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Encyclopedia > British Royal Family
Members of the Royal Family, during the lifetime of the late Queen Mother, on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after the Trooping the Colour ceremony.

The British Royal Family is the group of close relatives of the monarch of the United Kingdom. The term is also commonly applied to the same group of people as the relations of the monarch in his or her role as sovereign of any of the other Commonwealth realms, thus sometimes at variance with official national terms for the family.[1] Members of the royal family belong to, or are married into, the House of Windsor, since 1917, when George V changed the name of the royal house from Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. Image File history File links British_Royal_Family_reduced. ... Image File history File links British_Royal_Family_reduced. ... Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ... Mounted Bands at Trooping the Colour 2006. ... The Commonwealth Realms, shown in pink A Commonwealth Realm is any one of the sixteen sovereign states within the Commonwealth of Nations that recognise Elizabeth II as their respective monarch. ... For the documentary series, see Monarchy (TV series). ... The Commonwealth Realms, shown in pink A Commonwealth Realm is any one of the sixteen sovereign states within the Commonwealth of Nations that recognise Elizabeth II as their respective monarch. ... The House of Windsor is the current Royal House of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and each of the other Commonwealth Realms. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... Capitals Coburg and Gotha Head of State Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha Saxe-Coburg and Gotha or Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (German: Sachsen-Coburg und Gotha) served as the name of the two German duchies of Saxe-Coburg and Saxe-Gotha in Germany, in the present-day states of Bavaria...


Although in the United Kingdom there is no strict legal or formal definition of who is or is not a member of the Royal Family,[2] and different lists will include different people, those carrying the style His or Her Majesty (HM), or His or Her Royal Highness (HRH) are generally considered members, which usually results in the application of the term to the monarch, the consort of the monarch, the widowed consorts of previous monarchs, the children of the monarch, the male-line grandchildren of the monarch, and the spouses and the widowed spouses of a monarch's son and male-line grandsons. A style of office, or honorific, is a form of address which by tradition or law precedes a reference to a person who holds a title or post, or to the political office itself. ... Look up majesty in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Majesty is an English word rooting in the Latin Maiestas, meaning literally, Greatness. ... Royal Highness (abbreviation HRH) is a style (His Royal Highness or Her Royal Highness); plural Royal Highnesses (abbreviation TRH, Their Royal Highnesses). ...


Members and relatives of the British Royal Family historically represented the monarch in various places throughout the British Empire, sometimes for extended periods as viceroys, or for specific ceremonies or events. Today, they often perform ceremonial and social duties throughout the United Kingdom and abroad on behalf of the UK, but, aside from the monarch, have no constitutional role in the affairs of government. This is the same for the other realms of the Commonwealth, in personal union with the United Kingdom, though the family there acts on behalf of, is funded by, and represents the sovereign of that particular state, and not Britain. For a comprehensive list of the territories that formed the British Empire, see Evolution of the British Empire. ... A viceroy is a royal official who governs a country or province in the name of and as representative of the monarch. ... The Commonwealth Realms, shown in pink A Commonwealth Realm is any one of the sixteen sovereign states within the Commonwealth of Nations that recognise Elizabeth II as their respective monarch. ... It has been suggested that Dynastic union be merged into this article or section. ...

Contents

List of members

Members of the Royal Family gathered for a dinner celebrating the 60th wedding anniversary of Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of Edinburgh.
Members of the Royal Family gathered for a dinner celebrating the 60th wedding anniversary of Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of Edinburgh.

This is a list of current members of the Royal Family: Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ...

Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (born Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark, 10 June 1921)[2] is the husband and consort of Queen Elizabeth II. Originally a royal Prince of Greece and Denmark, Prince Philip renounced these titles shortly before his marriage. ... A consort is somebodys spouse, usually a royalty. ... “Prince Charles” redirects here. ... Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall (Camilla Rosemary; formerly Parker Bowles; née Shand, born 17 July 1947) is the second wife of Charles, Prince of Wales, heir apparent to the thrones of the United Kingdom and the other 15 Commonwealth Realms. ... Prince William redirects here. ... Prince Henry of Wales (Henry Charles Albert David; born 15 September 1984), commonly known as Prince Harry, is the younger son of Charles, Prince of Wales, and his first wife, the late Diana, Princess of Wales. ... The Prince Andrew, The Duke of York (Andrew Albert Christian Edward; born 19 February 1960) is a member of the British Royal Family, the third child and second son of Queen Elizabeth II. He has held the title of Duke of York since 1986. ... “Princess Beatrice” redirects here. ... Princess Eugenie of York (Eugenie Victoria Helena; born 23 March 1990) is a member of the British Royal Family and a granddaughter of Queen Elizabeth II. Princess Eugenie is sixth in the Line of succession to the British Throne and has been since her birth in 1990. ... The Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, KG, KCVO, SOM (Edward Antony Richard Louis Mountbatten-Windsor; born 10 March 1964) is a member of the British Royal Family, the youngest child and third son of Queen Elizabeth II. He has held the title of Earl of Wessex since 1999. ... The Countess of Wessex (Sophie Helen; neé Rhys-Jones, born 20 January 1965), is a member of the British Royal Family, the wife of Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, the youngest son of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. ... The Lady Louise Windsor (Louise Alice Elizabeth Mary; born 8 November 2003) is a member of the British Royal Family. ... Princess Anne redirects here. ... Prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester (Richard Alexander Walter George; born 26 August 1944) is a member of the British Royal Family, a grandson of George V. He has been Duke of Gloucester since his fathers death in 1974. ... Image:Birgitte Van Deurs. ... Field Marshal Prince Edward, Duke of Kent (Edward George Nicholas Patrick Paul; born 9 October 1935) is a member of the British Royal Family, a grandchild of George V. He has held the title of Duke of Kent since 1942. ... Her Royal Highness Princess Edward, Duchess of Kent (Katharine Lucy Mary Windsor, formerly Worsley), styled HRH The Duchess of Kent, is a member of the British Royal Family the wife of HRH Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, a grandson of King George V and cousin of Queen Elizabeth II. The... Prince Michael of Kent, GCVO (Michael George Charles Franklin Windsor; born 4 July 1942) is a member of the British Royal Family, a grandson of King George V and Queen Mary. ... Princess Michael of Kent (née Baroness Marie-Christine Agnes Hedwig Ida von Reibnitz, 15 January 1945), is a member of the British Royal Family. ... Princess Alexandra, The Honourable Lady Ogilvy (Alexandra Helen Elizabeth Olga Christabel; born 25 December 1936), is a member of the British Royal Family, a granddaughter of George V. She was married to the late Sir Angus Ogilvy. ...

