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Encyclopedia > Brown University
Brown University

Latin: Universitas Brunensis
Motto: In deo speramus
(Latin for "In God we hope")
Established 1764
Type: Private
Endowment: US $2.8 billion[1]
President: Ruth J. Simmons
Faculty: 679 full-time, non-clinical
2,900 total (approx).
Students: 8,025
Undergraduates: 5,821
Postgraduates: 2,204 (370 medical)
Location Flag of the United States Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Campus: Urban
143 acres (579,000 m²)
Colors: Seal brown, cardinal red, and white                  
Nickname: Brown Bears
Athletics: NCAA Division I Ivy League
37 varsity teams
Website: www.brown.edu

Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. Founded in 1764 as the College of Rhode Island, it is the third-oldest institution of higher education in New England and the seventh-oldest in the United States. It is a member of the Ivy League. Pembroke College, Brown University's all women's college, merged with The College, in 1971. Download high resolution version (487x822, 11 KB) Brown University coat of arms This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Ruth J. Simmons (born 1945 in Grapeland, Texas), is the 18th president of Brown University and first black president of an Ivy League institution. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Providence redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Seal brown is a rich dark brown color, resembling the color of the dyed fur from the fur seal. ... Cardinal is a vivid red, which gets its name from the cassocks worn by Catholic cardinals. ... This article is about the color. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Ursus arctos range map. ... NCAA redirects here. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... Providence redirects here. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... The colonial colleges are nine institutions of higher education chartered in the American Colonies before the American Revolution (1775–1783). ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ...


Brown was the first college[2] in the nation to accept students regardless of religious affiliations. The school also has the oldest undergraduate engineering program in the Ivy League (1847) and once had the only History of Mathematics department in the world (housed in the same building as Egyptology). For a timeline of events in mathematics, see timeline of mathematics. ...


The Brown "New Curriculum," instituted in 1969, eliminates distribution requirements and mandatory A/B/C grades (allowing any course to be taken on a "satisfactory/no credit" basis). Moreover, there are no pluses (+) or minuses (-) in the grading system.


Since 2001, Brown's current and 18th president has been Ruth J. Simmons, the first African American president and second female president of an Ivy League institution, as well as the first permanent female president of Brown. Ruth J. Simmons (born 1945 in Grapeland, Texas), is the 18th president of Brown University and first black president of an Ivy League institution. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ...


The school colors are seal brown, cardinal red, and white. Brown's mascot is the bear[3] and the sports teams are called the Brown Bears. The costumed bear mascot named "Bruno" makes appearances at athletic games. The use of a bear as the University's mascot dates back to 1904. People associated with the University are known as Brunonians or, in informal tone or jocularity, Brownies. Seal brown is a rich dark brown color, resembling the color of the dyed fur from the fur seal. ... Cardinal is a vivid red, which gets its name from the cassocks worn by Catholic cardinals. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... For other uses, see Bear (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Ursus arctos range map. ... The following is a partial list of notable and non-notable Brown University people, known as Brunonians. ...

Contents

Profile

Brown University seal as a detail on a university building.
Brown University seal as a detail on a university building.

Admission to Brown is extremely competitive, with an overall admissions rate of 13.8% for the class of 2010.[4] The class of 2011 has an admittance rate of 13.5%. The regular decision acceptance rate for the Class of 2010 was 12.6%, and the regular decision acceptance rate of the Class of 2011 was 12.3%.[5][6] Brown does not accept the Common Application. Image File history File linksMetadata Brown_University_seal_building_detail. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Brown_University_seal_building_detail. ... The Common Application (informally known as the Common App) is a college admission application that students may use to apply to any of 321 member colleges and universities in the United States. ...


More than one-third of the members of the Class of 2010 scored above 750 on the verbal or math sections of the SAT I: Reasoning Test.[7] Approximately 15 percent of the students in the Class of 2010 graduated number one or number two in their high school classes. Students come from all 50 states, as well as 65 countries.[7]


Brown's financial aid program awards approximately $70 million each year in the form of scholarships, jobs, and loans. Over 50% of students receive some form of financial aid.


In the 2008 U.S. News & World Report college rankings, Brown ranked fourteenth in the nation among "National Universities" (tied with Johns Hopkins University and Northwestern University). Over a decade ago, in 1995, US News & World Report ranked Brown second in the country in excellence in undergraduate teaching.[8] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... In higher education, college and university rankings are listings of educational institutions in an order determined by any combination of factors. ... The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ... Northwestern University (NU) is a selective private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university with campuses located in Evanston, Illinois and downtown Chicago, Illinois. ...


According to a study entitled "Revealed Preference Ranking," published in December 2005 by the National Bureau of Economic Research, Brown ranks seventh in the country when students are choosing which of the schools to which they are admitted to attend. Brown ranks fifth when the Revealed Preference Ranking method focuses on students interested in humanities and social studies and seventh for students interested in the sciences and mathematics. A notable fact is that Brown ranks ahead of all the Ivy League schools other than Harvard, Yale, and Princeton. [9]


According to a 2007 Princeton Review survey of colleges, Brown is the fourth most selective college in America, and Brown's students are the happiest.


92 to 95% of Brown students are admitted to one of their top three law school choices. For business schools the figure is nearly 100%. Finally, Brown consistently ranks in the top 5 colleges in the country in terms of the percentage of students accepted into medical school. [7]


History

The founding of Brown

Hope College (left) was built in 1822, while Manning Hall (right) was built in 1834.
Hope College (left) was built in 1822, while Manning Hall (right) was built in 1834.

In 1763, James Manning, a Baptist minister, was sent to Rhode Island by the Philadelphia Association of Baptist Churches in order to found a college. At the same time, local Congregationalists, led by Ezra Stiles, were working toward a similar end. On March 3, 1764, a charter was filed to create the College of Rhode Island in Warren, Rhode Island, reflecting the work of both Stiles and Manning. Image File history File linksMetadata Manning_Chapel. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Manning_Chapel. ... James Manning James Manning (October 22, 1738– July 29, 1791) was an American Baptist minister and educator from Providence, Rhode Island. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... The Rev. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1764 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Warren is a town in Bristol County, Rhode Island, United States. ...


