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Encyclopedia > British police

The British police are a group of similar but independent police services which operate in the United Kingdom. Most of these police forces operate in defined territorial areas, typically counties, groups of counties or larger metropolitan areas, but some, such as the British Transport Police, have a more specialised, non-territorial remit. Originally, a county was the land under the jurisdiction of a count (in Great Britain, an earl, though the original earldoms covered larger areas) by reason of that office. ... A metropolitan area is a large population center consisting of a large city and its adjacent zone of influence, or of several neighboring cities or towns and adjoining areas, with one or more large cities serving as its hub or hubs. ... A British Transport Police motorcycle in London The British Transport Police (BTP) is a national police service for the railway system throughout Great Britain. ...

A police helicopter (Eurocopter EC 135T), shared by the English police forces of Avon and Somerset and Gloucestershire
A police helicopter (Eurocopter EC 135T), shared by the English police forces of Avon and Somerset and Gloucestershire

Contents

Eurocopter EC135T, shared by the police forces of Avon and Somerset, and Gloucestershire, built 2001, photographed at the Heli-Day, Kemble, England, in August 2003. ... Eurocopter EC135T, shared by the police forces of Avon and Somerset, and Gloucestershire, built 2001, photographed at the Heli-Day, Kemble, England, in August 2003. ... The EC 135 is a twin-engine IFR civil helicopter produced by Eurocopter, widely used amongst police and ambulance services, and for executive transport. ... Avon & Somerset Constabulary is a police force in England covering the county of Somerset and the districts of South Gloucestershire, Bristol, North Somerset and Bath and North East Somerset; these districts were the now defunct county of Avon hence the forces name. ...


History

While constables had existed since Saxon times, the creation of a police force comparable to modern structures did not come about until the early 19th century, with the introduction of a nationwide system of local forces on a broadly common pattern (with some variation). However this had been foreshadowed in the late 18th century with the establishment of the Marine Police based in Wapping, although this was only a localised force with a limited remit. A Constable is a person holding a particular office, most commonly that of law-enforcement. ... The Saxon people or Saxons were a large and powerful Germanic people located in what is now northwestern Germany and a small section of the eastern Netherlands. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Water police, also called harbor patrols, port police, marine police, or river police, are police officers, usually a department of a larger police organisation, who patrol in water craft. ... Wapping is a place in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. ...


After abortive attempts to set up a police force in Glasgow, Scotland, during the 18th century, the city authorities successfully persuaded Parliament to pass the Glasgow Police Act in 1800. This allowed the formation of the City of Glasgow Police, funded by taxation of local citizens, to prevent crime. This was quickly followed by the setting up of similar police forces in other towns [1]. The General Police Act (1857) required each County and Burgh to establish a police force, either its own or by by uniting with a neighbouring county. Glasgows location in Scotland Glasgow (or Glaschu in Gaelic) is Scotlands largest city, situated on the River Clyde in the countrys west central lowlands. ... Royal motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (Latin: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within the UK Languages with Official Status1 English Scottish Gaelic Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... 1800 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The City of Glasgow Police Force served the city of Glasgow from 1800 to 1975. ... Originally, in continental Europe, a county was the land under the jurisdiction of a count. ... Burgh can refer to the following: Burgh (pronounced burruh) - A highly autonomous unit of local government in Scotland, with rights to representation in the Parliament of Scotland, in use from at least the 9th century until their abolition in 1975 when a new regional structure of local government was introduced...


In England in 1812, 1818 and 1822, a number of committees had examined the policing of London. Based on their findings the Home Secretary, Robert Peel, introduced the Metropolitan Police Act of 1829, heralding a more rigorous and less discretionary approach to law enforcement. The new Metropolitan Police, founded on September 29, was depersonalised, bureaucratic and hierarchical, with the new police constables instructed to prevent crime and pursue offenders. However in contrast to the more paramilitary police of continental Europe, the British police, partly to counter public fears and objections concerning armed enforcers, were clearly civilian and their armament was initially limited to the truncheon. Uniform was blue, resembling the navy rather than the red of the army, who had policed with firearms and a heavy handedness which had long caused public consternation. A fear of spy systems and political control also kept 'plain clothes' and even detective work to a minimum. The force was independent of the local government; through its commissioner it was responsible direct to the Home Office. The new constables were nicknamed 'peelers' or 'bobbies' after the Home Secretary. Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... 1812 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1818 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1822 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The clock tower of the Palace of Westminster, which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... The Home Secretary (official full title Secretary of State for the Home Department) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Metropolitan Police redirects here. ... September 29 is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years). ... Bureaucracy is a concept in sociology and political science. ... A paramilitary organization is a group of civilians trained and organized in a military fashion. ... World map showing location of Europe When considered a continent, Europe is the worlds second smallest continent in terms of area, with an area of 10,600,000 km² (4,140,625 square miles), making it larger than Australia only. ... Hercules fights the Lernaean Hydra with a club A club or cudgel is perhaps the simplest of all melee weapons. ... The United Kingdom is made up of four parts - England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... The Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis (usually just referred to as the Metropolitan Police Commissioner) is the head of the Metropolitan Police Service in London. ... The modern concept of Small Office and Home Office or SoHo , or Small or Home Office deals with the category of business which can be from 1 to 10 workers. ...