Family tree of members

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
HM George V
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
HM George VI
 
 
 
 
 
HRH Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
HRH Prince George, Duke of Kent
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
HM The Queen
 
HRH The Duke of Edinburgh
 
HRH The Duke of Gloucester
 
HRH The Duchess of Gloucester
 
HRH The Duke of Kent
 
HRH The Duchess of Kent
 
HRH Prince Michael of Kent
 
HRH Princess Michael of Kent
 
HRH Princess Alexandra
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
HRH The Prince of Wales
 
HRH The Duchess of Cornwall
 
HRH The Duke of York
 
 
 
HRH The Earl of Wessex
 
HRH The Countess of Wessex
 
HRH The Princess Royal
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
HRH Prince William of Wales
 
HRH Prince Henry of Wales
 
HRH Princess Beatrice of York
 
HRH Princess Eugenie of York
 
Viscount Severn
 
Lady Louise Windsor

HM can signify: Air Seychelles: IATA code Heard Island and McDonald Islands: ISO 3166 digram and FIPS PUB 10-4 territory code HM (patient), pseudonym of a man with no long-term memory (also written H.M.) HM Magazine, a Christian Hard rock magazine His Majesty/Her Majesty, a form... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... HM can signify: Air Seychelles: IATA code Heard Island and McDonald Islands: ISO 3166 digram and FIPS PUB 10-4 territory code HM (patient), pseudonym of a man with no long-term memory (also written H.M.) HM Magazine, a Christian Hard rock magazine His Majesty/Her Majesty, a form... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 11 December 1936 until his death. ... HRH is an abbreviation for the style His Royal Highness or Her Royal Highness. ... The Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester (Henry William Frederick Albert; 31 March 1900 – 10 June 1974) was a member of the British Royal Family, the third son of George V of the United Kingdom and Queen Mary, and thus uncle to Elizabeth II. He was appointed regent for his niece... HRH is an abbreviation for the style His Royal Highness or Her Royal Highness. ... The Prince George, Duke of Kent (George Edward Alexander Edmund; 20 December 1902 - 25 August 1942) was a member of the British Royal Family, the fourth son of George V and Mary of Teck. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (born Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark, 10 June 1921)[2] is the husband and consort of Queen Elizabeth II. Originally a royal Prince of Greece and Denmark, Prince Philip renounced these titles shortly before his marriage. ... Prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester (Richard Alexander Walter George; born 26 August 1944) is a member of the British Royal Family, a grandson of George V. He has been Duke of Gloucester since his fathers death in 1974. ... Image:Birgitte Van Deurs. ... Field Marshal Prince Edward, Duke of Kent (Edward George Nicholas Patrick Paul; born 9 October 1935) is a member of the British Royal Family, a grandchild of George V. He has held the title of Duke of Kent since 1942. ... Her Royal Highness Princess Edward, Duchess of Kent (Katharine Lucy Mary Windsor, formerly Worsley), styled HRH The Duchess of Kent, is a member of the British Royal Family the wife of HRH Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, a grandson of King George V and cousin of Queen Elizabeth II. The... Prince Michael of Kent, GCVO (Michael George Charles Franklin Windsor; born 4 July 1942) is a member of the British Royal Family, a grandson of King George V and Queen Mary. ... Princess Michael of Kent (née Baroness Marie-Christine Agnes Hedwig Ida von Reibnitz, 15 January 1945), is a member of the British Royal Family. ... Princess Alexandra, The Honourable Lady Ogilvy (Alexandra Helen Elizabeth Olga Christabel; born 25 December 1936), is a member of the British Royal Family, a granddaughter of George V. She was married to the late Sir Angus Ogilvy. ... “Prince Charles” redirects here. ... Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall (Camilla Rosemary; formerly Parker Bowles; née Shand, born 17 July 1947) is the second wife of Charles, Prince of Wales, heir apparent to the thrones of the United Kingdom and the other 15 Commonwealth Realms. ... The Prince Andrew, The Duke of York (Andrew Albert Christian Edward; born 19 February 1960) is a member of the British Royal Family, the third child and second son of Queen Elizabeth II. He has held the title of Duke of York since 1986. ... The Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, KG, KCVO, SOM (Edward Antony Richard Louis Mountbatten-Windsor; born 10 March 1964) is a member of the British Royal Family, the youngest child and third son of Queen Elizabeth II. He has held the title of Earl of Wessex since 1999. ... The Countess of Wessex (Sophie Helen; neé Rhys-Jones, born 20 January 1965), is a member of the British Royal Family, the wife of Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, the youngest son of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. ... Princess Anne redirects here. ... Prince William redirects here. ... Prince Henry of Wales (Henry Charles Albert David; born 15 September 1984), commonly known as Prince Harry, is the younger son of Charles, Prince of Wales, and his first wife, the late Diana, Princess of Wales. ... “Princess Beatrice” redirects here. ... Princess Eugenie of York (Eugenie Victoria Helena; born 23 March 1990) is a member of the British Royal Family and a granddaughter of Queen Elizabeth II. Princess Eugenie is sixth in the Line of succession to the British Throne and has been since her birth in 1990. ... The Lady Louise Windsor (Louise Alice Elizabeth Mary; born 8 November 2003) is a member of the British Royal Family. ...

