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Encyclopedia > British National Front
National Front
The logo of the British National Party
Leader Tom Holmes
Founded 1967
Headquarters Solihull,West Midlands
Political Ideology White nationalism
Political Position Far right
International Affiliation
European Affiliation None
European Parliament Group n/a
Colours Red, White and Blue
Website www.national-front.org.uk
See also Politics of the UK

Political parties
Elections Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... Shortcut: WP:NPOVD Articles that have been linked to this page are the subject of an NPOV dispute (NPOV stands for Neutral Point Of View; see below). ... Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Thomas Frank Holmes (born 1930s) is the current chairman of the far-right British political party, the National Front and a long standing member of the movement. ... , Solihull (IPA: , or ) is a large town in the West Midlands of England, with a population of 94,753. ... The County of West Midlands is a metropolitan county in western central England with a population of around 2,600,000 people. ... // White nationalism (WN) advocates a racial definition (or redefinition) of national identity, as opposed to multiculturalism. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into far right. ... For other uses, see Red (disambiguation). ... This article is about the color. ... For other uses, see Blue (disambiguation). ... The Politics of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland takes place in the framework of a constitutional monarchy in which the Monarch is head of state and the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom is the head of government. ... This is a list of political parties in the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom has five distinct types of elections: general, local, regional, European and mayoral. ...

The British National Front (most commonly called the National Front) is a British far right political party whose major political activities were during the 1970s and 1980s. [1] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into far right. ... “Political Parties” redirects here. ...

Contents

Late 1960s: formation

The NF was founded on February 7, 1967, under the chairmanship of A. K. Chesterton. Its purpose was to oppose immigration and multiculturalist policies in Britain, and multinational agreements such as the United Nations or the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation as replacements for negotiated bilateral agreements between nations. The new movement brought the LEL into permanent coalition with the 1960s incarnation of the British National Party and a portion of the Racial Preservation Society led by Robin Beauclair (the remainder of the RPS—led by Dr David Brown—joined its house political party, the National Democratic Party). There was a ban on neo-Nazi groups being allowed to join the party, but members of John Tyndall's neo-Nazi Greater Britain Movement joined as individual members (by a policy of entryism to circumvent the ban (this led to several members resigning in protest, most notably Rodney Legg, who went on to become an acclaimed local historian and conservationist). Arthur Keneth Chesterton (1896 — August 16, 1973) was an ultra right-wing politician and journalist, instrumental in founding a number of right-wing organisations in Britain, primarily in opposition to the break-up of the British Empire, and later adopting a broader anti-immigration stance. ... The multicultural national representation of the countries of origin at the student union of San Francisco City College. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... NATO 2002 Summit in Prague The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), also called the North Atlantic Alliance, the Atlantic Alliance or the Western Alliance, is an international organisation for collective security established in 1949, in support of the North Atlantic Treaty signed in Washington, DC, on 4 April 1949. ... The British National Party was a far right political party that operated in the United Kingdom from 1960 to 1967. ... The Racial Preservation Society was a right-wing pressure group opposed to immigration and in favour of white supremacy in the United Kingdom in the 1960s. ... The National Democratic Party was a right wing political party that operated in the United Kingdom during the 1960s and 1970s. ... The terms Neo-Nazism and Neo-Fascism refer to any social or political movement to revive Nazism or Fascism, respectively, and postdates the Second World War. ... The Greater Britain Movement was a political group formed by John Tyndall in 1964 after he split from Colin Jordans National Socialist Movement. ... Entryism (or entrism or enterism) is a political tactic by which an organisation encourages members to infiltrate another organisation in an attempt to gain recruits, or take over entirely. ...


Early 1970s: growth

The NF grew during the 1970s and had as many as 20,000 members by 1974. It did particularly well in local elections and polled 44% in Deptford, London (with a splinter group), almost beating the incumbent Labour candidate, who only won due to the split in the vote. It came third in three parliamentary by-elections. In only one of these instances—the Newham by-election of 1975 (where the candidate was former Communist Party of Great Britain candidate Mike Lobb)—NF outperformed the Liberals. Deptford is an area of the London Borough of Lewisham, on the south bank of the River Thames in south-east London. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Lord Speaker Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... The Communist Party of Great Britain (CPGB) was the largest communist party in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ...


