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Encyclopedia > Bronzeville, Chicago
Douglas (Chicago, Illinois)
Community Area 35 - Douglas
Chicago Community Area 35 - Douglasand Community Area 35 - Douglas
Image:US-IL-Chicago-CA35.GIF|300px|Chicago Community Area 38 - Grand Boulevard]]
Location within the city of Chicago
Latitude
Longitude
41°49.8′N, 87°37.2′W
Neighborhoods
ZIP Code parts of 60609, 60616 and 60653
Area 4.33 km² (1.67 mi²)
Population (2000)
Density
26,470 (down 13.64% from 1990)
6,119.8 /km²
Demographics White
Black
Hispanic
Asian
Other
6.59%
85.5%
1.11%
5.25%
1.53%
Median income $27,800
Source: U.S. Census, Record Information Services

Douglas is a neighborhood located on the south side of Chicago, Illinois. The neighborhood is named for Stephen A. Douglas a famous Illinois politician whose estate included a tract of land given to the federal government. The Douglas tract later became the infamous Civil War Union prison camp, Camp Douglas, located in what is now the eastern portion of the Douglas neighborhood. As part of the Chicago 2016 Olympic bid, the Olympic Village is planned to be located on a 37 acre truck parking lot south of McCormick Place that is mostly in the Douglas community area and partly in the Near South Side.[1] The city Chicago, Illinois, is divided into seventy-seven community areas. ... Chicago Community Area 35 - Douglas This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The city Chicago, Illinois, is divided into seventy-seven community areas. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Latitude, usually denoted symbolically by the Greek letter phi, , gives the location of a place on Earth north or south of the equator. ... Longitude, sometimes denoted by the Greek letter λ (lambda),[1][2] describes the location of a place on Earth east or west of a north-south line called the Prime Meridian. ... Neighbourhood is also a term in topology. ... Mr. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In physics, density is defined as mass m per unit volume V. For the common case of a homogeneous substance, it is expressed as: where, in SI units: ρ (rho) is the density of the substance, measured in kg·m-3 m is the mass of the substance, measured in kg... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ... Demographics is a shorthand term for population characteristics. Demographics include race, age, income, mobility (in terms of travel time to work or number of vehicles available), educational attainment, home ownership, employment status, and even location. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... In probability theory and statistics, a median is a number dividing the higher half of a sample, a population, or a probability distribution from the lower half. ... Income, generally defined, is the money that is received as a result of the normal business activities of an individual or a business. ... A neighbourhood or neighborhood (see spelling differences) is a geographically localised community located within a larger city or suburb. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Stephen Arnold Douglas nicknamed the Little Giant (April 23, 1813 – June 3, 1861) was an American politician from the western state of Illinois, and was the Democratic Party nominee for President in 1860. ... Camp Douglas Camp Douglas was a Union prisoner-of-war camp in Chicago, Illinois, USA, during the American Civil War. ... Chicago 2016 Bid Logo The Chicago 2016 Olympic bid is a reference to an attempt by the City of Chicago and other cities, townships and villages in Illinois, Indiana and Wisconsin to be chosen by the United States Olympic Committee as the official United States bid for the International Olympic... An Olympic Park is a venue or group of venues set up when a country hosts the Olympic Games. ... McCormick Place is an enormous exposition complex located in Chicago, Illinois. ... The city Chicago, Illinois, is divided into seventy-seven community areas. ... The Near South Side is an officially designated community area (neighborhood) in Chicago, Illinois, USA located just south of the downtown central business district, the Loop, which is itself a community area. ...


The community area contains part of the famous neighborhood of Bronzeville, a very famous center of African-American culture in the city. Languages Predominantly American English Religions Christianity (predominantly Baptist), Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ...

Contents

Neighborhoods

Bronzeville

Bronzeville is a neighborhood located in the Douglas and Grand Boulevard community areas on the South Side of Chicago around the Illinois Institute of Technology and Illinois College of Optometry. It is accessible via the Green, Red Lines of the Chicago Transit Authority or the Metra Electric District Main Line. Grand Boulevard, located on the southwest side of Chicago, Illinois, is one of the official Chicago Community Areas. ... State Street Village, S.R. Crown Hall, Armour Main Building Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) is a private Ph. ... The Illinois College of Optometry is a 4 year private optometry school located in Chicago, Illinois. ... The Green Line, formerly the Lake-Englewood/Jackson Park line, of the Chicago Transit Authority runs entirely above ground. ... The Red Line (Howard-Dan Ryan Service) is a heavy rail line in Chicago, run by the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) as part of the Chicago L system. ... Chicago Transit Authority, also known as CTA, is the operator of mass transit within the City of Chicago, Illinois. ... The Metra Electric Line (ME) is an electrified commuter rail line owned and operated by Metra, connecting Randolph Street Station in downtown Chicago, Illinois with its southern suburbs. ...


