FACTOID # 25: If you're tired of sitting in traffic on your way to work, move to North Dakota.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Brompton Cemetery

Coordinates: 51°29′0″N, 0°11′21″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Brompton Cemetery is a cemetery located near Earl's Court in West Brompton, a part of the Borough of Kensington & Chelsea in west London, England. It is managed by The Royal Parks and is one of the Magnificent Seven. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x721, 637 KB)Photograph taken by Colin Gregory Palmer in 2005 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x721, 637 KB)Photograph taken by Colin Gregory Palmer in 2005 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (666x1023, 389 KB)Photograph taken by Colin Gregory Palmer in 2005 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (666x1023, 389 KB)Photograph taken by Colin Gregory Palmer in 2005 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Earls Court is a place in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, in London, England. ... West Brompton is an area of South-West London, within the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. ... The Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea (often abbreviated to RBKC) is a London borough in the west side of central London. ... The Royal Parks is an organisation within the UK Government that manages the eight Royal Parks and certain other areas of garden and parkland in London. ... The Magnificent Seven are seven cemeteries used by the citizens of nineteenth century London. ...


While the cemetery is still open for occasional new burials, today more people use it as a public park than as a place for mourning the dead.


It has featured in a number of films, including The Wisdom of Crocodiles (starring Jude Law), Crush (Imelda Staunton and Andie MacDowell) and Johnny English (starring Rowan Atkinson); as well as being used as a location by photographers such as Bruce Weber (see "The Chop Suey Club"). The Wisdom of Crocodiles (also released as Immortality) is a 1998 romantic thriller by Po-Chih Leong starring Jude Law. ... David Jude Law (born 29 December 1972) is an BAFTA Award-winning and Academy Award-nominated British actor. ... Crush is a 2001 R-rated film written and directed by John McKay and starring Andie MacDowell, Imelda Staunton, Anna Chancellor, Kenny Doughty and Bill Paterson. ... Imelda Mary Philomena Bernadette Staunton OBE (born on January 9, 1956) is an Academy Award-nominated English actress. ... Andie MacDowell (born April 21, 1958) is an American screen actress. ... Johnny English is a British comic film parodying the James Bond secret agent genre, released in 2003. ... Rowan Sebastian Atkinson (born 6 January 1955) is an English comedian, actor and writer, famous for his title roles in the British television comedies Blackadder and Mr. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

Contents

History

The cemetery was opened as part of an initiative in the mid-19th century to provide seven large, modern cemeteries (sometimes called the 'Magnificent Seven') in a ring around the edge of London of which Highgate Cemetery was another example. The inner city cemeteries, mostly the graveyards attached to individual churches, had long been unable to cope with the number of burials and were seen as a hazard to health and an undignified way to treat the dead. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Magnificent Seven are seven cemeteries used by the citizens of nineteenth century London. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Circle of Lebanon, West Cemetery Entrance to the Egyptian Avenue, West Cemetery Highgate Cemetery is a famous cemetery located in Highgate, London, England. ...


Brompton Cemetery was designed by Benjamin Baud and has at its centre a modest domed chapel (in the style of the basilica of St. Peter's in Rome), reached by long colonnades, and flanked by catacombs. The chapel is dated 1839.

Nutkins gravestone
Nutkins gravestone

Beatrix Potter, who lived in The Boltons nearby, took the names of many of her animal characters from tombstones in the cemetery and it is said that Mr McGregor's walled garden was based on the colonnades. Names on headstones included Mr Nutkins, Mr McGregor, a Tod (with that unusual single 'd' spelling), Jeremiah Fisher, Tommy Brock - and even a Peter Rabbett. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2304x3072, 4006 KB) Kittybrewster 15:57, 29 July 2006 (UTC) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2304x3072, 4006 KB) Kittybrewster 15:57, 29 July 2006 (UTC) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Helen Beatrix Potter (28 July 1866 – 22 December 1943) was an English author and illustrator, botanist, and conservationist, best known for her childrens books, which featured animal characters such as Peter Rabbit. ...

