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Encyclopedia > British banknotes

British banknotes are the banknotes of the United Kingdom and British Islands, denominated in pounds sterling (GBP). A £20 Ulster Bank banknote. ... Under the Interpretation Act 1978 of the United Kingdom, the term British Islands refers to the [[United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland] along with the Republic of Ireland], together with the Crown Dependencies: the Bailiwicks of Jersey and of Guernsey (which in turn includes the smaller islands of... The pound sterling is the official currency of the United Kingdom (UK). ...

Contents


Issuing banks

Pound sterling banknotes are issued:

These are legal tender in England and Wales, and generally accepted throughout the UK;
These are recognised currency in Scotland and generally accepted throughout the UK, though many people outside Scotland are unfamiliar with the notes and they may be refused.
These are rarely seen outside Northern Ireland. They are generally accepted in Scotland, but are often not accepted in England and Wales without some explanation.

Sterling banknotes are also issued by the following British dependencies outside the UK: Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... The Bank of England is the central bank of the United Kingdom, sometimes known as The Old Lady of Threadneedle Street or The Old Lady. The Bank of England // Functions of the Bank It performs all the recognized functions of a central bank -- to maintain price stability, and subject to... Legal tender or forced tender is payment that cannot be refused in settlement of a debt by virtue of law. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... National motto: Cymru am byth (Welsh: Wales for ever) Waless location within the UK Official languages English, Welsh Capital Cardiff Largest city Cardiff First Minister Rhodri Morgan Area  - Total Ranked 3rd UK 20,779 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 3rd UK 2,903,085 140/km² Ethnicity: 97. ... ... The Governor and Company of the Bank of Scotland is a major commercial bank in Scotland, and, to a lesser extent, in the rest of the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. ... The Royal Bank of Scotland LSE: RBSis one of Scotlands four national clearing banks and one of the oldest in the UK, founded in Edinburgh in 1727 by Royal Charter. ... Categories: Stub | Banks of the United Kingdom ... Royal motto: Quis separabit (Latin: Who will separate?) Northern Irelands location within the UK Official languages English, Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Area  - Total Ranked 4th 13,843 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 4th 1,685,267 122/km² NUTS 1... The Bank of Ireland (ISEQ: BKIR_p) LSE: BKIR NYSE: IRE, officially known as the Governor and Company of the Bank of Ireland is a commercial bank operation on the island of Ireland, one of the Big Four. The bank was formed by an Act of the Irish Parliament in 1782... First Trust Bank, part of the AIB Group, is a commercial bank in Northern Ireland. ... Northern Bank, is a commercial bank in Northern Ireland. ... Ulster Bank (Irish: Banc Uladh) is a large commercial bank, one of the Big Four in Ireland. ...

Bank of England notes are the only banknotes that are legal tender in England and Wales. Scottish, Northern Ireland, Jersey, Guernsey and Manx banknotes are not legal tender in England and Wales. However, they are not illegal under English law and creditors and traders may accept them if they so choose. The Isle of Man (Ellan Vannin in Manx) or Mann (Mannin in Manx), is a self-governing democracy located in the Irish Sea at the geographical centre of the British Isles. ... The Bailiwick of Jersey (Jèrriais: Jèrri) is a Crown dependency off the coast of Normandy, France. ... The Bailiwick of Guernsey (French: Bailliage de Guernesey) is a British crown dependency in the English Channel off the coast of Normandy. ... Legal tender or forced tender is payment that cannot be refused in settlement of a debt by virtue of law. ...


In Scotland and Northern Ireland no banknotes - not even ones issued in those regions - are legal tender, although Bank of England one pound notes were when they existed: Bank of England notes of under five pounds value are legal tender. Scottish and Northern Irish notes are 'promissory notes', essentially cheques made out from the bank to 'the bearer', as the wording on each note says.


Most of the notes issued in Scotland and Northern Ireland have to be backed by Bank of England notes held by the issuing bank. To make this possible the Bank of England issues one million pound notes for internal use by the other banks.


Issuers

England and Wales

Bank of England notes

A £10 Bank of England note.
A £10 Bank of England note.
A £20 Bank of England note.
A £20 Bank of England note.