The charter had more than sixty signatories, including John and Nicholas Brown of the Brown family, who would give the College its present day name. The college's mission, the charter stated, was to prepare students "for discharging the Offices of Life" by providing instruction "in the Vernacular Learned Languages, and in the liberal Arts and Sciences."[10] The charter's language has long been interpreted by the university as discouraging the founding of a business school or law school. Brown continues to be one of only two Ivy League colleges with neither a business school nor a law school (the other being Princeton). John Brown (1736–1803) was an American merchant and statesman from Providence, Rhode Island. ... Nicholas Brown (1769-1841) was a Providence, Rhode Island businessman and philanthropist. ... A business school is a university-level institution that confers degrees in Business Administration. ... // A law school is an institution where future lawyers obtain legal degrees. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ...


The charter required that the makeup of the board of thirty-six trustees include twenty-two Baptists, five Friends, four Congregationalists, and five Episcopalians, and by twelve Fellows, of whom eight, including the President, should be Baptists "and the rest indifferently of any or all denominations." It specified that "into this liberal and catholic institution shall never be admitted any religious tests, but on the contrary, all the members hereof shall forever enjoy full, free, absolute, and uninterrupted liberty of conscience." One of the Baptist founders, John Gano, had also been the founding minister of the First Baptist Church in the City of New York. The Encyclopedia Britannica Eleventh Edition remarks that "At the time it was framed the charter was considered extraordinarily liberal" and that "the government has always been largely non-sectarian in spirit."[11] Baptist churches are part of a Christian movement often regarded as an Evangelical, Protestant denomination. ... Quaker redirects here. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... This article is about the Episcopal Church in the United States. ... Baptist churches are part of a Christian movement often regarded as an Evangelical, Protestant denomination. ... The First Baptist Church in the City of New York is a Christian congregation based in a sanctuary built in 1891 at the intersection of Broadway and 79th Street in the Upper West Side of Manhattan Island. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ...


James Manning, the minister sent to Rhode Island by the Baptists, was sworn in as the College's first president in 1765. The College of Rhode Island moved to its present location on College Hill, in the East Side of Providence, in 1770 and construction of the first building, The College Edifice, began. This building was renamed University Hall in 1823. The Brown family — Nicholas, John, Joseph and Moses — were instrumental in the move to Providence, funding and organizing much of the construction of the new buildings. The family's connection with the college was strong: Joseph Brown became a professor of Physics at the University, and John Brown served as treasurer from 1775 to 1796. In 1804, a year after John Brown's death, the University was renamed Brown University in honor of John's nephew, Nicholas Brown, Jr., who was a member of the class of 1786 and contributed $5,000 (which, adjusted for inflation, is approximately $61,000 in 2005, though it was 1,000 times the roughly $5 tuition) toward an endowed professorship. In 1904, the John Carter Brown Library was opened as an independent historical and cultural research center based around the libraries of John Carter Brown and John Nicholas Brown. James Manning James Manning (October 22, 1738– July 29, 1791) was an American Baptist minister and educator from Providence, Rhode Island. ... College Hill is a neighborhood in the eastern central part of Providence, Rhode Island. ... West-facing entrance of the building in front of the Van Wickle Gates The University Hall at Brown University is the oldest building on campus. ... John Brown (1736–1803) was an American merchant and statesman from Providence, Rhode Island. ... Moses Brown (1738–1836), designed and built the first factory houses for spinning machines during the American industrial revolution. ... John Brown (1736–1803) was an American merchant and statesman from Providence, Rhode Island. ... Nicholas Brown (1769-1841) was a Providence, Rhode Island businessman and philanthropist. ... The John Carter Brown Library is an independently funded research library of the humanities located on the campus of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. ... John Carter Brown (1797-1874) was a book collector whose library formed the basis of the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University. ...


The Brown family was involved in various business ventures in Rhode Island, including the slave trade; the family itself was divided on the issue. John Brown had unapologetically defended slavery, while Moses Brown and Nicholas Brown Jr. were fervent abolitionists. In recognition of this history, the University established the University Steering Committee on Slavery and Justice in 2003.[12] The history of slavery covers many different forms of human exploitation across many cultures and throughout human history. ... Moses Brown (1738–1836), designed and built the first factory houses for spinning machines during the American industrial revolution. ... This article is about the abolition of slavery. ...


Brown began to admit women when it established a Women's College in 1891, which was later named Pembroke College. "The College" (the undergraduate school) merged with Pembroke College in 1971 and became co-educational. Pembroke College was the womens college of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. ...

Image File history File links Question_book-3. ...

The American Revolution

Stephen Hopkins, Chief Justice and Governor of colonial Rhode Island, was later a Delegate to the Colonial Congress in Albany in 1754 and to the Continental Congress from 1774 to 1776. He was a signatory to the United States Declaration of Independence on behalf of the state of Rhode Island. He also served as the first chancellor of Brown (at the time called the College of Rhode Island) from 1764 to 1785. His house is a minor historical site, located just off the main quadrangle at Brown. This article is about the 18th century American politician; Stephen Hopkins is also the name of a film and television director. ... The Continental Congress was the first national government of the United States. ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies in North America were Free and Independent States and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to...


James Manning was also a delegate for Rhode Island to the Continental Congress in 1786.


In 1781, allied American and French armies under the command of General George Washington and the Comte de Rochambeau, who led troops sent by King Louis XVI of France, embarked on a 600-mile march from Rhode Island to Virginia, where they fought and defeated British forces sent by King George III of the United Kingdom on the Yorktown, Virginia peninsula. The victory ended the major battles of the American Revolutionary War. Prior to the march, Brown University served as an encampment site for French troops, and the College Edifice, now University Hall, was turned into a military hospital.[4] George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau (July 1, 1725 – May 10, 1807), French soldier, was born at Vendôme (Loir-et-Cher). ... Louis XVI, born Louis-Auguste de France (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then as King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... George III redirects here. ... York Hall is a government building on Yorktowns historic Main Street. ... This article is about military actions only. ... West-facing entrance of the building in front of the Van Wickle Gates The University Hall at Brown University is the oldest building on campus. ...