Famous occupants

Famous occupants of the cemetery include:

[Geraldine Jewsbury]] - writer Tomasz Arciszewski (1877-1955) was a Polish politician who served as prime minister of the Polish government-in-exile in London from 1944 to 1947, thus presiding over the period when the government lost the recognition of the Western Powers. ... William Edward Ayrton (14 September 1847 - 8 November 1908) was a British physicist. ... Sir Samuel White Baker (8 June 1821-30 December 1893) was an English explorer. ... Sir Squire Bancroft (May 14, 1841 - April 19, 1926), English actor and manager, was born near London. ... Metropolitan Anthony (Bloom) of Sourozh (19 June 1914 - 4 August 2003), Metropolitan of the Russian Orthodox Church. ... Joseph Bonomi the Younger (9 October 1796 – 3 March 1878) was an English sculptor, artist, egyptologist and museum curator. ... Sculptor redirects here. ... The definition of an artist is wide-ranging and covers a broad spectrum of activities to do with creating art, practicing the arts and/or demonstrating an art. ... The Great Sphinx of Giza against Khafres Pyramid at the Giza pyramid complex. ... For other uses, see Museum (disambiguation). ... Look up curator in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... George Borrow George Henry Borrow (1803-1881) was an English author who wrote novels and travelogues based on his own experiences around Europe. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into John Keats. ... Keats redirects here. ... Sir James Browne (1839 - 13 June 1896) was a Scottish-Indian engineer and administrator, the son of Robert Browne of Falkirk in Scotland. ... Francis Trevelyan Buckland Francis Trevelyan Buckland (December 17, 1826 - December 19, 1880), was an English zoologist, the son of William Buckland. ... Henry James Byron (1834 - 1884) was a dramatist, born at Manchester, entered the Middle Temple, but soon took to writing for the stage, and produced many popular burlesques and extravaganzas. ... Photo submitted by Jo-anne Sunbeam William Martin Cafe was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... Marchesa Luisa Casati (1881-1957) with a greyhound by Giovanni Boldini Luisa Casati Stampa di Soncino, Marchesa di Roma (23 January 1881 - 1 June 1957) was an eccentric Italian heiress, muse, and patroness of the arts in early 20th century Europe. ... William Cargill was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, 1784. ... Otago (help· info) is one of the regions of New Zealand and lies in the south-east of the South Island. ... John Graham Chambers codified the Marquess of Queensberry rules upon which modern-day boxing is based. ... The Amateur Athletic Association of England (formerly simply the Amateur Athletic Association) or AAA (pronounced three As) is the oldest athletics organization in the UK, having been established in 1880. ... Sir Henry Cole (15 July 1808, Bath – 18 April 1882, London) was a civil servant who facilitated many innovations in commerce and education in 19th century Britain. ... The Victoria and Albert Museum (often abbreviated as the V&A) in London is the worlds largest and finest museum of decorative arts and design, housing a permanent collection of over 4. ... Albert Hall redirects here. ... // This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Great Exhibition: Paxtons Crystal Palace enclosed full-grown trees in Hyde Park. ... Some christmas cards A Christmas card is a greeting card that is decorated in a manner that celebrates Christmas. ... Sir William Crookes, OM, FRS (17 June 1832 – 4 April 1919) was an English chemist and physicist. ... Sir Samuel Cunard Sir Samuel Cunard, 1st Baronet (21 November 1787–28 April 1865) was a Canadian-born British shipping magnate. ... The Cunard Line, formerly Cunard White Star Line, is a British cruise line, operator of ocean liners RMS Queen Elizabeth 2 (QE2) and RMS Queen Mary 2 (QM2). ... Admiral Sir Charles Howe Fremantle (June 1, 1800 _ May 25, 1869) was a Captain of the British Royal Navy. ... Swan River Colony was a British settlement established at the Swan River on the west coast of Australia in 1829. ... Nerissa (1906) John William Godward John William Godward (9 August 1861 – 13 December 1922) was an English painter from the end of the Pre-Raphaelite / Neo-Classicist era. ... Sir George Dashwood Taubman Goldie (May 20, 1846–August 20, 1925) was an English administrator who played a role in the founding of Nigeria. ... Brian Glover (April 2, 1934 - July 24, 1997) was a British actor. ...