Relations or spouses or former spouses of members

Sarah, Duchess of York (born Sarah Margaret Ferguson, 15 October 1959) is the former wife of Prince Andrew, Duke of York, fourth in line to the British throne. ... A Captain in armies, air forces and marine forces, is a rank an army or air force rank with a NATO rank code of OF-2. ... Mark Antony Peter Phillips (born September 22, 1948), former Olympic gold-medal-winning horseman, was the first husband of Anne, Princess Royal. ... Peter Mark Andrew Phillips (born 15 November 1977) is the only son of The Princess Anne, the Princess Royal and her first husband, Mark Phillips. ... Zara Anne Elizabeth Phillips, MBE (born 15 May 1981) is the second child and only daughter of Princess Anne, the Princess Royal and her first husband, Captain Mark Phillips. ... Vice Admiral is a naval rank of three star level, equivalent to Lieutenant General in seniority. ... Rear Admiral Timothy James Hamilton Laurence, MVO, ADC (born 1 March 1955) was Equerry to The Queen from 1986 to 1989 and is the second husband of Anne, Princess Royal. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Lady Sarah Frances Elizabeth Chatto, née Armstrong-Jones, (born 1 May 1964) is the only daughter of the 1st Earl of Snowdon and Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon, the second daughter of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth (later The Queen Mother. ... Alexander Patrick Gregers Richard Windsor, Earl of Ulster (born 24 October 1974) is the only son of the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester. ... Claire Alexandra Windsor, Countess of Ulster, born Claire Alexandra Booth, is the wife of Alexander Windsor, Earl of Ulster, who is the son of HRH Prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester and his wife HRH The Duchess of Gloucester, formerly Birgitte van Deurs of Denmark. ... The Lady Davina Lewis (Davina Elizabeth Alice Benedikte Lewis; née Windsor; born 19 November 1977) is the elder daughter of Prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester and the Duchess of Gloucester, and is currently 21st in the line of succession to the British Throne. ... Lady Rose Victoria Brigitte Louise Windsor (born 1 March 1980) is the younger daughter of the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester, formerly Birgitte Eva van Deurs originally from Denmark. ... George Philip Nicholas Windsor, Earl of St Andrews (b. ... Sylvana Palma Windsor, Countess of St Andrews (born 28 May 1957) is the wife of George Windsor, Earl of St Andrews, the eldest son of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent. ... Lady Helen Marina Lucy Taylor (born 28 April 1964), a member of the British royal family, The House of Windsor. ... The Lord Nicholas Windsor is a member of the British Royal Family. ... Lady Nicholas Windsor (née Paola Doimi di Delupis, previously Paola Doimi de Frankopan; born 7 August 1969) is the wife of Lord Nicholas Windsor, the younger son of the Duke and Duchess of Kent. ... The Lord Frederick Michael George David Louis Windsor (born 6 April 1979) is an English financial analyst who is the only son of Prince and Princess Michael of Kent (née Baroness Marie-Christine von Reibnitz). ... Lady Gabriella Windsor (born 23 April 1981) is an English journalist, using the byline Ella Windsor. ... James Robert Bruce Ogilvy (born 29 February 1964) is the elder child and only son of Princess Alexandra, The Honourable Lady Ogilvy and the late Sir Angus Ogilvy. ... Julia Caroline Ogilvy (née Rawlinson) (born 28 October 1964) is a member of the extended British Royal Family. ... Alexander Charles Ogilvy (born 12 November 1996) is a distant relative of the British Royal Family and is 35th in the line of succession to the British Throne. ... Flora Alexandra Ogilvy (born 15 December 1994) is a distant relative of the British Royal Family and 36th in the line of succession to the British throne. ...

Collaterals

The following persons are descendants (or widows) of the younger children of Queen Victoria, King Edward VII, and King George V: Queen Victoria redirects here. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ...

The Earl of Harewood is a female-line first cousin of the Queen. The Duke of Fife, the Marquess of Milford Haven, the Countess Mountbatten of Burma, and the Lady Saltoun, and their respective families, as well as Lord Harewood's descendants, are so distant from the reigning sovereign that they are relatives of, rather than members of, the Royal Family. George Henry Hubert Lascelles, 7th Earl of Harewood KBE (born 7 February 1923), styled The Hon. ... The Princess Mary, Princess Royal and Countess of Harewood, (Victoria Alexandra Alice Mary Lascelles, née Windsor) (25 April 1897 – 28 March 1965) was a member of the British Royal Family. ... The Honourable Gerald Lascelles (21 August 1924 – 27 February 1998) was the youngest son of Henry Lascelles, 6th Earl of Harewood and Princess Mary, Princess Royal. ... James George Alexander Bannerman Carnegie, 3rd Duke of Fife (born 23 September 1929) is a great grandson of King Edward VII of the United Kingdom and a member of the extended British Royal Family, 54th in line of succession to the British Throne (and the first person in the succession... Flora Marjory Fraser, 21st Lady Saltoun1, Chief of the Name and the Arms of Fraser (born October 18, 1930) is currently the only female holder of a lordship of Parliament who has a seat in the House of Lords as an elected hereditary peer. ... Captain Alexander Ramsay of Mar (21 December 1919–20 December 2000) was the only child of HRH Princess Patricia of Connaught, who renounced her royal title and style when she married then-Captain the Hon. ... Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn (Arthur William Patrick Albert; 1 May 1850 – 16 January 1942) was a member of the British Royal Family, a son of Queen Victoria. ... The Most Honourable George Ivar Louis Mountbatten, 4th Marquess of Milford Haven (b. ... The Most Honourable George Louis Victor Henry Serge Mountbatten, 2nd Marquess of Milford Haven (December 6, 1892–April 8, 1938) was born the son of Louis Mountbatten, 1st Marquess of Milford Haven and Princess Victoria of Hesse and by Rhine at Darmstadt, Hessen, Germany. ... The Right Honourable Patricia Edwina Victoria Knatchbull, 2nd Countess Mountbatten of Burma (born 14 February 1924) is a British peeress. ... Admiral of the Fleet Louis Francis Albert Victor Nicholas George Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma, KG, GCB, OM, GCSI, GCIE, GCVO, DSO, PC (25 June 1900–27 August 1979) was a British admiral and statesman and an uncle of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. ...


None of these persons receive any monies from the State or undertake official engagements on behalf of the Queen. However, the Queen does invite them to private family functions and to participate in official royal occasions, such as the Trooping the Colour, the Golden Jubilee celebrations, and ceremonial or state funerals. Mounted Bands at Trooping the Colour 2006. ... A Golden Jubilee is a celebration held to mark a 50th anniversary of a monarchs reign. ...


There are three living former spouses of members of the British Royal Family:

  • Sarah, Duchess of York (the former wife of The Duke of York),
  • Capt Mark Phillips (the first husband of The Princess Royal), and
  • The Earl of Snowdon (the former husband of the late Princess Margaret).

Recently deceased members of the Royal Family include: Lord Snowdon redirects here. ...

Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, later Queen Elizabeth (Elizabeth Angela Marguerite; 4 August 1900 – 30 March 2002), was the Queen Consort of King George VI of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 1936 until his death in 1952. ... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 11 December 1936 until his death. ... Princess Margaret redirects here. ... Diana Spencer redirects here. ... Princess Alice, Duchess of Gloucester (born The Lady Alice Montagu-Douglas-Scott; 25 December 1901 – 29 October 2004) was the wife of Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester, the third son of George V and Queen Mary. ... The Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester (Henry William Frederick Albert; 31 March 1900 – 10 June 1974) was a member of the British Royal Family, the third son of George V of the United Kingdom and Queen Mary, and thus uncle to Elizabeth II. He was appointed regent for his niece...

