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Encyclopedia > Britpop
Britpop
Stylistic origins
Cultural origins
early 1990s, United Kingdom
Typical instruments
Mainstream popularity Popular from the mid-to late 1990s.
Subgenres
New wave of new wave, Lion Pop
Regional scenes
England - Scotland - Wales - Northern Ireland
Other topics
Bands - Cool Britannia - Timeline of alternative rock

Britpop is a subgenre of alternative rock that originated in the United Kingdom. Britpop emerged from the British independent music scene of the early 1990s and was characterised by bands influenced by British guitar pop music of the 1960s and 1970s. The movement developed as a reaction against various musical and cultural trends in the late 1980s and early 1990s, particularly the grunge phenomenon from the United States. In the wake of the musical invasion into the United Kingdom of American grunge bands such as Nirvana, many bands positioned themselves as opposing musical forces, referencing British guitar music of the past and writing about uniquely British topics and concerns. Oasis, Blur and Pulp are often considered the scene's most prominent acts.[1] Alternative music redirects here. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... An NME Originals issue covering the Madchester movement. ... For other uses, see British Invasion (disambiguation). ... Harry Belafonte singing, photograph by C. van Vechten Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, which is often contrasted with speech. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... A sunburst-colored Fender Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass[1][2]; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played primarily with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... For other kinds of drums, see drum (disambiguation). ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... A genre is any of the traditional divisions of art forms from a single field of activity into various kinds according to criteria particular to that form. ... The New Wave of New Wave (NWONW) was a term coined by music journalists to describe a sub-genre of the British alternative rock scene in the early 90s. ... Lion Pop was a pre-Britpop term first coined by the lead singer (Carl) from the band Cud to discribe his music. ... The Music of England has a long history. ... The Tannahill Weavers Scotland is internationally known for its traditional music, which has remained vibrant throughout the 20th century, when many traditional forms worldwide lost popularity to pop music. ... Wales is a part of the United Kingdom, but is a culturally and politically separate Celtic country. ... Ireland is an island in the North Atlantic politically divided between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. ... Britpop was a genre of alternative rock music from mid-1990s Britain. ... Cool Britannia is a media term that was used in the late 1990s to describe the contemporary culture of the United Kingdom. ... This is a timeline of alternative rock, from its beginnings in the 1970s to the present. ... Alternative music redirects here. ... In popular music, independent music, often abbreviated as indie, is a term used to describe genres, scenes, subcultures, styles and other cultural attributes in music, characterized by their independence from major commercial record labels and their autonomous, do-it-yourself approach to recording and publishing. ... Grunge redirects here. ... Grunge redirects here. ... This article is about the American grunge band. ... Oasis are an English rock band that formed in Manchester in 1991. ... Blur were an English rock band that formed in Colchester in 1989. ... Pulp were a rock band, formed in Sheffield, England in 1978, by then 15-year-old school boy Jarvis Cocker (vocals, guitar). ...


Britpop groups brought British alternative rock into the mainstream and formed the backbone of a larger British cultural movement called "Cool Britannia". Although its more popular bands were able to spread their commercial success overseas, especially to America, the movement largely fell apart by the end of the decade. Cool Britannia is a media term that was used in the late 1990s to describe the contemporary culture of the United Kingdom. ...

Contents

Style, roots and influences

Part of a series of articles on
British music

BPIOCC Music from the United Kingdom has achieved great international popularity since the 1960s, when a wave of British musicians helped to popularise rock and roll. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... The British Phonographic Industry was founded in 1973 to represent the interests of British music companies and to fight the growing problem of music piracy. ... Previously Chart Information Network (CIN). ...

Charts
Singles chart (#1s; Records)
Albums chart (#1s)
Download chart (#1s)
“British Hit Singles” redirects here. ... This is a list of the number one hits in the UK Singles Chart, from its inception in 1952 to the present. ... Since the inception of the UK Singles Chart in 1952 there have been various records to break, including most chart toppers, longest run at number one, biggest selling single etc. ... The UK Albums Chart is a chart of the sales positions of albums in the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of the number one hits in the UK Albums Chart, from its inception in 1956 to the present. ... The UK Official Download Chart is compiled by The Official UK Charts Company on behalf of the music industry. ... This is a list of the number one hits in the UK Official Download Chart, from its inception on 1 September 2004 to the present. ...

Awards
BRIT AwardsMercury Prize
NME Awards
The Brit Awards are the annual United Kingdom pop music awards founded by the British Phonographic Industry. ... The Mercury Prize, formerly the Mercury Music Prize and currently known as the Nationwide Mercury Prize for sponsorship reasons, is an annual music prize awarded for the best British or Irish album of the previous 12 months. ... The NME Awards are an annual music awards show, founded by the music magazine NME (New Musical Express). ...

Periods
Pre-19501950s & 60s
1970s1980s
1990s - Present
The diverse nations that now make up the United Kingdom were much more distinct from each other prior to modern times. ... Indigenous styles of music production and performance dominated the United Kingdom until the late 1950s, when imported American rock and roll, pop-folk and rockabilly gained fans among British youth, while American roots music, especially the blues, found its own devoted fanbase. ... In the 1970s, music from the United Kingdom further diversified. ... In the early 1980s, the death of Sid Vicious (of the Sex Pistols) and the alleged selling-out of bands like The Clash and The Jam led to still-frequent cries that punk is dead. ... In the early 1990s, American alternative rock bands became mainstream in the US and achieved great popularity in the UK as well. ...

Origins and influences
Overview
EnglandScotlandWales
IrelandCaribbean Music from the United Kingdom has achieved great international popularity since the 1960s, when a wave of British musicians helped to popularise rock and roll. ... The Folk Music of England has a long history. ... The Tannahill Weavers Scotland is internationally known for its traditional music, which has remained vibrant throughout the 20th century, when many traditional forms worldwide lost popularity to pop music. ... Wales is a part of the United Kingdom, but is a culturally and politically separate Celtic country. ... Jamaican music in the United Kingdom // White Reggae White reggae has very low artistic credibility, but it laid a path for genuine reggae in Britain. ...