In 1921 the Bank of England gained a legal monopoly on the issue of banknotes in England and Wales, a process that started in 1844 when the ability of other banks to issues notes was restricted. Image File history File links Permission granted by Bank of England for display on Wikipedia for a period of 12 months, ending 29 July 2006. ... Image File history File links Permission granted by Bank of England for display on Wikipedia for a period of 12 months, ending 29 July 2006. ... Image File history File links Permission granted by Bank of England for display on Wikipedia for a period of 12 months, ending 29 July 2006. ... Image File history File links Permission granted by Bank of England for display on Wikipedia for a period of 12 months, ending 29 July 2006. ... 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Bank of England is the central bank of the United Kingdom, sometimes known as The Old Lady of Threadneedle Street or The Old Lady. The Bank of England // Functions of the Bank It performs all the recognized functions of a central bank -- to maintain price stability, and subject to... In economics, a monopoly (from the Greek monos, one + polein, to sell) is defined as a persistent market situation where there is only one provider of a kind of product or service. ... 1844 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


The bank issued its first banknotes in 1694, although until 1745 they were written for irregular amounts, rather than pre-defined multiples of a pound. It tended to be times of war, which put inflationary pressure on the British economy which led to greater note issue. In 1759 during the Seven Years' War, when the lowest value note issued by the Bank was £20, a £10 note was issued for the first time. In 1793, during the war with revolutionary France, the Bank issued the first £5 note. Four years later, £1 and £2 notes appeared, although not on a permanent basis. Notes did not become entirely machine-printed and payable to the bearer until 1855. Events February 6 - The colony Quilombo dos Palmares is destroyed. ... // Events May 11 - War of Austrian Succession: Battle of Fontenoy - At Fontenoy, French forces defeat an Anglo-Dutch-Hanoverian army including the Black Watch June 4 – Frederick the Great destroys Austrian army at Hohenfriedberg August 19 - Beginning of the 45 Jacobite Rising at Glenfinnan September 12 - Francis I is elected... 1759 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Seven Years War, sometimes referred to as the Pomeranian War, (1754 and 1756–1763) pitted Great Britain, Prussia, and Hanover against France, Austria, Russia, Sweden, and Saxony. ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


At the start of World War I, the government issued £1 and 10-shilling Treasury notes to supplant the sovereign and half-sovereign gold coins. The first coloured banknotes were issued in 1928, and were also the first notes to be printed on both sides. World War II saw a reversal in the trend of warfare creating more notes when, in order to combat forgery, higher denomination notes (at the time as high as £1,000) were removed from circulation. World War I was primarily a European conflict with many facets: immense human sacrifice, stalemate trench warfare, and the use of new, devastating weapons - tanks, aircraft, machine guns, and poison gas World War I, also known as the First World War, the Great War, the War of the Nations and... Three Gold Sovreigns with a Krugerrand A gold sovereign is a British gold coin, first issued in 1489 for Henry VII, generally with a value of one pound. ... 1915 half sovereign: reverse The half sovereign was first introduced in 1544 under Henry VIII. It was a gold coin valued at ten shillings. ... Color is an important part of the visual arts. ... 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrination, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons such as the atom bomb. ... Operation Bernhard was the name of a secret German plan devised during the Second World War to destabilise the British economy by flooding the country with forged Bank of England £5, £10, £20, and £50 notes. ...


As of July 2005 the Bank of England banknotes in circulation, known as Series E, do not exceed £50. Higher notes are used within the banks, particularly those of £1 million and £100 million notes to maintain parity with issued Scottish and Northern Irish notes. The notes are as follows: 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Issues of banknotes by Scottish and Northern Irish banks have to be backed by Bank of England notes, other than a small amount representing the currency in circulation in 1845, for which purpose special million pound notes are used, though these resemble simple IOUs and bear no aesthetic design features. [1] Elizabeth Fry Elizabeth Fry (May 21, 1780 — October 12, 1845) was an English prison reformer, social reformer and philanthropist. ... In his lifetime Charles Darwin gained international fame as a controversial and influential scientist. ... Genera Many, see text. ... HMS Beagle (centre) from an 1841 watercolour by Owen Stanley, painted during the third voyage while surveying Australia. ... Sir Edward Elgar Sir Edward William Elgar, 1st Baronet, OM, GCVO (2 June 1857 â€“ 23 February 1934) was an English composer, born in the small village of Lower Broadheath outside Worcester, Worcestershire, to William Elgar, a piano tuner and music dealer, and his wife Ann. ... A plan of Worcester Cathedral made in 1836. ... Sir John Houblon (1632 - 1711) was the Bank of Englands first Governor, and held the post during 1694–1697. ...


