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Encyclopedia > Brooklyn College
Brooklyn College

Motto: Nil sine magno labore ("Nothing without great effort")
Established: 1930
Type: Public
Endowment: $36.9 million
President: Christoph M. Kimmich
Staff: 519 full-time, 444 part-time
Students: 15,385
Undergraduates: 11,172
Location: Brooklyn, NY, USA
Campus: Urban
Athletics: 14 teams
Mascot: Bridges
Website: www.brooklyn.cuny.edu

Brooklyn College is a senior college of the City University of New York, located in Brooklyn, New York. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Educated at Haverford College (BA 1961) and Oxford University (PhD. 1964). ... This article is about work. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... This article is about the New York City borough, or Kings County, New York. ... This article is about the state. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... The City University of New York (CUNY; acronym pronounced ), is the public university system of New York City. ... For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ...


Established in 1930 by the New York City Board of Higher Education, the College had its beginnings as branches of Hunter College (then a women's college) and the City College of New York (then a men's college). With the merger of these branches, Brooklyn College became the first public coeducational liberal arts college in New York City. The 26-acre campus is known for its great beauty. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... See also: Hunter College High School Hunter College of The City University of New York (known more commonly as simply Hunter College) is a senior college of the City University of New York (CUNY), located on Manhattans Upper East Side. ... In higher education, particularly in the United States, a womens college is a college (that is, a primarily undergraduate, bachelors degree-granting institution) whose students are exclusively women. ... “City College” redirects here. ... A men’s college is a college or university whose students are exclusively men. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... This article is about the unit of measurement. ...


The College ranked in the top 10 nationally for the second consecutive year in Princeton Review’s 2006 guidebook, America’s Best Value Colleges. The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in...

Contents

Campus history

Brooklyn College in winter
Brooklyn College in winter

In 1932, an architect named Randolph Evans drafted a plan for the college's campus on a large plot of land his employer owned in the Midwood section of Brooklyn. He sketched out a Georgian-style campus facing a central quadrangle, and anchored by a library building with a tall tower. Evans presented the sketches to the President of the college at the time, Dr. William A. Boylan. Boylan was pleased with the plans, and the lot of land was purchased for $1.6 million. Construction of the new campus began in 1935, with a groundbreaking ceremony attended by then Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia and Brooklyn Borough President Raymond Ingersoll. In 1936, then-President of the United States Franklin D. Roosevelt went to Brooklyn College to lay the cornerstone of the Brooklyn College Gymnasium. President Boylan, Borough President Ingersoll, and President Roosevelt all had buildings on Brooklyn College's campus named after them. The campus located in Midwood became the only Brooklyn College campus after the school's Downtown Brooklyn campus was shut down during the 1975 budget emergency. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 338 KB) Snowy Brooklyn College File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Brooklyn College Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 338 KB) Snowy Brooklyn College File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Brooklyn College Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ... Midwood has a substantial population of Haredi Jews and Modern Orthodox Jews, many of whom live and worship in the side streets around Kings Highway Midwood is a neighborhood located in the south central part of the Borough of Brooklyn, New York, USA, roughly halfway between Prospect Park and Coney... A Georgian house in Salisbury For the unrelated architecture of the country Georgia, see Architecture of Georgia (country). ... Quadrangle of University of Sydney In architecture, a quadrangle, or more colloquially, quad, is a space or courtyard, usually square or rectangular in plan, the sides of which are entirely or mainly occupied by parts of a large building. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Fiorello Henry LaGuardia (December 11, 1882–September 20, 1947) was the Mayor of New York from 1934 to 1945. ... Borough President is an elective office in New York City. ... FDR redirects here. ... Look up cornerstone in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Modern indoor gymnasium with pull-down basketball hoops. ... Midwood has a substantial population of Haredi Jews and Modern Orthodox Jews, many of whom live and worship in the side streets around Kings Highway Midwood is a neighborhood located in the south central part of the Borough of Brooklyn, New York, USA, roughly halfway between Prospect Park and Coney... Skyline of Downtown Brooklyn seen from the East River Metro Tech is a business center in Downtown Brooklyn Downtown Brooklyn is the third largest central business district in New York City (following Midtown Manhattan and Downtown Manhattan), and is located in the northwestern section of the borough of Brooklyn. ...