Genres
ClassicalBritpopHip-hop
OperaRockJazz This article, Classical music of the United Kingdom, includes a history of the form and discussion of its most notable composers and musicians. ... British Hip Hop is a genre of music, and a culture that covers a variety of styles of rap music made in the United Kingdom. ... British opera is opera which was composed either in Britain or by a composer of British nationality. ... British rock was born out of the influence of rock and roll and rhythm and blues from the United States, but added a new drive and urgency, exporting the music back and widening the audience for black R & B in the U.S. as well as spreading the gospel world... Britain has been home to a number of noted jazz musicians. ...

Major music publications
NMEMelody Maker
Music WeekRecord Collector
Record MirrorRecord Retailer
Smash HitsSounds
QKerrang!fRoots For other uses, see NME (disambiguation). ... This article is about the music newspaper. ... Music Week is a trade paper for the UK record industry. ... Cover of the Nov 2005 issue Record Collector started in 1979 and is the UK’s longest-running monthly music magazine. ... Record Mirror was a British weekly music newspaper. ... UK trade paper for the record industry. ... The cover of a May 1981 edition of Smash Hits magazine Smash Hits was a pop music based magazine, aimed at children and young teenagers, and originally published in the United Kingdom. ... Sounds was a British music paper, published weekly from October 10, 1970 – April 6, 1991. ... Q is a music magazine published monthly in the United Kingdom, with a circulation of 140,282 and a readership of 731,000. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... fRoots (previous Folk Roots) is a specialist music magazine publish monthly in the UK. It specialises in folk and world music, and features a compilation cover CD twice every year. ...

Other links
Bands • Musicians
Festivals • Venues There are a large number of music festivals in the United Kingdom, covering a wide variety of genres. ...

Timeline
19911992199319941995
19961997199819992000
20012002200320042005
20062007 • 2008 • (full list) 1991 The Simpsons reached number 1 with Do The Bartman in January 1991, even though the actual series wasnt to premiere on UK Terrestrial TV until 1996 Enigma - Sadness Part 1 January 13 for 1 week Queen - Innuendo January 20 for 1 week The KLF featuring Children of The... This is a summary of 1992 in music in the United Kingdom, including the official charts from that year. ... 1993 These are the UK number one albums of the year: Genesis - Live - The Way We Walk Volume 2: The Longs January 23 for 2 weeks Little Angels - Jam February 6 for 1 week The Cult - Pure Cult February 13 for 1 week Buddy Holly & The Crickets - Words Of Love... This is a summary of 1994 in music in the United Kingdom, including the official charts from that year. ... This is a summary of 1995 in music in the United Kingdom, including the official charts from that year. ... This is a summary of 1996 in music in the United Kingdom, including the official charts from that year. ... This is a summary of 1997 in music in the United Kingdom, including the official charts from that year. ... This is a summary of 1998 in music in the United Kingdom, including the official charts from that year. ... This is a summary of 1999 in music in the United Kingdom, including the official charts from that year. ... This is a summary of 2000 in music in the United Kingdom, including the official charts from that year. ... This is a summary of 2001 in music in the United Kingdom, including the official charts from that year. ... This is a summary of 2002 in music in the United Kingdom, including the official charts from that year. ... This is a summary of 2003 in music in the United Kingdom, including the official charts from that year. ... This is a summary of 2004 in music in the United Kingdom, including the official charts from that year. ... This is a summary of 2005 in music in the United Kingdom, including the official charts. ... This is a summary of the current year in the United Kingdom including the official single and album charts. ... This is a summary of the year 2007 in British music // 2007 began with the introduction of new chart rules meaning that all songs legally downloaded over the internet can count towards chart positions, whether or not a physical version of a song is available to purchase. ...

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Britpop bands were influenced by British guitar music of the past, particularly British Invasion groups The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Who, The Kinks, and The Small Faces; glam rock artists such as David Bowie and T. Rex; and punk rock bands like the The Jam, the Buzzcocks and Wire. Specific influences varied: Blur and Oasis drew from the Kinks and the Beatles, respectively, while Elastica had a fondness for arty punk rock. Regardless, all Britpop artists projected a sense of reverence for the sounds of the past.[2] For other uses, see British Invasion (disambiguation). ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... The Who are an English rock band that formed in 1964. ... The Kinks were an English rock group formed in 1963 by lead singer-songwriter Ray Davies, his brother, lead guitarist and vocalist Dave Davies, and bassist Pete Quaife. ... Small Faces were a British mod group formed in 1965[1] by Steve Marriott, Ronnie Lane, Kenney Jones, and Jimmy Winston (who was soon replaced by Ian McLagan). ... Glam rock (also known as glitter rock), is a rock music style that developed in the UK in the post-hippie early 1970s which was performed by singers and musicians wearing outrageous clothes, makeup, hairstyles, and platform-soled boots. ... David Bowie (pronounced ) (born David Robert Jones on 8 January 1947) is an iconic English musician, actor, producer, arranger, and audio engineer. ... T. Rex (originally known as Tyrannosaurus Rex, also occasionally spelled T Rex or T-Rex), were an English rock band fronted by Marc Bolan. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... The Jam were an English punk rock/mod revival band active during the late 1970s and early 1980s. ... For the panel game, see Never Mind the Buzzcocks. ... Wire are an English rock band formed in 1976 (and intermittently active to the present) by Graham Lewis (bass, vocals), Bruce Gilbert (guitar), Colin Newman (vocals, guitar) and Robert Gotobed (né Grey) (drums). ... Elastica were a Britpop band who were popular in the 1990s, formed by Justine Frischmann after leaving Suede in 1991. ...