As of 2005, they are signed by the Chief Cashier, Andrew Bailey. 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


All the notes issued since Series C in 1960 also depict Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom in full view facing left and as a watermark, hidden, facing right; recent issues have the EURion constellation around. The custom of depicting historical figures on the reverse began with Series D in 1970. Previous banknotes have depicted Sir Isaac Newton, the Duke of Wellington, Florence Nightingale, William Shakespeare, Sir Christopher Wren, George Stephenson, Charles Dickens and Michael Faraday 1960 was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor), born 21 April 1926, is the Queen regnant of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Jamaica, Barbados, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and... This Crown & CA (for Crown Agent) watermark was standard for postage stamps of the British colonies from the 1880s to the 1920s. ... The small circles or dots constituting the EURion constellation are clearly visible on the centre-left of 10 euro banknotes. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Sir Isaac Newton, PRS (25 December 1642 (OS) – 20 March 1727 (OS) / 4 January 1643 (NS) – 31 March 1727 (NS)) was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, inventor, philosopher and alchemist. ... The Most Noble Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (c. ... Florence Nightingale, OM (12 May 1820–13 August 1910), who came to be known as The Lady with the Lamp, was the pioneer of modern nursing. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Christopher Wren by Godfrey Kneller, 1711. ... George Stephenson Statue of George Stephenson at the National Railway Museum, York George Stephenson (9 June 1781 – 12 August 1848) was a British engineer who designed a famous and historically important steam-powered locomotive named Rocket, and is known as the Father of British Steam Railways. ... Dickens was a prolific writer who was almost always working on a new installment for a story and rarely missed a deadline. ... Michael Faraday Michael Faraday (September 22, 1791 – August 25, 1867) was a British scientist (a physicist and chemist) who contributed significantly to the fields of electromagnetism and electrochemistry. ...


The Bank of England Series D one pound note was discontinued in 1984, being replaced by a pound coin. This page is about the year 1984. ... This article discusses the British One Pound circulating coin issued since 1983, only. ...


Scotland

Bank of Scotland notes

A £50 Bank of Scotland note.
A £50 Bank of Scotland note.

In circulation: Bank of Scotland £50 note illustration This work is copyrighted. ... Bank of Scotland £50 note illustration This work is copyrighted. ...

All the notes also depict Sir Walter Scott who was instrumental in retaining the right of Scottish banks to issue their own notes in the 1840s. The word vignette has several meanings, depending on the context. ... Oil is a generic term for organic liquids that are not miscible with water. ... Strathisla whisky distillery in Keith, Scotland Distillation is a means of separating liquids through differences in their vapor pressures. ... The Brewer, designed and engraved, in the Sixteenth. ... Research is an active, diligent, and systematic process of inquiry in order to discover, interpret and/or revise facts. ... Resources ArtLex. ... Look up Culture in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Wikinews has news related to this article: Culture and entertainment Dictionary of the History of Ideas: Cultural Development in Antiquity Dictionary of the History of Ideas: Culture and Civilization in Modern Times Classificatory system for cultures and civilizations, by Dr. Sam Vaknin... Tigers playing in the water Girl playing on tyre swing Adults enjoying the day. ... A tourist boat travels the River Seine in Paris, France Beaches make popular tourist resorts. ... Sir Walter Scott, Bart. ... // Events and Trends Technology First use of anaesthesia in an operation, by Crawford Long War, peace and politics First signing of the Treaty of Waitangi (Te Tiriti o Waitangi) on February 6, 1840 at Waitangi New Zealand. ...