Modern campus history

Brooklyn College's campus today still looks much as it did when it was originally constructed, but with extensions of Ingersoll Hall and Roosevelt Hall. The campus also serves as home to the Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts complex and its four theaters, including the George Gershwin. The most recent construction to take place on the campus was the demolition of the Plaza Building, due to its inefficient use of space, poor ventilation, and significant maintenance cost. To replace the Plaza Building, the college is currently constructing a new West Quad. To keep with the academic style of the campus, the new grounds will contain a newly landscaped quadrangle with grassy areas and trees. Also, new façades will be constructed on the Roosevelt and James Hall buildings where they once connected with the Plaza Building. In addition to these changes, a new building will be built that will house classroom space, offices, and the Department of Physical Education and Exercise Science. The building will also contain new gymnasiums, and a swimming pool. This follows a major library renovation that saw the library moved to a temporary home while construction took place. Ingersoll (2001 population 10,977) is a town on the Thames River in southwestern Ontario, Canada. ... Roosevelt is a surname of Dutch origin, with the literal meaning of rose field. ... The George Gershwin Theatre is a 500-seat proscenium theatre, one of four situated in the Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts complex located on the campus of Brooklyn College at 2900 Campus Road in Brooklyn, New York. ... Quadrangle of University of Sydney In architecture, a quadrangle, or more colloquially, quad, is a space or courtyard, usually square or rectangular in plan, the sides of which are entirely or mainly occupied by parts of a large building. ... West façade of the Notre-Dame de Strasbourg Cathedral A facade (or façade) is the exterior of a building – especially the front, but also sometimes the sides and rear. ... Physical education (PE) is the interdisciplinary study of all area of science relating to the transmission of physical knowledge and skills to an individual or a group, the application of these skills, and their results. ...


Quality education requires excellent teachers, and Brooklyn College has a faculty distinguished by master teaching and scholarly achievement. Ninety percent of the Brooklyn College faculty hold the highest degree in their field. Among them are Fulbright and Guggenheim fellows, a National Book Award finalist, an Obie Award-winning playwright, 3 Pulitzer Prize-winning authors, and award-winning scientists and musicians. The Fulbright Program is program of educational grants (Fulbright Fellowships) sponsored by the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the United States Department of State. ... Guggenheim can be a reference to any of a number of members or interests of the Meyer Guggenheim family, including: Meyer Guggenheim, or his descendants: Guggenheim family; The Guggenheim Museums; foundations such as the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation (see also Guggenheim Fellowship), and the Harry... The National Book Awards is one of the most preeminent literary prizes in the United States. ... The Obie Awards, short for Off-Broadway Theater Awards, are annual awards bestowed by the newspaper The Village Voice on theater artists performing in New York City. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ...


Perhaps the best measure of an excellent college is the success of its graduates. The College ranks 19th nationally in the number of its undergraduates who have gone on to receive Ph.D. degrees. Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ...


Divisions

Brooklyn College is made up of three academic divisions:

In addition the college also offers free polo classes tought by renowned polo expert Sean Degol In addition, the Conservatory of Music at Brooklyn College offers undergraduate and graduate work in performance, musicology, composition, and music education. A Bachelor of General Studies (BGS) degree is an undergraduate degree, offered by some universities in the Western world. ... A graduate school is the school that a college student may attend after completion of his or her undergraduate education in order to obtain a degree higher than a Bachelors degree. ...


Undergraduate curriculum

Beginning in 1981, the college instituted a group of classes that all undergraduates were required to take, called "Core Studies." The classes were: Classical Origins of Western Culture; Introduction to Art; Introduction to Music; People, Power, and Politics; The Shaping of the Modern World; Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning and Computer Programming; Landmarks of Literature; Chemistry; Physics; Biology; Geology; Studies in African, Asian, and Latin American Cultures; and Knowledge, Existence and Values.[1]


In 2006, the Core Curriculum was revamped, and the 13 required courses were replaced with 15 courses in 3 disciplines, from which students were required to take 11.[2]


Division of Graduate Studies

About


The Division of Graduate Studies draws on this record of achievement. For almost 70 years, the division has enabled qualified students of diverse backgrounds to acquire an advanced education of superior quality at a comparatively modest tuition. Today students from almost every state and more than 30 countries are working toward their master's or doctoral degrees at Brooklyn College. The Division of Graduate Studies offers more than 60 master's degree and advanced certificate programs in the arts, education, humanities, social sciences, sciences, and professional studies. Each year hundreds of graduate students embark on professional careers with the assistance of the Center for Career Development and Internships. Fostering a strong sense of community are the Graduate Student Organization, a number of student clubs, a graduate student newsletter, a series of graduate student lectures, and lively social events.


