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Encyclopedia > Bronx High School of Science
The Bronx High School of Science
Motto "Every great advance in science has issued from a new audacity of imagination" --John Dewey
Established 1938
Type Public, Selective Magnet
Principal Valerie J. Reidy
Faculty 139[1]
Students 2,676[2]
Grades 9 - 12
Location 75 West 205th Street,
Bronx, NY 10468, USA
Colors Green and Gold
Mascot Wolverine
Yearbook The Observatory
Newspaper Science Survey
Phone (718) 817-7700
Admission Competitive Examination
Tuition None
Website www.bxscience.edu

The Bronx High School of Science (commonly called Bronx Science, Bronx Sci, or just Science, and officially known as H.S. 445) is a specialized New York City public high school. Founded in 1938, it is currently located in the Bedford Park section of the Bronx. Admission is by an exam open to all grade-eligible students in New York City, reportedly taken by more than 20,000 students annually. [3]. Although known for its focus on mathematics and science, Bronx Science also concentrates intensively on the humanities and social sciences. As a result, it has continually attracted gifted students with a wide variety of interests. For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Educational institutions are often categorised along several dimensions. ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... For other uses, see Yearbook (disambiguation). ... The Specialized High Schools Admissions Test (SHSAT) is an examination administered to eighth and ninth grade students residing in New York City and used to determine admission to all but one of the citys Specialized High Schools. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... The Specialized High Schools of New York City are selective public high schools, established and run by the New York City Department of Education to serve the needs of academically and artistically gifted students. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... A public high school is a secondary school that is financed by tax revenues and other government-collected revenues, and administered exclusively by, and at the discretion of, state and local officials. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bedford Park is a residential neighborhood in the borough of the Bronx in New York City. ... For other uses, see Bronx (disambiguation). ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... For other uses, see Humanities (disambiguation). ... The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study human aspects of the world. ...

Bronx High School of Science
Bronx High School of Science

Bronx Science has developed a worldwide reputation[4][5] as one of the best[6] high schools in the United States, public or private. It attracts an intellectually gifted blend of culturally, ethnically,[7][8] and economically diverse students from New York City.[9] Its students are required to study five major subjects each semester, as compared to four major subjects required in nearly all of the other public high schools. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


Bronx Science is a member of the National Consortium for Specialized Secondary Schools of Mathematics, Science and Technology (NCSSSMST).[10] Together with Stuyvesant High School and Brooklyn Technical High School, it is one of three original "specialized" science high schools operated by the New York City Department of Education. National Consortium for Specialized Secondary Schools of Mathematics, Science and Technology (NCSSSMST) is an alliance of specialized high schools in the United States whose focus is advanced preparatory studies in mathematics, science and technology. ... Stuyvesant High School, commonly referred to as Stuy, is a New York City public high school that specializes in mathematics and science. ... Brooklyn Technical High School, commonly called Brooklyn Tech or just Tech, and also administratively sometimes as High School 430, is a New York City public high school that specializes in engineering, math and science and is the largest specialized high school for science, technology, engineering and mathematics in the United... The Official Seal of the City of New York The New York City Department of Education is the branch of municipal government in New York City that manages the citys public school system. ...


Most Bronx Science graduates go on to four-year colleges; many attend Ivy League and other highly selective schools.[11] Bronx Science has counted 131 finalists in the prestigious Intel (formerly Westinghouse) Science Talent Search, the largest number of any high school.[12] Seven Nobel Prize-winning scientists -- the highest number of all secondary education institutions -- and five Pulitzer Prize-winning authors are among the many notable Bronx Science graduates.[13][14] For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... Intel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC, SEHK: 4335), founded in 1968 as Integrated Electronics Corporation, is an American multinational corporation that is best known for designing and manufacturing microprocessors and specialized integrated circuits. ... The Intel Science Talent Search (ISTS) is a prestigious research-based science competition in the United States primarily for high school students. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ), as designated in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, is awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The Bronx High School of Science (commonly called Bronx Science, Bronx Sci, or just Science, and officially known as H.S. 445) is a specialized New York City public high school. ...

Contents

History

The founding

Original Bronx Science Building (1938-1958)
Original Bronx Science Building (1938-1958)

The Bronx High School of Science was founded in 1938 as a specialized science and math high school for boys, by resolution of the Board of Education of the City of New York, with Dr. Morris Meister as the first principal and guiding light of the school. They were given use of an antiquated Gothic-gargoyled edifice located at Creston Avenue and 184th Street. The building, built in 1918 for Evander Childs High School, had been successively occupied by Walton High School (1930) and by an annex of DeWitt Clinton High School (1935). The initial faculty were comprised in part by a contingent from Stuyvesant High School.[15] Dr. Meister put his imprint on the school from its formation, for example selecting as school colors "green to represent chlorophyll and gold the sun, both of which are essential to the chain of life."[16] The Bronx High School of Science. ... The Bronx High School of Science. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York City Department of Education is the branch of municipal government in New York City that manages the citys public school system. ... Dr. Morris Meister was the founder and first principal of the Bronx High School of Science as well as the first president of Bronx Community College. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Walton High School is a large comprehensive secondary school located in the Bronx borough of New York, comprising 1191 students. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... DeWitt Clinton High School is an American high school located in New York City. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Stuyvesant High School, commonly referred to as Stuy, is a New York City public high school that specializes in mathematics and science. ...


Expansion to co-education

Bronx Science started with about 150 ninth year students and 250 tenth year students, the remaining facilities of the building being used by DeWitt Clinton. As Science became larger, the Clinton contingent was gradually returned to its own main building. During their joint occupation, which lasted for 2 years, until 1940, the two schools had separate teaching staff and classes, but the same supervision and administration. Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1946, as a result of the efforts of Dr. Meister, the faculty, and the Parents Association, the school became co-ed, preceding its rival schools Stuyvesant (1969) by 23 years, and Brooklyn Tech (1972) by 26 years. This opened the doors to gifted and talented girls of New York, giving them equal opportunity to pursue a quality education in a specialized high school, previously denied to them. Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In February 1958, Dr. Morris Meister, after 20 years as the principal of the school, resigned to become the first president of the newly organized Bronx Community College. Dr. Alexander Taffel succeeded Dr. Meister as principal. Jan. ... The Bronx Community College of The City University of New York is a community college in the City University of New York system. ...