Royal Bank of Scotland notes

A £100 Royal Bank of Scotland note.
A £100 Royal Bank of Scotland note.

in circulation are: Image File history File links Royal Bank of Scotland £100 illustration OR EITHER File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Royal Bank of Scotland £100 illustration OR EITHER File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

All these notes also depict Lord Ilay (1682-1761), first governor of the bank. Edinburgh Castle and NorLoch, around 1780 by Alexander Nasmyth Edinburgh Castle is an ancient stronghold on the Castle Rock in the centre of the city of Edinburgh, has been in use by assorted military forces since prehistoric times and only transferred from the Ministry of Defence recently. ... Culzean Castle (pronounced cull-ANE) is a castle near Maybole on the Ayrshire coast of Scotland. ... Glamis Castle Glamis Castle is situated beside the village of Glamis — pronounced Glahmz (in IPA [ɡlɑːmz]) — in the county of Angus, Scotland. ... Brodick Castle is a castle situated outside the port of Brodick on the Isle of Arran, an island in the Firth of Clyde, Scotland. ... Inverness Castle Inverness Castle sits on a cliff overlooking the River Ness, in Scotland. ... Balmoral Castle Balmoral Castle, painted by Queen Victoria in 1854 during its construction Balmoral Castle is a large mansion built by Queen Victoria in the Scottish baronial style on the River Dee in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, current (as of 2004) summer residence of Queen Elizabeth II, who stays there for 12... Archibald Campbell, 3rd Duke of Argyll, 1st Earl of Islay (June 1682 - April 15, 1761) was a Scottish nobleman, politician, lawyer, and soldier. ... Events March 11 – Chelsea hospital for soldiers is founded in England May 6 - Louis XIV of France moves his court to Versailles. ... 1761 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... A governor is also a device that regulates the speed of a machine. ...


Occasionally the Royal Bank issues commemorative banknotes, usually in the £5 denomination. Examples are for the 100th birthday of Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother in 2000, and honouring veteran golfer Jack Nicklaus in his last competitive Open competition at St Andrews in 2005 (an issue of two million notes). Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother Lady Elizabeth Angela Marguerite Bowes-Lyon (4 August 1900 – 30 March 2002) as Queen Elizabeth was the Queen consort of George VI of the United Kingdom from 1936 to 1952 and the mother of his successor, Queen Elizabeth II, the current British monarch. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... // Jack William Nicklaus (born January 21, 1940 in Columbus, Ohio), also known as The Golden Bear, was a major force in professional golf from the 1960s to the late 1990s, and is regarded as the greatest golfer of all time. ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Clydesdale Bank notes

A £20 Clydesdale Bank note.
A £20 Clydesdale Bank note.

Clydesdale Bank £20 illustration This work is copyrighted. ... Clydesdale Bank £20 illustration This work is copyrighted. ... Robert Burns, preeminent Scottish poet Statue of Burns in London Robert Burns (January 25, 1759 – July 21, 1796) is the best known of the poets who have written in Scots. ... Field mouse may refer to: in North America, a small vole such as the Meadow Vole in Europe, Asia and north Africa, one of several species of mice in genus Apodemus in South America, one of several species of mice in genus Akodon This is a disambiguation page — a navigational... Mary Slessor Mary Slessor (2 December 1848 - 13 January 1915) was a Scottish missionary to Nigeria. ... A map of the world by Johannes Kepler A map is a simplified depiction of a space, a navigational aid which highlights relations between objects within that space. ... Location of Calabar in Nigeria Calabar is a city in south eastern Nigeria. ... // Etymology World map showing Africa (geographically) The name Africa came into Western use through the Romans, who used the name Africa terra — land of the Afri (plural, or Afer singular) — for the northern part of the continent, as the province of Africa with its capital Carthage, corresponding to... A missionary is a propagator of religion, often an evangelist or other representative of a religious community who works among those outside of that community. ... Robert I, King of Scots, usually known as Robert the Bruce (July 11, 1274 – June 7, 1329, reigned 1306 – 1329), was, according to a modern biographer (Geoffrey Barrow), a great hero who lived in a minor country. ... Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The Horse (Equus caballus) is a sizeable ungulate mammal, one of the seven modern species of the genus Equus. ... Stirling Castle (southwest aspect) Stirling Castle is an historic castle in Stirling, Scotland. ... For other people named Adam Smith, see Adam Smith (disambiguation). ... A modern hammer is directly descended from ancient hand tools A tool is a device that provides a mechanical or mental advantage in accomplishing a simple machine, or a combination of them. ... Wooden sailing boat Sailing is the skillful art of controlling the motion of a sailing ship or smaller boat, across a body of water using wind as the source of power. ... Italian ship-rigged vessel Amerigo Vespucci in New York Harbor, 1976 A ship is a large, sea-going watercraft, sometimes with multiple decks. ... William Thomson, Archbishop of York, has the same name as this man. ... The University of Glasgow is the largest of the three universities in Glasgow, Scotland. ...