Today, under the administraion of its eighth president, Dr. Christopher M. Kimmich, Brooklyn College is building on traditions that have given it a place among the nation's most respected institutions of higher education.


Mission


Brooklyn College is a comprehensive, state-supported institution of higher learning in the borough of Brooklyn, a culturally and ethnically diverse community of two-and-one-half million people. As one of the 11 senior colleges of the City University of New York, it shares the mission of the university, whose commitment is to access and excellence.


The College seeks to extend its educational mission to graduate students through advanced programs offered by the Division of Graduate Studies. The academic goals of the division build on the College's tradition of academic excellence in the liberal arts and in teacher education programs. The division offers studies in specialized areas to serve the growing number of adults who seek to continue their intellectual pursuits and broaden their professional goals. In addition, in order to meet the changing needs of society, Brooklyn College continually develops new degree and advanced certificate programs as well as new concentrations of courses in existing programs. The College participates in a range of doctoral programs offered by the Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New York, including campus-based programs in the sciences.


B.A.-M.D. program

The Brooklyn College B.A.-M.D. program is an 8-year program affiliated with SUNY Downstate Medical Center. The Program follows a rigorous selection process, with a maximum of 17 students selected every year. Each student selected to the program receives a Brooklyn College Presidential Scholarship. B.A.-M.D. students must engage in community service for three years, beginning in their lower sophomore semester. During one summer of their undergraduate studies, students are required to volunteer in a clinical setting where they are involved in direct patient care. B.A.-M.D. students are encouraged to major in the humanities or social sciences. A student who majors in a science must choose a minor in the humanities or social sciences. All students meet the pre-med science requirements by taking cell and molecular biology, botany, physiology, general chemistry, organic chemistry, and general physics. B.A.-M.D. students must maintain at Brooklyn College an overall grade point average of 3.5, and a pre-med science GPA of 3.5. A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... The Medicinæ Doctor or Doctor of Medicine (M.D. or D.M.) is a doctorate level degree held by medical doctors. ... The State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn, better known as SUNY Downstate Medical Center, is an academic medical center and is the only one of its kind in the Borough of Brooklyn in New York City. ... Community service refers to service that a person performs for the benefit of his or her local community. ... See drugs, medication, and pharmacology for substances that treat patients. ... Patient care is part of a nurses role in implementing a care plan. ... For other uses, see Humanities (disambiguation). ... The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study human aspects of the world. ... Cell biology (also called cellular biology or formerly cytology, from the Greek kytos, container) is an academic discipline that studies cells. ... Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. ... Pinguicula grandiflora commonly known as a Butterwort Example of a cross section of a stem [1] Botany is the scientific study of plant life. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Organic chemistry is a specific discipline within chemistry which involves the scientific study of the structure, properties, composition, reactions, and preparation (by synthesis or by other means) of chemical compounds consisting primarily of carbon and hydrogen, which may contain any number of other elements, including nitrogen, oxygen, the halogens as... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... A grade in education can mean either a teachers evaluation of a students work or a students level of educational progress, usually one grade per year (often denoted by an ordinal number, such as the 3rd Grade or the 12th Grade). This article is about evaluation of...


The Scholars Program

The Scholars Program was established in 1960 with support from the Ford Foundation. It was the first honors program in the City University of New York, and one of the earliest at any American college or university. The program received national recognition, became a model for honors programs elsewhere, and was the foundation of the Brooklyn College Honors Academy, which now includes nine federated programs. Students in the program are distinguished by their strong writing ability. Applicants must score at least 680 on their SAT II Writing, and maintain a GPA over 3.50. Graduates of the Scholars Program enter such fields as medicine, law, speech therapy, public health, television, film producing and directing, and biochemistry. They are admitted to Ph.D.programs at such universities as Princeton, Pennsylvania, Yale, Berkeley, and New York University. Many are elected to membership in Phi Beta Kappa, and have received awards, including Brooklyn College’s Tow Travel Fellowship and Furman Travel Fellowship for undergraduate international study and research, and the nationally competitive Beinecke Fellowship and Mellon Humanities Fellowship for graduate study. Limited to 15-20 new students per year, the Program offers a community much like a small residential college.[1][2] The Ford Foundation is a charitable foundation incorporated in Michigan and based in New York City created to fund programs that promote democracy, reduce poverty, promote international understanding, and advance human achievement. ... The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ...