Chelsea Football Club (also known as the Blues, previously also known as the Pensioners), founded in 1905, is a Premier League football team that plays at Stamford Bridge football ground in west London. ... Leonard Constant Lambert (August 23, 1905 – August 21, 1951) was a British composer and conductor. ... Percy Lambert was the first person to cover a hundred miles in an hour. ... Nat Langham Nat Langham (born May, 1820 - died 1st September 1871) was born in Hinckley, Northamptonshire, he was an English middleweight bare-knuckle prize fighter. ... Henry Augustus Gus Mears (1873-1912) was an English businessman most notable for founding Chelsea Football Club. ... Chelsea Football Club (also known as the Blues, previously also known as the Pensioners), founded in 1905, is a Premier League football team that plays at Stamford Bridge football ground in west London. ... Lionel Monckton (December 18, 1861 - September 15, 1924) was a British writer and composer of musical theatre. ... Cover of the Vocal Score Edwardian Musical Comedies are those British musical theatre shows from the period between the 1890s, when Gilbert and Sullivan began to lose their dominance, to the rise of the American musicals by George Gershwin, Cole Porter and Jerome Kern following the First World War. ... Henrietta Moraes (d. ... For other persons named Francis Bacon, see Francis Bacon (disambiguation). ... Sir Roderick Murchison Sir Roderick Impey Murchison (February 19, 1792 – October 22, 1871), was an influential Scottish geologist who first described and investigated the Silurian era. ... For other uses, see Silurian (disambiguation). ... Adelaide Neilson (1846 - August 15, 1880), English actress, whose real name was Elizabeth Ann Brown, was born in Leeds. ... Statue of Emmeline Pankhurst in Victoria Tower Gardens next to the Houses of Parliament, Westminster. ... Suffragette with banner, Washington DC, 1918 The title of suffragette (also occasionally spelled suffraget) was given to members of the womens suffrage movement, originally in the United Kingdom. ... Percy Sinclair Pilcher (1866-1899) was an English inventor and pioneer aviator who, in one of the big what if events of history, could well have become the first person to achieve controlled, powered, heavier-than-air flight well before the Wright brothers had he not been tragically killed in... Blanche Roosevelt (b. ... Timothy Alan Patrick Rose (September 23, 1940 – September 24, 2002) was an American singer-songwriter. ... Categories: People stubs | 1821 births | 1907 deaths ... Samuel Smiles (December 23, 1812 – April 16, 1904), was a Scottish author and reformer. ... Dr. John Snow John Snow (16 March 1813 – 16 June 1858) was a British physician and a leader in the adoption of anaesthesia and medical hygiene. ... Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan (May 13, 1842 – November 22, 1900) was an English composer best known for his operatic collaborations with librettist W. S. Gilbert. ... W. S. Gilbert Arthur Sullivan Gilbert and Sullivan refers to the Victorian era partnership of librettist W. S. Gilbert (1836–1911) and composer Arthur Sullivan (1842–1900). ... Queen Victoria redirects here. ... This article is about the cathedral church of the diocese of London. ... Richard Tauber (16 May 1891 – 8 January 1948) was an Austrian tenor acclaimed as one of the greatest singers of the 20th century. ... Ernest Thesiger, (January 15, 1879 - January 14, 1961), sometimes credited as Ernst Thesiger, was a British stage and film actor. ... The Old Dark House is a 1932 horror film directed by James Whale and starring Boris Karloff, produced just one year after their success with Frankenstein. ... Bride of Frankenstein is a horror/science fiction film released on April 22, 1935, a sequel to the 1931 film Frankenstein. ... Frederic Thesiger, 1st Baron Chelmsford (25 April 1794 - 5 October 1878), was an English jurist and politician. ... Brandon Thomas (December 24, 1850 - June 19, 1914), British actor and playwright who wrote the play Charleys Aunt (1892). ... W. S. Penley as the first Charleys Aunt, Donna Lucia d’Alvadorez in 1892 Charleys Aunt is a farce in three acts written by Brandon Thomas that broke all historic records for plays of any kind, with an original London run of 1,466 performances. ... Frederic Augustus Thesiger, 2nd Baron Chelmsford (May 31, 1827–April 9, 1905) was a British general. ... // Charles Blacker Vignoles (1793-1875) was an influential early railway engineer, and eponym of the Vignoles rail. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... Comparison of flat-bottomed with bullhead rail Vignoles rail is the name popularly used for the flat-bottomed rail used internationally for railway track, after Charles Vignoles the engineer who introduced it to Britain. ... Richard Wadeson was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... For other uses, see Victoria Cross (disambiguation). ... British artist born 1889, died 1949. ... Thomas Attwood Walmisley (1814 – 1856) was an English composer and organist. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Organ in Katharinenkirche, Frankfurt am Main, Germany The organ is a keyboard instrument played using one or more manuals and a pedalboard. ... Colonel Sir Robert Warburton (1842 - 22 April 1899), was an Anglo-Indian soldier and administrator. ... Reginald Alexander John Warneford was a recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... For other uses, see Victoria Cross (disambiguation). ... Sir Philip Watts is the former chairman of Royal Dutch Shell. ... Andrew Scott Waugh (1810 – 1878) was a British army officer and surveyor now remembered as the man who named the highest mountain in the world after Sir George Everest, his predecessor in the post of Surveyor-General of India. ... Photograph of Everest Colonel Sir George Everest (4 July 1790 – 1 December 1866) was a Welsh surveyor, geographer and Surveyor-General of India from 1830 to 1843. ... Benjamin Nottingham Webster (September 3, 1797 - July 3, 1882), English actor, manager and dramatic writer, was born in Bath, the son of a dancing master. ... Sir Thomas Spencer Wells, 1st Baronet (3 February 1818 – 31 January 1897) was surgeon to Queen Victoria, a medical professor and president of the Royal College of Surgeons. ... Victoria Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819–22 January 1901) was a Queen of the United Kingdom, reigning from 20 June 1837 until her death. ... The Royal College of Surgeons of England is an independent professional body committed to promoting and advancing the highest standards of surgical care for patients. ... William Fenwick Williams Sir William Fenwick Williams, 1st Baronet GCB (December 4, 1800 – July 26, 1883) was a British military leader of the Victorian era. ... John Wisden (5 September 1826 – 5 April 1884) was an English cricketer who played 190 first-class cricket matches for three English county cricket teams, Kent, Middlesex and Sussex. ... Wisden is the main publisher of information on cricket in the United Kingdom. ... Thomas Wright (April 21, 1810 - December 23, 1877) was an English antiquarian and writer. ... An antiquarian or antiquary is one concerned with antiquities or things of the past. ... Zukertort, early 1880s Johannes Hermann Zukertort (7 September 1842 Lublin – 20 June 1888 London) was a leading Polish-Jewish chess master. ...