Outside of the metropolitan area, the Municipal Corporations Act of 1835 and further legislation in 1839 and 1840 allowed counties to create their own constabulary. The first county force created was in Wiltshire in 1839. Around thirty counties had voluntarily created police forces before the County and Borough Police Act of 1856 made such forces mandatory and subject to central inspection. There were over 200 separate forces in England and Wales by 1860, while in Ireland a more centralised paramilitary force, the Royal Irish Constabulary, was created. A car of the Devon and Cornwall police, photographed in Ilfracombe, North Devon. ... A car of the Devon and Cornwall police, photographed in Ilfracombe, North Devon. ... See also Fiat Panda. ... The Devon and Cornwall Constabulary is a British police force responsible for the counties of Devon and Cornwall and the unitary authorities of Plymouth, Torbay and the Isles of Scilly. ... 1839 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The British Isles are divided into the following traditional counties (also vice counties or historic counties). ... Wiltshire (abbreviated Wilts) is a large southern English county. ... 1839 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... National motto: Cymru am byth (Welsh: Wales for ever) Waless location within the UK Official languages English, Welsh Capital Cardiff Largest city Cardiff First Minister Rhodri Morgan Area  - Total Ranked 3rd UK 20,779 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 3rd UK 2,903,085 140/km² Ethnicity: 97. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... A paramilitary organization is a group of civilians trained and organized in a military fashion. ... The Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC) was one of Irelands two police forces in the early twentieth century, alongside the Dublin Metropolitan Police. ...


Within the Metropolitan Police a detective force was founded in 1842 and, following the Turf Fraud scandal of 1877, it was reorganised and renamed the CID in 1878. A pension was guaranteed by the Police Act of 1890; previously it had been discretionary. The police became unionised during World War I and the strikes of 1918 and 1919 resulted in the Police Act of 1919, prohibiting trade unions but creating the Police Federation. However, the fragmented nature of the police was resistant to change, and there were still over 200 separate police forces before World War II and 117 before the mass reorganisation of the Police Act of 1964, which created 49 larger forces, some covering two or more counties or large urban areas. 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1877 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Criminal Investigation Department (CID) is the branch of all British Police forces to which plain clothes detectives belong. ... 1878 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... World War I was primarily a European conflict with many facets: immense human sacrifice, stalemate trench warfare, and the use of new, devastating weapons - tanks, aircraft, machineguns, and poison gas. ... 1918 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... 1919 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrinations, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons like the atom bomb World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a mid-20th-century conflict that engulfed much of the globe...


In addition to the regional constabularies, there exist a small number of special police forces that have particular powers. The most notable of these is the British Transport Police, who are responsible for policing on Britain's railway network. A British Transport Police motorcycle in London The British Transport Police (BTP) is a national police service for the railway system throughout Great Britain. ...


In 2004 the creation of the national Serious Organised Crime Agency was announced. 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The creation of the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) in the United Kingdom was announced on February 9, 2004. ...


Accountability

In England and Wales a Police Authority, normally consisting of three magistrates, nine local councillors and five independent members, is responsible for overseeing each local force. They also have a duty under law to ensure that their community gets best value from their police force. Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... National motto: Cymru am byth (Welsh: Wales for ever) Waless location within the UK Official languages English, Welsh Capital Cardiff Largest city Cardiff First Minister Rhodri Morgan Area  - Total Ranked 3rd UK 20,779 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 3rd UK 2,903,085 140/km² Ethnicity: 97. ... Police authority - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... A magistrate is a judicial officer with limited authority to administer and enforce the law. ... A councillor is a member of a council (such as a city council), particularly in the U.K., Canada, and its former colonies. ... English law, the law of England and Wales (but not Scotland and Northern Ireland) is considered by some to be one of Britains great gifts to the world. ...