The New Curriculum

Brown adopted the New Curriculum in 1969, marking a major change in the University's institutional history. The curriculum was the result of a paper written by Ira Magaziner and Elliot Maxwell, "Draft of a Working Paper for Education at Brown University." The paper came out of a year-long Group Independent Studies Project (GISP) involving 80 students and 15 professors. The group was inspired by student-initiated experimental schools, especially San Francisco State College, and sought ways to improve education for students at Brown. The philosophy they formed was based on the principle that "the individual who is being educated is the center of the educational process." In 1850, Brown President Francis Wayland wrote: "The various courses should be so arranged that, insofar as practicable, every student might study what he chose, all that he chose, and nothing but what he chose." For a curriculum vitae, see Résumé. In formal education, a curriculum (plural curricula) is the set of courses, and their content, offered at a school or university. ... Ira Magaziner (born November 8, 1947?[1]) was an aide to President Clinton and later became his chief Internet policy advisor. ... San Francisco State University (commonly referred to as San Francisco State, SF State, State and SFSU) is a public university located in the southwestern San Francisco, California, bordering Lake Merced and Lowell High School, near Fort Funston and Daly City, near the San Mateo County line. ... Francis Wayland (March 7, 1796 - September 30, 1865), American educationist, was born in New York City. ...


The paper made a number of suggestions for improving education at Brown, including a new kind of interdisciplinary freshman course that would introduce new modes of inquiry and bring faculty from different fields together. Their goal was to transform the survey course, which traditionally sought to cover a large amount of basic material, into specialized courses that would introduce the important modes of inquiry used in different disciplines. Interdisciplinary work is that which integrates concepts across different disciplines. ...


The New Curriculum that came out of the working paper was significantly different from the paper itself. Its key features were:

  • Modes of Thought courses aimed at first-year students
  • Interdisciplinary University courses
  • Students could elect to take any course Satisfactory/No Credit
  • Distribution requirements were dropped
  • The University simplified grades to ABC/No Credit, eliminating pluses, minuses and D's. Furthermore, "No Credit" would not appear on external transcripts.

Except for the Modes of Thought courses, a key component of the reforms which have been discontinued, these elements of the New Curriculum are still in place.


Additionally, due to the school's proximity and close partnership with the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), Brown students have the ability to take up to four courses at RISD and have the credit count towards a Brown degree. Likewise, RISD students can also take courses at Brown. Since the two campuses are effectively adjacent to each other, the two institutions often partner to provide both student bodies with services (such as the local Brown/RISD after-hours and downtown transportation shuttles). A joint degree program has been announced which would allow students to pursue an A.B. degree at Brown and a B.F.A. degree at RISD simultaneously, taking five years to complete this course of study.[13] The Rhode Island School of Design (RISD, pronounced /RIZ-dee/) is one of the premier fine arts institutions in the United States. ... The Rhode Island School of Design (commonly abbreviated RISD and pronounced RIZ-dee) is one of the premier fine arts institutions in the United States. ...


Recently, there has been some debate on reintroducing plus/minus grading to the curriculum. Advocates argue that adding pluses and minuses would reduce grade inflation and allow professors to give more specific grades, while critics say that this plan would have no effect on grade inflation while increasing unnecessary competition among students and violating the principle of the New Curriculum.


The University is currently in the process of broadening and expanding its curricular offerings as part of the "Plan for Academic Enrichment." The number of faculty has been greatly expanded. Seminars aimed at freshmen have begun to be offered widely by most departments.


As a part of the re-accreditation process, Brown University is undergoing an expansive reevaluation of its undergraduate education offerings through the newly appointed Task Force on Undergraduate Education. This Task Force is charged with assessing the areas of general education, concentrations, advising, and pedagogy and assessment [14].


Brown, the Ivy League and slavery

In 2003, 18th Brown University President Ruth J. Simmons[15] appointed the Steering Committee on Slavery and Justice[16], which included Brown faculty members, undergraduate and graduate students and University administrators. This Brown Steering Committee[17] produced the first ever internally produced Ivy League[18] report regarding the commercial ties between the origins of one of the Ivy League institutions and the Triangular Trade in slaves taken from various regions in Africa. The Report of the Brown University Steering Committee on Slavery and Justice is a historic first for the Ivy League which comprises several member universities whose currently unexamined initial financial endowments were financed in some measure by wealth accumulated through the Triangular Trade. The carefully researched report offers several recommendations for Brown which are addressed in the official University response. For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... An historic example of three way trade in the North Atlantic Triangular trade is a historical term indicating trade between three ports or regions. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ...


The Report of the Brown University Steering Committee on Slavery and Justice also offers a wealth of historical records and teaching materials[19] available to the public worldwide regarding an important period in the history of the Ivy League, pre-Revolutionary New England and Triangular Trade contributions to the ascendance of Great Britain's leading universities, including the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge, prior to the 1807 Act of Parliament which outlawed the use of British ships in any aspect of the slave trade. St. John's College, Cambridge has received funding to conduct inquiries similar to those led by the Brown Steering Committee on Slavery and Justice but naturally focused on the benefits flowing from the Triangular Trade which accrued to the British Empire and the United Kingdom's most prestigious institutions of learning, including those of Oxbridge.[5] As part of the commemoration of the Bicentenary of the Act of 1807 at Cambridge, President Simmons gave a public lecture at St. John's College entitled "Hidden in Plain Sight: Slavery and Justice in Rhode Island."[6] This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... Full name The College of Saint John the Evangelist of the University of Cambridge Motto - Named after The Hospital of Saint John the Evangelist, Cambridge, named after John the Evangelist Previous names - Established 1511 Sister College Balliol College Master Prof. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... Oxbridge is a name used to refer to the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, the two oldest in the United Kingdom and the English-speaking world. ... This article is about the city in England. ...


The records are maintained by the Center for Digital Initiatives at Brown[7].


As one feature of the official February 2007 Response of Brown University to the Report of the Steering Committee on Slavery and Justice, President Simmons announced Brown's decision to create a U.S.$10 Million Endowment (£5,043,100.00; €7,400,000.00; ¥1,192,950,000.00) intended to benefit public schools in Providence, Rhode Island in part by funding graduate fellowships in urban education. This initiative echoes recommendations of former Brown University president Vartan Gregorian who suggested in several public addresses that the best remedy for the United States in its efforts to address the legacies of slavery and racial discrimination was to redouble commitments to K-12 education nationally. In that spirit, Dr. Simmons noted: “Lack of access to a good education, particularly for urban schoolchildren, is one of the most pervasive and pernicious social problems of our time. Colleges and universities are uniquely able to improve the quality of urban schools. Brown is committed to undertaking that work.”[8] Vartan Gregorian is a distinguished Iranian-American academic. ...


