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Encyclopedia > British Rail Class 40
No.40145 at Carlisle on 27 August 2004, whilst working a charter train. This locomotive is the last remaining 'centre headcode' type Class 40.
No.40145 at Carlisle on 27 August 2004, whilst working a charter train. This locomotive is the last remaining 'centre headcode' type Class 40.

The British Rail Class 40 is a type of British railway diesel locomotive. Built by English Electric between 1958 and 1962, and eventually numbering 200, they were for a time the pride of the British Rail early diesel fleet. Despite their initial success, by the time the last examples were entering service they were already being replaced on some top-link duties by more powerful locomotives. As they were slowly relegated from express passenger uses, the type found work on secondary passenger and freight services where they worked for many years, the final locomotives being retired from regular service in 1985. Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 655 KB)BR Class 40, no. ... Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 655 KB)BR Class 40, no. ... Carlisle is a city in the far north-west of England, and is the largest urban area in Cumbria. ... This article is about the defunct entity British Railways, which later traded as British Rail. The History of rail transport in Great Britain is covered in its own article. ... A modern Diesel locomotive. ... English Electric logo English Electric was a 20th-century British industrial manufacturer, initially of electric motors, and expanding to include railway locomotives and aviation, before becoming part of GEC. // 1917: Dick, Kerr & Co. ... This article is about the defunct entity British Railways, which later traded as British Rail. The History of rail transport in Great Britain is covered in its own article. ...


Origins

The origins of the Class 40 fleet lay in the prototype diesel locomotives (Types D16/1 and 16/2) ordered by the London, Midland and Scottish Railway and British Railways between 1947 and 1954, most notably with the Southern Region locomotive No. 10203, which was powered by English Electric's 16SVT MkII engine developing 2,000bhp (1,460kW)[1]. A development of this engine was used in the production Class 40s. 10001 at Bletchley, 1954. ... British Railways Class D16/2 (10201-10202) was built by BR Ashford and introduced in 1950-1951. ... The London, Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS1) was a British railway company. ... British Railways (BR), later rebranded as British Rail, ran the British railway system, from the nationalisation of the Big Four British railway companies in 1948 until its privatisation in stages between 1994 and 1997. ... British Railways Southern Region totem station sign for Hither Green. ... hp, see HP (disambiguation) The horsepower (hp) is the name of several non-metric units of power. ... The watt (symbol: W) is the SI derived unit of power, equal to one joule per second. ...


Prototypes

One of the ten prototypes, D202, at Liverpool Street station in original green livery, 1963. Note the headcode discs as fitted to the first batch of locomotives.

British Railways originally ordered ten Class 40s, then known as "English Electric Type 4s", as evaluation prototypes. They were built at the Vulcan Foundry in Newton-le-Willows, Lancashire[2]. . The first locomotive, D200, was delivered in March 1958 and made its passenger debut on an express train from London Liverpool Street to Norwich on 18 April 1958[1]. Five of the prototypes, Nos. D200-D204, were trialled on similar services on the former Great Eastern routes, whilst the remaining five, Nos. D205-D209, worked on Great Northern services on the East Coast Main Line. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x672, 181 KB) © Max Batten Summary Later Class 40. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x672, 181 KB) © Max Batten Summary Later Class 40. ... Liverpool Street station, also called London Liverpool Street, is a mainline railway station and connected London Underground station in the north eastern corner of the City of London, the main financial district, with entrances on Bishopsgate and Liverpool Street itself. ... British Railways, later British Rail, used a list of power classifications in order to categorise its main line diesel locomotive fleet. ... Vulcan Foundry was a British locomotive builder sited at Newton-le-Willows, Lancashire. ... Location within the British Isles. ... Lancashire is a non-metropolitan county of historic origin in the North West of England, bounded to the west by the Irish Sea. ... Liverpool Street station, also called London Liverpool Street, is a mainline railway station and connected London Underground station in the north eastern corner of the City of London, the main financial district, with entrances on Bishopsgate and Liverpool Street itself. ... Norwich (IPA: //) is a city in East Anglia, in Eastern England. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Great Eastern Railway (GER) was formed in 1862 as an amalgamation of the Eastern Counties Railway; and also with several other smaller railways: Norfolk, the Eastern Union, the Newmarket, the Harwich, the East Anglian Light and the East Suffolk; among others. ... The East Coast Main Line viaduct at Durham. ...