In Northern Ireland the Police Service of Northern Ireland is supervised by the Northern Ireland Policing Board. Royal motto: Quis separabit (Latin: Who will separate?) Northern Irelands location within the UK Official languages English, Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Area  - Total Ranked 4th 13,843 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 4th 1,685,267 122/km² NUTS 1... The Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) is the police service that covers Northern Ireland. ... The Northern Ireland Policing Board is the Police Authority for Northern Ireland, charged with supervising the activities of the Police Service of Northern Ireland. ...


In Scotland each police force is overseen either by the local authority (for Fife Constabulary and Dumfries and Galloway Constabulary) or by a joint board of the relevant authorities (all other forces). Royal motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (Latin: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within the UK Languages with Official Status1 English Scottish Gaelic Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... Before 1975 local government in Scotland was organised on the county system. ...


Use of firearms

A police officer guards the entrance to Downing Street, London, home of the Prime Minister
A police officer guards the entrance to Downing Street, London, home of the Prime Minister

Unlike the police in most other countries, the British police are not routinely armed, except in Northern Ireland, at airports, nuclear facilities, and on some protection duties. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1295x1464, 521 KB) A police officer guards the entrance to Downing Street, London, home of the UK Prime Minister. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1295x1464, 521 KB) A police officer guards the entrance to Downing Street, London, home of the UK Prime Minister. ... Royal motto: Quis separabit (Latin: Who will separate?) Northern Irelands location within the UK Official languages English, Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Area  - Total Ranked 4th 13,843 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 4th 1,685,267 122/km² NUTS 1... The word nuclear means of or belonging to the nucleus of something. ...


In fact, officers on night patrols in some London divisions were frequently armed with Webley revolvers (and, after the Battle of Stepney, Webley semi-automatics) for over 50 years following the murder of two officers in 1884, though individual officers were able to choose whether to carry the weapons. The practice ended in July 1936, after which arms could be issued by a sergeant if there was a good reason, and if the officer had been trained. The clock tower of the Palace of Westminster, which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Colt Single Action Army, one of the most popular revolvers of all time A revolver is a multishot firearm, usually a handgun, in which the rounds are held in a revolving cylinder that rotates to fire them through a single barrel. ... The Siege of Sidney Street, popularly known as the Battle of Stepney, was a gunfight in Londons East End in 1911. ... A semi-automatic handgun is one which fires a single round every time that the trigger is pulled until its ammunition is exhausted. ... 1884 is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar). ... 1936 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


The issue of routine arming was next raised after the 1952 Derek Bentley case, and again after the 1966 murder of three officers in London (Massacre of Braybrook Street), following which around 17% of officers in London were authorised to carry firearms. After the deaths of a number of members of the public in the 1980s, control was considerably tightened, many officers had their firearm authorisation revoked, and training for the remainder was greatly improved and later extended to include some training from the SAS. Currently around 7 per cent of officers in London are trained in the use of firearms. Firearms are also only issued to an officer under strict guidelines. See SO19 (Metropolitan Police Firearms Unit). 1952 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Derek Bentley (30 June 1933 - 28 January 1953) was hanged at the age of 19 for a murder committed by a friend, creating a cause célèbre and leading to a 45-year long successful campaign to win him a posthumous pardon. ... 1966 was a common year starting on Saturday (link goes to calendar) // Events January January 1 - In a coup, Colonel Jean-Bédel Bokassa ousts president David Dacko and takes over the Central African Republic. ... The Massacre of Braybrook Street was, excepting terrorist attacks, the worst mass murder of police officers in British history. ... // Events and trends The 1980s marked an abrupt shift towards more conservative lifestyles after the momentous cultural revolutions which took place in the 60s and 70s and the definition of the AIDS virus in 1981. ... For other Special Air Services, see Australian Special Air Service Regiment and Special Air Service of New Zealand. ... The Force Firearms Unit (better known by its Specialist Operations designation SO19) is the department of the London Metropolitan Police which provides firearms-related support to the generally unarmed force. ...