In the United Kingdom

Public role and image

Members of the Royal Family engage in hundreds of public engagements yearly, throughout the United Kingdom, as formally recorded in the Court Circular, to honour, encourage and learn about the achievements or endeavors of individuals, institutions and enterprises in a variety of areas of life. As representatives of the Queen, they often also join the nation in commemorating historical events, holidays, celebratory and tragic occurrences, and may also sponsor or participate in numerous charitable, cultural and social activities. Their travels abroad on behalf of the UK (called State Visits when the sovereign officially meets with other heads of state) draw public attention to amicable relations within and between the Commonwealth and other nations, to British goods and trade, and to Britain as a historical, vacation, and tourist destination. Their presence, activities and traditional roles constitute the apex of a modern "royal court," and provide a distinctly British and historical pageantry to ceremonies (e.g. Trooping the Colour) and flavour to public events (e.g. Garden Parties, Ascot). Throughout their lives they draw enormous media coverage in the form of photographic, written and televised commentary on their activities, family relationships, rites of passage, personalities, attire, behaviour, and public roles. The Court Circular is the official record of all the engagements carried out by the British Royal Family, as well as appointments to their staff and to the court. ... State visits usually involve a military review. ... A royal or noble court, as an instrument of government broader than a court of justice, comprises an extended household centered on a patron whose rule may govern law or be governed by it. ... Mounted Bands at Trooping the Colour 2006. ... Buckingham Palace Garden Buckingham Palace Garden or, to give it its full title, The Garden at Buckingham Palace, is the garden situated at the rear of Buckingham Palace. ... Ascot Racecourse is a racecourse, located in the village of Ascot in the English county of Berkshire used for thoroughbred horse racing. ... A rite of passage is a ritual that marks a change in a persons social or sexual status. ...


In a lengthy interview conducted by PBS prior to the death of Diana, Princess of Wales in August 1997, Max Hastings, editor of the Daily Telegraph between 1986 and 1995, discussed the impact of Andrew Morton's and Jonathan Dimbleby's biographies of, respectively, the Princess and Charles, Prince of Wales on subsequent news coverage of the Royal Family in the UK: PBS redirects here. ... Diana Spencer redirects here. ... Sir Max Hastings (born December 28, 1945) is a British journalist, editor, historian and author. ... This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ... Andrew Morton (born 1953) is a former British Fleet Street tabloid journalist. ... Jonathan Dimbleby, (born 31 July 1944, Aylesbury) is a British presenter of current affairs and political radio and television programmes, a political commentator and a writer. ... “Prince Charles” redirects here. ...

I suppose the Morton book was a watershed because finally one was asked to come to terms with the fact that a very prominent member of the Royal Family had done something incredibly foolish, incredibly indiscreet and attempted to manipulate the media for her own ends. Now when this was compounded by the Prince of Wales doing exactly the same with Jonathan Dimbleby and also engaging the Murdoch press in this operation, that at that moment in fact--I did write to the Prince of Wales's office and I said 'Hitherto I've always tried very hard to run the newspaper for which I am responsible in a way that will be helpful to the institution of the Monarchy and the Royal Family. But from hereon all bets are off.' Not that one would ever wantonly do the Monarchy or the Royal, the Royal Family any disservice but any notion that one would act against the interest of the paper or keep something out of the paper in order to help the Royal Family has to be off when you've half the Royal Family exploiting the media for their own ends and in this particular case actually being willing to flog anything they've got to flog to the Murdoch press, who in this case were our competition. So, if they're not prepared to help themselves, why on earth should any of the rest of us stick our necks out to help them?

Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born United States citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ...

Funding

Monies to support the Queen in the exercise of her duties as head of state of the United Kingdom (the Head of State Expenditure) come from the Civil List. This is a return of a small portion of the revenue from the Crown Lands that are surrendered by the monarch to parliament at the beginning of each reign; all Crown Land being administered by The Crown Estates, an institution that is answerable to parliament. In the 2003-04 fiscal year, the amount surrendered was £176.9 million, where the Head of State Expenditure was £36 million. The Head of State Expenditure does not include the cost of security. A civil list is a list of individuals to whom money is paid by the government. ...


Only the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh receive funding from the Civil List. The Duke receives £359,000 per year.


Only some members of the Royal Family carry out public duties; these individuals receive an annual payment known as a Parliamentary Annuity, the funds being supplied to cover office costs.

  • The Duke of York: £249,000 per annum
  • The Earl and Countess of Wessex: £141,000 per annum
  • The Princess Royal: £228,000 per annum
  • The Duke and Duchess of Gloucester: £175,000 per annum
  • The Duke and Duchess of Kent: £236,000 per annum
  • Princess Alexandra £225,000 per annum

These amounts are repaid by The Queen from her private funds.


Though always voluntarily subject to the Value Added Tax and other indirect taxes, the Queen agreed to pay taxes on income and capital gains from 1992, although the details of this arrangement are both voluntary and secret. At the same time it was announced that only the Queen and Prince Philip would receive civil list payments. Since 1993 the Queen's personal income has been taxed as any other Briton. The Queen's private estate (eg shareholdings, personal jewellery, Sandringham House and Balmoral Castle) will be subject to Inheritance Tax, however bequests from Sovereign to Sovereign are exempt. [3] A civil list is a list of individuals to whom money is paid by the government. ... Sandringham House, Norfolk, England Sandringham House is a country house on 8,000 acres (32 km²) of land near the village of Sandringham in Norfolk, England, which is privately owned by the British Royal Family. ... Balmoral Castle. ...


Royal styles and titles

Members of the Royal Family in the Royal box at Westminster Abbey during the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II.
Members of the Royal Family in the Royal box at Westminster Abbey during the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II.

The style His Majesty or Her Majesty (HM) is enjoyed by a King, a Queen (regnant), a Queen consort, and a former Queen consort (a Queen Dowager or a Queen Mother). Image File history File links Royal_Family_Coronation_1952. ... Image File history File links Royal_Family_Coronation_1952. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... Look up majesty in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Majesty is an English word rooting in the Latin Maiestas, meaning literally, Greatness. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Queen Dowager or Dowager Queen is a title or status generally held by the widow of a deceased king. ... Queen Mother is a title reserved for a widowed queen consort whose son or daughter from that union is the reigning monarch. ...


Use of the style His Royal Highness or Her Royal Highness (HRH) and the titular dignity of Prince or Princess are governed by Letters Patent issued by George V on 30 November 1917 and published in the London Gazette on 11 December 1917. These Letters Patent state that henceforth only the children of the Sovereign, the children of the sons of the Sovereign, and the eldest son of the eldest son of the Prince of Wales would "have and at all times hold and enjoy the style, title or attribute of Royal Highness with their titular dignity of Prince or Princess prefixed to their respective Christian names or with their other titles of honour." They further state, "the grandchildren of the sons of any such Sovereign in the direct male line (save only the eldest living son of the eldest son of the Prince of Wales) shall have the style and title enjoyed by the children of Dukes." Royal Highness (abbreviation HRH) is a style (His Royal Highness or Her Royal Highness); plural Royal Highnesses (abbreviation TRH, Their Royal Highnesses). ... The term prince, from the Latin root princeps, is used for a member of the highest ranks of the aristocracy or the nobility. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... The London Gazette , front page from Monday 3 - 10 September 1666, reporting on the Great Fire of London. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... This article is about the title Prince of Wales. ...