Notable alumni

In a National Research Council study of baccalaureate origins of Ph.D. recipients between 1920 and 1995, Brooklyn College ranked 19th in the nation. The National Research Council (NRC) of the USA is the working arm of the United States National Academy of Sciences and the United States National Academy of Engineering, carrying out most of the studies done in their names. ...


Academia

Barbara Aronstein Black was the first woman to head an Ivy League law school. ... In an educational setting, a dean is a person with significant authority . ... Columbia Law School, located in New York City, is one of the professional schools of Columbia University and one of the leading law schools in the United States. ... The University of Iowa College of Law, founded in 1865, is the oldest law school in continuous operation west of the Mississippi River. ... Temple University School of Medicine (TUSM), located on the Health Science Campus of Temple University in Philadelphia, PA, is one of 6 schools of medicine in Pennsylvania conferring the doctor of medicine (M.D.) degree. ... Alan Morton Dershowitz (born September 1, 1938) is an American political figure and criminal law professor at Harvard Law School. ... Harvard Law School (colloquially, Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Harvard School of Dental Medicine Harvard School of Dental Medicine (HSDM) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Brooklyn College is a senior college of the City University of New York, located in Brooklyn, New York. ... Jewish studies also known as Judaic studies is a subject area of study available at many colleges and universities in the Western World. ... For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ... The American Federation of Teachers or AFT is an American labor union founded in 1916 which represents teachers; paraprofessionals and school-related personnel; local, state and federal employees; higher education faculty and staff; and nurses and other healthcare professionals. ... The Hospital for Special Surgery is a hospital in New York City. ... The Joan and Sanford I. Weill Medical College is the medical school and biomedical research unit of Cornell University. ... Cornell redirects here. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... The City University of New York (CUNY; acronym pronounced ), is the public university system of New York City. ... Kingsborough Community College Kingsborough Community College, part of the City University of New York (CUNY) system, is a junior college in Brooklyn, New York. ... In education, a superintendent is an individual that has executive oversight and administration rights, usually within an educational entity or organization. ... Nickname: Map of Newark in Essex County Coordinates: , Country State County Essex Founded/Incorporated 1666/1836 Government  - Mayor Cory Booker, term of office 2006–2010 Area [1]  - Total 26. ... Oscar Handlin (born September 29, 1915, Brooklyn) is a U.S. historian. ... // Onomastics about the words, place- & human-names that forms Löb-, Loeb-, etc: Etymology See Onomastics in Judaism, List of Jewish surnames. ... Harvard redirects here. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Donald Kagan (born 1932) is a Yale historian specializing in ancient Greece, notable for his four-volume history of the Peloponnesian War. ... In an educational setting, a dean is a person with significant authority . ... Yale redirects here. ... Israel Meir Kirzner (Yisroel Mayer Kirzner) (born February 13, 1930) is a leading economist in the Austrian School. ... This article is about the branch of medicine. ... University of Wisconsin redirects here. ... Harvey Lichtenstein (born 1929) is a retired American dancer and arts administrator, best known for his 32-year tenure (1967-99) as executive director of the Brooklyn Academy of Music. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM) is a major performing arts venue in Brooklyn, a borough of New York City, known as a center for progressive and avant garde performance. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... The California State University (CSU) is one of three public higher education systems in the state of California, the other two being the University of California system and the California Community College System. ... For the journal, see Linguistics (journal). ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... Faculty Photo Stuart Alan Rice (born January 6, 1932 in New York City) is an American theoretical chemist and physical chemist. ... Physical chemistry, is the application of physics to macroscopic, microscopic, atomic, subatomic, and particulate phenomena in chemical systems[1] within the field of chemistry traditionally using the principles, practices and concepts of thermodynamics, quantum chemistry, statistical mechanics and kinetics. ... The University of Chicago is a private co-educational university located in Chicago, Illinois. ... Provost is from the Latin praepositus (set over, from praeponere, to place in front). It may mean: Provost (religion), a church official. ... For the private Christian university in Tennessee, see Tennessee Temple University. ... Jack B. Weinstein (born 1921, Kansas) is a United States federal judge in the Eastern District of New York. ... Columbia Law School, located in the New York City borough of Manhattan, is one of the professional schools of Columbia University, a member of the Ivy League, and one of the leading law schools in the United States. ... The United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York is the Federal district court whose jurisdiction is comprised of the entirety of Long Island and Staten Island. ... The University of Colorado at Boulder (CU-Boulder, UCB officially[3]; Colorado and CU colloquially) is the flagship university of the University of Colorado System in Boulder, Colorado. ... RIT redirects here. ... York University (French: Université York), located in Toronto, Ontario, is Canadas third-largest university and has produced several of the countrys top leaders in the fields of law, politics, literature, philosophy, journalism, management, meteorological, chemical, and space sciences, and fine arts including film, theatre, jazz and experimental music...

