.
Catton was known as a narrative historian who specialized in popular histories that emphasized the colorful characters and vignettes of history, in addition to the simple dates, facts, and analyses.
Bruce Catton was born in Petoskey, Michigan, but spent most of his boyhood in Benzonia.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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