Brown's response to the Report of the Steering Committee on Slavery and Justice was published in the year marking the 200th anniversary of the abolition of the slave trade by the British Empire following a lengthy campaign by the Committee for the Abolition of the Slave Trade and the successor Society for the Abolition of the Slave Trade, as reported by the Oxford Today magazine and presented at Rhodes House in Oxford.[9] The Committee for the Abolition of the Slave Trade was formed on May 22, 1787, when twelve men gathered together at a printing shop in London, England, and committed themselves to founding the Society for the Abolition of the Slave Trade. ... Rhodes House from South Parks Road. ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ...


Organization

Brown University's Science Library

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1600 pixel, file size: 759 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1600 pixel, file size: 759 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation... The Brown University Science Library is a high-rise building in Providence, Rhode Island, Rhode Island. ...

The College and Graduate School

The College and the Graduate School are by far the largest parts of the school, spanning 100 undergraduate concentrations (majors), over 50 graduate school programs, and offering around 2,000 courses each year. The most popular undergraduate concentrations are Biology, History, and International Relations.[20] Brown is one of the few schools in the United States with a major in Egyptology available and the only school in the world with a History of Math major. Undergraduates can also design an independent concentration if the existing standard programs do not fit their interests. The Great Sphinx of Giza against Khafres Pyramid at the Giza pyramid complex. ... For a timeline of events in mathematics, see timeline of mathematics. ...


The Watson Institute for International Studies

The Watson Institute for International Studies, usually referred to as the Watson Institute, is a center for the analysis of international issues at Brown University. Its original benefactor was Thomas J. Watson, Jr., former Ambassador to the Soviet Union and president of IBM. The Watson Institute is currently led by Dr. Barbara Stallings. Summary The Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown University is a center for research and teaching on international affairs. ... Thomas John Watson, Jr. ... Since 1780, the United States has maintained diplomatic relations with Russia. ... For other uses, see IBM (disambiguation) and Big Blue. ...


The Warren Alpert Medical School

Main article: Alpert Medical School

The University's medical program started in 1811, but the school was suspended by President Wayland in 1827 after the program's faculty declined to live on campus (a new requirement under Wayland). In 1975, the first M.D. degrees from the new Program in Medicine were awarded to a graduating class of 58 students. In 1984, Brown endorsed an eight-year medical program called the Program in Liberal Medical Education (PLME). The majority of openings for the first-year medical school class are reserved for PLME students. Each year, approximately 60 students matriculate into the PLME out of an applicant pool of about 1,600. In 1991, the school was officially renamed the Brown University School of Medicine, then renamed once more as simply "Brown Medical School" in October 2000.[21] The Warren Alpert Medical School (formerly known as Brown Medical School) is a graduate school of Brown University. ... The Brown Medical School is Brown Universitys medical school. ...


In addition, Brown offered a joint program with Dartmouth Medical School called the Brown-Dartmouth Medical Program. Approximately 15 students at Dartmouth Medical School enrolled in the program annually, spending the first two basic medical science years at Dartmouth and the next two years in clinical education at Brown, where they received their M.D. degree. The Brown-Dartmouth program accepted its final class in the fall of 2006, their respective deans stating that the institutions desired to move in their own directions. Dartmouth Medical School is the medical school of Dartmouth College, in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ...


Several other admission pathways exist. The Early Identification Program (EIP) encourages Rhode Island residents to pursue careers in medicine by recruiting sophomores from Providence College, Rhode Island College, the University of Rhode Island, and Tougaloo College to BMS. In 2004, the school once again began to accept applications via the "standard route", from pre-medical students at any college or university. For the Class of 2009, nine students were accepted via this route. This page refers to a college in Rhode Island. ... Rhode Island College (commonly referred to as RIC) is a state-supported comprehensive college founded in 1854, located in Providence, Rhode Island, USA. Rhode Island College is the oldest of the three public institutions of higher education that operate under the aegis of the Board of Governors for Higher Education. ... The University of Rhode Island, commonly abbreviated as URI, is the principal public research university in the State of Rhode Island, with its main campus in Kingston, Rhode Island, and three other campuses located throughout the state. ... {{Infobox University |name = Tougaloo College |image = |caption = |motto =Where History Meets the Future |tagline = |established = 1869 |type =[[Private College |affiliation =United Church of Christ |endowment =$8 million |staff = |faculty =108 |president =Dr. Beverly Wade Hogan |students = |undergrad =913 (in 2006-2007) |city = Tougaloo |state = Mississippi |country = USA |campus = suburban, 500...


Combined degree programs leading to the M.D./Ph.D. or M.D./M.P.H. degrees are also offered. Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... The Master of Public Health (MPH) is a professional masters degree awarded for studies in areas related to public health. ...


In January 2007, self-made entrepreneur Warren Alpert, having made previous contributions to Harvard Medical School and the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, donated the sum of $100 million to Brown Medical School on behalf of the Warren Alpert Foundation, tying Sidney Frank for the largest single monetary contribution ever made to the University. In recognition of the gift, the faculty of Brown University approved changing the name of the Brown Medical School to The Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University. The funds are expected to contribute to the construction of a new, exclusive medical school building, medical student scholarships (through the Warren Alpert Scholars Program), support for biomedical research and faculty recruitment, and new endowed professorships.[22] Harvard Medical School (HMS) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... This page is about a medical school in New York. ... Sidney E. Frank (October 2, 1919 – January 10, 2006) was an American businessman who became a billionaire through his savvy promotion of Grey Goose vodka and Jägermeister. ... The Warren Alpert Medical School (formerly known as Brown Medical School) is a graduate school of Brown University. ...


The current dean of the Brown Medical School is Eli Y. Adashi, M.D.


Presidents of Brown University

Main article: Presidents of Brown University

The current president of the University is Ruth J. Simmons. She is the 18th president of Brown University and first black president of an Ivy League institution. According to a November 2007 poll by the Brown Daily Herald, Simmons enjoys a more than 80% approval rating among Brown undergraduates. The following is a list of presidents of Brown University. ... Ruth J. Simmons (born 1945 in Grapeland, Texas), is the 18th president of Brown University and first black president of an Ivy League institution. ... The Brown Daily Herald, the student newspaper of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, is the fifth-oldest college daily newspaper in the United States. ...