Northern Ireland

Bank of Ireland notes

All Bank of Ireland notes feature Queen's University on the obverse. The principle difference between the denominations is their colour and size. For other educational establishments called Queens, see Queens College and Queens University (disambiguation) Queens University, Belfast - or officially The Queens University of Belfast (QUB; in Irish, Ollscoil na Banríona, Béal Feirste) - is a university in Belfast, Northern Ireland. ...

  • 5 pound note, blue
  • 10 pound note, pink
  • 20 pound note, green
  • 50 pound note, blue-green

For other uses, see Blue (disambiguation) Blue is one of the three primary additive colors; blue light has the shortest wavelength range (about 420–490 nanometers) of the three additive primary colors. ... Pink is a color made by mixing red and white and sometimes described as being a light red, but it is more accurately a bright undersaturated red. ... Look up green in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

First Trust Bank notes

A £100 First Trust Bank note.
A £100 First Trust Bank note.

First Trust Bank is the successor to the Allied Irish Banks (AIB). It was formed by a merger of the Northern Irish parts of AIB and TSB. AIB was itself the successor to the Provincial Bank of Ireland following another merger. The banknotes issued by First Trust Bank continue the series started by the Provincial Bank of Ireland, also issued by AIB. N Ireland First Trust Bank £100 illo This work is copyrighted. ... N Ireland First Trust Bank £100 illo This work is copyrighted. ...


First Trust Bank's current notes depict generic people of Northern Ireland on the front, alternately male and female, but with a pair of older people on the £100. The obverse generally features designs associated with the Spanish Armada, or coastal features. Male symbol Male is the sex of an organism, or a part of an organism, which produces sperm. ... Female symbol Female is the sex of an organism, or a part of an organism, which produces egg cells. ... The Spanish Armada or Great/ Grand Armada(Old Spanish: Grande y Felicísima Armada, large and most fortunate fleet; but called by the English, with ironic intention, la Armada Invencible, the Invincible Fleet) was the largest fleet to date, sent by the Catholic King Philip II of Spain in 1588... A coastal image featured on a United States postal stamp. ...

  • 10 pound note featuring the Girona (galeass) on the obverse
  • 20 pound note featuring the chimney at Lagada Point on the obverse
  • 50 pound note featuring a commemorative medal on the obverse
  • 100 pound note featuring the Armada on the obverse

A 5 pound note featuring Dunluce Castle on the obverse was issued by the Provincial Bank of Ireland and by AIB but has not been issued by First Trust Bank. A chimney is a system for venting hot gases and smoke from a boiler, stove, furnace or fireplace to the outside atmosphere. ... A Medal can mean three things: a wearable medal awarded by a government for services to a country (such as Armed force service); strictly speaking this only refers to a medal of coin-like appearance, but informally the word also refers to an Order (decoration); a table medal awarded by...


Northern Bank notes

A £20 Northern Bank note (this version was withdrawn in 2005).
A £20 Northern Bank note (this version was withdrawn in 2005).
£5 Northern Bank note (front)
£5 Northern Bank note (front)
  • 5 pound polymer note featuring the U.S. space shuttle
  • 10 pound note featuring J.B. Dunlop on the front and the portico of Belfast's city hall on the back
  • 20 pound note featuring Harry Ferguson on the front and the portico of Belfast City Hall on the back
  • 50 pound note featuring Sir S.C. Davidson on the front and the portico of Belfast City Hall on the back
  • 100 pound note featuring Sir James Martin on the front and the portico of Belfast City Hall on the back