Alternative rock acts from the 1980s and early 1990s indie scene were the direct ancestors of the Britpop movement. The influence of The Smiths was common to the majority of Britpop artists.[3] The Madchester scene, fronted by The Stone Roses, Happy Mondays, and Inspiral Carpets (for whom Oasis' Noel Gallagher had worked as a roadie during the Madchester years), was the immediate root of Britpop since its emphasis on good times and catchy songs provided an alternative to shoegazing.[4] In popular music, independent music, often abbreviated as indie, is a term used to describe genres, scenes, subcultures, styles and other cultural attributes in music, characterized by their independence from major commercial record labels and their autonomous, do-it-yourself approach to recording and publishing. ... The Smiths were an English rock band active from 1982 to 1987. ... An NME Originals issue covering the Madchester movement. ... The Stone Roses were an influential English rock band from Manchester formed in 1984. ... Happy Mondays are an English alternative rock band from Salford, Greater Manchester. ... The Inspiral Carpets is an alternative rock band from Oldham in Greater Manchester, England formed by Graham Lambert in 1986. ... Noel Thomas David Gallagher (born May 29, 1967 in Longsight, Manchester, England) is an English songwriter, guitarist and occasional vocalist with the Manchester rock band Oasis. ... Shoegazing (also known as shoegaze or shoegazer; practitioners referred to as shoegazers) is a genre of alternative rock that emerged from the United Kingdom in the late 1980s. ...


Stylistically, Britpop bands relied on catchy hooks and wrote lyrics that were meant to be relevant to British young people of their own generation.[4] Britpop bands conversely denounced shoegazing and grunge as irrelevant and having nothing to say about their lives. Damon Albarn of Blur summed up the attitude in 1993 when after being asked if Blur was an "anti-grunge band" he said, "Well, that's good. If punk was about getting rid of hippies, then I'm getting rid of grunge."[5] In spite of the professed disdain for the genres, some elements of both crept into the more enduring facets of Britpop. Noel Gallagher has since championed Ride (to the point of including Andy Bell in Oasis), and Martin Carr of the Boo Radleys has pointed out Dinosaur Jr's influence on their work. Noel Gallagher stated in a 1996 interview that Nirvana's Kurt Cobain was the only songwriter he had respect for in the last ten years, and that he felt their music was similar enough that Cobain could have written "Wonderwall".[6] Damon Albarn, (born March 23, 1968 in Leytonstone, London), is an English singer-songwriter who gained fame as the lead singer and keyboard player of rock band Blur. ... Ride were a British shoegazing band. ... Andrew Piran Bell (Born 11 August 1970, in Cardiff, Wales) is a British musician formerly of Ride, a 1980s and 90s British shoegazing band, and Hurricane #1. ... The Boo Radleys were a British guitar band of the 1990s who made experimental indie music, and were briefly associated with the Britpop movement. ... Dinosaur Jr is an American alternative rock band formed in Amherst, Massachusetts in 1983 as Dinosaur. ... Kurt Donald Cobain (February 20, 1967 – c. ... (Whats the Story) Morning Glory? track listing Roll with It (2) Wonderwall (3) Dont Look Back in Anger (4) Stop the Clocks track listing The Importance of Being Idle (5) Wonderwall (6) Slide Away (7) Wonderwall is a song and subsequent single by British rock band Oasis taken...


The imagery associated with Britpop was equally British and working class. Music critic Jon Savage asserted that Britpop was "an outer-suburban, middle-class fantasy of central London streetlife, with exclusively metropolitan models."[7] Suede's lyrics and videos dealt with the seedier side of suburban and sink estate life. In their early career, Blur introduced another critical element of the Britpop movement - a mod-influenced 1960s view of English life, portrayed through a clear lyrical narrative, in stark contrast to the previous shoegazing and Madchester scenes. Blur's promotion of Modern Life Is Rubbish also prefigured the rise in male working class values within the media, with the band in press photos straining to control a pitbull terrier, and the words "British image no 1" graffittied on a wall behind them. This rise of unabashed maleness, exemplified by Loaded magazine and lad culture in general, would be very much part of the Britpop era. The Union Flag also became a prominent symbol of the movement, and its use as a symbol of pride and nationalism contrasted deeply with the controversy that erupted just a few short years before when former Smiths singer Morrissey performed draped in it.[8] The emphasis on British reference points made it difficult for the genre to achieve success in the United State.[9] Jon Savage real name Jonathan Sage (born 1953) is a writer, broadcaster and music journalist, best known for his award winning history of the Sex Pistols and punk music, Englands Dreaming (1991). ... A sink estate is a British council housing estate characterised by high levels of economic and social deprivation. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Shoegazing (also known as shoegaze or shoegazer; practitioners referred to as shoegazers) is a genre of alternative rock that emerged from the United Kingdom in the late 1980s. ... An NME Originals issue covering the Madchester movement. ... Modern Life Is Rubbish is the second album by the British rock band Blur, released on May 10 1993. ... The American Pit Bull Terrier is one of several bull terrier breeds, often kept as a pet. ... Loaded, first published by IPC in 1994, is a British monthly lads mag. Its motto is For men who should know better. // Loaded was founded by James Brown a former deputy editor of the music weekly New Musical Express. ... Lad culture also Laddish culture is a subculture commonly associated with Britpop music of the 1990s and the BBC TV sitcom, Men Behaving Badly. ... Union Jack redirects here. ... For other uses, see Morrissey (disambiguation). ...