Campus

Brown is the largest institutional landowner in Providence with property in the East Side and the Jewelry District. Brown's main campus is located atop College Hill, in the East Side, across the Providence River from downtown Providence. The main campus consists of 235 buildings and covers 143 acres. The East Side is home to the largest remaining collection of historic colonial homes in the country. The College Hill Historic District is designated on the National Register of Historic Places. In addition, six of Brown's buildings are listed on the National Register of Historic Places: Corliss-Brackett House, Gardner House, Hoppin House, Ladd Observatory, Nightingale-Brown House, and University Hall which was at least partially built by slave labor.[23] The last two are also designated as National Historic Landmarks. Adjacent to Brown's main campus, and further down the Hill to the west by the Providence River, is the campus of the Rhode Island School of Design. Thayer Street, which runs through Brown's campus, is a commercial district that hosts many restaurants and shops popular with students and faculty from Brown and RISD. Also on the Hill, but further to the south and away from the main campus area, is Wickenden Street, another commercial district offering restaurants and shops. Brown Stadium, built in 1925 and home to the football team, is located approximately a mile to the northeast of the main campus. More recently, Brown has expanded into the Jewelry District, located in southern downtown Providence, by acquiring and renovating five buildings to serve as administrative and research facilities. Outside of Providence, Brown also owns a 376-acre property, the Mount Hope Grant, in Bristol, which is the setting of the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology. A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... The Ladd Observatory is an astronomical observatory of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, USA. The observatory was dedicated in 1891 and is named for benefactor Herbert W. Ladd. ... West-facing entrance of the building in front of the Van Wickle Gates The University Hall at Brown University is the oldest building on campus. ... The USS Arizona Memorial. ... The Rhode Island School of Design (RISD, pronounced /RIZ-dee/) is one of the premier fine arts institutions in the United States. ... Thayer Street in Providence, Rhode Island is a popular destination for students of the areas colleges, including Brown University, RISD, and Johnson and Wales University. ... Nickname: Motto: Official website: http://www. ... The Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology is Brown Universitys anthropology museum, set within 350 acres of woodland on the shores of Mount Hope Bay on Tower Street, Bristol, Rhode Island, and with a satellite location on the university campus in Providence, Rhode Island. ...


Boldly Brown

Under President Ruth Simmons, the University has launched a Campaign for Academic Enrichment. This campaign consists of re-evaluating the existing curriculum and raising $1.4 billion for greater academic ambition. The money will be used for academic programs, research, new facilities, biology and medicine, students who need financial assistance, and expanding the faculty and staff. Currently, $1.034 billion has been raised. [24]


Some ongoing projects: [10]

  • The Sidney E. Frank Life Sciences Hall (completed Fall 2006)
  • The Warren Alpert Medical School (in planning stages)
  • The relocation and renovation of the Peter Green House (ongoing) [25]
  • Construction of the new Walk to connect Lincoln Field with the Pembroke Campus (ongoing; completion by 2009)
  • A new Campus Center by renovating Wilson Lab (construction scheduled for Fall 2007)
  • Renovation of Faunce House (construction scheduled for Fall 2008)
  • The Nelson Fitness Center (will be completed by 2010)

Student life

Atmosphere

Princeton Review ranks Brown first among all American colleges for "happiest students."[26] Brown was recently named "the most fashionable school in the Ivy League" by the fashion trade journal Women's Wear Daily on the basis that students on campus seem to have the strongest sense of personal style.[27] The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in... For other uses, see Fashion (disambiguation). ... Womens Wear Daily is an influential fashion-industry trade journal founded by Edmund Fairchild. ...


Nightlife

Brown is home to an active on-campus nightlife. A wide array of parties take place on the weekends, most of them in dorms and off-campus houses. Some parties, such as SexPowerGod and Starf*ck, are annual occurrences. Both parties were massively scaled back, however, after Bill O'Reilly sent a clothed cameraman into SexPowerGod in Fall 2005 and aired footage of the party on his show, The O'Reilly Factor. It has been suggested that Bill OReilly political beliefs and points of view be merged into this article or section. ... The OReilly Factor is an American talk show on the Fox News Channel hosted by commentator Bill OReilly, who discusses current political and social issues with guests from opposing ends of the political spectrum. ...


Athletics

Brown Bears logo

Brown is a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Ivy League athletic conference. It sponsors 37 varsity intercollegiate teams. Its athletics program has been featured in the College Sports Honor Roll as one of the top 20 athletic programs in the country according to U.S. News & World Report. Brown Women's Rowing Team has won 5 national titles in the last 11 years and Brown Football won the 2005 Ivy League Championships and shared the 1999 Ivy League title with Yale. Brown's Men's Soccer program is consistently ranked in the top 25, has won 18 Ivy League titles overall, and 8 of the last 12 - recent graduates play professionally in Major League Soccer and overseas. Brown's Varsity Equestrian team won the Ivy League Championships for the past two years in a row, and has consistently performed extremely well within the team's zone and region.[28] Brown also features several competitive intercollegiate club sports, including its nationally ranked sailing, Taekwondo, Ultimate, and Rugby union teams. In 2005, the men's ultimate team, Brownian Motion, won the national championship, and the football team won its first-ever outright Ivy League title. Brown's table tennis team finished in first place and were undefeated in the New England division of National College Table Tennis Association (NCTTA) in the 2006-2007 season and earned a spot in the National competition. In 2007, Brown won its first Ivy League baseball championship in school history. In the 2006-2007 season, the Brown Womens Rugby team won the Ivy League championship and currently ranked in the top ten of college teams. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... NCAA redirects here. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... In the United States and Canada, varsity sports teams are the principal athletic teams representing a college, university, or high school or other secondary school. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... For either of the songs named Sailing, see Sailing (song). ... Taekwondo (also Tae Kwon Do, Taekwon-Do, or Tae Kwon-Do) is a Korean martial art and combat sport. ... Ultimate (sometimes called ultimate Frisbee in reference to the trademarked brand name) is a non-contact competitive team game played with a 175 gram flying disc. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Brownian Motion is the mens Ultimate team at Brown University. ...


Student groups

There are approximately 240 registered student organizations on campus with diverse interests. The Student Activities Fair, during the orientation program, is an opportunity for first-years to become acquainted with the wide range of clubs.