Following the theft of £22 million from its money handling centre in Belfast on 22 December 2004, allegedly by the Provisional IRA, Northern Bank announced on 7 January 2005 that all its notes were to be recalled and reissued in different colours and styles, and using the bank's new logo. The reissue began on 14 March 2005. See Northern Bank robbery. Northern Ireland Northern Bank £20 illo This work is copyrighted. ... Northern Ireland Northern Bank £20 illo This work is copyrighted. ... Image File history File links 5 GBP Schein aus Polymer, Vorderseite Source: © Northern Bank File links The following pages link to this file: Pound sterling ... Image File history File links 5 GBP Schein aus Polymer, Vorderseite Source: © Northern Bank File links The following pages link to this file: Pound sterling ... A polymer is a generic term used to describe a substantially long molecule. ... ... The Space Shuttle Columbia seconds after engine ignition, 1981 (NASA). ... Categories: Architectural elements | Stub ... Belfast (Béal Feirste in Irish) is a city in the United Kingdom, and the second-largest city on the island of Ireland. ... Small-town post office and town hall A city hall, or town hall is the headquarters of a citys (or towns) administration. ... Harry Ferguson (Ferguson) was a Formula One constructor from Britain which participated in a single grand prix. ... Several people have the name James Martin: James Martin, former Premier of New South Wales James Martin, computer systems design author. ... Belfast (Béal Feirste in Irish) is a city in the United Kingdom, and the second-largest city on the island of Ireland. ... December 22 is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA) is a paramilitary group which aimed, through the use of violence, to achieve three goals: (i) British withdrawal from Ireland, (ii) the political unification of Ireland through the merger of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland , and (iii) the creation of an all... January 7 is the seventh day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 14 is the 73rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (74th in Leap years) with 292 days remaining in the year. ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Notes such as this Northern Bank £20 note were stolen. ...


Ulster Bank notes

A £20 Ulster Bank note.
A £20 Ulster Bank note.

Ulster Bank's current notes all share a rather plain design of a view of Belfast harbour flanked by landscape views; the design of the reverse is dominated by the bank's coats-of-arms. The principal difference between the denominations is their colour and size. Ulster Bank £20 illo This work is copyrighted. ... Ulster Bank £20 illo This work is copyrighted. ... A harbor (or harbour) or haven is a place where ships may shelter from the weather or are stored. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ...

  • 5 pound note, purple.
  • 10 pound note, blue-green.
  • 20 pound note, purple.
  • 50 pound note, blue.

Chromaticity diagram. ... For other uses, see Blue (disambiguation) Blue is one of the three primary additive colors; blue light has the shortest wavelength range (about 420–490 nanometers) of the three additive primary colors. ... Look up green in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Channel Islands

States of Jersey notes

The obverse of a Jersey £20 pound note.
The obverse of a Jersey £20 pound note.
The reverse of a Jersey £20 pound note.
The reverse of a Jersey £20 pound note.

Main article: Jersey pound States of Jersey £20 note - front File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... States of Jersey £20 note - front File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... States of Jersey £20 note - back This work is copyrighted. ... States of Jersey £20 note - back This work is copyrighted. ... The Jersey pound is the pound sterling issued in Jersey. ...


The Treasurer of the States of Jersey, Channel Islands, holds £1.10 in Bank of England notes for each £1 issued, making the Jersey Pound a very strong currency. The current notes depict Queen Elizabeth II on the front and various landmarks of Jersey or incidents in Jersey history on the reverse. The watermark is a Jersey cow The island of Jersey and the other Channel Islands represent the last remnants of the medieval Duchy of Normandy that held sway in both France and England. ... A Jersey cow in the western United States. ...