History

Origins and first years

The origins of Britpop lie primarily in the indie scene of the early 1990s, and in particular around a group of bands feted by the music press and involved in a vibrant social scene focused in the Camden Town area of London. This scene was dubbed "The Scene That Celebrates Itself" by Melody Maker.[10] Some members of this scene (Blur, Lush, Suede) would go on to play a leading part in Britpop. Others such as Kingmaker, Slowdive, Spitfire and Ride would not. The dominant musical force of the period was the grunge invasion from the United States, which filled the void left in the indie scene by the Stone Roses' inactivity.[11] For other uses of Camden, see Camden. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Scene That Celebrates Itself was a term used to describe a social and musical scene in the early 1990s within London and the Thames Valley area. ... This article is about the music newspaper. ... Blur were an English rock band that formed in Colchester in 1989. ... Lush was an English shoegazing band, formed in 1988. ... Suede (or The London Suede in the U.S.) were a popular and influential English rock band of the 1990s that helped start the Britpop musical movement of the decade. ... Kingmaker was a British indie rock group, founded in Kingston upon Hull in 1990. ... Slowdive // Slowdive were a shoegazing band formed in 1989, lasting until 1995. ... Spitfire are a band from Crawley, West Sussex, England whose ever-changing line up revolved around brothers Nick & Jeff Pitcher. ... Ride were a British shoegazing band. ...


Journalist John Harris has suggested that Britpop began when Blur's single "Popscene" and Suede's "The Drowners" were released around the same time in the spring of 1992. He stated, "[I]f Britpop started anywhere, it was the deluge of acclaim that greeted Suede's first records: all of them audacious, successful and very, very British".[12] Suede was the first of the new crop of guitar-oriented bands to be embraced by the UK music media as Britain's answer to Seattle's grunge sound. Their debut album Suede became the fastest-selling debut album in the history of the UK.[13] In April 1993, Select magazine featured Suede's lead singer Brett Anderson on the cover with a Union Flag in the background and the headline "Yanks go home!". The issue included features on Suede, The Auteurs, Denim, Saint Etienne and Pulp and helped forment the idea of an emerging movement.[11] For other persons named John Harris, see John Harris (disambiguation). ... This article is about the song by Blur. ... The Drowners is the debut single by Suede, released on May 11, 1992 on Nude Records. ... Suede is the debut album of the band Suede, released in 1993 on Nude Records. ... Select was a UK music magazine of the 90s, particularly famous for its involvement in Britpop. ... This article is about the frontman of Suede and The Tears. ... The Auteurs were a vehicle for the songwriting talents of Luke Haines (guitar, piano and vocals). ... Denim are the brainchild of the frontman of 1980s post-punk outfit Felt, Lawrence Hayward (more commonly known as just Lawrence). Teaming glam rock with cutting and humorous lyrics, Denims brash ways differed greatly from Felt. ... Saint Etienne are an English indie dance act, fronted by Sarah Cracknell (born April 12, 1967, Chelmsford, Essex). ... Pulp were a rock band, formed in Sheffield, England in 1978, by then 15-year-old school boy Jarvis Cocker (vocals, guitar). ...


Blur, a group that formerly mixed elements of shoegazing and baggy, took on an Anglocentric aesthetic with its second album Modern Life is Rubbish (1993). Blur's new approach was inspired by their tour of the United States. During the tour, frontman Damon Albarn began to resent American culture and found the need to comment on that culture's influence seeping into Britain.[11] Albarn's girlfriend Justine Frischmann (formerly of Suede and leader of Elastica) explained, "Damon and I felt like we were in the thick of it at that point [. . .] it occured to us that Nirvana were out there, and people were very interested in American music, and there should be some sort of manifesto for the return of Britishness."[14] John Harris wrote in an NME article just prior to the release of Modern Life is Rubbish, "[Blur's] timing has been fortuitously perfect. Why? Because, as with baggies and shoegazers, loud, long-haired Americans have just found themselves condemned to the ignominious corner labeled 'yesterday's thing'".[5] The music press also fixated on what the NME had dubbed the New Wave of New Wave (or 'NWONW'), a term applied to the more punk-derivative acts such as Elastica, S*M*A*S*H and These Animal Men. Shoegazing (also known as shoegaze or shoegazer; practitioners referred to as shoegazers) is a genre of alternative rock that emerged from the United Kingdom in the late 1980s. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Modern Life Is Rubbish is the second album by the British rock band Blur, released on May 10 1993. ... Damon Albarn, (born March 23, 1968 in Leytonstone, London), is an English singer-songwriter who gained fame as the lead singer and keyboard player of rock band Blur. ... Justine Elinor Frischmann (b. ... Elastica were a Britpop band who were popular in the 1990s, formed by Justine Frischmann after leaving Suede in 1991. ... For other uses, see NME (disambiguation). ... The New Wave of New Wave (NWONW) was a term coined by music journalists to describe a sub-genre of the British alternative rock scene in the early 90s. ... S*M*A*S*H were a punk band who were briefly popular in the early 1990s in the UK. S*M*A*S*H were formed by Ed Borrie (vocals, guitar), Salvatorre Alessi (cretited as Salv) (bass), and Rob Hague (drums) in Welwyn Garden City in Hertfordshire, England. ... These Animal Men were a UK band achieving minor fame in the 1990s as part of the New Wave of New Wave and splitting, after 2 albums, in 1998. ...


While Modern Life is Rubbish was a moderate success, it was Blur's third album Parklife that made them arguably the most popular band in the UK in 1994.[13] Parklife continued the fiercely British nature of its predecessor, and coupled with the death of Nirvana's Kurt Cobain in April of that year it seemed that British alternative rock had finally turned back the tide of grunge dominance. That same year Oasis released their debut album Definitely Maybe, which broke Suede's record for fastest-selling debut album.[13][15] Parklife is a critically acclaimed Britpop album by the band Blur, released on April 25, 1994. ... For other uses, see Definitely Maybe (disambiguation). ...