The move to modern facilities

From the very beginning, a campaign for a new building was conducted by the Parents Association, and sparked by the tireless dedication of Dr. Meister. Working with the Board of Education and the City of New York took twenty years to see the dream become a reality, but under Dr. Taffel's guidance, plans were finally completed for a new building specifically designed and equipped for the Bronx High School of Science. The new building would be on 205th Street near Bedford Park Boulevard, in a predominantly institutional area, commonly referred to as the "Educational Mile" between DeWitt Clinton High School and its large football field on one side, and Harris Field and Hunter College (now Lehman College) on the other. On March 3, 1959, students and faculty occupied the new building for the first time, solving the problem of how to move the books from the old library to the new in typical Bronx Science manner: on Friday afternoon each student took home five library books from the old building, and on Monday returned them to the new one. See also: Hunter College High School Hunter College of The City University of New York (known more commonly as simply Hunter College) is a senior college of the City University of New York (CUNY), located on Manhattans Upper East Side. ... Lehman College is one of the constituent colleges of the City University of New York, USA. Founded in 1931 as the Bronx campus of Hunter College, the school became an independent college within the City University in 1968. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


They entered a school equipped with the most modern facilities and state-of-the-art laboratories, classrooms, and technical studio areas, all designed to the specific needs of the specialized Bronx Science curriculum. Gracing the main lobby entrance was a large, 63-foot, Venetian glass mosaic mural depicting major figures from the history of science such as Marie Curie and Charles Darwin under the protective hands of a God-like figure representing knowledge, with this quote from John Dewey: "Every great advance in science has issued from a new audacity of imagination". The mural is an original work of art by Frank J. Reilly entitled Humanities Protecting Biology, Physics, Chemistry, reflecting the breadth of the school's mission: to excel not only in the sciences and mathematics for which it was founded, but also in the humanities. Legions of students over the years, bemoaning the lack of swimming facilities, have sarcastically referred to the mural as "the Science swimming pool", perpetuating the idea - perhaps apochryphal - that a choice was made to fund a mural rather than a pool in the new building; but the mural continues to epitomize the special nature of the Bronx High School of Science.[17] This article is about the chemist and physicist. ... For other people of the same surname, and places and things named after Charles Darwin, see Darwin. ... John Dewey (October 20, 1859 – June 1, 1952) was an American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer, whose thoughts and ideas have been greatly influential in the United States and around the world. ... Frank J. Reilly (1906-1967) was noted as the number 1 art teacher in America. ...


The move was not without incident. In the first spring of the move, rumors swept the school that various Bronx youth street gangs were coming to the school, and that the Fordham Baldies would shave the hair of Science students. This never happened. Another incident did happen that spring: The first time Science girls appeared on the outdoor physical education field in skimpy shorts/t-shirts (which probably showed less than in the average high school in 2006), some students from the neighboring, all-male DeWitt Clinton High School charged the separation fence between their field and the Science field. The fence held, but the female students exercised indoors for the remainder of that year. // Many cities and times have seen active gangs and gang members congregating and controlling territory, however in the 1950s and 60s the youth gangs in the Bronx, New York, emerged with a particular notoriety. ... DeWitt Clinton High School is an American high school located in New York City. ...


When Bronx Science celebrated its silver anniversary in June 1963, President John F. Kennedy hailed it as "a significant and pathfinding example of a special program devoted to the development of the student gifted in science and mathematics." The President had occasion to know the quality of the school's product since he had recently selected one of its graduates, Dr. Harold Brown, of the class of 1943, for the position of Director of Defense Research and Engineering; he'd later serve as Secretary of Defense under President Jimmy Carter. John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Harold Brown (born September 19, 1927), American scientist, was U.S. Secretary of Defense from 1977 to 1981 in the cabinet of President Jimmy Carter. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ...

The Stuart S. Elenko Holocaust Museum and Studies Center
The Stuart S. Elenko Holocaust Museum and Studies Center

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Stuart S. Elenko Holocaust Museum and Studies Center

In 1978, a popular Social Studies faculty member, Stuart Elenko, founded a Holocaust Museum and Studies Center at Bronx Science practically single-handedly. It has been funded by grants, donations, and the New York City Council. The Museum was one of the first of its kind in the United States, and houses an impressive collection of rare documents, photographs, artifacts and other material from the Nazi era; the Studies Center sponsors speakers and puts together and distributes educational materials about the Holocaust. The Museum has had over 60,000 visitors, and has received wide acclaim from leaders in the field. In 2003, the Museum celebrated its 25th Anniversary with a gala. In 2004 an anonymous benefactor - an alumnus of the school - made a very large donation which is allowing the Museum to modernize and be totally revamped; eventually it will move out of the library where it now resides, and turned into a full-sized museum. In 2006, the Museum finally moved out of its original home into a larger space. It has upgraded its facilities to include a plasma television screen and a computer to display presentations about different topics related to the Holocaust. Renovations are still being made to improve the aesthetics of the new location. Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Tours of the museum are given by students in the Holocaust Leadership Class to any guest that requests one, as well as to sophomore World History students. The Museum and the tours have received tremendous reviews and only add to the excellent educational experience.[18]


Recent administration

When Dr. Taffel retired in 1978, the chairman of the Biological Science Department, Dr. Milton Kopelman, became Principal.[19] He remained so for over ten years. Upon Dr. Kopelman's retirement in 1990, long-time faculty member and Biology Assistant Principal Vincent Galasso became Principal. He was followed by Physical Science Department Assistant Principal Stanley Blumenstein, a 1963 graduate of Bronx Science. Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ...


In 2000 William Stark, a popular Assistant Principal of the Social Studies Department, was appointed Acting Principal. He was expected to move up to the Principal's office, when Chancellor Harold O. Levy decided to try to find a Nobel laureate to become Principal; that effort failed, and before being offered the job as Science's Principal, Stark accepted a job as Principal of Manhasset High School. Many faculty and parents were upset that Stark was not appointed in a timely way and thus had left the school; Vincent Galasso agreed to an interim appointment for one term in 2001. Valerie J. Reidy, Assistant Principal of the Biology Department, was appointed Principal in September 2001; the first woman Principal in the school's history. She has been a controversial figure.[20][21] Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ...


Enrollment

The Bronx High School of Science has a student body of about 2,800 students. Admission is based exclusively on an entrance examination, known as the Specialized High Schools Admissions Test (SHSAT),[22] open to all eighth and ninth grade New York City students interested in attending one of the specialized schools. Each year, thousands of students from the five boroughs of New York City take this comprehensive examination covering math (word problems and computation) and verbal (reading comprehension, logical reasoning, unscrambling paragraphs). Out of the 26,000 students taking the entrance examination only about 700 are admitted to Science, based on a system of ranked scores. The Specialized High Schools Admissions Test (SHSAT) is an examination administered to eighth and ninth grade students residing in New York City and used to determine admission to all but one of the citys Specialized High Schools. ...


The student body is diversified, comprising almost every ethnic group in New York City. Currently, about 60% of the school is of Asian descent.[23] The students are evenly split between males and females.[24]