Under these conventions, The Queen's children and the children of The Prince of Wales, The Duke of York and The Earl of Wessex are titled Princes or Princesses and styled Royal Highness. However, upon Prince Edward's marriage in 1999, it was announced that his children would be styled as earl's children, but no Letters Patent were issued to this affect. The Duke of Gloucester, The Duke of Kent, Princess Alexandra, the Hon. Lady Ogilvy and Prince Michael of Kent enjoy the titular dignity of Prince or Princess and the style Royal Highness as male-line grandchildren of George V. However, none of their children has a royal title. For example, the children of Prince Michael of Kent are known as Lord Frederick Windsor and Lady Gabriella Windsor, the courtesy titles as children of dukes. They are not entitled to any royal title. The children of The Princess Royal, Princess Alexandra and the late Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon, are not entitled to any royal title since princesses do not transmit their titles to their children. An exception to this rule was when George VI issued Letters Patent such that his heiress presumptive, Princess Elizabeth, could transmit her title to her children. Princess Margaret's son enjoys the courtesy title Viscount Linley as the son and heir of the Earl of Snowdon, while her daughter enjoys the courtesy title Lady. The children of the Princess Royal and Princess Alexandra have no titles, because Mark Phillips and Sir Angus Ogilvy did not accept hereditary peerages upon marriage. “Prince Charles” redirects here. ... The Prince Andrew, The Duke of York (Andrew Albert Christian Edward; born 19 February 1960) is a member of the British Royal Family, the third child and second son of Queen Elizabeth II. He has held the title of Duke of York since 1986. ... The Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, KG, KCVO, SOM (Edward Antony Richard Louis Mountbatten-Windsor; born 10 March 1964) is a member of the British Royal Family, the youngest child and third son of Queen Elizabeth II. He has held the title of Earl of Wessex since 1999. ... Prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester (Richard Alexander Walter George; born 26 August 1944) is a member of the British Royal Family, a grandson of George V. He has been Duke of Gloucester since his fathers death in 1974. ... Field Marshal Prince Edward, Duke of Kent (Edward George Nicholas Patrick Paul; born 9 October 1935) is a member of the British Royal Family, a grandchild of George V. He has held the title of Duke of Kent since 1942. ... Princess Alexandra, The Honourable Lady Ogilvy (Alexandra Helen Elizabeth Olga Christabel; born 25 December 1936), is a member of the British Royal Family, a granddaughter of George V. She was married to the late Sir Angus Ogilvy. ... Prince Michael of Kent, GCVO (Michael George Charles Franklin Windsor; born 4 July 1942) is a member of the British Royal Family, a grandson of King George V and Queen Mary. ... Princess Anne redirects here. ... Princess Margaret redirects here. ... Mark Antony Peter Phillips (born September 22, 1948), former Olympic gold-medal-winning horseman, was the first husband of Anne, Princess Royal. ... Sir Angus James Bruce Ogilvy, KCVO (14 September 1928 – 26 December 2004) was a British businessman best known as the husband of Princess Alexandra of Kent, a first cousin of Queen Elizabeth II. [1] Sir Angus also is remembered for his role in a scandal involving the breaking of sanctions... For other uses, see Peerage (disambiguation). ...


Women marrying sons and male-line grandsons of a Sovereign are normally styled Her Royal Highness followed by the feminised version of her husband's highest title. The wives of royal peers are known as "HRH The Duchess of ..." or " HRH The Countess of ..." Thus, the wives of the Duke of Kent, the Duke of Gloucester, and the Earl of Wessex are "HRH The Duchess of Kent," "HRH The Duchess of Gloucester," and "HRH The Countess of Wessex," respectively. Before her divorce, the late Diana, Princess of Wales enjoyed the title and style of "HRH The Princess of Wales." However, when a woman marries a prince who does not hold a peerage, she is known as HRH Princess [Her husband's Christian name], followed by whatever territorial or titular designation. For example, the former Baroness Marie-Christine von Reibnitz enjoys the title and style of "HRH Princess Michael of Kent," and not "HRH Princess Marie-Christine of Kent." Similarly, the former Birgitte Eva van Deurs was titled "HRH Princess Richard of Gloucester" from her wedding until her husband succeeded to his father's dukedom in 1974. The widows of princes remain HRH. However, under Queen Elizabeth II's 21 August 1996 Letters Patent, a divorced wife of a Prince of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland "shall not be entitled to hold and enjoy the style, title or attribute of Royal Highness." Diana Spencer redirects here. ... For other uses, see Wedding (disambiguation). ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...


There has been one exception to the convention that wives of princes take their husband's rank. In Letters Patent dated 28 May 1937, King George VI specifically denied the style HRH to the wife of the Duke of Windsor, the former King Edward VIII. Therefore, the former Wallis Warfield Simpson was known as "Her Grace The Duchess of Windsor," not "Her Royal Highness The Duchess of Windsor." is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 11 December 1936 until his death. ... Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; later The Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of Great Britain, Ireland, the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from the death of his father, George V (1910–36), on 20... Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; later The Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of Great Britain, Ireland, the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from the death of his father, George V (1910–36), on 20... Wallis, The Duchess of Windsor (previously Wallis Simpson; previously Wallis Spencer; born Bessie Wallis Warfield; 19 June 1895 or 1896 – 24 April 1986) was the American wife of Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor. ...


It should also be noted due a reluctance by the public to universally support the second wife of The Prince of Wales, it has been announced by Clarence House that should The Prince of Wales become King, that his wife HRH The Duchess of Cornwall will not be known as HM The Queen but will take the lesser title of HRH The Princess Consort. Out of respect for the late Diana, Princess of Wales, it was also announced that HRH The Duchess of Cornwall would not be known as HRH The Princess of Wales. Clarence House, London Clarence House is a royal home in London, situated in The Mall. ...


The daughters and male-line granddaughters of the Sovereign do not lose their royal titles upon marriage. Men who marry the daughters and the male-line granddaughters of the Sovereign, however, do not acquire their wives' royal rank and the style HRH. The only exception to this convention is Prince Philip. Born a Prince of Greece and Denmark, it was only after his wartime service that he renounced the use of his title and became a naturalised British subject, as Lieutenant Philip Mountbatten RN (although he was already a British citizen as a descendant of the Electress Sophia). The day before his marriage he was created Duke of Edinburgh with the style HRH by King George VI's Letters Patent of 19 November 1947. The Duke of Edinburgh was not created a Prince of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland until 22 February 1957.Since that date, his full title has been "HRH The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh." HRH The Duke of Edinburgh His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (Philip Mountbatten), styled HRH The Duke of Edinburgh (born June 10, 1921), is the consort of Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. ... Mountbatten is the family name adopted by two branches of the Battenberg family due to rising anti-German sentiment among the British public during World War I. On 14 July 1917, Prince Louis of Battenberg assumed the surname Mountbatten (a literal translation of the German Battenberg) for himself and his... The Duke of Edinburgh is a dukedom associated with Edinburgh, Scotland. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ...