The movement was soon dubbed Britpop. The term "Britpop" had been used in the late 1980s (in Sounds magazine by journalist, Goldblade frontman and TV pundit John Robb referring to bands such as The La's, Stone Roses, Inspiral Carpets and The Bridewell Taxis). "Britpop" arose around the same time as the term "Britart" (which referred to the work of British modern artists such as Damien Hirst). However, it would not be until 1994 when the term entered the popular consciousness, being used extensively by the music press and radio DJs.[16] A rash of band emerged aligned with the new movement. At the start of 1995 Britpop bands including Sleeper, Supergrass, and Menswear scored pop hits.[17] Elastica released ts debut album Elastica that March; its first week sales surpassed the record set by Definitely Maybe the previous year.[18] The scene around Camden Town was now seen as a musical centre; frequented by Britpop groups like Blur, Elastica, and Menswear, Melody Maker declared "Camden is to 1995 what Seattle was to 1992, what Manchester was to 1989, and what Mr Blobby was to 1993."[19] Goldblade are a British punk rock soul power band led by journalist John Robb. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Las were an English rock band of the late 1980s and early 1990s from Liverpool consisting of frontman Lee Mavers (vocals) and John Power (bass, backing vocals), plus a rotating cast of guitarists and drummers. ... The classic line-up at the time of Spike Island The Stone Roses were one of the most influential bands to come out of Britain during the late 1980s and early 90s. ... The Inspiral Carpets is an alternative rock band from Oldham in Greater Manchester, England formed by Graham Lambert in 1986. ... Young British Artists is the name given to a collective of United Kingdom. ... Damien Hirst (born June 7, 1965) is an English artist and the most prominent of the group that has been dubbed Young British Artists (or YBAs). ... For the witnesses who betray information about associated criminals, see Supergrass (informer). ... Menswear were a short-lived Britpop band in the mid 1990s from Camden in London. ... Elastica, released in 1995, was the first album by the band of the same name. ... Seattle redirects here. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ...


Peak of success

Cover of the 12 August 1996 issue of NME advertising the "British Heavyweight Championship" battle between Oasis and Blur
Cover of the 12 August 1996 issue of NME advertising the "British Heavyweight Championship" battle between Oasis and Blur

A chart battle between Blur and obviously. Oasis dubbed "The Battle of Britpop" brought Britpop to the forefront of the British press in 1995. The bands had initially praised each other but over the course of the year antagonisms between the two increased.[20] Spurred on by the media, the groups became prime contenders in what the NME dubbed on the cover of its 12 August issue the "British Heavyweight Championship" with the pending release of Oasis' single "Roll with It" and Blur's "Country House" on the same day. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... The Battle of Britpop is the unofficial title given to the chart battle of 1995 which took place between leading Britpop groups, Blur and Oasis. ... Roll With It is a song by British rock band Oasis written by their lead guitarist Noel Gallagher. ... A country house is a large dwelling, such as a mansion, located on a country estate. ...


The battle pitted the two bands against each other, with the conflict as much about British class and regional divisions as much as it was about music.[21] Oasis were taken as representing the North of England, while Blur represented the South.[11] The event caught the public's imagination and gained mass media attention in national newspapers, tabloids, and even the BBC News. The NME wrote about the phenomeon, "Yes, in a week where news leaked that Saddam Hussein was preparing nuclear weapons, everyday folks were still getting slaughtered in Bosnia and Mike Tyson was making his comeback, tabloids and broadsheets alike went Britpop crazy."[22] Blur won the battle of the bands, selling 274,000 copies to Oasis' 216,000 - the songs charting at number one and number two respectively.[23] However, in the long-run Oasis became more successful than Blur. Unlike Blur, Oasis was able to achieve commercial success in the United States thanks to the single "Wonderwall".[24] Oasis's second album (What's the Story) Morning Glory? (1995) eventually sold over four million copies in the UK, becoming the third best-selling album British history.[25] Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (28 April 1937 – 30 December 2006) was the fifth President of Iraq and Chairman of the Iraqi Revolutionary Command Council from 1979 until his overthrow by US forces in 2003. ... This article is about the country of Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Michael Gerard Tyson (born June 30, 1966) is a former two-time American world heavyweight boxing champion and is the youngest man to have won a world heavyweight title. ... Singles from (Whats the Story) Morning Glory? Released: 24 April 1995 Released: 14 August 1995 Released: 15 September 1995 (Australia only) Released: 30 October 1995 Released: 19 February 1996 Released: 13 May 1996 (Australia and USA only) (Whats the Story) Morning Glory? is the second album by the...


Oasis's prominence was such that NME termed a number of Britpop bands (including The Boo Radleys, Ocean Colour Scene and Cast) as "Noelrock", citing Gallagher's influence on their success.[26] John Harris typified this wave of Britpop bands, and Gallagher, of sharing "a dewy-eyed love of the 1960s, a spurning of much beyond rock's most basic ingredients, and a belief in the supremacy of 'real music'".[27] Starting on 10 August 1996, Oasis played a two-night set at Knebworth to a combined number of 250,000 people.[28] The Boo Radleys were a British guitar band of the 1990s who made experimental indie music, and were briefly associated with the Britpop movement. ... Ocean Colour Scene (often abbreviated to OCS) are an English rock band from Birmingham. ... Cast were a band formed in Liverpool, England in 1993 by John Power, the former bassist of The Las and Peter Wilkinson, the former bassist of Shack. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...


During this time the new electioneering saw the emergence of the young leader of the Labour Party - Tony Blair. Blair represented the new face of the dreams and wishes of the British counterculture and many acts like Oasis and Blur admired him. Noel Gallagher also appeared on several official meetings - even being invited to Downing Street on one occasion, along with Alan McGee from Creation Records - and expressed his support for Blair. The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... Counterculture (also counter-culture) is a sociological word used to describe the values and norms of behavior of a cultural group, or subculture, that run counter to those of the social mainstream of the day,[1] the cultural equivalent of political opposition. ... Alan McGee is a British music industry mogul and musician famed for founding the independent Creation Records label which ran from 1983 to 2000. ... At least two different record labels called Creation Records have existed. ...