Facilities and resources

A monitor in the front lobby of Bronx Science allows students and faculty to monitor the status of the school's rooftop solar array.
A monitor in the front lobby of Bronx Science allows students and faculty to monitor the status of the school's rooftop solar array.
  • Computerized & renovated science laboratories, including the Syracuse University @ Bronx Science Crime Lab and DNA Research Lab
  • Television studio
  • Computer laboratories
  • Weather Station
  • Rooftop planetarium
  • High speed internet access in every room
  • Televisions equipped with DVD/VHS players in every room
  • State-of-the-art library
The Bronx Science Library is committed to supporting the student body by providing extensive resources ranging from traditional print and microform to electronic subscription e-journals and databases rivaling many higher institutions. Located on the first floor just off the main lobby, the library is composed of three smaller rooms encompassing approximately 65,000 square feet (6,000 m²) with a seating capacity of 100. Holdings include over 30,000 volumes, 135 different magazines, microforms (including the New York Times on microfilm dating back to 1851) and readers, and computers in the computer room. Every available space is productively used, and presents a comfortable and attractive environment for students who use the library for study, relaxation, and computer activities.
Especially notable among its electronic resources is ScienceDirect, a free science journal service by Elsevier to a select few science high schools. It is used by students in their own original research endeavors as a gateway to firsthand experience with published scientific research. The library currently also holds the renowned Holocaust Museum and Studies Center.[25]
  • Distance Learning Lab
  • Animal Room
  • Nationally renowned on-site Holocaust Museum
  • 2 rooftop greenhouses
  • Foreign Language Multimedia Learning Center
  • As of Sept. 2006, a campus-wide wireless internet (WiFi) is now available and fully functional.
  • Rooftop solar arrays
Completed in February of 2006, the installment of solar panels on the roof epitomizes Bronx Science's constant efforts to employ innovative technological solutions to advance and improve instructional facilities for its talented student body. The turn-key 33.6 kW (DC) photovoltaic (PV) arrays consist of 168 Sharp Solar 200 watt DC PV modules laminated to PowerLight's flat-roof PowerGuard mounting system and utilizes a Xantrex PV-30208 30 kW AC 3 phase inverter. Integration with the school's computer network provides a hands-on approach with an economical and ecological power source by allowing students to monitor the solar panels' production of electricity in real time, while reaping savings on energy cost. A screen just off the main lobby displays production data at every moment.[26]

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2816x2112, 2240 KB) A screen showing Bronx Sciences solar array status - installed in the front lobby in November of 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2816x2112, 2240 KB) A screen showing Bronx Sciences solar array status - installed in the front lobby in November of 2006. ... A photovoltaic module is composed of individual PV cells. ... Crouse College, a 19th-century Romanesque building which houses the universitys visual arts and music programs Syracuse University (SU) is a private research university located in Syracuse, New York, United States the geographic center of the state, about 250 miles northwest of New York City. ... Elseviers logo. ... Elseviers logo. ... Wi-Fi (or Wi-fi, WiFi, Wifi, wifi), short for Wireless Fidelity, is a set of standards for wireless local area networks (WLAN) currently based on the IEEE 802. ... A photovoltaic module is composed of individual PV cells. ...

Collaborations

The Bronx High School of Science has extensive collaborations with corporations, institutions and organizations that allow the faculty to provide students with the breadth of knowledge that comes with the world outside the classroom.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) (IPA [ˈnæsə]) is an agency of the United States government, responsible for the nations public space program. ... For the Biblical Mount Sinai, and a discussion of its possible locations, see Biblical Mount Sinai. ... The Wildlife Conservation Society, (WCS), endeavours to save wildlife and wild lands though careful use of science, conservation around the world, education and through a system of urban wildlife parks. ... For other uses, see first. ... Seal of the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons The Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, abbreviated P&S, is a graduate school of Columbia University located on the health sciences campus in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan. ... The State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn, better known as SUNY Downstate Medical Center, is an academic medical center and is the only one of its kind in the Borough of Brooklyn in New York City. ... The original New York Cancer Hospital[1], first built between 1884 and 1886, now converted to luxury condominiums, at 455 Central Park West and 106th St. ...

Colleges & Universities

“City College” redirects here. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... Fordham University is a private, coeducational research university[3] in the United States, with three campuses located in and around New York City. ... See also: Hunter College High School Hunter College of The City University of New York (known more commonly as simply Hunter College) is a senior college of the City University of New York (CUNY), located on Manhattans Upper East Side. ... Lehman College is one of the constituent colleges of the City University of New York, USA. Founded in 1931 as the Bronx campus of Hunter College, the school became an independent college within the City University in 1968. ... The main entrance to Manhattan College Manhattan College is a Roman Catholic liberal arts college in the Lasallian tradition in New York City. ... Polytechnic University (Brooklyn Poly, Poly, or Polytech), located in the Borough of Brooklyn in New York City, is the United States second oldest private technological university, founded in 1854. ... St. ... Crouse College, a 19th-century Romanesque building which houses the universitys visual arts and music programs Syracuse University (SU) is a private research university located in Syracuse, New York, United States the geographic center of the state, about 250 miles northwest of New York City. ... University at Albany, SUNY, is a public university located in the capital of New York state, and is the senior campus of the SUNY system. ...

Major corporations

For other uses, see Cablevision (disambiguation). ... “Cisco” redirects here. ... Consolidated Edison Company of New York (NYSE: ED) (Con Edison, or Con Ed) is a utility company in New York state, USA. Con Edison is a regulated utility that provides electric service in New York City and most of Westchester County, New York. ...

Academics

Students relaxing on Science's campus in warm weather.
Students relaxing on Science's campus in warm weather.

Bronx Science students take a rigorous, well-rounded, college preparatory curriculum that includes four years of lab science, math, English, foreign language, social studies, and fine arts, with required courses and a wide selection of electives, including AP classes. Over 600 classes are offered.[27] Students have an opportunity to do independent research, and many compete in the annual Intel Science Talent Search (formerly known as "Westinghouse"). After the completion of four years at Bronx Science, and the fulfillment of the Bronx Science academic track, students graduate with a Bronx Science degree - more advanced and more prestigious than a typical New York State Regents Degree. Image File history File linksMetadata Bxscicampus. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Bxscicampus. ... The Intel Science Talent Search (ISTS) is a prestigious research-based science competition in the United States primarily for high school students. ...


The core science courses chosen are typically earth sciences, biology, chemistry, and physics; many students choose to take the Advanced Placement versions of these courses, which allow students to place out of introductory college science courses that match Science rigour. In the life sciences, the students have the additional option of taking a special "double honors" biology course, which features extra laboratory exposure. Science electives include microbiology, physiology, forensic science, human genetics, evolution, astronomy, organic chemistry, electronics and others. Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, knowledge), also referred to as the biological sciences, is the study of living organisms utilizing the scientific method. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... Advanced Placement (AP) is the term used to describe high school classes that are taught at a college level. ...


In mathematics, beyond the standard AP courses in AB/BC calculus and statistics, courses in multivariable calculus and computer science (including AP Computer Science) are among the choices. A course in linear algebra and differential equations will be offered for the first time in fall 2007. For other uses, see Calculus (disambiguation). ... This article is about the field of statistics. ...


Students take four years of English, which also allows for electives, including courses in journalism, Shakespeare, creative writing and AP English. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... Shakespeare redirects here. ... Creative writing is a term used to distinguish certain imaginative or different types of writing from technical writing. ...


Social studies and history classes are required, and include US and world history, economics, with electives in psychology, law, finance, and global studies, among others.


Three years of languages are required. Bronx Science offers French, Spanish, Latin, Italian, Russian, Modern Greek, Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. At one time Hebrew and German were also offered. Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Main article: Greek language Modern Greek (Νέα Ελληνικά or Νεοελληνική, lit. ... The word Hebrew most likely means to cross over, referring to the Semitic people crossing over the Euphrates River. ...