Saint Helier (Jèrriais: St Hélyi) is one of the twelve parishes and the largest town on Jersey, the largest of the Channel Islands in the English Channel. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... An anniversary (from the Latin anniversarius, meaning returning yearly) is a day that commemorates and/or celebrates an event that occurred on the same day of the year some time in the past. ... The Duchy of Normandy stems from the Viking invasions of France in the 8th century. ... // Events February - Byzantine emperor Alexius IV is overthrown in a revolution, and Alexius V is proclaimed emperor. ... Mont Orgueil (French: Mount Pride) has guarded Jerseys east coast since the 13th century Mont Orgueil is a castle in Jersey. ... Saint-Malo sculpture commemorating a maritime rescue in 1995 La Corbière (Jèrriais: La Corbiéthe) is the extreme south-western point of Jersey in St. ... The Peggys Point lighthouse in Nova Scotia, Canada An aid for navigation and pilotage at sea, a lighthouse is a tower building or framework sending out light from a system of lamps and lenses or, in older times, from a fire. ... Red is a color at the lowest frequencies of light discernible by the human eye. ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Ruins of Grosnez Castle Saint Ouen (Jèrriais: St Ouën) is one of the twelve parishes of Jersey in the Channel Islands. ... Brown is a color produced by mixing small intensities of red and green, orange and blue, or yellow and purple pigment. ... Government House is the name usually given to the residence of Governors-General, Governors and Lieutenant-Governors in the Commonwealth and the former British Empire. ...

States of Guernsey notes

Main article: Guernsey pound The Guernsey pound (currency code GGP) is the currency used in Guernsey. ...


The Guernsey Pound is legal tender only in Guernsey, but also circulates freely in Jersey. Elsewhere it can be exchanged in banks and bureaux de change. In addition to coins, the following banknotes are also used Legal tender or forced tender is payment that cannot be refused in settlement of a debt by virtue of law. ... The term Bureau de Change is a term used, mainly in Europe, to describe a bank or facility which changes one currency to another. ... A £20 Ulster Bank banknote. ...

  • 1 pound note, green, Daniel De Lisle Brock, Bailiff of Guernsey 1762 - 1842 and Royal Court, St Peter Port 1840 on front and the Market, St Peter Port on back
  • 5 pound note, pink, Queen Elizabeth II and the Town Church, St Peter Port on front, and Fort Grey and Hanois Lighthouse 1862 on the back
  • 10 pound note, blue/orange, Queen Elizabeth II and Elizabeth College, St Peter Port on the front and Saumarez Park, Les Niaux Watermill, Le Trepid Dolmen on the back
  • 20 pound note, pink, Queen Elizabeth II and St James Concert Hall, St Peter Port on the front and Vale Castle and St Sampson's Church on the back

The Bailiwick of Guernsey is a British crown dependency off the coast of France. ... 1762 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... This is a map of Guernsey. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor), born 21 April 1926, is the Queen regnant of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Jamaica, Barbados, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and...

The monarch on bank notes

Queen Elizabeth II was not the first British monarch to have her face on UK banknotes. Georges II, III and IV appeared on early Royal Bank of Scotland notes and George V appeared on 10 shillings and 1 pound notes issued by the Treasury between 1914 and 1928. However, prior to the issue of its Series C banknotes in 1960, Bank of England banknotes did not depict the monarch. Today, notes issued by the other note issuing banks do not depict the monarch. The shilling (or informally: bob) was a British coin first issued in 1548 for Henry VIII, although arguably the testoon issued about 1487 for Henry VII was the first shilling. ... A treasury is the part of a government which manages all money and revenue. ... 1960 was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ...


The monarch is depicted on banknotes issued by the Crown dependencies.


External links

  • Bank of England banknote page
  • Bank of England Other Banknotes page
  • Committee of Scottish Clearing Bankers home page
  • RBS Jack Nicklaus commemorative £5 note description {PDF file}

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
British & Foreign Banknotes (1608 words)
A banknote is a form of promissory note, which developed from the bill of exchange - an open letter requesting one person to pay a stated sum of money to another on behalf of the person who wrote the letter.
Banknotes were payable on demand, it being an act of bankruptcy not to immediately meet such a demand.
Banknotes would often be exhibited at bankruptcy hearings as evidence of debt.
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: British banknotes (6005 words)
British banknotes are the banknotes of the United Kingdom and British Islands, denominated in pounds sterling (GBP).
In 1920, the silver content of all British coins was reduced from 92.5% to 50%, with a portion of the remainder consisting of manganese, which caused the coins to tarnish to a very dark color after they had been in circulation for a significant period.
British government sources suggest that prices have risen over 61 fold since 1914, so a mediaeval sterling silver penny might be worth around £4.50 today, and a farthing (a quarter penny) would have the value of slightly more than today's pound.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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