As grandchildren of the Sovereign through the female line, the children of the then Princess Elizabeth and The Duke of Edinburgh would not have been entitled to use HRH or Prince or Princess of the United Kingdom until their mother became Queen, had those titles and styles not been granted in Letters Patent of 22 October 1948. They could neither be styled HRH Prince or Princess of Greece and Denmark through their father, as the Duke of Edinburgh had renounced these use of these royal titles and styles. is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Peerages

The British Royal Family in 1880.
The British Royal Family in 1880.

Female consorts of the Sovereign have generally not been created peers or peeresses. A notable exception occurred in 1532, when Henry VIII created Anne Boleyn Marchioness of Pembroke before marrying her. Male consorts, however, have sometimes been granted dukedoms. The husband of Mary I was already King of Spain, and that of Mary II was jointly Sovereign in England, so neither of them received peerage dignities. Prince George of Denmark, the husband of Anne (later Queen Anne), was created Duke of Cumberland in 1683 . Victoria's husband, Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, was given the style Royal Highness before his marriage. In 1857, Queen Victoria granted him title of Prince Consort; however, Prince Albert was not made a British peer. Prince Philip, husband of the present Queen, was created Duke of Edinburgh and granted the style Royal Highness the day before his wedding (which occurred prior to her accession). Print of the British royal family from 1880. ... Print of the British royal family from 1880. ... Henry VIII redirects here. ... Anne Boleyn, 1st Marquess of Pembroke[1] (1501/1507–19 May 1536) was a Queen Consort of England, the second wife of King Henry VIII and the mother of Queen Elizabeth I. Henrys marriage to Anne, and her subsequent execution, made her a key player in the political and... Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ... Mary II (30 April 1662–28 December 1694) reigned as Queen of England and Ireland from 13 February 1689, and as Queen of Scots (as Mary II of Scotland) from 11 April 1689 until her death. ... Prince George of Denmark Prince George of Denmark (April 2, 1653 - October 28, 1708) was the Prince consort of Queen Anne of Great Britain. ... Anne (6 February 1665 – 1 August 1714) became Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland on 8 March 1702, succeeding William III of England and II of Scotland. ... Queen Victoria redirects here. ... Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (Francis Charles Augustus Albert Emmanuel, of the Saxe-Coburg-Gotha branch of the House of Wettin) (26 August 1819 - 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... A prince consort, generally speaking, is the husband of a Queen regnant, unless he himself is a king. ...


Generally, the sons of the Sovereign are awarded peerage dignities to mark either adulthood or marriage. Originally, younger sons of the Sovereign were not styled Princes (except the Prince of Wales); thus, in order to indicate their exalted rank, peerage dignities were conferred upon them. From the time of Edward III, nearly every son of a Sovereign surviving into adulthood became a Duke. Certain dukedoms were granted more often than others, including the Dukedoms of York, Albany and Clarence. Normally, a peerage once awarded to a member of the Royal Family is not thereafter granted to any person outside the Royal Family (though some exceptions do exist). This article is about the King of England. ... HRH The Prince Andrew, the current Duke of York For the nursery rhyme see The Grand Old Duke of York. ... Duke of Albany is a peerage title that has occasionally been bestowed on the youngers sons in the Scottish and later the British Royal Family, particularly in the Houses of Stuart and Hanover. ... Duke of Clarence is a title which has been traditionally awarded to junior members of the English and British royal families. ...


The Dukedom of York is generally created for the second son of the Sovereign. The first creation was in 1384; the dukedom merged in the Crown in 1483 . Every Duke thereafter has either died without heirs or succeeded to the Crown, and so has not been able to leave the Royal Family. The pattern of awarding the dukedom to the second-eldest son of the Sovereign was upset by George I, who gave the Dukedom of York and Albany to his younger brother. The Dukedom of York and Albany was next granted by George II to the second son of his son, who had predeceased him. York and Albany featured one last time as a dukedom in 1784, when George III granted it to his second son. Thereafter, the dukedom has always borne the designation York, rather than York and Albany. The current duke is The Prince Andrew, second son of Queen Elizabeth II. George I (George Louis; 28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727)[1] was King of Great Britain and Ireland, from 1 August 1714 until his death. ... George II (George Augustus; 10 November 1683 – 25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ... George III (George William Frederick) (4 June 1738–29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain, and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ...


The Dukedom of Albany served a function similar to the Dukedom of York in Scotland. The dukedom was created in 1398 for Robert Stewart, brother of King Robert III. It was at the time the only dukedom other than the Dukedom of Rothesay. It was created thrice more in Scotland: twice for the second son of a Sovereign, and once for a brother of a Sovereign. It was last created in 1881 for the fourth son of Victoria; the dukedom was then suspended under the Titles Deprivation Act after its holder fought on the side of Germany during World War I. Robert Stewart or Stuart, 1st Duke of Albany (c. ... Robert III (circa 1340 – April 4, 1406), king of Scotland (reigned 1390 - 1406), the eldest son of King Robert II by his mistress, Elizabeth Mure, became legitimised with the formal marriage of his parents about 1349. ... Queen Victoria redirects here. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


There are several other dukedoms that have been used for members of the Royal Family. Clarence was first used as a dukedom in 1362, most of the time being granted to the third son of the Sovereign. Among the dukedoms granted to still younger sons of the Sovereign are Aumale, Cambridge, Connaught, Cumberland, Edinburgh, Gloucester, Kent and Sussex. Some of those dukedoms were used for younger brothers, nephews and other kinsmen of Sovereigns. The dukedom of Windsor was also a Royal dukedom, being granted to Edward VIII after he abdicated so that he could marry against the tenets of the Church of England. Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; later The Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of Great Britain, Ireland, the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from the death of his father, George V (1910–36), on 20... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[3] in England, the Mother Church of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the oldest among the communions thirty-eight independent national churches. ...


Often, sons of the Sovereign were granted titles associated with England and Scotland, later with Ireland, and most recently with Wales. Thus, the Dukedom of Strathearn (named after a place in Scotland) has been held with the Dukedoms of Connaught (named after an Irish province), Kent and Cumberland (both named after English places). This pattern continues in the present Royal Family. The current Duke of York, for example, is also Earl of Inverness and Baron Killyleagh; the subsidiary titles are associated with Scotland and Northern Ireland, respectively. This article is about the city in Scotland. ... Killyleagh (IPA: ) (Cill Uí Laoigh in Irish, meaning Church of the descendants of heroes) is a large village in County Down, Northern Ireland. ...


The convention of granting dukedoms to senior members of the Royal Family was broken most recently in 1999, when The Prince Edward was created Earl of Wessex. The Earldom of Wessex had not been created earlier by an English or British Sovereign since 1066. It has been suggested that the Dukedom of Edinburgh will eventually be granted to the Earl of Wessex. The current dukedom will descend to Charles, Prince of Wales, however, and not to the Earl of Wessex. When The Prince of Wales becomes Sovereign, or if he is already Sovereign when the dukedom passes to him, the dukedom will merge in the Crown and then only become available for a regrant.