Its electoral base largely consisted of blue-collar workers and the self-employed who resented immigrant competition in the labour market or simply the appearance of immigrants. The party also attracted a few disillusioned Conservatives, who gave the party much needed electoral expertise and respectability. The Conservatives came particularly from the Conservative Monday Club group within the Conservative Party that had been founded in hostile reaction to Harold Macmillan's "Winds Of Change" speech. The NF fought on a platform of opposition to communism and liberalism, support for Ulster loyalism, opposition to the European Economic Community, and the compulsory repatriation of new Commonwealth immigrants that were able to come over to Britain because of its unique passport system of the period that allowed Commonwealth citizens to Britain as equal citizens. A blue-collar worker is a working class employee who performs manual or technical labor, such as in a factory or in technical maintenance trades, in contrast to a white-collar worker, who does non-manual work generally at a desk. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Monday Club (widely known as the Monday Club) is a British right-wing [1] pressure-group with its origins in the Conservative Party. ... Maurice Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton, OM, PC (10 February 1894 – 29 December 1986), was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1957 to 1963. ... Communism is an ideology that seeks to establish a classless, stateless social organization based on common ownership of the means of production. ... Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ... In the context of Irish politics, Unionists are people in Northern Ireland, who wish to see the continuation of the Act of Union 1800, as amended by the Government of Ireland Act 1920, under which Northern Ireland, created in that latter Act, remains part of the United Kingdom of Great... The European Community (EC), most important of three European Communities, was originally founded on March 25, 1957 by the signing of the Treaty of Rome under the name of European Economic Community. ... Repatriation (from late Latin repatriare - to restore someone to his homeland) is a term used to describe the process of return of refugees or soldiers to their homes, most notably following a war. ... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2006 Headquarters Marlborough House, London, UK Official languages English Membership 53 sovereign states Leaders  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Secretary-General Don McKinnon (since 1 April 2000) Establishment  -  Balfour Declaration 18 November 1926   -  Statute of Westminster 11 December 1931   -  London Declaration 28 April 1949  Area  -  Total...


A common sight in England in the 1970s, the NF was well-known for its noisy demonstrations, particularly in London, where it often faced anti-fascist protestors from opposing left-wing groups, including the International Marxist Group and later the SWP supported Anti-Nazi League. Opponents of the National Front claimed it to be a neo-Fascist organization, and its activities were opposed by anti-racist groups such as Searchlight. For other uses, see Demonstration. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Members of the Dutch Eindhoven Resistance with troops of the US 101st Airborne in Eindhoven in September 1944. ... The International Marxist Group (IMG) was a Trotskyist political party in the United Kingdom between 1964 and 1987. ... The Socialist Workers Party (SWP) is a political party of the far left in England It sees itself as standing in the revolutionary socialist tradition. ... Anti-Nazi League logo The Anti-Nazi League (ANL) was an organisation set up on the initiative of the Socialist Workers Party with some sponsorship (and a few small financial donations) from some trade unions and the endorsement of a list of prominent people in 1977 to oppose the rise... The terms Neo-Nazism and Neo-Fascism refer to any social or political movement to revive Nazism or Fascism, respectively, and postdates the Second World War. ... Searchlight is a British publication which describes itself as an international anti-fascist magazine, and publishes material critical of far-right political parties. ...


The NF was led at first by Chesterton, who left under a cloud after half of the directorate (led by the NF's major financer, Gordon Marshall) moved a vote of no confidence in him. He was replaced in 1970 by the party's office manager John O'Brien, a former Conservative and supporter of Enoch Powell. O'Brien however left when he realised the NF's leadership functions were being systematically taken over by the former Greater Britain Movement members in order to ensure the party was really being run by John Tyndall and his deputy Martin Webster. He and the NF's treasurer Clare McDonald led a small group of supporters into John Davis' National Independence Party, and the leadership passed to John Tyndall and Martin Webster. John OBrien was a leading figure on the far right of British politics during the early 1970s. ... John Enoch Powell, MBE (June 16, 1912 – February 8, 1998) was a British politician, linguist, writer, academic, soldier and poet. ... The Greater Britain Movement was a political group formed by John Tyndall in 1964 after he split from Colin Jordans National Socialist Movement. ... John Tyndall John Hutchyns Tyndall (July 14, 1934 – July 19, 2005) was a far-right British nationalist politician best known for leading the National Front in the 1970s and for founding the British National Party in the 1980s. ... Martin Guy Alan Webster (born May 1943) was a leading figure on the far-right in British politics. ... The National Independence Party was a minor right wing party that appeared in British politics during the 1970s. ... John Tyndall John Hutchyns Tyndall (July 14, 1934 – July 19, 2005) was a far-right British nationalist politician best known for leading the National Front in the 1970s and for founding the British National Party in the 1980s. ... Martin Guy Alan Webster (born May 1943) was a leading figure on the far-right in British politics. ...