Decline

Oasis' third album Be Here Now (1997) was highly anticipated. Despite initially attracting positive review and selling strongly, the record was soon subjected to strong criticism from music critics, record-buyers and even Noel Gallagher himself for its overproduced and bloated sound. Music critic Jon Savage pinpointed Be Here Now as the moment where Britpop ended; Savage said that while the album "isn't the great disaster that everybody says," he noted that "[i]t was supposed to be the big, big triumphal record" of the period.[11] Conversely, Blur's fifth album, the self-titled Blur, was well-received by critics—partly because it showcased a stylistic evolution for the band. The band moved away from their Parklife-era sound, and their music began to assimilate American lo-fi influences, particularly that of Pavement. Damon Albarn explained to the NME in January 1997 that "We created a movement: as far as the lineage of British bands goes, there'll always be a place for us", but added, "We genuinely started to see that world in a slightly different way."[29] For other uses, see Be Here Now (disambiguation). ... Blur is the fifth album by Blur, first release in 1997. ... Lo-fi — from Low Fidelity — describes a sound recording which contains accidental artifacts, like distortion, or environmental noise, or a recording which has a limited frequency response. ... Pavement was an American indie rock band in the 1990s. ...


As the movement began to slow down, many acts began to falter. Though some acts found success with more challenging records—such as Pulp's This Is Hardcore, Supergrass' In It for the Money and Cornershop's When I Was Born for the 7th Time—many acts found the pressure too great and split, or simply faded from the limelight. Elastica fell victim to drug abuse and did not follow up its 1995 debut album until 1999. Menswear also failed to follow up their debut, Nuisance, and split. In the aftermath of Britpop only Blur and Oasis emerged with their large fanbases more or less intact, Blur by moving away from the Britpop sound at the critical moment that the movement imploded and Oasis by dint of their incredibly loyal following built on years of touring. By contrast Pulp struggled to repeat their former success with subsequent albums and interest in bands such as Cast, Ocean Colour Scene, The Bluetones and Shed Seven evaporated almost overnight. Some of the bands, sensing their time in the spotlight was up, split whilst others continued recording and releasing records in the face of dwindling sales and critical apathy. Furthermore, many of the newer acts the record industry rushed to sign during the heyday of Britpop sank without trace. This Is Hardcore is an album by British alternative rock band Pulp, first released in March 1998 (see 1998 in music). ... In It For the Money was the second album by Supergrass, released in 1997. ... Cornershop is a British indie band formed in Leicester in 1992 by Wolverhampton-born Tjinder Singh (singer, songwriter, and dholaki player), his brother Avtar Singh (bass guitar, vocals), David Chambers (drums) and Ben Ayres (guitar, keyboards, and tamboura), the first three having previously been members of Preston-based band General... When I Was Born for the 7th Time is a 1997 album by Cornershop. ... Elastica were a Britpop band who were popular in the 1990s, formed by Justine Frischmann after leaving Suede in 1991. ... Menswear were a short-lived Britpop band in the mid 1990s from Camden in London. ... Cast were a band formed in Liverpool, England in 1993 by John Power, the former bassist of The Las and Peter Wilkinson, the former bassist of Shack. ... Ocean Colour Scene (often abbreviated to OCS) are an English rock band from Birmingham. ... The Bluetones are an English indie rock band, formed in Hounslow, Greater London, in 1994. ... Shed Seven are an English indie rock band from York. ...


While established acts struggled, attention began to turn to the likes of Radiohead and The Verve, who had been previously overlooked by the British media. These two bands—in particular Radiohead—showed considerably more esoteric influences from the 1960s and 1970s, influences that were uncommon among earlier Britpop acts. While Radiohead had found commercial success their 1993 single "Creep" and commercial and critical success with 1995s The Bends, they had attracted little positive attention from the likes of the NME. Conversely, the Verve had enjoyed positive reviews, but little success. In 1997, Radiohead and The Verve released their respective efforts OK Computer and Urban Hymns, both of which were and remain widely acclaimed. Radiohead are an English alternative rock band from Oxfordshire. ... The Verve (originally Verve) are an English rock band formed in Wigan, Greater Manchester in 1989 at Winstanley Sixth Form College, by vocalist Richard Ashcroft, guitarist Nick McCabe, bassist Simon Jones, and drummer Peter Salisbury. ... Creep was the second single from the rock band, Radiohead. ... This article is about the album by Radiohead. ... OK Computer is the third album by the English rock band Radiohead, released in 1997. ... Singles from Urban Hymns Released: 16 June 1997 Released: 1 September 1997 Released: 24 November 1997 Released: 2 March 1998 Urban Hymns is the highly acclaimed alternative rock/space rock album released on September 29, 1997 by English rock band The Verve. ...


Aftermath

Blur continued to move away from the movement with their subsequent releases, parting company first with long-time producer Stephen Street in 1997 and eventually with guitarist Graham Coxon in May 2002 during sessions to record their latest album, 2003's Think Tank. Coxon later reunited with Street to record his most successful solo albums. Damon Albarn found enormous worldwide success in the 2000s with his electronica/hip hop-influenced project Gorillaz and super group The Good, the Bad and the Queen which also features Simon Tong (formerly of The Verve.) In September 2007, the band reunited with Coxon, though further studio work remain distant possibility. Stephen Street is a music producer best known for his work with The Smiths in the 1980s and Blur in the 1990s. ... Graham Coxon singing in the video to Blurs Tender Graham Coxon (born Graham Leslie Coxon on 12 March 1969, in Rinteln, West Germany) is an English singer-songwriter, best known as the former guitarist in the rock band Blur. ... Think Tank is the seventh studio album by English rock band Blur, released on May 5, 2003 in the United Kingdom and on May 6 in the United States. ... For the Gorillazs self-titled debut album, see Gorillaz (album). ... In the late 1960s, the term supergroup was coined to describe music groups composed of members who had already achieved fame or respect in other groups or as individual artists. ... The Good, the Bad and the Queen is the debut album by an unnamed alternative rock band fronted by Damon Albarn released in January 2007. ... Simon Tong a British a musican, a school friend of Richard Ashcroft, Simon Jones and Peter Salisbury played with the The Verve on Urban Hymns and replaced Nick McCabe. ...