Production

After the success of the prototypes, another 190 locomotives were ordered by British Railways, and were numbered from D210 to D399. All were built at Vulcan Foundry, except a batch of twenty (Nos. D305-D324) which were built at Robert Stephenson and Hawthorns factory in Darlington. All the locomotives were painted in the British Railways diesel green livery, and the final locomotive, D399, was delivered in September 1962[3]. Preserved RSH Works No. ... Darlington, including the town clock. ...

'Split headcode' No.40142 at Edinburgh Waverley in 1977.
'Split headcode' No.40142 at Edinburgh Waverley in 1977.

Batches of the class were built with significant design differences, due to changes in railway working practices. The first 125 locomotives, Nos. D200-D324, were built with steam-age 'disc' headcode markers, which BR used to identify services. Later, it was decided that locomotives should display the four character train reporting number (or headcode) of the service they were hauling, and Nos. D324-D344 were built with 'split' headcode boxes, which displayed two characters either side of the locomotive's central gangway doors. Another policy decision led to the discontinuing of the gangway doors (which enabled crew to move between a locomotive and train), and the remaining locomotives, Nos. D345-D399, carried a central four-character headcode box. Seven of the first batch of locomotives, Nos.D260-D266, were later converted to the central headcode design. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x673, 189 KB) Summary © Max Batten 40142 heading a train out of Edinburgh Waverley station - 14-09-1977 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: British Rail Class 40 ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x673, 189 KB) Summary © Max Batten 40142 heading a train out of Edinburgh Waverley station - 14-09-1977 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: British Rail Class 40 ... Waverley railway station- the principal mainline station in Edinburgh viewed from Edinburgh Castle. ... A headcode or train reporting number is used by railway staff in Great Britain to identify a particular train service. ...


Locomotives in the range D210-D235 (bar D226) were named after cruise ships operated by the companies Cunard, Elder Dempster Lines, and Canadian Pacific, as they hauled express trains to Liverpool, the home port of these companies. D226 was to carry the name Media but never did so. From approximately 1970, with Class 40s no longer working these trains, the nameplates were gradually removed[3]. Cunard may refer to: Samuel Cunard (1787–1865), British shipping magnate. ... Elder Dempster Lines was a British shipping company which operated from 1932 to 2000, although the origins of the company stretch back into the mid-19th century. ... The Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR; AAR reporting marks CP, CPAA, CPI), known as CP Rail between 1968 and 1996, is a Canadian Class I railway that is operated by Canadian Pacific Railway Limited. ...


From 1973, locomotives were renumbered to suit the TOPS computer operating system, and became known as 'Class 40'. Locomotives D201 to D399 were renumbered in sequence into the range 40001 to 40199. The first built locomotive, D200, was renumbered 40122, which was vacant due to the scrapping of D322 after an accident in September 1967[4]. The Total Operations Processing System, better known by its initials TOPS, is a computer system for managing the locomotives and rolling stock (railroad cars) owned by a rail system. ...


BR Service

The Class 40s operated in most areas of British Railways (except the Western and Southern Regions). After the early trials, the majority were based at depots in northern England, notably Manchester Longsight, Carlisle Kingmoor, Wigan Springs Branch, Thornaby and Gateshead. Longsight is an area in Manchester, England, around 3 miles south of the city centre. ... Carlisle is a city in the far north-west of England, and is the largest urban area in Cumbria. ... Wigan is a town in Greater Manchester, North West England. ... Thornaby-on-Tees is a town in the northernmost part of the historic county of North Riding of Yorkshire, located on the south bank of the River Tees. ... Gateshead is a town in North-East England on the southern bank of the River Tyne, opposite Newcastle upon Tyne, which covers the north bank. ...