Business

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Entertainment

Entertainment Tonight is a daily television entertainment news show that is syndicated by CBS Paramount Domestic Television throughout the United States, Canada, on the Nine Network in Australia and on UBC Inside in Thailand. ... Oscar Brand (born February 7, 1920, in Winnipeg, Manitoba) is a folk singer and songwriter. ... Folk music, in the original sense of the term, is music by and of the people. ... Daniel Glass (born in Brooklyn, New York) is a music industry producer. ... Paul Mazursky (born April 25, 1930) is an American actor and film director. ... Down and Out in Beverly Hills is a 1986 American comedy motion picture starring Nick Nolte, Bette Midler and Richard Dreyfuss. ... Jimmy Smits as President Matt Santos on The West Wing. ... NYPD Blue was an Emmy Award-winning hour long-running American television police drama set in New York City. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... An Emmy Award. ... Dirk Weiler (Neunkirchen (Saar),Germany) is a native German musical theatre actor living in the United States. ... Joel Zwick, born January 11, 1942 in Brooklyn, New York, USA is an American director of movies and television shows. ... Family Matters is an American sitcom about a middle-class African-American family living in Chicago. ... My Big Fat Greek Wedding is a 2002 romantic comedy film written by and starring Nia Vardalos and directed by Joel Zwick. ...

Government, law, and public policy

Barbara Levy Boxer (born November 11, 1940) is an American politician and the current junior U.S. Senator from the State of California. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Shirley Anita St. ... A Congressman or Congresswoman (generically, Congressperson) is a politician who is a member of a Congress. ... Manuel F. Cohen (October 9, 1912 – June 16, 1977) served as chairman of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission between 1964 and 1969 and also served as a member from 1961-1929. ... The Securities and Exchange Commission, commonly referred to as the SEC, is the United States governing body which has primary responsibility for overseeing the regulation of the securities industry. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Nickname: Location of Portland in Multnomah County and the state of Oregon Coordinates: , Country State Counties Multnomah, Washington, Clackamas Incorporated February 8, 1851 Government  - Type Commission  - Mayor Tom Potter[1]  - Commissioners Sam Adams Randy Leonard Dan Saltzman Erik Sten  - Auditor Gary Blackmer Area  - City 376. ... The United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York is the Federal district court whose jurisdiction is comprised of the entirety of Long Island and Staten Island. ... Marty Markowitz is the Borough President of Brooklyn, New York City. ... This article is about the New York City borough, or Kings County, New York. ... Borough President is an elective office in New York City. ... Harvey Pitt was appointed 26th chairman of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) in 2001. ... The Securities and Exchange Commission, commonly referred to as the SEC, is the United States governing body which has primary responsibility for overseeing the regulation of the securities industry. ... Rosemary S. Pooler (born 1938), is a U.S. federal judge. ... The United States Courts of Appeals (or circuit courts) are the mid-level appellate courts of the United States federal court system. ... The United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts: District of Connecticut Northern, Southern, Eastern, and Western Districts of New York District of Vermont The Second Circuit hears argument at the Thurgood Marshall U... Chief Justice Deborah Poritz Deborah T. Poritz is the Chief Justice of the New Jersey Supreme Court. ... The Chief Justice in many countries is the name for the presiding member of a Supreme Court in Commonwealth- or other countries with an Anglosaxon type of justice, such as the Supreme Court of the United States, the Supreme Court of Canada, the Supreme Court of New Zealand, the Supreme... This article is about the U.S. state. ... In the United States, the state supreme court (known by various names in various states) is the highest state court in the state court system. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... Victor Gotbaum was the head of DC37, the largest municipal union in New York City, from 1965-1987. ...