Residential / Greek

12.7% of Brown students are in fraternities or sororities. There are eleven residential Greek houses: six all-male fraternities (Alpha Epsilon Pi, Delta Tau, Delta Phi, Theta Delta Chi, Sigma Chi, and Phi Kappa Psi), two sororities (Alpha Chi Omega and Kappa Alpha Theta), one co-ed literary fraternity (St. Anthony Hall), one co-ed fraternity (Zeta Delta Xi), and one co-ed literary society (Alpha Delta Phi). All recognized Greek letter organizations live on-campus in University-owned dorm housing. Ten of the houses are overseen by the Greek Council and are located on Wriston Quadrangle. St. Anthony Hall, a co-ed fraternity that does not participate in Greek Council, is located in King House. The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... Alpha Epsilon Pi (ΑΕΠ or AEPi) is currently the only international Jewish college fraternity in North America, with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... Delta Phi (ΔΦ) is a fraternity was founded in 1827 at Union College in Schenectady, New York. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest and oldest all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities. ... Phi Kappa Psi (ΦΚΨ, Phi Psi) is a U.S. national college fraternity. ... Alpha Chi Omega (ΑΧΩ, also known as A-Chi-O) is a womens fraternity founded on October 15, 1885. ... Kappa Alpha Theta (ΚΑΘ) is an international womens fraternity founded on January 27, 1870 at DePauw University. ... St. ... Zeta Delta Xi (Zete) is a local co-educational fraternity at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... St. ...


An alternative to fraternity life at Brown are the program houses, which are organized around various themes. As with Greek houses, the existing residents of each house take applications from students, usually at the start of the Spring semester. Examples of program houses include: Buxton International House, the Machado French/Spanish House, Art House, Technology House, Harambee House, Culinary Arts (Cooking) House, West House and Interfaith House. The term interfaith or interfaith dialogue refers to cooperative and positive interaction between people of different religious traditions, (ie. ...


Currently, there are three student cooperative houses at Brown. Two of the houses, Watermyn and Finlandia on Waterman Street, are owned by the Brown Association for Cooperative Housing (BACH), an independent non-profit corporation owned and operated by house members. The third co-op, West House, is located in a Brown-owned house on Brown Street. All three houses also run a vegetarian food co-op for residents and non-residents. The Brown Association for Cooperative Housing is a non-profit student housing cooperative in Providence, Rhode Island. ...


Secret societies

As at most other Ivies, secret societies have existed at Brown since the mid-18th century. They originated as literary clubs and organized disputes among their members, a forensic tradition that continues today in the Brown Debating Union. The first known literary society was Athenian at Queen's, founded in 1776, but this group disbanded by the mid-1780s.[citation needed] The Philermenian Society (founded as the Misokosmian Society) arose in 1794.[29] In reaction to the Federalist Philermenians, a Democratic-Republican society called the United Brothers Society was formed in 1806.[30] In 1824 a third society, the Franklin Society, was formally recognized by the university president, and counted as honorary members Thomas Jefferson, John Quincy Adams, and Henry Clay.[31] All of these societies had libraries and meeting rooms on the top floor of Hope College, and few written documents were preserved in order to protect against inter-society espionage. However, by the mid-19th century, these organizations had diminished on account of the growth in the number of Greek letter fraternities.[32] Brown Debating Union - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... ... The Democratic-Republican party was a United States political party, which evolved early in the history of the United States. ... For the Whittier College Fraternity, see The Franklin Society (Fraternity). ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was a diplomat, politician, and the sixth President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 4, 1829). ... For his namesake son, see Henry Clay, Jr. ... The Greek alphabet (Greek: ) is an alphabet consisting of 24 letters that has been used to write the Greek language since the late 8th or early 8th century BC. It was the first alphabet in the narrow sense, that is, a writing system using a separate symbol for each vowel... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ...


Traditions

Main article: Brown University traditions

Though the early history of Brown as a men's school includes a number of unusual hazing traditions, the University's present-day traditions tend to be non-violent while maintaining the spirit of zaniness.[33] This follow is the summary of the traditions of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Hazing is an often ritualistic test and a task, which may constitute harassment, abuse or humiliation with requirements to perform random, often meaningless tasks, sometimes as a way of initiation into a social group. ...


Van Wickle Gates

The Van Wickle Gates, dedicated on June 18, 1901, have a pair of center gates and a smaller gate on each side. The side gates remain open throughout the year, while the center gates remain closed except for two occasions each year. At the beginning of the academic year, the center gates open inward to admit students during Convocation. At the end of the second semester, the gates open outward for the Commencement Day procession.[34] A traditional superstition is that students who pass through the gates for a second time before graduation do not graduate. Undergraduate members of the Brown Band who must pass through the gates during the Commencement ceremonies walk through it backwards. Formerly, the graduation superstition only applied to male students, as female students had their own fear of never marrying. Similar superstitions apply to the Pembroke seal on the stone steps leading to the Pembroke quad from Meeting Street, a holdover from when Pembroke College was a separate college for women. Another traditional superstition is that students rub the nose of the statue of John Hay in the John Hay Library for good luck on exams, a superstition that has been in effect since around 1910, resulting in a very shiny nose.[35] is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Brown University Band is the official band of Brown University. ... John Milton Hay (October 8, 1838 – July 1, 1905) was an American statesman, diplomat, author, journalist, and private secretary and assistant to Abraham Lincoln. ... John Hay Library The John Hay Library is the second oldest library on the campus of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. ...


Josiah S. Carberry

Main article: Josiah S. Carberry

One of Brown's most notable traditions is keeping alive the spirit and accomplishments of Josiah S. Carberry, the fictional Professor of Psychoceramics (the equally fictional study of cracked pots), who was born on a University Hall billboard in 1929. He is the namesake of "Josiah's", a University-run snackbar. "Josiah" is also the name of the University's electronic library catalog. Josiah Stinkney Carberry is a fictional professor, created as a joke. ... Josiah Stinkney Carberry is a fictional professor, created as a joke. ... West-facing entrance of the building in front of the Van Wickle Gates The University Hall at Brown University is the oldest building on campus. ...


According to Encyclopedia Brunoniana, "on Friday, May 13, 1955, an anonymous gift of $101.01 was received by the University from Professor Carberry to establish the Josiah S. Carberry Fund in memory of his 'future late wife.' A condition of the gift was that, henceforth, every Friday the 13th would be designated 'Carberry Day,' and on that day friends of the University would deposit their loose change in brown jugs to augment the fund, which is used to purchase 'such books as Professor Carberry might or might not approve of.'" Students have followed this tradition ever since, and the fund currently has over $10,000 in it.[36] Encyclopedia Brunoniana is an American reference work by Martha Mitchell covering Brown University. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ...