Oasis remained popular, but entered a period of inactivity following Be Here Now. While recording the follow-up in 1999, they suffered after parting company with founding members Bonehead and Guigsy, replaced respectively by Gem Archer (Heavy Stereo) and Andy Bell (Ride). In 2004 longtime drummer and member Alan White left and was replaced by Zak Starkey (Ringo Starr's son), leaving only the Gallagher brothers as original members from the Britpop era. Regardless of line-up changes, Oasis along with Supergrass are the only bands who continue to release notable records on any regular basis, of the many bands who helped propel Britpop in the mid-90s. Both bands released commercially successful albums into the millenium with Oasis' Don't Believe the Truth (2005) reaching #1 and Supergrass' Diamond Hoo Ha (2008) peaking at #19 in the UK charts. Paul Bonehead Arthurs, (b. ... Paul McGuigan (born 9 May 1971 in Manchester), better known by his nickname, Guigsy (pronounced Gwigzee), was one of the four founding members of British rock band Oasis. ... Colin Murray Archer (born December 7, 1966 County Durham), better known as Gem (pronounced with a hard G - like guitar, after the Scottish footballer Archie Gemmill), is an English musician best known for his work with Heavy Stereo and Oasis. ... A band that Gem Archer of Oasis used to play in, before he joined them as the replacement for Bonehead as a lead and rythym guitarist. ... Andrew Piran Bell (Born 11 August 1970, in Cardiff, Wales) is a British musician formerly of Ride, a 1980s and 90s British shoegazing band, and Hurricane #1. ... Ride were a British shoegazing band. ... Alan White (born 26 May 1972, in Eltham, South London) is an English drummer, longtime drummer of British rock group Oasis between 1995 and 2004. ... Zak Starkey (born 13 September 1965 at Queen Charlottes Maternity Hospital in London) is an British drummer, is well-known as the first-born child of The Beatles drummer Ringo Starr (whose real name is Richard Starkey) and his first wife, Maureen Cox. ... Richard Starkey, MBE (born 7 July 1940), better known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is an Academy Award-winning English musician, singer, songwriter and actor, best known as the drummer for The Beatles. ... Dont Believe the Truth is the critically acclaimed sixth studio album by Oasis, released on May 30, 2005 internationally and a day later in the United States. ...


Suede released two more albums in 1999 (Head Music) and 2002 (A New Morning), before eventually breaking up in 2003 . Brett Anderson reunited briefly with Bernard Butler in 2004 in the formation The Tears, who released an album Here Come the Tears the following year. Anderson has since released his first solo self-titled album. Pulp followed up 1998's This is Hardcore in 2001 with the Scott Walker-produced We Love Life. Afterwards they entered an extended hiatus from which they have yet to emerge. Jarvis Cocker reemerged in late 2006 with a well-received solo self-titled album Jarvis that featured other ex-members of Pulp. Pulp's Richard Hawley also forged a succeful solo career. When interviewed, Cocker said that he saw no reason to reunite the band at the moment. On 26 June 2007 Jo Whiley, on BBC Radio 1, announced the reunion of The Verve's original line-up. The band embarked on a sell-out UK tour and scheduled an album of new material for release in 2008. Head Music is the fourth album by Suede, released by Nude Records in 1999. ... A New Morning is the fifth and final studio album by Suede, released in late 2002. ... The Tears are a band formed in 2004 by ex-Suede bandmates Brett Anderson and Bernard Butler. ... Here Come The Tears is the debut album by The Tears, to be released on June 6, 2005 on Independiente Records. ... Brett Anderson is the first solo release from former Suede and current The Tears frontman Brett Anderson. ... This Is Hardcore is an album by British alternative rock band Pulp, first released in March 1998 (see 1998 in music). ... Scott Walker can refer to more than one person: Scott Walker (singer) (born 1943), singer Scott Walker (politician) (born 1967), county executive of Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Scott Walker (boxer) (1969-2004), boxer Scott Walker (hockey player) (born 1973), professional hockey player Scott Walker (the ultimate beast) (born 1983), professional degen... We Love Life is an album by Pulp. ... Jarvis, also known as The Jarvis Cocker Record, is the debut solo album by Pulp vocalist Jarvis Cocker, released in the UK on 13 November 2006. ... Richard Hawley portrait by Gareth James. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...


Media

Image File history File links OasisLiveForever. ... For other uses, see Live Forever (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Blur_-_Stereotypes_song_sample. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Boo_Radleys_-_Wake_Up_Boo_excerpt. ...

See also

Britpop was a genre of alternative rock music from mid-1990s Britain. ... The Britpop Story was a documentary aired on BBC Four about the Britpop movement which occurred in Britain during the 1990s. ...

References

  • Cavanagh, David. The Creation Records Story: My Magpie Eyes Are Hungry for the Prize, 2001.
  • Harris, John. Britpop!: Cool Britannia and the Spectacular Demise of English Rock. Da Capo Press, 2004. ISBN 0-306-81367-X
  • Harris, John. "Modern Life is Brilliant!" NME. January 7, 1995.
  • Live Forever: The Rise and Fall of Brit Pop. Passion Pictures, 2004.