In order to allow armed officers to rapidly attend an incident, weapons are now frequently carried in the secure armoury of patrolling Armed Response Vehicles (ARVs). ARVs were modelled on the Instant Response Cars introduced by the West Yorkshire Police in 1976, and were first introduced in London in 1991, when 132 armed deployments were made. Armed Response Vehicles (ARVs) are the British polices solution to combating armed criminal activity. ... 1976 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1991 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In a 1995 ballot amongst members of the Police Federation of England and Wales, over 75% of the vote was against routine arming. However, the huge increase in gun crime since the late 1990s is seen as a major issue. For the first time since 1936, the routine carrying of firearms on normal police patrols was re-introduced in Nottingham in February 2000, in response to a number of gang related shootings on the St Ann's and Meadows estates. 1995 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Elections and Parties Series Democracy Representative democracy History of democracy Referenda Liberal democracy Representation Voting Voting systems Ideology Elections Elections by country Elections by calender Electoral systems Politics Politics by country Political campaigns Political science Political philosophy Related topics Political parties Parties by country Parties by name Parties by... The Police Federation of England and Wales is the representative body to which all police officers up to and including the rank of Chief Inspector belong. ... // Events and trends The 1990s are generally classified as having moved slightly away from the more conservative 1980s, but otherwise retaining the same mindset. ... Nottingham is a city located in Nottinghamshire, in the East Midlands of England. ... This article is about the year 2000. ...


On the 22 September 1999 Harry Stanley, a painter and decorator, born in Bellshill near Glasgow, was returning home from a Pub carrying a table leg in a plastic bag that had been repaired by his brother earlier that day. Someone in the pub had phoned the police to report "an Irishman with a gun". Close to his home, officers Inspector Neil Sharman and Pc Kevin Fagan of the Metropolitan police challenged Mr Stanley from behind, as he turned to face them they shot him dead at a distance of 15 feet. September 22 is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years). ... 1999 is a common year starting on Friday Anno Domini (or the Current Era), and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Harry Stanley (1953 - 22 September 1999) was a painter and decorator mistakenly shot dead by the police. ... Bellshill is a town in North Lanarkshire, Scotland, situated in the suburbs of Glasgow two miles north of Motherwell. ... Glasgows location in Scotland Glasgow (or Glaschu in Gaelic) is Scotlands largest city, situated on the River Clyde in the countrys west central lowlands. ... An amusingly named pub (the Old New Inn) at Bourton-on-the-Water, in the Cotswold Hills of South West England A pub in the Haymarket area of Edinburgh, Scotland A public house, usually known as a pub, is a drinking establishment found mainly in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada... Metropolitan Police redirects here. ...


On 22 July 2005, Jean Charles de Menezes, a Brazilian electrician living in London, was shot dead by Metropolitan Police officers as he boarded an Underground train at Stockwell tube station, in the belief he was a suicide bomber. While his shooting occurred as a result of the police investigation into the 21 July 2005 London bombings, it was later revealed that he was unconnected with the attempted attacks. His family has called on the government to open a public inquiry into the shooting. July 22 is the 203rd day (204th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 162 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jean Charles de Menezes (7 January 1978 – 22 July 2005) was a Brazilian electrician living in Tulse Hill in south London, England. ... An electrician is a tradesman specializing in electrical wiring of buildings and related equipment. ... The clock tower of the Palace of Westminster, which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... Metropolitan Police redirects here. ... Slight modifications to the famous London Underground roundel indicate the name of each station on platform and some outdoor signs. ... Stockwell tube station Stockwell tube station is a London Underground station in Stockwell, in the London Borough of Lambeth. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death in addition to the attacks primary purpose (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Four small explosions strike Londons transport system On 21 July 2005, four attempted bomb attacks disrupted part of Londons public transport system two weeks after the 7 July 2005 London bombings. ...

Thames Valley Police policing an animal rights demonstration in Oxford
Thames Valley Police policing an animal rights demonstration in Oxford

The national media have often commented on and criticized the apparent "Shoot to Kill" policy apparently adopted by police forces, however, no such policy exists. The police operate on a "Shoot to Stop" basis. Download high resolution version (1760x1168, 444 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1760x1168, 444 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Thames Valley Police is one of the largest police services in England and the largest non-metropolitan one, covering 2200 sq mi (5,700 km²) and a population of 2. ...


As of September 2004, all forces in England and Wales also have the Taser available, but it may only be used where a full firearms authority has been granted. 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Summary An electroshock gun or stun gun, is a weapon used for subduing a person by administering an electric shock. ...