"Professor Carberry has been the subject of articles in a number of periodicals, including the New York Times, which proclaimed him 'The World’s Greatest Traveler' on the front page of its Sunday travel section in 1974, and in Yankee magazine, where he was 'The Absent-Bodied Professor' in 1975. A recent honor which came to Professor Carberry was the award to him of an Ig Nobel Prize at the First Annual Ig Nobel Prize Ceremony in 1991. At this event sponsored by M.I.T. and the Journal of Irreproducible Results, Carberry, the 1991 Ig Nobel Interdisciplinary Research Prize laureate, was cited as 'bold explorer and eclectic seeker of knowledge, for his pioneering work in the field of psychoceramics, the study of cracked pots.'"[37] Flying frog. ... “MIT” redirects here. ... The Journal of Irreproducible Results is a magazine of science humor, published in San Mateo, California as of 2004. ...


Spring Weekend

Starting in 1950, Brown replaced the traditional Junior Week and Junior Prom, which were discontinued during World War II, with Spring Weekend, which featured athletic contests and dances. Concerts featuring invited performers began in 1960.[38] [39] Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Brown songs

Alma Mater

The "Alma Mater" was written by James Andrews DeWolf (Class of 1861) in 1860, who named it "Old Brown" and set it to the tune of "Araby's Daughter" (which was later known as "The Old Oaken Bucket"). The song was renamed "Alma Mater", after the incipit, in 1869.[40] It is sung and played after varsity athletic victories and at formal events such as Convocation and Commencement. See also: 1821 in music, other events of 1822, 1823 in music and the list of years in music. Events March 16 - Marriage of Gioacchino Rossini and Spanish soprano Isabella Colbran Popular Music None listed Births March 7 - Victor Masse, composer December 10 - César Franck Deaths unknown date - Jean... Samuel Woodworth was born January 13, 1784 in Scituate, Massachusetts to Benjamin Woodworth and Abigail Bryant. ... The incipit of a text, such as a poem, song, or book, is its first few words or opening line. ...

Alma Mater! we hail thee with loyal devotion,
And bring to thine altar our off'ring of praise;
Our hearts swell within us, with joyful emotion,
As the name of old Brown in loud chorus we raise.
The happiest moments of youth's fleeting hours,
We've passed, 'neath the shade of these time-honored walls,
And sorrows as transient as April's brief showers
Have clouded our life in Brunonia's halls.
And when we depart from thy friendly protection,
And boldly launch out upon life's stormy main,
We'll oft look behind us, with grateful affection,
And live our bright college days over again.
When from youth we have journeyed to manhood's high station,
And hopeful young scions around us have grown,
We'll send them, with love and deep veneration,
As pilgrims devout, to the shrine of Old Brown.
And when life's golden autumn with winter is blending,
And brows, now so radiant, are furrowed by care;
When the blightings of age on our heads are descending.
With no early friends all our sorrows to share; -
Oh! then, as in memory backward we wander,
And roam the long vista of past years adown,
On the scenes of our student life often we'll ponder,
And smile, as we murmur the name of Old Brown.

Ever True To Brown

Brown's official fight song "Ever True To Brown" was written by Donald Jackson (Class of 1909). The song is played by the Brown Band at varsity athletic events. The unofficial version is alternately played by the Band as well.

Traditional version Unofficial version

We are ever true to Brown,
For we love our college dear,
And wherever we may go,
We are ready with a cheer,
And the people always say,
That you can't outshine Brown Men,
With their Rah! Rah! Rah!
And their Ki! Yi! Yi!
And their B-R-O-W-N!

We are ever true to Brown,
For we love our college dear,
And wherever we may go, (Where are we going?)
We are ready with a beer,
And the people always say, (What do they say?)
That you can't outdrink Brown Men, (and Women!)
With a scotch and rye,
And a whiskey dry,
And a B-O-U-R-B-O-N!

Computing projects

Several projects of note involving hypertext and other forms of electronic text have been developed at Brown, including:

In addition, the Computer Science department at Brown is home to The CAVE, part of the Thomas J. Watson, Sr. Center for Information Technology. This project is a complete virtual reality room, one of few in the world, and is used for everything from three-dimensional drawing classes to tours of the circulatory system for medical students. The File Retrieval and Editing System, or FRESS, was a hypertext system developed at Brown University in 1968 by Andries van Dam. ... Brown University Interactive Language (BRUIN) was an introductory programming language developed at Brown University in the late 1960s. ... HES is also for Historical European Swordsmanship. ... Since 1986, the Women Writers Project at Brown University has worked to encode early literature by women writers in SGML. The eventual goal of the project is to include all English language works written or co-authored by women up to 1850. ... A Cave Automatic Virtual Environment (better known by the recursive acronym CAVE) is an immersive virtual reality environment where projectors are directed to four, five or six of the walls of a room-sized cube. ... This article is about the simulation technology. ... For transport in plants, see Vascular tissue. ...


Notable alumni, faculty and honoris causa laureates

The following is a partial list of notable and non-notable Brown University people, known as Brunonians. ...

Trivia

  • The John Hay library contains three books bound in human skin; other large university libraries also have such volumes, and a rare book cataloguer says that while the idea of making leather from human skin seems bizarre and cruel today, it was not uncommon in centuries past.[41]
  • In 2000, a group of students from the university's Technology House converted the south side of the Sciences Library into a giant video display which allowed bystanders to play Tetris, the largest of its kind ever in the Western Hemisphere. Constructed from eleven custom-built circuit boards, a twelve-story data network, a personal computer running Linux, a radio-frequency video game controller, and over 10,000 Christmas lights, the project was named La Bastille and could be seen for several miles.[42][43]

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Tetris (Russian: ) is a falling-blocks puzzle video game, released on a large spectrum of platforms. ... This article is about operating systems that use the Linux kernel. ...

See also

The following is a list of buildings at Brown University. ... The following is a list of statues and sculptures on Brown University campus. ... The Warren Alpert Medical School (formerly known as Brown Medical School) is a graduate school of Brown University. ... The Brown Medical School is Brown Universitys medical school. ... Summary The Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown University is a center for research and teaching on international affairs. ... The Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology is Brown Universitys anthropology museum, set within 350 acres of woodland on the shores of Mount Hope Bay on Tower Street, Bristol, Rhode Island, and with a satellite location on the university campus in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Brown Stadium is a football stadium located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... The Ladd Observatory is an astronomical observatory of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, USA. The observatory was dedicated in 1891 and is named for benefactor Herbert W. Ladd. ... Encyclopedia Brunoniana is an American reference work by Martha Mitchell covering Brown University. ...