The heyday of the class was in the early 1960s, when they hauled top-link expresses on the West Coast Main Line and in East Anglia. However, the arrival of more powerful diesels such as Class 47 and Class 55, together with the electrification of the West Coast Main Line, meant that the fleet was gradually relegated to more mundane duties. The WCML running alongside the M1 motorway at Watford Gap in Northamptonshire A Virgin Pendolino and freight train on the WCML The West Coast Main Line (WCML) is one of the most important intercity railway lines in the United Kingdom, part of the British railway system. ... thank god for class 57s that took the bodies of 47s - NO MORE 47 FREAKS!!! POGO, LIVES IN YORK REAL NAME - PAUL ILLINGSWORTH GED THE TRAMP, BIRMINGHAM REAL NAME - GERALD IZAAC HAPPLE ADDRESS - 378 GILLIOTT ROAD, EDGBASTON, BIRMINGHAM PHONE NO - 0121 454 4679 (PLEASE CONTACT ABOVE FOR GEN... British Rail assigned Class 55 to the English Electric Type 5 express diesel locomotives built in 1961/2 for high-speed service on the East Coast Main Line between London Kings Cross and Edinburgh. ... Overhead wire in Coventry, England Overhead wire and its suspension system in Bridgeport, Connecticut, USA A railway electrification system is a way of supplying electric power to electric locomotives and multiple units. ...


In later life the locomotives were mainly to be found hauling heavy freight and passenger trains in the north of England and Scotland. As more new rolling stock was introduced, their passenger work decreased, partly due to their lack of electric train heating for newer passenger coaches. They lost their last front-line passenger duties - in Scotland - in 1980, and the last regular use on passenger trains was on the North Wales Coast Line between Holyhead, Crewe and Manchester. Electric Train Supply or ETS is electricity which the locomotive uses to power the rolling stock, usually coaches. ... The North Wales Coast Line is the railway line from Crewe to Holyhead. ...


Decline

Withdrawal of the Class 40s started in 1976, when three locomotives (40005, 40039 and 40102) were taken out of service. At over 130 tons the Class were by then considered underpowered. In addition, some were found to be suffering from fractures of the plate-frame bogies, and spares were also needed to keep other locomotives running. Also, many Class 40s were not fitted with air braking, leaving them unable to haul more modern freight and passenger vehicles. Despite this, only sixteen had been withdrawn by the start of the 1980s[5]. Piping diagram from 1920 of a Westinghouse E-T Air Brake system. ...


Withdrawals then picked up pace, with the non-air brake fitted locomotives taking the brunt of the decline. In 1981, all 130 remaining locomotives were concentrated in the London Midland region of BR. After that, numbers dwindled slowly until by the end of 1984 there were only thirteen still running. These included the pioneer locomotive, 40122, which having been withdrawn in 1981, was re-instated in July 1983 and painted in the original green livery to haul rail enthusiast's specials. The last passenger run by a Class 40 apart from 40122 occurred on 27 January 1985, when 40012 hauled a train from Birmingham New Street to York. All the remaining locomotives except 40122 were withdrawn the next day. Ex-LMS Jubilee Class 45641 Sandwich at Chinley in 1954 The London Midland Region (LMR) was one of the six regions created on the formation of the nationalised British Railways (BR) and consisted of ex-London, Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) lines in England and Wales. ... The tracks at the eastern end of Birmingham New Street station Class 390 no. ... York is a city in North Yorkshire, England, at the confluence of the rivers Ouse and Foss. ...


Further use

The Class 40 story was not quite over, however. 40122 was retained in working condition, and was regularly used to haul normal passenger trains in the hope of attracting enthusiasts, as well as special trains. In addition, four locomotives were temporarily returned to service as Class 97 departmental locomotives, numbered 97405-97408. They were used to work engineering trains for a remodelling project at Crewe station. These were withdrawn by early 1987. British Rail reserved the TOPS Class 97 designation for departmental locomotives, which were used for special or engineering duties. ... Crewe station is one of the most historic railway stations in the world. ...


40122 was eventually withdrawn in 1988, and presented to the National Railway Museum. Six other locomotives were preserved, and on 30 November 2002, over sixteen years after the last Class 40 had hauled a mainline passenger train, the Class 40 Preservation Society's 40145 hauled an enthusiast's railtour from Crewe to Holyhead and back[6]. Locomotives arranged around the turntable in the Great Hall. ...


Miscellany

  • D326 (later 40126) was the engine used to haul the train involved in the Great Train Robbery in 1963.
  • 40106 retained its original green livery throughout its career. In 1979, it was the last locomotive remaining in the livery, and instead of being repainted into rail blue, was given a new coat of green. It was regularly used on charter specials, and after withdrawal in 1983 it was later preserved. The locomotive was later named Atlantic Conveyor, after the ship of the same name sunk in the Falklands War.