The weapons carried routinely by ordinary police constables are currently an extending baton and, in all but two county police services, personal issue incapacitant CS spray. Its effects are designed to be short-lived, subsiding within 30-60 minutes and clearing even quicker in well-ventilated areas. Baton is the name of one of two leaders of the Illyrian uprising against the Romans in Pannonia in 6 AD. The term baton refers to any of several types of cylindrical or tapered instruments composed of a wide variety of materials, and of differing functions: A baton (billy, billy... CS gas (commonly called tear gas), or chlorobenzylidene malonitrile, is a usually non-lethal riot control agent. ...


Uniform

Although there are minor variations in the styling, pattern and insignia, the police forces of Great Britain, Jersey, Guernsey, the Isle of Man and Gibraltar all wear very similar uniforms. In general, these have historically taken their lead from the Metropolitan Police, with changes appearing in that force first. The base colour is a very dark blue, almost indistinguishable from black (and these days often actually is black), which has earned the police the nickname of the "boys in blue". Insignia (the plural of Latin insigne: emblem, symbol) is a symbol or token of personal power, status or office, or of an offical body of government or jurisdiction. ... This page describes uniform in the sense of clothing. ... Metropolitan Police redirects here. ...


Formal uniform comprises an open-necked tunic (with or without an attached belt, depending on the force) and trousers or skirt, worn with a white or light blue shirt and black tie (usually clip-on, so it cannot be used to strangle the wearer). Although most forces once wore blue shirts, these have been going out of fashion since the 1980s (when the Metropolitan Police changed to white) and most now wear white. Officers of the rank of inspector and above have always worn white shirts, and in many forces so have female officers. In some forces, female officers wear a black and white checked cravat instead of a tie. Tupa Inca tunic The tunic was the common masculine garment of Roman Civilization. ... A belt A belt is a flexible band, made of either leather or a type of cloth, worn around the waist. ... Trousers are now acceptable clothing for men or women, in most parts of the world. ... A skirt is a traditionally feminine tube- or cone-shaped garment which is worn from the waist and covers the legs. ... Business shirt A shirt is a piece of clothing for the trunk of the body. ... Modern neckties, shown here tied as if they were on a person, may be found in a plethora of colours and designs. ... // Events and trends The 1980s marked an abrupt shift towards more conservative lifestyles after the momentous cultural revolutions which took place in the 60s and 70s and the definition of the AIDS virus in 1981. ... Inspector is a rank in many police forces. ... Modern neckties, shown here tied as if they were on a person, may be found in a plethora of colours and designs. ...


Until the 1980s this was also the everyday working uniform, but today it is rarely seen except on formal occasions. The normal working dress retains the shirt (open-necked or with a tie or cravat) and trousers, worn with or without a jersey or fleece. Some forces use combat trousers and boots. Today, female officers almost never wear a skirt in working dress, and frequently wear trousers in formal dress as well. Officers also frequently wear reflective waterproof jackets, which have replaced the old greatcoats and cloaks traditionally worn in inclement weather. Most officers now wear body armour over their uniforms when on duty. Combat boot - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Look up jacket in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A jacket is an outer garment worn by both men and women, for warmth or fashion. ... An overcoat is a long coat worn over other clothing. ... A cloak is a type of loose garment which is worn over indoor clothing and serves the same purpose as an overcoat – it protects the wearer from the cold, rain or wind for example, or it may form part of a fashionable outfit (e. ... A bulletproof vest – also called body armour (U.S. body armor) – is an article of protective clothing that works as a form of armour to minimize injury from being hit by a fired bullet. ...


Basic headgear is a peaked cap for men and a round bowler style hat for women. All officers wear a black and white (red and white for the City of London Police) diced band around the hat, a distinction first used in Scotland and later adopted by all forces in Great Britain. Traffic officers wear white cap covers. On foot duty, male constables and sergeants wear the familiar conical custodian helmet. There are several patterns, with different forces wearing different types. The helmet is not, however, worn in Scotland (although some Scottish forces did use helmets in the past). A Combination Cap is a form of military headgear worn with dress uniforms. ... The bowler hat is a hard felt hat created for an Englishman James Coke in 1850. ... City Police Mounted Section officer The City of London Police is the police force responsible for the City of London. ... Pith helmet of Harry S. Truman For information about the band Helmet, see Helmet (band) Helmet of Swedish Royal Guard soldier A helmet is a form of protective clothing worn on the head and usually made of metal or some other hard substance, typically for protection of the head from...


