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Encyclopedia > Bromophenol blue
Bromophenol Blue
Bromophenol Blue
Bromophenol blue (pH indicator)
below pH 3.0 above pH 4.6
3.0 4.6

Bromophenol blue, Tetrabromophenolsulfonephthalein, is an acid-base indicator whose useful range as an indicator lies between pH 3.0 and 4.6. It changes from yellow at pH 3.0 to purple at pH 4.6; this reaction is reversible. This image is ineligible for copyright and therefore in the public domain, because it consists entirely of information that is common property and contains no original authorship. ... Acids and bases: Acid-base extraction Acid-base reaction Acid dissociation constant Acidity function Buffer solutions pH Proton affinity Self-ionization of water Acids: Lewis acids Mineral acids Organic acids Strong acids Superacids Weak acids Bases: Lewis bases Organic bases Strong bases Superbases Non-nucleophilic bases Weak bases edit A... Acids and bases: Acid-base extraction Acid-base reaction Acid dissociation constant Acidity function Buffer solutions pH Proton affinity Self-ionization of water Acids: Lewis acids Mineral acids Organic acids Strong acids Superacids Weak acids Bases: Lewis bases Organic bases Strong bases Superbases Non-nucleophilic bases Weak bases edit A... For other uses, see PH (disambiguation). ...


Bromophenol blue is also used as a color marker to monitor the process of agarose gel electrophoresis and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Since bromophenol blue carries a slight negative charge at moderate pH, it will migrate in the same direction as DNA or protein in a gel; the rate at which it migrates varies according to gel density and buffer composition, but in a typical 1% agarose gel in TAE buffer or TBE buffer, bromophenol blue migrates at the same rate as a DNA fragment of approximately 500 base pairs. Xylene cyanol and Orange G may also be used for this purpose. Digital image of 3 plasmid restriction digests run on a 1% w/v agarose gel, 3 Volts/cm, stained with ethidium bromide. ... Picture of an SDS-PAGE. The molecular marker is in the left lane SDS-PAGE, officially sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, is a technique used in biochemistry, genetics and molecular biology to separate proteins according to their electrophoretic mobility (a function of length of polypeptide chain or molecular weight... The structure of part of a DNA double helix Deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, is a nucleic acid molecule that contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms. ... A representation of the 3D structure of myoglobin, showing coloured alpha helices. ... Acids and bases: Acid-base reaction theories pH Self-ionization of water Buffer solutions Systematic naming Electrochemistry Acid-base extraction Acids: Strong acids Weak acids Superacids Lewis acids Mineral acids Organic acids Bases: Strong bases Weak bases Superbases Lewis bases Organic bases edit Buffer solutions are solutions which resist change... An agarose is a polysaccharide polymer material, generally extracted from seaweed. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... TBE buffer is widely used for the electrophoresis of nucleic acids and has a higher buffer capacity than TAE. It can be used for DNA and RNA polyacrylamide and agarose gel electrophoresis. ... Base pairs, of a DNA molecule. ... Xylene cyanol can be used as a color marker to monitor the process of agarose gel electrophoresis and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis; in agarose gels, it typically migrates at about the same rate as a 4000 base pair DNA fragment. ... Orange G Orange G, Acid Orange 10, or C.I. 16230, is a synthetic azo dye used in histology in many staining formulations. ...


The molecular weight of bromophenol blue is around 670 Daltons or grams per mole. The unified atomic mass unit (u), or dalton (Da), is a small unit of mass used to express atomic masses and molecular masses. ...


The bromophenol blue is also used as a dye. At neutral pH, the dye absorbs red light most strongly and transmits blue light. Solutions of the dye therefore are blue. At low pH, the dye absorbs ultraviolet and blue light most strongly and appears yellow in solution. In solution at pH 3.6 (in the middle of the transition range of this pH indicator) obtained by dissolution in water without any pH adjustment, bromophenol blue has a characteristic green red color. This phenomenon is called dicromatic colour[1].. A dichromat is an organism for which the perceptual effect of any arbitrarily chosen light from its visible spectrum can be matched by a mixture of no more than two different pure spectral lights. ...


Bromophenol blue is commonly used in entry-level lab courses to stain proteins in wet-mount slides.


References

  1. ^ Kreft S and Kreft M (2007) Physicochemical and physiological basis of dichromatic colour, Naturwissenschaften (in press) On-line PDF

  Results from FactBites:
 
Star Republic: Guide for Biologists (230 words)
0.1% bromophenol blue, 0.1% xylene cyanol FF, 60% glycerol, 60 mM EDTA
0.03% bromophenol blue, 0.03% xylene cyanol FF, 1 mM EDTA, in deionized formamide.
0.025% bromophenol blue, 0.025% xylene cyanol FF, 95% formamide, 0.025% SDS, 0.025% ethidium bromide, 0.5 mM EDTA
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