For other uses, see NME (disambiguation). ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Blur, Oasis and Pulp were the main subjects of John Dower's 2003 documentary Live Forever: The Rise and Fall of Britpop and a review of Different Class recalls the "holy Britpop triumvirate" of Oasis, Blur and Pulp; Garry Mulholland; Q magazine, September 2006; p116
  2. ^ Harris, John. Britpop!: Cool Britannia and the Spectacular Demise of English Rock. Da Capo Press, 2004. Pg. 202. ISBN 0-306-81367-X
  3. ^ Harris, pg. 385
  4. ^ a b Britpop. Allmusic.com. Retrieved on 11 October 2006
  5. ^ a b Harris, John. "A shite sports car and a punk reincarnation." NME. 10 April 1993
  6. ^ Caws, Matthew. "Top of the Pops". Guitar World. May 1996.
  7. ^ Savage, Jon. "Letere From London: Britpop." Artforum. October 1995.
  8. ^ Harris, pg. 295
  9. ^ Reynolds, Simon. "RECORDINGS VIEW;Battle of the Bands: Old Turf, New Combatants". The New York Times. 22 October 1995. Retrieved on 30 March 2008.
  10. ^ Harris, pg. 57
  11. ^ a b c d e Live Forever: The Rise and Fall of Brit Pop. Passion Pictures, 2004.
  12. ^ The Last Party: Britpop, Blair and the Demise of English Rock; John Harris; Harper Perennial; 2003
  13. ^ a b c Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "British Alternative Rock". All Music Guide. Retrieved 11 October 2006.
  14. ^ Harris, pg. 79
  15. ^ Harris, pg. 178
  16. ^ Harris, pg. 201
  17. ^ Harris, pg. 203-04
  18. ^ Harris, pg. 210-11
  19. ^ Parkes, Taylor. "It's An NW1-derful Life". Melody Maker. 17 June 1995.
  20. ^ Richardson, Andy. "The Battle of Britpop." NME. 12 August 1995.
  21. ^ Harris, pg. 230
  22. ^ "Roll with the presses." NME. 26 August 1995.
  23. ^ Harris, pg. 235
  24. ^ Harris, pg. 261
  25. ^ "Queen head all-time sales chart". BBC.co.uk. 16 November 2006. Retrieved on 3 January 2007.
  26. ^ Kessler, Ted. "Noelrock!" NME. 8 June 1996.
  27. ^ Harris, pg. 296
  28. ^ Harris, pg. 298
  29. ^ Mulvey, John. "We created a movement...there'll always be a place for us". NME. 11 January 1997.

Different Class is a 1995 album by Pulp. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see NME (disambiguation). ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a metadata database about music, owned by All Media Guide. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...

External links

  • All Music Guide entry for Britpop
  • BBC News article on Britpop's 10th anniversary
  • Alternative Music
Alternative music redirects here. ... Alternative metal is an eclectic form of music that gained popularity in the early 1990s alongside grunge. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... C86 is the name of a celebrated cassette compilation released by the British music magazine New Musical Express (NME) in 1986, featuring new bands licenced from independent labels of the time. ... Christian alternative music is a form of alternative rock music lyrically grounded in a Christian worldview. ... College rock was a term used in the USA to describe 1980s alternative rock before the term alternative came into common usage. ... Dream pop is a type of alternative rock that originated in Britain in the early 1980s, when bands like Cocteau Twins, The Chameleons, The Passions, Dead Can Dance, Dif Juz, Lowlife and A.R. Kane (to whom the term has been attributed) began fusing post-punk experiments with bittersweet pop... Dunedin is a southern New Zealand University Town that spawned The Dunedin Sound. Similar in many ways to the traditional indie pop sound, the Dunedin Sound uses jingly jangly guitaring, minimal bass lines and loose drumming. ... John Flansburgh and John Linnell of They Might Be Giants. ... Gothic rock (sometimes called goth rock or simply goth) is a genre of alternative rock that originated during the late 1970s. ... For the language, see Grebo language. ... Grunge redirects here. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Industrial Rock is a musical genre which is a fusion between Industrial Music and specific Rock n Roll subgenres such as Punk, Oi!, Hardcore and later on Hard Rock. ... Jangle pop is a musical genre that began in United States during the middle of the 1960s, combining angular, chiming guitars and power pop structures. ... Lo-fi is a subgenre of indie rock which uses lo-fi recording practices. ... An NME Originals issue covering the Madchester movement. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Noise pop is a term used to loosely describe a number of alternative rock bands that fuse punk rocks attitude and anger with the atonal noise, feedback, and free song structures of noise music, presented in a decidedly pop context. ... Lightning Bolt Live at the Southgate House 2005. ... Paisley Underground is a term used to describe a genre of rock music, based primarily in Los Angeles, California, which was at its most popular in the mid-1980s. ... Post-grunge is a very diverse subgenre of alternative rock music that emerged in the mid-1990s immediately following the downfall of grunge music as an offshoot. ... The post-punk revival is a movement in modern rock music consisting of Indie Rock, Punk Rock, Goth Rock, and Electronic bands that draw from the conventions of the original Post-Punk sound of the early 1980s, as well as the early 90s Britpop, 80s New Wave and... The term post-rock was coined by Simon Reynolds in issue 123 of The Wire (May 1994) to describe a sort of music using rock instrumentation for non-rock purposes, using guitars as facilitators of timbres and textures rather than riffs and powerchords. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Riot grrrl (or riot grrl) is an indie/punk feminist movement that reached its height in the 1990s but continues to exert influence over alternative cultures. ... Sadcore/Slowcore is a subgenre of alternative rock that developed from the downbeat melodies and slower tempos of late 1980s indie rock. ... Shoegazing (also known as shoegaze or shoegazer; practitioners referred to as shoegazers) is a genre of alternative rock that emerged from the United Kingdom in the late 1980s. ... The term slowcore, generally used interchangeably with sadcore, refers to a subgenre of alternative rock that developed from the downbeat melodies and slower tempos of late 1980s indie rock. ... For space rocks, see asteroid. ... This is a list of alternative rock artists. ... Campus radio (also known as college radio, university radio or student radio) is a type of radio station that is run by the students of a college, university or other educational institution. ... This is a timeline of alternative rock, from its beginnings in the 1970s to the present. ... In popular music, independent music, often abbreviated as indie, is a term used to describe genres, scenes, subcultures, styles and other cultural attributes in music, characterized by their independence from major commercial record labels and their autonomous, do-it-yourself approach to recording and publishing. ... Lollapalooza is an American music festival featuring rock, alternative rock, hip hop, and punk rock bands, dance and comedy performances, and craft booths. ...

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