In the early 20th century, Bronzeville was known as the "Black Metropolis," one of the nation's most significant landmarks of African-American urban history. Between 1910 and 1920, during the peak of the "Great Migration," the population of the area increased dramatically when thousands of African-Americans fled the oppression of the south and emigrated to Chicago in search of industrial jobs. Many famous people were associated with the development of the area including: Andrew "Rube" Foster, founder of the Negro National Baseball League; Ida B. Wells, a civil rights activist, journalist and organizer of the NAACP; Bessie Coleman, the first African-American woman pilot; Gwendolyn Brooks, famous author and first African-American recipient of the Pulitzer Prize; and Louis Armstrong, the legendary trumpet player and bandleader who performed at many of the area's night clubs. For other uses, see Metropolis (disambiguation). ... Ida Wells-Barnett Ida B. Wells, (Holly Springs, Mississippi, July 16, 1862 – Chicago, Illinois, March 25, 1931), later known as Ida Wells-Barnett and Ida B. Wells-Barnett, was an African American civil rights advocate and womens rights activist. ... Bessie Coleman (1892-1926) Bessie Queen Bess Coleman (January 26, 1892 – April 30, 1926), was the first African American woman to become an airplane pilot, and the first American woman to hold an international pilot license. ... Gwendolyn Brooks (June 7, 1917 – December 3, 2000) was an award-winning African American woman poet. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Louis Daniel Armstrong (4 August 1901[1] – July 6, 1971) (also known by the nicknames Satchmo, for satchel-mouth, and Pops) was an American jazz musician. ...


47th Street was and remains the hub of the Brozeville neighborhood & in recent years has started to regain some of the former glory of years gone by. Gone though for good is the Regal Theater (demolished in 1973) where many great performers took the stage.


During the 1950s and 1960s, a decision was made to replace the "slums" with several straight miles of high-rise public housing projects, managed by the Chicago Housing Authority, essentially isolating and simultaneously concentrating the poor black population in this section of the city. The largest complex was Robert Taylor Homes. The result was high crime and prolonged disinvestment in the community. Recently, these complexes have begun to be demolished by federal mandate; however, they are being replaced by less than half the number of previously-available public housing units. Crime has gone down, however, which allows the southernmost fringes of the rapid gentrification occurring in the South Loop to be moving into the neighborhood. The Chicago Housing Authority is an organization focusing on public housing in the city of Chicago. ... Robert Taylor Homes is the name of a housing project in the Bronzeville neighborhood of the South Side of Chicago, alongside the Dan Ryan Expressway. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ...


Origins of the name

The name itself was first used in 1930, by James J. Gentry, a local theatre editor for the Chicago Bee publication. It refers to the color of the African-American's skin, overly predominant in that area, at that time. It is also more accurate, because the skin tone of African-Americans is more brown that black. It has became common usage thorughout the decades. http://www.iit.edu/~bronzeville-stories/history.html


Education

The following Chicago Public Schools campuses serve Bronzeville: Beethoven School and Phillips Academy High School. Chicago Public Schools, commonly abbreviated as CPS by local residents and politicians, is a school district that controls over 600 public elementary and high schools in Chicago, Illinois. ...


Bronzeville is a home to renowned Illinois Institute of technology which houses renowned programs in Design, Planning, Architecture, Finance.


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Douglas, Chicago - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (546 words)
Bronzeville is a neighborhood located in the Douglas and Grand Boulevard community areas on the South Side of Chicago around the Illinois Institute of Technology and Illinois College of Optometry.
In the early 20th century, Bronzeville was known as the "Black Metropolis," one of the nation's most significant landmarks of African-American urban history.
During the 1950s and 1960s, a decision was made to replace the "slums" with several straight miles of high-rise public housing projects, managed by the Chicago Housing Authority, essentially isolating and simultaneously concentrating the poor fl population in this section of the city.
NEWCITYCHICAGO.COM: Street Smart Chicago (2504 words)
Bounded by 26th Street to the north, Martin Luther King Drive to the west, Pershing Road to the south and the lake to the east, the area was a crucible of entrepreneurs, artists, musicians and professionals.
The Chicago Tribune and Sun-Times began to reach out to this forgotten population, hiring fl reporters and focusing on the concerns of South Side residents, which had been exclusively in the Defender's domain.
A recent Chicago Tribune article quoted the Defender's current daily circulation at 17,000, paltry in comparison to the 160,000 at its zenith during the thirties.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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