Student organizations

See also: Category:Brown University organizations

The Brown Daily Herald, the student newspaper of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, is the fifth-oldest college daily newspaper in the United States. ... The College Hill Independent, commonly referred to as the Indy, is a weekly News, Politics, Opinions, Arts and Culture newspaper published in Providence, RI by students of Brown University and the Rhode Island School of Design. ... The Critical Review, sometimes abbreviated CR, is a student publication that produces reviews of course offerings at Brown University. ... The Brown Journal of World Affairs is an American journal of international relations, published bi-annually at Brown University. ... The Brown University Band is the official band of Brown University. ... The Brown University Orchestra was founded in 1918 and is composed of around 100 members of the Brown University community. ... Co-founded in 2005 by Brown University students Michael Hadley 07 and Clara Schuhmacher 06, Brown Opera Productions is dedicated to the promotion and performance of classical vocal music both on campus and in the greater Providence community and is a space for singers and musicians to collaborate on exciting... Brown Badmaash Dance Company, often referred to as Brown Badmaash, is a nationally competitive South Asian fusion dance team based at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. ... WBRU is a commercial radio station in Providence, Rhode Island that broadcasts on 95. ... The Undergraduate Council of Students, originally known as the Cammarian Club, is the student government at Brown University. ... This article lacks information on the importance of the subject matter. ... The Brown University Mock Trial team is among one of the few non-athletic organizations engaged in intercollegiate competitions at Brown University, an Ivy League university. ...

External links

Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

References

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ http://www.brown.edu/Administration/Admission/gettoknowus/ourhistory.html
  3. ^ From Martha Mitchell’s Encyclopedia Brunoniana: Bear
  4. ^ Brown Campus News: Acceptance Rate of Class of 2010 Lowest in University History
  5. ^ Ivy Success article
  6. ^ Hernandez College Consulting
  7. ^ a b c Brown University Office of Admission facts and figures
  8. ^ [2] Boston College News Article
  9. ^ [3] Social Science Research Network Paper Download
  10. ^ Brunson, Walter C. (1972). The History of Brown University, 1764-1914, p. 500. 
  11. ^ "Providence." Encyclopedia Britannica. 1911. 11th edition. Vol 22 (POL-RHE). p. 511c: (Makeup of board, 22 Baptists, etc. No religious tests for admission. "Considered extraordinary liberal.")
  12. ^ Howell, Ricardo (2001, July). "Slavery, the Brown Family of Providence and Brown University." Brown University News Service
  13. ^ http://www.brown.edu/Administration/News_Bureau/2007-08/07-013.html
  14. ^ http://www.brown.edu/Administration/Provost/committees/tue/
  15. ^ Office of the President
  16. ^ Steering Committee on Slavery and Justice
  17. ^ About the Committee
  18. ^ Ivy League
  19. ^ A Forgotten History: The Slave Trade and Slavery in New England
  20. ^ Undergraduate Concentrations Completed: Selected Years
  21. ^ History of the Brown Medical School
  22. ^ Brown University Names Medical School To Honor Warren Alpert. Brown University Media Relations. Retrieved on 2007-01-29.
  23. ^ Allen, Brenda A., Paul Armstrong, Farid Azfar, et al. "Slavery and Justice: Report of the Brown University Steering Committee on Slavery and Justice'" Brown University Steering Committee on Slavery and Justice, October 21, 2006), retrieved March 15, 2007.
  24. ^ Boldly Brown web site
  25. ^ Peter Green House Relocation Video
  26. ^ The Princeton Review. (2006, August). "Quality of Life." The Best 361 Colleges
  27. ^ Perkins, Sara. (2004, April 19). "Fashion Journal likes what Brown is wearing." The Brown Daily Herald
  28. ^ U.S. News & World Report. (2002, March 18). "College Sports: Honor Roll." U.S. News & World Report
  29. ^ Mitchell, Martha. (1993). "Philermenian Society." Encyclopedia Brunoniana
  30. ^ Mitchell, Martha. (1993). "United Brothers Society." Encyclopedia Brunoniana
  31. ^ Mitchell, Martha. (1993). "Franklin Society." Encyclopedia Brunoniana
  32. ^ Mitchell, Martha. (1993). "Fraternities." Encyclopedia Brunoniana
  33. ^ Poulson, Dan. (1 March 2002). "Investigating the death of campus traditions." The Brown Daily Herald
  34. ^ Mitchell, Martha. (1993). "Van Wickle Gates." Encyclopedia Brunoniana
  35. ^ Brown Admission: Brown Traditions
  36. ^ Brown Admission: Brown Traditions
  37. ^ Mitchell, Martha. (1993). "Carberry, Josiah S.." Encyclopedia Brunoniana
  38. ^ Mitchell, Martha. (1993). "Spring Weekend." Encyclopedia Brunoniana
  39. ^ Brown Concert Agency
  40. ^ Mitchell, Martha. (1993). "Alma Mater." Encyclopedia Brunoniana
  41. ^ Johnson, M.L. (2006, January 7). "Some of nation's best libraries have books bound in human skin." Associated Press
  42. ^ La Bastille: A Tech House Art Installation
  43. ^ http://www.macobserver.com/news/00/april/000425/wozontetris.shtml

  Results from FactBites:
 
Brown University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4839 words)
The family's connection with the college was strong: Joseph Brown became a professor of Physics at the University and John Brown served as treasurer from 1775 to 1796.
Brown was recently named "the most fashionable school in the Ivy League" by the fashion trade journal Women's Wear Daily on the basis that students on campus seem to have the strongest sense of personal style.
One of Brown's most notable traditions is keeping alive the spirit and accomplishments of Josiah S. Carberry, the fictional Professor of Psychoceramics (the equally fictional study of cracked pots), who was born on a University Hall billboard in 1929.
John Brown University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (605 words)
John Brown University's history begins with John E. Brown, an evangelist with a goal in mind for a college to provide an interdenominational, Christian education for needy students.
Brown laid the foundation in 1919 for the institution that would later be called John Brown University.
John Brown University has two endowed, associated centers that serve the university, community, and the world by actively addressing two major areas of concern in today’s society: the need for strong relationships and the need for ethical business leaders.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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