The Great Train Robbery is the name given to a £2. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 56 036 at the launch of Large Logo livery at Toton works on 9th June 1979 Rail Blue was one of British Rails corporate colours. ... The Atlantic Conveyor was a British merchant navy ship that was requisitioned during the Falklands War and sunk by an Exocet missile. ... Combatants Argentina United Kingdom Commanders President Leopoldo Galtieri Vice-Admiral Juan Lombardo Brigadier-General Ernesto Crespo Brigade-General Mario Menéndez Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher Admiral Sir John Fieldhouse Rear-Admiral John “Sandy” Woodward Major-General Jeremy Moore Casualties 649 killed 1,068 wounded 11,313 taken prisoner 75 fixed...

Preservation

Seven locomotives have been preserved on heritage railways, including the first built, number D200. A scene on a heritage railway. ...

Numbers (current in bold) Name Livery Location Notes
D200 40122 - - Green North Yorkshire Moors Railway Owned by the National Railway Museum
D212 40012 97407 Aureol Green Midland Railway Centre -
D213 40013 - Andania Blue Barrow Hill Engine Shed -
D306 40106 - Atlantic Conveyor Green Nene Valley Railway Named in preservation.
D318 40118 97408 - Blue Birmingham Railway Museum -
D335 40135 97406 - Green East Lancashire Railway -
D345 40145 - - Blue East Lancashire Railway Mainline registered.
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
British Rail Class 40

A diesel train on the NYMR Goathland station. ... Locomotives arranged around the turntable in the Great Hall. ... The MV Aureol was a British ocean liner, originally built for Elder Dempster Lines of Liverpool in 1951. ... The Midland Railway, Butterley is a complex of railway museum exhibits in Derbyshire, within the Midland Railway Centre. ... 56 036 at the launch of Large Logo livery at Toton works on 9th June 1979 Rail Blue was one of British Rails corporate colours. ... The Barrow Hill Engine Shed is a former Midland Railway roundhouse in Derbyshire. ... The Atlantic Conveyor was a British merchant navy ship that was requisitioned during the Falklands War and sunk by an Exocet missile. ... Wansford station viewed from the road A view of the station at Peterborough Swedish B Class No. ... 56 036 at the launch of Large Logo livery at Toton works on 9th June 1979 Rail Blue was one of British Rails corporate colours. ... The Birmingham Railway Museum Trust operates two subsidiaries: Tyseley Locomotive Works and Vintage Trains. ... LMS Class 3F Jinty 0-6-0T No. ... 56 036 at the launch of Large Logo livery at Toton works on 9th June 1979 Rail Blue was one of British Rails corporate colours. ... LMS Class 3F Jinty 0-6-0T No. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Class 40 History Part 1 Class 40 Preservation Society - Retrieved on 2007-07-17
  2. ^ Class 40 Page The Railway Centre - Retrieved on 2007-07-18
  3. ^ a b Class 40 History Part 2 Class 40 Preservation Society - Retrieved on 2007-07-23
  4. ^ Incidents in 1967 Railblue.com - Retrieved on 2007-07-23
  5. ^ Withdrawal list Class 40 page - Retrieved on 2007-07-24
  6. ^ 40145 maiden journey 2002 Six Bells Junction - Retrieved on 2007-07-24

Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External Links


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  Results from FactBites:
 
Class 40 Story (3714 words)
Class 40's became the preferred locos for use with the Royal Train from the late 1960's until 1977, when the train was replaced with an air conditioned set requiring electric train heating.
In front of the loco are representatives of British Rail Intercity and the NRM, with the driver and secondman from the final stage of the railtour.
Thankfully, the Class 40 preservation story was well underway before the end of their main line career.
Home (232 words)
The Class 40 Preservation Society was formed in 1980 and are the proud owners of two English Electric Type 4, Class 40 locomotives, D335 (40135) and 40145 (D345).
D335 is currently painted in its original 1961 British Railways green Livery, whilst 40145 is running in the overall BR blue livery of the 1970s/80s.
On the pages of this website you can find out about the history of the class, learn about 40145’s main line exploits, find the latest class 40 news, download booking forms for 40145’s railtours, take a browse through our sales items and lots more.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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