Journalism

CNN or Cable News Network is a cable television network that was founded in 1980 by Ted Turner & Reese Schonfeld [1]. It is a division of the Turner Broadcasting System, owned by Time Warner. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Print Syndication is a form of syndication in which news articles, columns, or comic strips are made available to newspapers and magazines. ... A columnist is a journalist who produces a specific form of writing for publication called a column. Columns appear in newspapers, magazines and the Internet. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... An Op-Ed is a piece of writing expressing an opinion. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Newsday is a daily tabloid-size newspaper that primarily serves Long Island and the New York City borough of Queens, although it is sold throughout the New York City metropolitan area. ... Self magazine is an American magazine specializing in fitness, health and nutrition for women. ... This article, image, template or category should belong in one or more categories. ... Todays San Francisco Chronicle was founded in 1865 as The Daily Dramatic Chronicle by teenage brothers Charles de Young and Michael H. de Young. ...

Literature and the arts

Stanley Bernard Ellin (October 6, 1916 - July 31, 1986) was an American mystery writer. ... The Edgar Allan Poe Awards (popularly called the Edgars), named after Edgar Allan Poe, are presented every year by the Mystery Writers of America. ... Ben Katchor (born 1951 in Brooklyn, NY) is an American cartoonist. ... Sam Levenson (December 28, 1911-August 27, 1980), American humorist, writer, and journalist. ... Jackson Mac Low (September 12, 1922 - December 8, 2004) was an American poet, performance artist, composer and playwright, known to most readers of poetry as a practioneer of systematic chance operations and other non-intentional compositional methods in his work, which Mac Low first experienced in the musical work of... Frank McCourt Colum McCann, unknown, Christopher Cahill and Frank McCourt Francis Frank McCourt (born August 19, 1930) is an Irish-American teacher and author. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Cover of Angelas Ashes Angelas Ashes is a memoir by American author Frank McCourt, and tells the story of his childhood. ... Tis is a memoir written by Frank McCourt. ... John Mahon is a professional percussionist and backing vocalist, most noted for his recent work with Elton John. ... Gloria Naylor (b. ... The American Book Award was established in 1978 by the Before Columbus Foundation. ... Peter Nero (born Bernard Nierow on May 22, 1934) is an American pianist and pops conductor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Harold Norse (born July 6, 1916 in New York City) is a American poet, two-time NEA grant recipient, and National Poetry Association award winner. ... Irwin Shaw (né Irwin Gilbert Shamforoff, February 27, 1913 - May 16, 1984) was an American Jewish playwright, screen writer and author. ... Rich Man, Poor Man is a 1969 novel written by Irwin Shaw. ... The O. Henry Awards are yearly prizes given to short stories of exceptional merit. ... American poet David Trinidad was born in 1953 in Los Angeles. ... Guggenheim Fellowships are awarded annually by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation to those who have demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts. ... Detail of exhibition. ... John Yau (born 1950) is an American poet and critic who lives in New York City. ...

Science and technology

Richard Ernest Bellman (1920–1984) was an applied mathematician, celebrated for his invention of dynamic programming in 1953, and important contributions in other fields of mathematics. ... Applied mathematics is a branch of mathematics that concerns itself with the application of mathematical knowledge to other domains. ... In mathematics and computer science, dynamic programming is a method of solving problems exhibiting the properties of overlapping subproblems and optimal substructure (described below) that takes much less time than naive methods. ... Stanley Cohen (born November 17, 1922) is an American-born researcher and Nobel Prize Laureate in Physiology and Medicine (1986). ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... Emil Adolf von Behring was the first person to receive the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, for his work on the treatment of diphtheria. ... For the English politician see: Frank Field (UK politician) Dr. Frank Field (born 1923) is a well known televison personality and meteorologist who has been on TV for decades. ... Jerry Goldstein (born 23 December 1970) is a space physicist whose research has focused on the Earths plasmasphere, a high-altitude extension of the ionized portion of the planets upper atmosphere. ... Leonard Arthur Herzenberg (born 5 November 1931) is an immunologist, geneticist and professor at Stanford University. ... Fluorescent-activated cell sorting is a type of flow cytometry, a method for sorting a suspension of biologic cells into two or more containers, one cell at a time, based upon specific light scattering and fluorescent characteristics of each cell. ... Mouse embryonic stem cells with fluorescent marker. ... The Kyoto Prize (京都賞) has been awarded annually since 1984 by the Inamori Foundation, founded by Kazuo Inamori (fortune from ceramics). ... Philip G. Zimbardo (born March 23, 1933) is an American psychologist, best known for his Stanford prison experiment and bestselling introductions to psychology. ... Social psychology is the study of the nature and causes of human social behavior. ... The Stanford prison experiment was ostensibly a psychological study of human responses to captivity and its behavioral effects on both authorities and inmates in prison. ...