The highest peerage dignity belonging to a Prince may be used as a part of the title of that Prince's children. Thus, the sons of The Prince of Wales are Prince William of Wales and Prince Harry of Wales; the daughters of the Duke of York are Princess Beatrice of York and Princess Eugenie of York; the daughter of the Earl of Wessex is Princess Louise of Wessex. (In the last case, the Princess is normally referred to as Lady Louise Windsor at the wishes of her parents, but officially remains a Princess.) Prince William redirects here. ... Officer Cadet Wales on parade when New Colours were presented to Sandhurst, 21 June 2005. ... “Princess Beatrice” redirects here. ... Princess Eugenie of York (Eugenie Victoria Helena; born 23 March 1990) is a member of the British Royal Family and a granddaughter of Queen Elizabeth II. Princess Eugenie is sixth in the Line of succession to the British Throne and has been since her birth in 1990. ... The Lady Louise Windsor (Louise Alice Elizabeth Mary; born 8 November 2003) is a member of the British Royal Family. ...


Sovereigns, especially Charles II, have sometimes granted peerage dignities to illegitimate children. James Scott became Duke of Monmouth in 1663 . Many more creations, mostly earldoms, followed in the 1670s: Charles FitzCharles became Earl of Plymouth, Charles FitzRoy Duke of Southampton, Henry FitzRoy Earl of Euston, George FitzRoy Earl of Northumberland, Charles Beauclerk Earl of Burford and Charles Lennox Duke of Richmond and Lennox. Many of the earls who were sons of Charles later became Dukes. Of the current Dukes, four are male-line descendants of Charles in the illegitimate line: the Duke of Richmond, Lennox and Gordon, the Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberry, the Duke of Grafton and the Duke of St Albans. James Crofts, later James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth and of Buccleuch (April 9, 1649 – July 15, 1685), was an English nobleman who was executed in 1685 after making an unsuccessful attempt to claim the British throne, the Monmouth Rebellion. ... Charles FitzCharles, 1st Earl of Plymouth (1657 – 17 October 1680) was the illegitimate son of Charles II, by Catherine, daughter of Thomas Pegge of Yeldersley, Derbyshire. ... Charles Fitzroy (or Palmer) (1662 - September 9, 1730) was the eldest son of Barbara Villiers, Countess of Castlemaine and Charles II. As the putative son of Roger Palmer, 1st Earl of Castlemaine, his nominal father, he became Lord Limerick at birth. ... Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton (1663 - 1690) was the natural son of King Charles II by Barbara Villiers, Countess of Castlemaine and later Duchess of Cleveland. ... George Fitzroy, 1st Duke of Northumberland (Oxford, December 28, 1665 - Epsom, June 28, 1716) was the third and youngest illegitimate son of King Charles II. His mother was Barbara Villiers, Countess of Castlemaine (also known as Barbara Villiers, Duchess of Cleveland). ... Charles Beauclerk circa 1690. ... Charles Lennox, 1st Duke of Richmond and 1st Duke of Lennox (29 July 1672 - 27 May 1723), was the illegitimate son of Charles II of England and his mistress Louise de Keroualle, Duchess of Portsmouth. ...


In other Commonwealth realms

As the Royal Family is shared by other Commonwealth realms, its members will often also conduct official and non-official duties outside the United Kingdom, on behalf of the relevant state. The Commonwealth Realms, shown in pink A Commonwealth Realm is any one of the sixteen sovereign states within the Commonwealth of Nations that recognise Elizabeth II as their respective monarch. ...

Further information: Royal Family's role in the realms

The Commonwealth Realms, shown in pink A Commonwealth Realm is any one of the sixteen sovereign states within the Commonwealth of Nations that recognise Elizabeth II as their respective monarch. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ For example, for Canada the family is known as the Canadian Royal Family
  2. ^ alt.talk.royalty FAQ: British royalty and nobility
  3. ^ Royal website Fact Files

This article is about the monarchy of Canada, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, the other Commonwealth realm monarchies, and other relevant articles, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. Queen of Canada redirects here. ...

Additional reading

  • Burke’s Guide to the Royal Family. Burke’s Peerage, 1973.
  • Cannon, John Ashton. The Oxford Illustrated History of the British Monarchy. Oxford University Press, 1988.
  • Churchill, Randolph S. They Serve the Queen: A New and Authoritative Account of the Royal Household. (“Prepared for Coronation Year”) Hutchinson, 1953.
  • Fraser, Antonia (ed). The Lives of the Kings & Queens of England. Revised & updated edition. University of California Press, 1998.
  • Hayden, Ilse. Symbol and Privilege: The Ritual Context of British Royalty. University of Arizona Press, 1987.
  • Longford, Elizabeth Harman (Countess of Longford). The Royal House of Windsor. Revised edition. Crown, 1984.
  • Weir, Alison. Britain’s Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy. Pimlico/Random House, 2002.

Royal Family (1969 documentary)

  • Royal Family (1969) is a celebrated and reverential BBC documentary made by Richard Cawston to accompany the investiture of the current Prince of Wales. The documentary is frequently held responsible for the greater press intrusion into the Royal Family's private life since its first broadcast.

For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... This article is about the title Prince of Wales. ...

Trivia

The British Royal Family were voted second on the television show "50 Greatest Families" losing only to The Simpsons. Simpsons redirects here. ...


See also

Other realms

  • Canadian Royal Family

Canada is a constitutional monarchy and a Commonwealth Realm with Queen Elizabeth II as its reigning monarch and head of state. ...