Students are required to take Technical Drawing (formerly known as Mechanical Drawing) and a Science Techniques Laboratory course; technology courses include engineering and architectural drawing, telescope making, computerized graphics, robotics technology, and medical illustration. Art and Music Appreciation are also required courses, with a range of studio art electives and music performance electives available.


Health and Physical Education courses are also required, with activities including step aerobics, weight training, basketball, skating, and yoga.


Representative Electives

  • ENGLISH- Ethics in America, Dramatic Tragedy & Comedy, Women in Literature, A Study in Evil, Shakespeare: Behind the Scenes, Poetry & Inner Visions, Basic and Advanced Acting, Play Production, Journalism Workshop, Yearbook Workshop, Introduction to College Health
  • SOCIAL STUDIES- Mock Trials, Introduction to Psychology, Introduction to Constitutional Law, The Principles of Economics and Finance, Film Studio, Holocaust Leadership Class, Social Science Research Projects
  • MATHEMATICS- Calculus, Multivariable Calculus, Pre-Calculus, Senior Math Team, Junior Math Team, Math Projects, Visual Basic, Advanced Computer Programming, Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
  • BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES- Biology Research, Animal Behavior & Human Psychology, Human Genetics & Evolution, Plant Physiology and Horticulture, Nutritional Science, Microbiology, Forensic Biology, Biomedical Ethics
  • PHYSICAL SCIENCES - Physical Science Research, Organic Chemistry, Earth System Science (Atmospheric Sciences, Oceanography, Geology), Modern Frontiers in Chemistry, Astronomy and Astrophysics, Electronics, Physics of Engineering
  • FOREIGN LANGUAGE- Honors Literature Courses in French, Modern Greek and Spanish. Honors Conversation courses in French, Italian & Spanish. College level Russian. Intermediate Korean Language and Culture.
  • TECHNOLOGY- Photography, Internetworking, Architectural Drafting, Computer Technology, Principles of Engineering, Computer Graphics, Cisco Networking, Advanced Internetworking, Theater Technology, Robotics Technology, Television Production Technology
  • FINE ARTS and MUSIC- Studio in Drawing and Design, Studio in Painting, Studio in Sculpture, Orchestra, Chorus, Band
  • HEALTH & PHYSICAL EDUCATION- Basketball, Baseball, Aerobatics, Whiffle Ball, Gymnastics, Yoga, Weight Training, Fitness, Flag Football, Soccer, Ultimate, In-Line Skating, Hockey

Advanced Placement courses

  • ENGLISH- English Literature, English Language and Composition
  • SOCIAL STUDIES- American History, European History, World History, U.S. Government and Politics, Microeconomics, Macroeconomics
  • MATHEMATICS- Calculus AB, Calculus BC, Statistics, Computer Science (JAVA)
  • SCIENCE- Biology, Environmental Science, Psychology, Chemistry, Physics without Calculus, Physics with Calculus
  • LANGUAGE- Spanish Language, Spanish Literature, French Language, French Literature, Italian Language & Culture, Latin (Virgil), Latin Poetry (Catullus/Ovid), Japanese Language
  • ARTS- Art, Art History, Music Theory

Student opportunities

Research

Along with a rigorous academic foundation and an array of extracurricular choices, students are provided with original research opportunities in the biological, physical, and social sciences, and programs that hone students' investigative skills and prepare them for academic competitions. Interested students may apply for research programs in their freshman year and begin a three-year sequence of voluntary work on their projects in their sophomore year. During this time, students collaborate with scientists at local laboratories to develop and complete an independent research project, usually concentrated during two summers. The program culminates in the writing of a scientific paper in the senior year, which is submitted to various competitions, such as the Intel Science Talent Search ("Westinghouse") competition. Since the inception of this prestigious national competition in 1942, often referred to as the "junior Nobel Prize," Bronx Science has accumulated the highest number of finalists, leading the nation with 125.


Publications

Bronx Science students working on the publication of the Science Survey in the newspaper publication room.
Bronx Science students working on the publication of the Science Survey in the newspaper publication room.
  • The Observatory is Bronx Science's prizewinning yearbook.
  • Science Survey is Bronx Science's entirely student-run newspaper. Students manage everything: reporting, layout, design, editing, and final production. The paper runs purely on funds from its advertisers, with no fiscal school support. The paper is distributed 5 times per year, gratis. Survey has been the name of the Bronx Science student newspaper since the founding of the school in 1938.
  • Math Bulletin is the annual publication of the Bronx Science Mathematics Department. Student term papers, original student mathematics research, and interesting topics in mathematics are featured.
  • Reactions is a school publication written by Physical Science students.
  • Dynamo is the literary magazine of the Bronx Science English Department. The entire student body is encouraged to submit original poems and other works which are considered for publication.
  • Bronx Science publishes an annual Biology Journal. It is a joint venture between students and the faculty of the Biology Department to document advances in the field, both within Bronx Science and in the outside world. Each themed issue contains interviews, commentaries, artwork, featured student research papers, and abstracts from every student Biology research project that year (see Research).
  • Exposition is an annual production of the Bronx Science Social Studies Department.[28]

Image File history File links Bronx_science_newspaper_publication. ... Image File history File links Bronx_science_newspaper_publication. ... The Bronx High School of Science (commonly called Bronx Science, Bronx Sci, or just Science, and officially known as H.S. 445) is a specialized New York City public high school. ...

Student life

Traditions and Events

[29]

  • Earth Day Festival- hosted annually by the LEAP club on Earth Day. Features musical performances, guest speakers at an assembly, and educational programs in courtyard.[30]
  • Day of Silence- an annual event hosted by the GSA to educate students about the difficulties faced by the gay, lesbian, and transgender community.
  • Winter & Spring Concerts- features performances from Science's bands and chorus.
The Bronx High School of Science Concert Band playing during the Winter Concert
The Bronx High School of Science Concert Band playing during the Winter Concert
  • Poem In Your Pocket Day
  • Holocaust Remembrance Assembly, held annually on Yom Hashoah
  • Black Organization of Student Strength/West Indian Society cultural assembly-produced by BOSS/WIS
  • Lunar New Year - produced by the Lunar New Year Productions club
  • SING musical production
  • Spring musical
  • UNIDAD - produced by UNIDAD
  • International Food Fair/Multicultural Day

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ... Yom haShoah VeHagvura or Yom HaShoah (יום השואה yom ha-sho’āh, יום הזיכרון לשואה ולגבורה-Yom ha-zikaron la-Shoah vla-Gvura), or The Remembrance day of The Holocaust and the Heroism, takes place on the 27th day of Nisan, in the Hebrew calendar. ...

Extra-curricular activities

Sports

Boys Outdoor Cross Country Track team competing at Van Cortlandt Park
Boys Outdoor Cross Country Track team competing at Van Cortlandt Park
  • Baseball: Boys, J.V. & Varsity
  • Basketball: Boys & Girls, J.V. & Varsity
  • Bowling: Co-ed, Varsity
  • Crew: Co-ed, Varsity
  • Cross Country: Boys & Girls, Varsity
  • Fencing: Coed, Varsity
  • Golf: Boys & Girls, Varsity
  • Gymnastics: Boys & Girls, Varsity
  • Handball: Boys & Girls, Varsity
  • Indoor and Outdoor Track: Boys & Girls, Varsity
  • Soccer: Boys & Girls, Varsity
  • Softball: Girls, J.V. & Varsity
  • Swimming: Boys & Girls,[31] Varsity
  • Tennis: Boys & Girls, Varsity
  • Volleyball: Boys & Girls, J.V. & Varsity
  • Ultimate Frisbee: Coed, Club team
  • Wrestling: Developmental

Image File history File linksMetadata Bxscrosscountry. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Bxscrosscountry. ... Van Cortlandt Park is a large urban park in the Bronx, NY. It has an area of 1,146 acres (4. ...