Sports

The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... The Pan American Games are a multi-sport event, held every four years between competitors from all nations of the Americas. ... NBA redirects here. ... NBA redirects here. ... The Boston Celtics are a professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... This article is about the martial art and sport. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... The Pan American Games are a multi-sport event, held every four years between competitors from all nations of the Americas. ... Marius Ugo Russo (July 19, 1914 - March 26, 2005) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the New York Yankees (1939-43, 1946). ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... This article is about the player in baseball. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... All-star (also, Allstar or All Star) is a term with meanings in both the worlds of sports and entertainment. ... Allie Sherman (born February 10, 1923 in Brooklyn, New York) is a retired American football running back and head coach. ... Off-track betting (or OTB) refers to sanctioned gambling on horse racing outside a race track. ... This article is about the current National Football League team. ... Gata Kamsky (Tatar:Ğataulla Kamski) (born June 2, 1974) is an American chess grandmaster. ... The title International Grandmaster is awarded to superb chess players by the world chess organization FIDE. It is a lifetime title, in chess literature usually abbreviated as GM or IGM (this is in contrast to WGM for Woman Grandmaster and IM for International Master). ...

Notable faculty

Fahrid Murray Abraham[1] (born October 24, 1939) is an American actor. ... Eric Alterman is a liberal American journalist, author, media critic, blogger, and educator, possibly best known for the political weblog named Altercation, which was hosted by MSNBC.com from 2002 until 2006, and now is hosted by Media Matters for America. ... Edwin G. Burrows is a professor of history at Brooklyn College, and is the Pulitzer Prize winning author of Gotham: A History of New York City to 1898. ... Gotham: A History of New York City to 1898 is a nonfiction book written by Edwin G. Burrows and Mike Wallace. ... Mike Wallace is an American historian. ... Michael Cunningham (born November 6, 1952) is an award-winning American writer, best known for his 1998 novel The Hours, which won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1999. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The Hours is a novel written by Michael Cunningham. ... In the United States, a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) is a terminal graduate degree in an area of visual, plastic, literary or performing arts typically requiring two to three years of study beyond the bachelor level. ... Charles Dodge (b. ... Irwin Allen Ginsberg (IPA: ) (June 3, 1926 – April 5, 1997) was an American poet. ... This biography does not cite any references or sources. ... Carey Harrison (born 1944) is an English novelist and dramatist. ... Agnieszka Holland (born November 28, 1948 in Warsaw, Poland) is a film and TV director and screenplay writer. ... Europa Europa is a 1990 motion picture based on the autobiography by Solomon Perel, Jewish German, who pretended not to be a Jew during the Nazi era. ... John Hospers (born 9 June 1918) was the first presidential candidate of the United States Libertarian Party, running in the 1972 presidential election. ... The Libertarian Party is a United States political party created in 1971. ... Dr. Robert David Johnson (1968-), also known as KC Johnson, is a history professor at Brooklyn College and the City University of New York Graduate Center. ... Abraham (Harold) Maslow (April 1, 1908 – June 8, 1970) was an American psychologist. ... Humanistic psychology is a school of psychology that emerged in the 1950s in reaction to both behaviorism and psychoanalysis. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Maslows hierarchy of needs. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Newsday is a daily tabloid-size newspaper that primarily serves Long Island and the New York City borough of Queens, although it is sold throughout the New York City metropolitan area. ... Itzhak Perlman (born August 31, 1945) is an Israeli-American violinist, conductor, and pedagogue. ... Mark Rothkos painting 1957 # 20 (1957) Mark Rothko born Marcus Rothkowitz (September 25, 1903–February 25, 1970) was a Russian-born American painter and printmaker who is classified as an abstract expressionist, although he rejected not only the label but even being an abstract painter. ... Philip Pearlstein (born May 24, 1924 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, is one of the most important and innovative artists of the contemporary Realist school. ... Adolph Dietmar Friedrich Reinhardt (Ad Reinhardt) (December 24, 1913 – August 30, 1967) was a painter, writer, and pioneer of conceptual and minimal art. ... Elizabeth Murray (born 1940) is an American artist. ... Vito Hannibal Acconci (born January 24, 1940) is a New York-based architect, landscape architect, and installation artist. ... Archie Rand Archie Rand (born 1950) is an artist and academic from Brooklyn, New York, currently Presidential Professor of Art at Brooklyn College. ...