Other related articles

This encyclopedia has several articles containing information relevant to the monarchies of the Commonwealth realms: In alphabetical order: British monarchy Monarchy in Antigua and Barbuda Monarchy in Australia Monarchy in Canada Monarchy in Jamaica Monarchy in New Zealand Monarchy in the Solomon Islands Though the Cook Islands are not themselves... // This is a list of the monarchs of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, that is, the monarchs on the thrones of some of the various kingdoms that have existed in the British Isles, namely: The Kingdom of Scotland, from 843 up to 1707; The Kingdom of... This is a list of British princes from the accession of King George I in 1714. ... This is a list of British princesses from the accession of King George I in 1714. ... The House of Windsor is the current Royal House of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and each of the other Commonwealth Realms. ... This is the British monarchs family tree, from James I of England (and VI of Scotland) to the present queen, Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom. ... HRH The Prince of Wales, the Heir Apparent. ... Below is a list of godchildren of members of the British Royal Family: // Prince George William Frederick of Wales, later George III (1738–1820) George Augustus Frederick, Prince of Wales, later George IV (1762–1830) George Augustus Frederick, Prince of Wales, later George IV (1762–1830) Prince William Henry of... This is a presentation of individuals and dynasties from which the current monarch of the United Kingdom and her heirs descend. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
British Royal Family
This is a list of British princesses from the accession of King George I in 1714. ... Margravine Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach (or Anspach) (Wilhelmina Charlotte Caroline) (1 March 1683 – 20 November 1737) as Queen Caroline was the queen consort of King George II of Great Britain 1727-1737. ... Augusta of Saxe-Gotha Augusta of Saxe-Gotha (November 30, 1719 – February 8, 1772) was Princess of Wales from May 8, 1736 to March 31, 1751. ... Maria Walpole (1736–22 August 1807), the Countess Waldegrave and Duchess of Gloucester and Edinburgh, was a member of the British Royal Family, the wife of Prince William Henry, Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh. ... Lady Anne Horton, (née Lady Anne Luttrell; later the Duchess of Cumberland and Strathearn; 24 January 1742 - 28 December 1808) was a member of the British Royal Family, the wife of Prince Henry Frederick, Duke of Cumberland and Strathearn. ... Caroline of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (later Queen Caroline; 17 May 1768 – 7 August 1821) was the queen consort of George IV of the United Kingdom from 29 January 1820 to her death. ... Princess Frederica Charlotte of Prussia (7 May 1767 – 6 August 1820) was the only daughter of Frederick William II of Prussia and his first wife Elisabeth Christine of Brunswick-Lüneburg. ... Princess Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen (Adelaide Louise Theresa Caroline Amelia) ( 13 August 1792 - 2 December 1849 ) as Queen Adelaide was the Queen consort of King William IV of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld (Mary Louise Victoria; 17 August 1786 – 16 March 1861), later HRH The Duchess of Kent, was the mother of Queen Victoria. ... Duchess Frederica of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (3 March 1778 – 29 June 1841), Duchess of Cumberland and later Queen of Hanover, was the consort of Ernest Augustus I of Hanover, the fifth son and eighth child of George III and Queen Charlotte. ... Princess Augusta of Hesse-Kassel (Augusta Wilhelmina Louisa; later Duchess of Cambridge; 25 July 1797 – 6 April 1889) was the consort of Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge, the tenth-born child, and seventh son, of George III and Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. ... Princess Marie of Saxe-Altenburg (Alexandrina Mary Wilhelmina Catherine Charlotte Theresa Henrietta Louise Pauline Elizabeth Frederica Georgina; German: ; 14 April 1818 – 9 January 1907) was Queen of Hanover and the consort of George V, a grandson of George III of the United Kingdom and Queen Charlotte. ... This page is about the wife of Edward VII of the United Kingdom. ... Grand Duchess Maria Alexandrovna of Russia (later Duchess of Edinburgh and Duchess of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha; 17 October 1853 – 24 October 1920) was a daughter of Alexander II of Russia and Empress Maria Alexandrovna. ... Princess Louise Margaret of Prussia (Louise Margaret Alexandra Victoria Agnes; later Duchess of Connaught and Strathearn; 25 July 1860 - 14 July 1917) was a German princess, and later a member of the British Royal Family, the wife of Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught. ... Princess Helena Frederica of Waldeck and Pyrmont Princess Helena Frederica of Waldeck and Pyrmont (17 February 1861 - 1 September 1922) was the daughter of George Victor of Waldeck-Pyrmont (1831-1893) and his wife Helene Wilhelmine of Nassau-Weilburg (1831-1888). ... This article is about the daughter of Christian IX of Denmark. ... Mary of Teck (Victoria Mary Augusta Louise Olga Pauline Claudine Agnes; 26 May 1867 – 24 March 1953) was the Queen Consort of George V. Queen Mary was also the Empress of India. ... Princess Victoria Adelaide of Schleswig-Holstein (December 31, 1885 - October 3, 1970) was the consort of Carl Eduard, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. ... Princess Viktoria Luise (13 September 1892–11 December 1980), Duchess of Brunswick-Luneburg, was the seventh child and the only daughter of Emperor Wilhelm II and Empress Augusta Viktoria. ... Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, later Queen Elizabeth (Elizabeth Angela Marguerite; 4 August 1900 – 30 March 2002), was the Queen Consort of King George VI of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 1936 until his death in 1952. ... Princess Alice, Duchess of Gloucester (born The Lady Alice Montagu-Douglas-Scott; 25 December 1901 – 29 October 2004) was the wife of Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester, the third son of George V and Queen Mary. ... HRH Princess Marina, Duchess of Kent Princess Marina, Duchess of Kent (née Princess Marina of Greece and Denmark), (13 December 1906 - 27 August 1968) was a member of the British Royal Family; the wife of Prince George, Duke of Kent, the fourth son of King George V and Queen... Princess Sophie of Greece and Denmark was the fourth child and youngest daughter of Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark and Princess Alice of Battenberg. ... Image:Birgitte Van Deurs. ... Her Royal Highness Princess Edward, Duchess of Kent (Katharine Lucy Mary Windsor, formerly Worsley), styled HRH The Duchess of Kent, is a member of the British Royal Family the wife of HRH Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, a grandson of King George V and cousin of Queen Elizabeth II. The... Princess Michael of Kent (née Baroness Marie-Christine Agnes Hedwig Ida von Reibnitz, 15 January 1945), is a member of the British Royal Family. ... Diana Spencer redirects here. ... Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall (Camilla Rosemary; formerly Parker Bowles; née Shand, born 17 July 1947) is the second wife of Charles, Prince of Wales, heir apparent to the thrones of the United Kingdom and the other 15 Commonwealth Realms. ... Sarah, Duchess of York (born Sarah Margaret Ferguson, 15 October 1959) is the former wife of Prince Andrew, Duke of York, fourth in line to the British throne. ... HRH The Countess of Wessex The Countess of Wessex (Sophie Helen Mountbatten-Windsor, née Rhys-Jones), (born January 20, 1965), is a member of the British Royal Family, the wife of HRH The Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, the youngest son of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke...

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Royalty.nu - The British Royal Family, the Windsors (3061 words)
Screenplay of a British TV movie about Prince John, the epileptic son of King George V, who was shut away at age 12 to save the royal family from embarrassment.
Behind the Palace Walls: The Rise and Fall of Britain's Royal Family by Peter Fearon is the sequel to Buckingham Babylon.
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The British Royal Family is a group of people closely related to the British monarch.
Use of the titles His Royal Highness or Her Royal Highness (HRH) and Prince or Princess is governed by an Order in Council laid down by King George V in 1917.
Among its provisions was stated that only the children of the Sovereign, the children of the sons of the Sovereign, and the eldest son of the eldest son of The Prince of Wales could receive these distinctions.
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