References

  • Culbertson, Judi & Tom Randall, Permanent Londoners: An Illustrated Guide to the Cemeteries of London. Post Mills, VT: Chelsea Green Publishing Company, 1991.

See also

This is a list of famous cemeteries, mausoleums and other places people are buried, world-wide. ... The Royal Parks of London are lands originally owned by the monarchy of England or the United Kingdom for the recreation of the royal family. ...

External links

  • Brompton Cemetery (Royal Parks website)
  • Recent photos and information on Brompton Cemetery
The Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, an Inner London borough, has responsibility for some of the parks and open spaces within its boundaries. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Brompton - LoveToKnow 1911 (101 words)
BROMPTON, a western district of London, England, in the south-east of the metropolitan borough of Kensington.
Brompton Road, leading south-west from Knightsbridge, is continued as Old Brompton Road and Richmond Road, to join Lillie Road, at which point are the District and West London railway stations of West Brompton.
The Oratory of St Philip Neri, commonly called Brompton Oratory, close by the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Brompton consumption hospital and the West London or Brompton cemetery are included in this district, which is mainly occupied by residences of the better class.
Brompton Cemetery - Definition, explanation (300 words)
Brompton Cemetery is a famous cemetery located in Kensington, west London, England.
The cemetery was opened as part of an initiative in the mid-19th century to provide seven large, modern cemeteries (sometimes called the 'Magnificent Seven') in a ring round the outside of London of which Highgate Cemetery was another example.
The inner-city cemeteries, mostly the graveyards attached to individual churches, had long been unable to cope with the number of burials and were seen as a hazard to health and an undignified way to treat the dead.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m