Uniform history

The first uniform, which was a lighter blue than at present, was a high-collared tailcoat, worn with white trousers in summer. The headgear was a hardened top hat, which served the dual purpose of protecting the officer from blows to the head and allowing him to use it as a step to climb or see over walls. The tailcoat was later replaced by a tunic, still high-collared, and the top hat by the helmet (both adopted by the Metropolitan Police in 1863). The tunic went through a large variety of lengths and styles, with the Metropolitan Police adopting the open-neck style in 1948 (although senior and female officers adopted it before that time). Senior officers used to wear peaked pillbox-style caps until the adoption of the wider peaked cap worn today. Bandleader Vincent Lopez in white tie, early 1920s Evening dress (also known as full evening dress) or white tie is the most formal dress code that exists for civilians today. ... Duke Ellington wearing a top hat. ... 1863 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1948 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Female officers' uniforms have gone through an even greater variety of styles, as they have tended to reflect the women's fashions of the time. Tunic style, skirt length and headgear have varied immensely by period and force. By the late 1980s, female working uniform was virtually identical to male, except for headgear and sometimes neckwear. // Events and trends The 1980s marked an abrupt shift towards more conservative lifestyles after the momentous cultural revolutions which took place in the 60s and 70s and the definition of the AIDS virus in 1981. ...


Recent and current issues

Evidence of corruption in the 1970s, serious urban riots and the police role in controlling industrial disorder in the 1980s, and the changing nature of police procedure made police accountability and control a major political football from the 1990s onwards. This article provides extensive lists of events and significant personalities of the 1970s. ... For the rock band Riot see Riot (the band) Riots in Newark, New Jersey Riots occur when crowds of people have gathered and are committing crimes or acts of violence. ... // Events and trends The 1990s are generally classified as having moved slightly away from the more conservative 1980s, but otherwise retaining the same mindset. ...


The miners' strike (19841985) saw thousands of police from various forces deployed against miners, frequently resulting in violent confontation. The miners strike of 1984-5 was a major piece of industrial action affecting the British coal industry. ... 1984 is a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1985 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The presence of Freemasons in the police caused disquiet in the early 1990s. the Square and Compasses Freemasonry is a worldwide fraternal organization. ...


Despite attempts to end racism and what has been described as "institutionalised racism" in the Police, especially since the 1993 murder of Stephen Lawrence, there have been ongoing problems. At the same time, some commentators and citizens' groups have claimed that political correctness and excessive sensitivity to issues of race and class have reduced the effectiveness of the police force, not least for people living in deprived areas or members of minority groups themselves. A black man drinks out of a water fountain designated for black people in 1939 at a streetcar terminal. ... 1993 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... Stephen Lawrence (September 14, 1974 - April 22, 1993) was a black British teenager living in London, UK, who was murdered in April 1993 at the age of 18. ... Political correctness is the alteration of language to redress real or alleged injustices and discrimination or to avoid offense. ...


In 2003, ten police officers from Greater Manchester Police, North Wales Police and Cheshire Constabulary were forced to resign after a BBC documentary, The Secret Policeman, shown on 21 October, revealed racism among recruits at Bruche Police National Training Centre at Warrington. On 4 March 2005 it was announced that minor disciplinary action would be taken against twelve other officers (eleven from Greater Manchester Police and one from Lancashire Constabulary) in connection with the programme, but that they would not lose their jobs. [2] 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cheshire Constabulary are the police force covering the English county of Cheshire and the independent areas of Runcorn , Widnes and Warrington. ... Corporate logo of the British Broadcasting Corporation The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is the national publicly funded broadcaster of the United Kingdom. ... October 21 is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 71 days remaining. ... Warrington, the United Kingdom’s third biggest town (as opposed to city), is a town and borough in North West England, between Manchester and Liverpool. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In November 2003 allegations were made that police officers were members of the far-right British National Party. 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The term far-right refers to the relative position a group or person occupies within a political spectrum. ... The British National Party (BNP) is the largest political party of the far-right in the United Kingdom. ...


The absence of a visible police presence on the streets also frequently causes concern. This is partially being addressed by the introduction of uniformed civilian Police Community Support Officers (PCSOs), following the passing of the Police Reform Act 2002, although these have been criticised for being a cheap alternative to fully-trained police officers. [3]. In the United Kingdom, a Police Community Support Officer (PCSO) is a uniformed civilian working with the Police. ...