Academic teams

  • Speech and Debate Team

Founded in 1969 by renowned debate coach Richard B. Sodikow, the Bronx High School of Science Speech and Debate Team has been prominent and successful. With he creation of the annual Lincoln-Douglas Debate in 1979, came the creation of the Bronx Science LD squad which has had national success. David Yalof won the national championship in 1984, and two years later, Hee-Sun Hong received the first-ever Tournament of Champions title in Lincoln-Douglas Debate. In 1988, Jonathan Koppell and Peter Colavito closed out the final round of the Tournament of Champions. This article is about a style of debate. ...


Bronx Science debaters have amassed many major titles: Emory University's Barkley Forum for High Schools, the Harvard National Invitational, the Lexington Winter Classic, Hendrick Hudson, T.A. Edison, University of Southern California, Villiger, the Northeast Regional Championships, the Newark Debates, the Westchester Classic, the Robert J. Kaiser Invitational, the MBA Round Robin, the Bronx Round Robin, the Glenbrooks Round Robin.[32] Emory University is a private university located in the metropolitan area of the city of Atlanta and in western unincorporated DeKalb County, Georgia, United States. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ...

  • Ocean Sciences Bowl Team, for the National Ocean Sciences Bowl competition
  • Moot Court Team competes in the New York City Bar Association's Moot Court Competition
  • Mock Trials Team
  • Robotics Team. The Bronx Science Robotics Team (FIRST Team 1155[33]) competes annually in the FIRST Robotics Competition. The team is an extensive collaboration between students and faculty to design, fund, and construct a winning robot.
  • Winners, 2007 New York City Regional Chairman's Award
  • Winners, 2007 New Jersey Regional Finalists
  • Winners, 2006 New York City Engineering Inspiration Award[34][35]
  • Winners, 2005 New York City Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield, and Byers Entrepreneurship Award[34][35]
  • Winners, 2004 New York City Delphi Driving Tomorrow Award[34][35]

For other uses, see first. ... FIRST Logo FIRST, or For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, is an organization founded by inventor Dean Kamen in 1989 in order to develop ways to excite students about engineering and technology. ...

Clubs

  • A Capella
  • American Cancer Society, Bronx Science Chapter
  • Amnesty International
  • Animal Room Squad
  • ARISTA Honor Society
  • Art & Cartoonists Society
  • Astronomy Club
  • Badminton Club
  • Baseball Club
  • BOSS/WIS (Black Organization for Student Strength/West Indian Society)
  • Cartoonists Society
  • Cheerleading Club
  • Chess Club
  • Children's Charity Club
  • Chinese Students Union
  • CIAO
  • Circle of Racial Understanding
  • College Circle
  • Computer Technology Society
  • Cooking Club
  • Current Events Club
  • Cyber
  • Dance Squad
  • DDR Club
  • Defenders of Wildlife
  • Digital Media Club
  • Drama Club
  • Dynamo
  • Eastern European Club
  • Eastern Religion Club
  • Echobelly (Poetry Workshop)
  • Equestrian Club
  • ESPN3
  • Exposition History magazine
  • FBLA
  • Fencing Club
  • Filipino Club
  • Film Production
  • Foreign Film Club
  • Gay-Straight Alliance
  • German Club
  • Go Club
  • Guyanese Club
  • Gymnastics Club
  • Health and Fitness Forum
  • Hellenic Cultural Society
  • Helping Hands
  • History Club
  • Horticulture
  • Indian Cultural Society
  • Japanese Animation Club
  • Japanese Culture Club
  • Judaic Cultural Society
  • Jewelry Club
  • Junior Electrical Engineers
  • Key Club
  • Korean Club
  • La Tour Eiffel
  • Latin Club
  • Leadership
  • League for Environmental and Animal Protection (LEAP) Club
  • Lunar New Year Productions
  • Media Activism Club
  • Model UN Club
  • Music Club
  • Muslim Student Association
  • Origami and Crafts
  • Perspectives ~ Outreach
  • Philosophy Club
  • Photo Club
  • Physics
  • Pre-Medical Society
  • Radio & Space Comm
  • Random Acts of Kindness
  • RCF
  • Reader's Society
  • Red Cross Club
  • Rival Magazine
  • Role Players
  • Robotics Team
  • Russian Cultural Society
  • S.O.S.J.
  • Science Fiction Fantasy
  • Seekers Club
  • Simulation Corporation
  • SING, student produced musical
  • Soccer Club
  • Speakers Forum
  • Speech and Debate Team
  • Stock Market Club
  • Students Against Violence Everywhere
  • Symposium
  • Table Tennis Club
  • Thai Expo
  • The Other Box
  • Tibetan Cultural Society
  • Ultimate Frisbee
  • UNIDAD
  • Urban Dance Club
  • Volleyball Club
  • Weather Club
  • Web Club
  • Women's Forum
  • Woodstock Nation
  • Young Republican Club
Newly-renovated Bronx Science Auditorium
Newly-renovated Bronx Science Auditorium

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2816x2112, 2546 KB) The Bronx High School of Science Auditorium. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2816x2112, 2546 KB) The Bronx High School of Science Auditorium. ...

Dress code

The school's dress code has evolved over the years. Once boys were required to wear ties and "collar" shirts and not allowed to wear "patch-pocket" pants (jeans) or hats; girls were required to wear skirts or dresses, no matter what the weather. Offenders were sent home if they were not dressed according to the rules. Many girls walking to school in the winter along wind-swept Goulden Avenue between the Jerome Park Reservoir and Clinton's football field, wore slacks under their skirts and removed them when they arrived at school. Boots also had to be removed.


In 1968 the students successfully demanded that the dress code be relaxed; girls then were allowed to wear slacks and boys could wear t-shirts.


Today's students still are not allowed to wear hats (a NYC Department of Education rule), and the dress regulations are less specific, forbidding clothing that is "distracting", "offensive", or "degrading"; anything promoting drug use or offensive language is similarly banned; and "undergarments must not be visible, and tops and bottoms of outer garments must meet or overlap".[36]


Faculty

The Bronx Science faculty comprises educators who possibly represent one of the most highly qualified high-school teaching staffs in the world. Many hold advanced degrees, including the Ph.D., in their field, and many have taught at universities. A rigorous hiring process fosters qualified staff: Unlike most New York City public schools, teachers are not hired according to seniority. Instead, teachers are interviewed and a committee of current teachers from the department meets to decide whether or not an individual upholds the qualities of a potential Bronx Science faculty member. So, although many new teachers are young and un-tenured, they come to the classroom familiar with the up-to-date methods of instruction. Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ...


