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Encyclopedia > Brown Dog affair

The Brown Dog affair was a controversy and cause célèbre for a brief period in Edwardian England, from 1903 to 1910, and revolving around vivisection and a statue erected in memory of a dog killed in the cause of medical research. The Brown Dog affair provoked riots the size of which were not repeated in the United Kingdom until the poll tax riot of March 1990. A cause célèbre (of which the plural is causes célèbres) is an issue or incident arousing widespread controversy, outside campaigning and/or heated public debate. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: England Travel guide to England from Wikitravel English language English law English (people) List of monarchs of England – Kings of England family tree List of English people Angeln (region in northern Germany, presumably the origin of the Angles for whom England is named) UK... 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Anaesthetised rat in a stereotaxic restraining device about to undergo brain surgery. ... Riots in Newark, New Jersey Riots occur when crowds of people have gathered and are committing crimes or acts of violence. ... The Poll Tax Riots, as they became known, were major acts of civil disobedience carried out in England and Scotland. ... This article is about the year. ...


The antecedents of the Brown Dog affair lay in a libel suit brought by Dr. William Bayliss of the Department of Physiology at University College London, against the Hon. Stephen Coleridge Honorary Secretary of the National Anti-Vivisection Society. Coleridge provoked the suit by claiming in a speech that Bayliss had broken two laws in his handling of a dog which was killed after vivisection in February 1903. Although Bayliss prevailed in the courts and was awarded damages of £2000 to be paid by Coleridge (a six-figure sum in today's currency), the latter achieved his aims of widespread press coverage of the subject of vivisection, which led to the Daily News newspaper launching a fund to cover the damages, which raised £5,735 within four months. In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ... William Maddock Bayliss(May 2, 1860-August 27, 1924) was an English physician. ... University College London, commonly known as UCL, is one of the colleges that make up the University of London. ...


Members of affiliated anti-vivisection organisations then took it on themselves to raise a subscription for a memorial to the dog at issue in the Bayliss versus Coleridge case. The group turned to the borough of Battersea, known as one of the more radical in London, for a location in which to install the memorial; the council provided a space near the newly completed Latchmere Estate. The memorial was in the form of a drinking fountain (for people and dogs) surmounted by a bronze of the dog in question. Battersea is a place in the London Borough of Wandsworth. ... Part of the London skyline viewed from the South Bank London is the most populous city in the European Union, with an estimated population on 1 January 2005 of 7,500,000 and a metropolitan area population of between 12 and 14 million. ...


Medical students at a number of London teaching hospitals were outraged at the inscription on the memorial, and organised protests and attempts to damage or destroy the statue. From this point on the memorial in effect became the fulcrum for a very heated public debate about the merits and demerits of vivisection, which from time to time led to mass protests, riots, and civic disobedience.


The statue was removed in 1910, after local elections in the borough tipped its political balance, and is presumed destroyed. A modern replica was installed in Battersea Park in 1985. 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Battersea Park peace pagoda The bandstand in Battersea Park The cover of Petula Clarks 2001 box set, Meet me in Battersea Park Battersea Park is a 200 acre (0. ... This article is about the year. ...


Reference

The Brown Dog Affair - Peter Mason, 1997, Two Sevens Publishing. ISBN 0-9529854-0-3


External links

  • The little brown dog forming the major part of the history of the National Anti-Vivisection Society
  • Why a brown dog and its descendants did not die in vain - Professor Steve Jones in the Daily Telegraph
  • "The queen has been dreadfully shocked" - Aspects of teaching experimental physiology using animals in Britain, 1876–1986. Volume 19 : Number 1 – Advances In Physiology Education – June 1998. (PDF)

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Brown Dog affair - definition of Brown Dog affair in Encyclopedia (435 words)
The Brown Dog affair was a controversy and cause célèbre for a brief period in Edwardian England, from 1903 to 1910, and revolving around vivisection and a statue erected in memory of a dog killed in the cause of medical research.
The Brown Dog affair provoked riots the size of which were not repeated in the United Kingdom until the poll tax riot of March 1990.
The antecedents of the Brown Dog affair lay in a libel suit brought by Dr. William Bayliss of the Department of Physiology at University College London, against the Hon.
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