At the beginning of 2005 it was announced that the Police Information Technology Organisation (PITO) had signed an eight-year £122m contract to introduce biometric identification technology [4]. PITO are also planning to use CCTV facial recognition systems to identify known suspects; a future link to the proposed National Identity Register has been suggested by some. [5] At Disney World, biometric measurements are taken of the fingers of multi-day pass users to ensure that the pass is used by the same person from day to day. ... The two-year-old Jamie Bulger being led away by his killers, recorded on shopping centre CCTV. Closed-circuit television (CCTV), as a collection of surveillance cameras doing video surveillance, is the use of television cameras for surveillance. ... A facial recognition system is a computer-driven application for automatically identifying a person from a digital image. ... After many years of discussion through successive governments, in 2003 Home Secretary David Blunkett announced that the government intends to introduce a British national identity card linked to a national identity database, the National Identity Register. ...


Police In Liverpool, England

In Liverpool slang Police are normally called "bizzies" and many smackheads standing outside shops shout "SHIT!! Bizzies" and bail to a hiding place. Also the yellow Caught on camera van is commonly known as " The Yellow Man"


See also

A British Transport Police motorcycle in London The British Transport Police (BTP) is a national police service for the railway system throughout Great Britain. ... Her Majestys Revenue and Customs (HMRC) is a new department of the British Government created by the merger of the Inland Revenue and Her Majestys Customs and Excise which came into formal effect on 18 April 2005. ... The International Criminal Police Organization – Interpol (ICPO-Interpol) was created in 1923 to assist international criminal police co-operation. ... // Territorial forces The territorial forces still use the boundaries of the local government areas (counties and Scottish regions) established in the 1974/1975 local government reorganisations (although with subsequent modifications). ... See also Fiat Panda. ... A jam sandwich is a sandwich containing jam. ... Police Complaints Authority The Police Complaints Authority no longer exists as it was replaced in April 2004 by the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC). ... New Scotland Yard, London New Scotland Yard, often referred to simply as Scotland Yard or The Yard, is the headquarters of the Metropolitan Police Service, responsible for policing Greater London (although not the City of London itself). ... The creation of the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) in the United Kingdom was announced on February 9, 2004. ... Special Branch is the arm of the British, Irish and many Commonwealth police forces that deals with national security matters. ... The Special Constabulary is the auxiliary wing of the British police. ... Most of the fifty-six UK Police forces use a standard set of ranks, listed here in ascending seniority. ... Shortcut: UK topics This is a list of topics related to the United Kingdom. ...

Databases

After many years of discussion through successive governments, in 2003 then British Home Secretary David Blunkett announced that the government intends to introduce a British national identity card linked to a national identity database, the National Identity Register, which will track all residents of the UK throughout their lives. ... In the United Kingdom, HOLMES2, the successor to HOLMES (Home Office Large Major Enquiry System), is an IT system used by the Police to assist with the investigation of serious crimes including murder, fraud and disasters. ... The Police National Computer (PNC) is a computer system used by police forces in the UK. Created in 1974 and now consisting of several databases accessible 24 hours a day, it is run by the Police Information Technology Organisation (PITO). ... In the United Kingdom, the Violent and Sex Offender Register (ViSOR) is a database that can be accessed by the Police and some Probation Service personnel. ... The United Kingdom National DNA Database (NDNAD; officially the UK National Criminal Intelligence DNA Database), set up in 1995, carries the profiles around 3 million people. ...

External links

  • UK Police Service portal
  • Association of Chief Police Officers
    • Police Guidelines
  • Association of Police Authorities
  • National Black Police Association
  • HM Inspectorate of Constabulary
  • Government Site on Police Reform
  • British Police Slang and Acronyms
  • Chronology of British Policing

  Results from FactBites:
 
British police - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2580 words)
The new Metropolitan Police, founded on September 29, was depersonalised, bureaucratic and hierarchical, with the new police constables instructed to prevent crime and pursue offenders.
However in contrast to the military gendarmerie forces of continental Europe, the British police, partly to counter public fears and objections concerning armed enforcers, were clearly civilian and their armament was initially limited to the truncheon.
However, the fragmented nature of the police was resistant to change, and there were still over 200 separate police forces before World War II and 117 before the mass reorganisation of the Police Act of 1964, which created 49 larger forces, some covering two or more counties or large urban areas.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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