Alumni lost on September 11, 2001

  • Ernest Alikakos, '89
  • Ezra Aviles, M.A., '87
  • Eustace "Rudy" Bacchus, '83
  • Steven H. Berger, '79
  • Andre Cox, '01
  • Peter L. Freund, '84
  • John Giordano, '80
  • Paul Lisson, '80
  • Gregory T. Saucedo, '92
  • Ian Schneider, '78
  • Robert Twomey, '78
  • Paul T. Zois, '78

References

External links

The City University of New York (CUNY; acronym pronounced ), is the public university system of New York City. ... Founded in 1963, Borough of Manhattan Community College, or BMCC is one of six two-year colleges within the City University of New York (CUNY) system and the only one in Manhattan. ... The Bronx Community College of The City University of New York is a community college in the City University of New York system. ... Eugenio María de Hostos Community College of The City University of New York is a community college in the City University of New York system. ... Kingsborough Community College Kingsborough Community College, part of the City University of New York (CUNY) system, is a junior college in Brooklyn, New York. ... LaGuardia Community College is a City University of New York (CUNY) community college located in Long Island City in Queens, New York. ... ``Queensborough Community College is one of the Junior Colleges in the City University of New York (CUNY) located in Queens, New York CIty. ... The Bernard M. Baruch College of The City University of New York, known more commonly as Baruch College is a public university and one of the constituent colleges comprising the City University of New York (CUNY). ... “City College” redirects here. ... New York City College of Technology, called New York City Technical College prior to 2002 and nicknamed City Tech, is the largest four-year technical school in the northeastern United States, and one of three colleges within the City University of New York (CUNY) system to grant, within the same... See also: Hunter College High School Hunter College of The City University of New York (known more commonly as simply Hunter College) is a senior college of the City University of New York (CUNY), located on Manhattans Upper East Side. ... The John Jay College of Criminal Justice is a criminal justice college in New York City which has about 12,000 FTE (full-time equivalent) students, including traditional, pre-career undergraduate students and those pursuing master’s degrees in several disciplines. ... Lehman College is one of the constituent colleges of the City University of New York, USA. Founded in 1931 as the Bronx campus of Hunter College, the school became an independent college within the City University in 1968. ... Medgar Evers College (MEC) is a college campus (offering bachelors and associates degrees) of the City University of New York. ... Queens College is one of the senior colleges of the City University of New York. ... The College of Staten Island (CSI) is a four-year, senior college of The City University of New York and is one of the 11 senior colleges of The City University of New York (CUNY). ... West side of York College Academic Core Building, looking north York College of The City University of New York is one of several senior colleges in the City University of New York (CUNY) system. ... The Graduate School and University Center of The City University of New York (known more commonly as the CUNY Graduate Center or the GC) is the sole doctorate-granting institution of the City University of New York. ... The City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism is a graduate school of the City University of New York (CUNY) in New York City that confers a Master of Arts degree in journalism. ... The City University of New York School of Law is a law school operated by the City University of New York (CUNY). ... Contents // Categories: Stub | City University of New York ...

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Brooklyn College's School of Education has begun to base evaluations of aspiring teachers in part on their commitment to social justice, raising fears that the college is screening students for their political views.
Brooklyn College, established in 1930, is a four-year school within the City University of New York.
Brooklyn College's School of Education, which is the only academic unit at the college with the status of school, is among dozens of education schools across the country that incorporate the notion of "social justice" in their guiding principles.
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Deborah A. Shanley, Dean of the School of Education at Brooklyn College, is in an enviable position.
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