Strong alumni relations are apparent at Bronx Science. In fact, many teachers are alumni of the school: Michael Contente (ret. June 2007) the former coordinator of the Department of Mathematics, is a 1966 graduate; Jean M. Donahue, Ph.D., the assistant principal of the Department of Biology (1977); Fred Levy, assistant principal of the art, music, and technology departments; David Cohen (math and technology), Sherill Mirsky (math), James Perna (math), Beatrice Robertson (math), and Polly Schoenfeld (English). There are other distinctions in the faculty. For example, one member of the Bronx Science faculty, Lateef O. Giwa, M.D., was a cardiothoracic surgeon for 39 years prior to becoming a science teacher at the school.[37] The Medicinæ Doctor or Doctor of Medicine (M.D. or D.M.) is a doctorate level degree held by medical doctors. ...

James Perna, a Teacher of the Year
James Perna, a Teacher of the Year

Many teachers are approachable and willing to help students. Students can speak to their teachers before and after class, or schedule a conference with their teachers during lunch or a free period. Students can also communicate with their teachers via e-mail, which is provided free of charge to the entire Bronx Science staff, faculty, and student body, through the school's computer network. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 519 KB) Summary http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 519 KB) Summary http://www. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... A computer network is an interconnection of a group of computers. ...


Many teachers also play an active role in the advancement of the school's vision. For example, Fanny K. Ennever, Ph.D., a teacher in the Physical Science Department and adjunct lecturer at Columbia University,[38] was responsible for securing a $27,500 grant in both 2004 and 2005 for developing and modifying the Bronx Science chemistry laboratory curriculum, in order to make sessions less "cookbook" and more inquiry-based.[39] Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ...


Every year, the senior members of ARISTA National Honor Society vote for the Honored Teacher Award, honoring a teacher they believe has gone well above and beyond the call of duty in educating their students. no one teacher can win this distinction more than once, thereby ensuring that all teachers have a chance to be acknowledged. Winners of the award include Patricia Nunez, Gregory Greene, and James Perna. Established in 1921, the National Honor Society (NHS) is recognition program for middle and high school students who show achievement in scholarship, leadership, service, and character. ...


Notable alumni and former students

The Bronx High School of Science counts seven Nobel Prize-winning physicists among its graduates: The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ), as designated in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, is awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace. ...

No other secondary school in the world has as many alumni who have won Nobel Prizes.[40] Leon Neil Cooper (born February 28, 1930) is an American physicist and winner of the 1972 Nobel Prize for Physics, along with John Bardeen and John Robert Schrieffer, for his role in developing the BCS theory (named for their initials) of superconductivity. ... Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hannes Alfvén (1908–1995) accepting the Nobel Prize for his work on magnetohydrodynamics [1]. List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... Sheldon Glashow at Harvard University Professor Sheldon Lee Glashow (born December 5, 1932) is an American physicist. ... For the similarly named institution in Chestnut Hill, see Boston College. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Steven Weinberg (born May 3, 1933) is an American physicist. ... University of Texas redirects here. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Melvin Schwartz (born November 2, 1932) is an American physicist. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Russell Alan Hulse (born November 28, 1950) is an American physicist and winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics, shared with his thesis advisor Joseph Hooton Taylor Jr. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Prof. ... The California Institute of Technology (commonly referred to as Caltech)[1] is a private, coeducational research university located in Pasadena, California, in the United States. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Roy Jay Glauber (born 1 September 1925) is the Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics at Harvard University and Adjunct Professor of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona. ... Harvard redirects here. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


If Bronx Science were a country, it would be tied at 23rd with Spain for number of Nobel laureates (as of 2007). [41] Were Bronx Science a university, it would be tied for 53rd place, matching Duke University and beating Ivy League schools Brown and Dartmouth, as well as academic powerhouses such as Purdue, the University of Virginia, and Swarthmore. [42]


Bronx Science also has five Pulitzer Prize-winning graduates: The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ...

Six alumni have won the National Medal of Science, the nation's highest scientific honor bestowed by the U.S. President and thus far awarded to 425 scientists and engineers. Bronx Science also counts among its graduates twenty-nine current members of the United States National Academy of Sciences (NAS), an honor attained by only about 2,000 American scientists. Twenty-two current members of the United States National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and ten current members of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) are Bronx Science graduates. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... William L. Safire (born December 17, 1929) is an American author, semi-retired columnist, and former journalist and presidential speechwriter. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Joseph Lelyveld (born April 5, 1937) was executive editor of the New York Times from 1994 to 2001. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... William Taubman is an American historian. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... Amherst College is a private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social sciences, biology, chemistry, engineering, mathematics and physics. ... President Harding and the National Academy of Sciences at the White House, Washington, DC, April 1921 The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) is a corporation in the United States whose members serve pro bono as advisers to the nation on science, engineering, and medicine. ... Founded in 1964, the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in the United States provides engineering leadership in service to the nation. ... The Institute of Medicine, a part of the National Academy of Sciences, is an American organization whose purpose is to provide national advice on issues relating to biomedical science, medicine, and health (National Academy of Sciences, n. ...


Other notable graduates and former students include:

The American Sociological Association (ASA), founded in 1905, is a non-profit organization dedicated to advancing the discipline and profession of sociology by serving sociologists in their work and promoting their contributions. ... Bruce Ames, by ItalianScallion Bruce Ames (born December 16, 1928), is a professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of California, Berkeley, and a senior scientist at Childrens Hospital Oakland Research Institute (CHORI). ... The Walt Whitman Award is given by the Academy of American Poets to an American poet who has never before published a book of poetry. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... A ladies Burberry handbag in the companys trademarked check pattern Burberry is a British luxury fashion house, manufacturing clothing and other apparel. ... Saks Fifth Avenue is a chain of upscale American department stores that is owned and operated by Saks Fifth Avenue Enterprises (SFAE), a subsidiary of Saks Incorporated. ... Harold Brown (born September 19, 1927), American scientist, was U.S. Secretary of Defense from 1977 to 1981 in the cabinet of President Jimmy Carter. ... The United States Secretary of Defense (SECDEF) is the head of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), concerned with the armed services and military matters. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Stokely Standiford Churchill Carmichael (June 29, 1941 – November 15, 1998), also known as Kwame Ture, was a Trinidadian-American black activist active in the 1960s American Civil Rights Movement. ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... Majora Carter (born c. ... The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation is a major private grant-making foundation based in Chicago that has awarded more than US$3 billion since its inception in 1978. ... Gregory John Chaitin (born 1947) is an Argentine-American mathematician and computer scientist. ... Salk Institute Salk Institute The Salk Institute for Biological Studies is an independent non-profit educational research organization in La Jolla, California. ... The University of California, San Diego (popularly known as UCSD) is a public, coeducational university located in La Jolla, California. ... Dominic Chianese (born February 24, 1931) in Bronx, New York, is an Italian-American actor and performer. ... Corrado Junior Soprano Corrado Junior Soprano, Jr. ... This article is about the television series. ... Jon Cryer (born on April 16, 1965 in New York, NY), is an American actor, writer and producer. ... Richard Danzig was the 71st Secretary of the United States Navy, serving under President Bill Clinton. ... USN redirects here. ... Bobby Darin (born Walden Robert Bobby Cassotto, 14 May 1936-December 20, 1973) was one of the most popular American big band performers and rock and roll teen idols of the late 1950s. ... Samuel Ray Chip Delany, Jr. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... E.L. Doctorow, photograph by Jill Krementz, from back cover of Doctorows 1975 novel Ragtime Edgar Lawrence Doctorow (born January 6, 1931, New York, New York) is the author of several critically acclaimed novels that blend history and social criticism. ... Look up ragtime in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Jonah Cardeli Falcon (born July 29, 1970) is an American actor and talk show host from New York City, who is known for his large penis. ... Jonathan K. Favreau (born on October 19, 1966) is an American actor and director. ... Jerald G. Fishman serves as Chief Executive Officer and President of Analog Devices since November 1996. ... Gitlin on the cover of Letters to a Young Activist Dr. Todd Gitlin is an American sociologist, political writer, novelist, and cultural commentator. ... SDS logo The Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) was, historically, a student activist movement in the United States that was one of the main iconic representations of the countrys New Left. ... Harrison Jay Goldin (born February 23, 1936 in the Bronx, New York City) is a lawyer and New York politician. ... Jeff Greenfield (born June 10, 1943 in New York, NY) has been a senior analyst at CNN since 1998 and contributor to Judy Woodruffs Inside Politics. ... Gene Michael Grossman (born December 11, 1955 in New York) is currently the Jacob Viner Professor of International Economics at Princeton University. ... Pablo Guzmán on CBS 2 News on WCBS in June of 2006. ... Clyde Haberman (born 1944) is an American journalist who is currently a columnist for The New York Times. ... Michael Hirsh can refer to: Michael Hirsh, one of the Nelvana studios founding fathers, or Michael Hirsh, a political reporter for the news magazine Newsweek. ... Nelvana Limited is a Canadian entertainment company, founded in 1971, that is well-known for its work in childrens animation, among many things. ... The bouncing ball animation (below) consists of these 6 frames. ... Martin Hellman - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Scott Ian Rosenfeld (born December 31, 1963) is the rhythm guitarist for the metal band Anthrax who uses the stage name Scott Ian. ... Martin Jay (born 1944) is the Sidney Hellman Ehrman Professor of History at the University of California, Berkeley. ... Michael Kay (born February 2, 1961) is the main play-by-play voice of the New York Yankees, host of Centerstage on the YES Network and the host of The Michael Kay Show on WEPN. // Kay began reporting as a youth at the Bronx High School of Science and then... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Leonard Kleinrock and the first IMP. source: (http://www. ... Leslie Lamport Dr. Leslie Lamport (born 1941) is an American computer scientist. ... (1934-). Leonard was chief executive until 1999; now serves as chairman of the board. ... Ronald Steven Lauder (born February 26, 1944 in New York City) is an American businessman, civic leader, philanthropist, and art collector. ... Many of the divisions and offices of the United States Department of Justice are headed by an Assistant Attorney General. ... President Clintons Cabinet, circa 1993 Headed by President of the United States Bill Clinton, the Clinton Administation was the executive branch of the federal government of the United States from 1993 to 2001. ... James Kyson Lee (born December 13, 1975) is a Korean American actor best known for his role of Ando Masahashi on the NBC television series Heroes. ... Jeanette Lee (born July 9, 1971, Brooklyn, New York) is an American professional pool player of Korean descent. ... Harold Levy is the former school chancellor for New York City public schools. ... Daniel Libeskind in front of his extension to the Denver Art Museum. ... For the building in Miami, Florida of the same name, see Freedom Tower (Miami). ... The Royal Ontario Museum, commonly known as the ROM (rhyming with Tom), is a major museum for world culture and natural history in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... John Liu is a New York City politician, currently serving on the New York City Council representing District 20. ... Nita M. Lowey (b. ... Anthony W. Marx, President of Amherst College Anthony W. Marx (born 1959) is the current president of Amherst College, in Amherst, Massachusetts. ... Marvin Lee Minsky (born August 9, 1927), sometimes affectionately known as Old Man Minsky, is an American cognitive scientist in the field of artificial intelligence (AI), co-founder of MITs AI laboratory, and author of several texts on AI and philosophy. ... Dr. Robert Arthur Moog (pronounced // to rhyme with vogue, not //) (May 23, 1934 – August 21, 2005) was a pioneer of electronic music, best known as the inventor of the Moog synthesizer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... Newsday is a daily tabloid-size newspaper that primarily serves Long Island and the New York City borough of Queens, although it is sold throughout the New York City metropolitan area. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Martin H. Peretz, also known as Marty Peretz, (born December 6, 1938), is an American publisher and former Harvard University lecturer. ... For other uses, see New Republic. ... There are several people called Kevin Phillips: Kevin Phillips, political commentator and writer Kevin Phillips, England and Southampton football player This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For other persons named Richard Price, see Richard Price (disambiguation). ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Robert Price is an American attorney, investment banker and corporate executive. ... Paul Provenza (born July 31, 1957 in New York City) is an actor, comedian and filmmaker. ... Christopher Kid Reid (left) and Christopher Play Martin(right) in Class Act in 1992. ... Daphne Maxwell Reid (born July 13, 1948 in New York City, New York) is an actress. ... Jun John Sakurai (January 31 1933 –1982) was a Japanese particle physicist, who authored the very popular graduate text Modern Quantum Mechanics and others such as Advanced Quantum Mechanics. ... Ben Shneiderman (born August 21, 1947) is an American computer scientist. ... // Human–computer interaction (HCI), alternatively man–machine interaction (MMI) or computer–human interaction (CHI)This interactive computer allows the user to intergrate a reaction towards oneself and the primary source that is the http server, the port and Ip address show as the user connects to the imb harddrive , is... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... Dava Sobel (born 1947[1]) is a writer of popular expositions of scientific topics. ... Michael I. Sovern (born 1931) is the Chancellor Kent Professor of Law at Columbia Law School. ... Norman Richard Spinrad (born September 15, 1940) is an American science fiction author. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Neil deGrasse Tyson (b. ... Hayden Planetarium is a public planetarium located on Central Park West, New York City, next to the famous American Museum of Natural History. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Eliot Wald was a comedy writer who worked for The Second City improv group in Chicago and for Saturday Night Live before turning to movies. ... This article is about the American television series. ... Camp Nowhere is a 1994 film directed by Jonathan Prince, written by Andrew Kurtzman and Eliot Wald, and starring Jonathan Jackson, Christopher Lloyd, Melody Kay, Andrew Keegan, and Marne Patterson. ... Gary Weiss is an award-winning investigative journalist and author of Born to Steal and Both books are harshly critical humorous examinations of the ethics and morality of Wall Street, often tinged with humor. ... Barry Wellman directs NetLab as a professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto. ... “We want to win NCAA as soon as possible. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Dave Winer (b. ... The Miss Hong Kong 2007 pageant, the 35th Miss Hong Kong pageant was held in the Hong Kong Coliseum on July 21, 2007. ... George D. Yancopoulos born 1958 in Middle Village, New York; Chief scientific officer and president of Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. ... President Harding and the National Academy of Sciences at the White House, Washington, DC, April 1921 The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) is a corporation in the United States whose members serve pro bono as advisers to the nation on science, engineering, and medicine. ...

Alma Mater

Words and music by H. Rensin[43]

Science High our school whose towers reach for truth and light; all for thee our hearts and powers solemnly unite.

Chorus

Hearken now , the chorus heightens as our praises soar; through the years your glory brightens: Science evermore.


In our hearts your name is graven, there to keep immortal. Hope and faith have found a haven, hidden in your portal.

Chorus

Hearken now, the chorus heightens as our praises soar; through the years your glory brightens: Science evermore.

Note: The Class of 1959 began the tradition of adding the irreverent "Oh Baby" as a bridge to the chorus, taking it from the 1958 pop song hit, "At The Hop", by Danny and the Juniors.

References

  1. ^ http://schools.nyc.gov/daa/SchoolReports/05asr/210445.pdf
  2. ^ http://schools.nyc.gov/SchoolPortals/10/X445/AboutUs/Statistics/register.htm
  3. ^ Heather Mac Donald (Spring 1999). How Gotham’s Elite High Schools Escaped the Leveller’s Ax. City Journal. Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  4. ^ Speech by Singapore's Minister for Education: SPEECH BY MR THARMAN SHANMUGARATNAM, MINISTER FOR EDUCATION & SECOND MINISTER FOR FINANCE, AT THE OFFICIAL OPENING OF NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF SINGAPORE HIGH SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE (NUS HIGH SCHOOL). Singapore Ministry of Education (2007-04-23). Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  5. ^ The Manila Science High School in the Philippines was modeled after Bronx Science's curriculum. History of the Philippines' First Science High School. 40th Commencement Exercises Yearbook, Manila Science High School (2003). Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  6. ^ See, for example, this: Brueck Promoted to UNM Distinguished Professor. University of New Mexico (2006-10-26). Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  7. ^ Herman Badillo (2006). One Nation, One Standard: An Ex-Liberal on How Hispanics Can Succeed Just Like Other Immigrant Groups. Sentinel, 28. 
  8. ^ By the Numbers: Public, Private and Religious High Schools. The Blackboard Awards (2006). Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  9. ^ Joseph Berger, "How Do You Get To Bronx Science? The Yellow Bus; A Private Transportation Service Fosters the Queens Connection". New York Times, January 14, 2003. available by subscription; also available here.
  10. ^ NCSSSMST Institutional Members. Retrieved on 2007-08-14.
  11. ^ http://www.city-journal.org/html/9_2_how_gothams_elite. html
  12. ^ Intel awards
  13. ^ Bronx Science alumni Nobel and Pulitzer Prize winners
  14. ^ Other National Awards
  15. ^ (1997-05-20). "(Former) Stuyvesant High School". Landmarks Preservation Commission. Retrieved on 2006-05-28.
  16. ^ [http://www.bxscience.edu/about.jsp?rn=2690 from BxScience.edu
  17. ^ Tyson, Neil deGrasse. Special Feature—City of Stars. Natural History Magazine. Retrieved on 2006-11-10.
  18. ^ http://shalomriverdale.org/content_display.html?ArticleID=114174
  19. ^ http://select.nytimes.com/search/restricted/article?res=FB0615FB3E5E0C768EDDA80894DF494D81
  20. ^ (2001-03-05). "Teacher flight feared at elite high school". Columbia University Journalism School. Retrieved on 2006-10-22.
  21. ^ (2005-05-27). "Showdown At Bronx Science". The New York Sun. Retrieved on 2006-10-31.
  22. ^ http://schools.nyc.gov/OurSchools/HSDirectory/SpecializedHighSchoolsStudentHandbook.htm Specialized High Schools Student Handbook
  23. ^ Joseph Berger, "How Do You Get To Bronx Science? The Yellow Bus; A Private Transportation Service Fosters the Queens Connection". New York Times, January 14, 2003. available by subscription; also available here.
  24. ^ According to Bronx Science FAQs, "The ratio of boys to girls at Science ranges from 51:49 to 49:51, averaging 50:50" [1]
  25. ^ (2005-10-01). "Teaching the Fourth ‘R’ of Science Education: Research". T.H.E. Journal. Retrieved on 2006-11-02.
  26. ^ . "Sunlight as Energy". New York Power Authority. Retrieved on 2006-12-02.
  27. ^ Lists of classes
  28. ^ http://bxscience.ny.schoolwebpages.com/education/staff/staff.php?sectiondetailid=2591&sc_id=1165189992
  29. ^ http://www.bxscience.edu/Events calendar
  30. ^ http://home.earthlink.net/~bxscience/ Earth Day
  31. ^ (PSAL playoff team for past 15 years)
  32. ^ http://bxscience.ny.schoolwebpages.com/education/staff/staff.php?sectionid=330
  33. ^ http://www.bxsciborgs.org
  34. ^ a b c http://bxsciborgs.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=28&Itemid=39
  35. ^ a b c http://www.archive.org/download/BronxScienceRoboticsTeam_10/parentnightpowerpoint.ppt SciBorgs Prospective Parent's Night Presentation
  36. ^ "Student Rules and Responsibilities" (January 2002) http://www.bxscience.edu/student_rules_responsibilities.jsp?rn=1128.
  37. ^ http://www.healthgrades.com/directory_search/physician/profiles/dr-md-reports/Dr-Lateef-Giwa-MD-39197385.cfm
  38. ^ http://www.columbia.edu/cu/mpaenvironment/pages/faculty.html
  39. ^ http://www.dreyfus.org/sg05awards.shtml
  40. ^ Nobel Prize laureates by secondary school affiliation
  41. ^ Nobel laureates by country
  42. ^ Nobel laureates by university affiliation
  43. ^ http://www2.bxscience.edu/alum/bhss/almamater.htm

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External links

  • Bronx High School of Science
  • The Bronx High School of Science Home Page (unofficial)
  • Bronx Science Alumni Association
  • Bronx Science Parent's Association

  Results from FactBites:
 
Bronx High School of Science - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography (3486 words)
Together with Stuyvesant High School and Brooklyn Technical High School, Bronx Science is one of three original specialized science high schools operated by the New York City Department of Education.
The Bronx High School of Science was founded in 1938 as a specialized science and math high school for boys, by resolution of the Board of Education of the City of New York, with Dr.
Bronx Science students take a rigorous, well-rounded, college preparatory curriculum that includes four years of life science (biology) and physical science (chemistry/physics), math, English, foreign language, social studies, and fine arts, with required courses and a wide selection of electives, including AP classes.
Bronx High School of Science - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1344 words)
The Bronx High School of Science, commonly called Bronx Science, is a public high school in the Bedford Park section of the Bronx, New York City.
Founded in 1938 with a traditional focus on mathematics and science, Bronx Science is one of a triumvirate of elite public schools in New York City, and is hailed by its supporters as one of the best high schools in the United States.
The Bronx High School of Science was founded in 1938 by resolution of the Board of Education of the City of New York with Dr. Morris Meister as the first principal of the school.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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