Mid 1970s: success and infighting

The NF's success in the 1973 West Bromwich by-election shocked many when the NF candidate finished third on 16%, and saving his deposit for the only time in NF history. This result was largely due to the candidate Martin Webster's own adopted 'chummy' persona for the campaign as "Big Mart", and the NF flooding the areas with hired coachloads of supporters over the four weeks of the by-election at the party's expense. The party thereafter enjoyed respectable results, even if it could not win any seats. The NF's first 'elected' councillor won in a by-election for Carrickfergus Town Council in Northern Ireland in 1975 when the only other candidate dropped out (there was also the temporary defection of two Conservative Councillors in Wandsworth, London, one of whom—Athlene O'Connell—was later accused of failing to have ever severed her NF links). Martin Guy Alan Webster (born May 1943) was a leading figure on the far-right in British politics. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Ulster County: District: Carrickfergus Borough UK Parliament: East Antrim European Parliament: Northern Ireland Dialling Code: 028, +44 28 Post Town: Carrickfergus Postal District(s): BT38 Population (2005) 32,668 Carrickfergus (from the Irish: Carraig Fhearghais meaning Rock of Fergus) is a large town in...


In 1974, the ITV documentary This Week exposed the neo-Nazi pasts (and continued links with Nazis from other countries) of Tyndall and Webster. This resulted in a stormy annual conference two weeks later, where Tyndall was booed with chants of "Nazi! Nazi!" when he tried to make his speech. This led to the leadership being passed to the populist John Kingsley Read. A standoff between Read and his supporters (such as Roy Painter and Denis Pirie) and Tyndall and Webster followed, leading to a temporary stand-still in NF growth. Before long, Read and his supporters were forced out by intimidation tactics of Tyndall's Honour Guard, and Tyndall returned as leader. Read formed the short-lived National Party, which won two council seats in Blackburn in 1976. Independent Television (generally known as ITV, but also as ITV Network) is a public service network of British commercial television broadcasters, set up under the Independent Television Authority (ITA) to provide competition to the BBC. ITV is the oldest commercial television network in the UK. Since 1990 and the Broadcasting... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... This Week was the name of a weekly current affairs series screened on the ITV network in the United Kingdom, produced for the network by Thames Television. ... The terms Neo-Nazism and Neo-Fascism refer to any social or political movement to revive Nazism or Fascism, respectively, and postdates the Second World War. ... National Socialism redirects here. ... Look up Populism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... John Kingsley Read (1937 – 1985) was chairman of the British National Front from 1974 to 1976. ... Roy Painter was a former Conservative politician who for a time became one of the leading figures on the British far right. ... Denis Pirie was a veteran of the British far right scene who took a leading role in a number of movements. ... The National Party was formed on January 6, 1976 by John Kingsley Read as a less extreme alternative to the National Front. ... , Blackburn is a large town in Lancashire, England. ...


Late 1970s: riot and downfall

If anything encapsulated the NF under Tyndall and Webster - and the clumsy response by its opponents - it was the events of August 1977, when a large NF march specifically went through the largely non-white areas of Lewisham in South East London under an inflammatory slogan claiming that 70% of muggers were black whilst 70% of muggers' victims were white (nb. these figures came courtesy of an ill-worded press statement from Chief of the Metropolitan Police Sir Kenneth Newman that was actually intended to illustrate how poor relations between the black community and the police had become: ie. black victims of crime seldom bothered to report it). Lewisham is a district in south-east London, England and the principal settlement of the London Borough of Lewisham. ...


As the NF were at that time taking part in the Birmingham Ladywood by-election, such a large march elsewhere can only be construed as being deliberately to provoke trouble. 270 policemen were injured (56 hospitalised), over 200 were arrested, and 78 marchers or protestors injured, and an attempt to destroy the local police station saw the first use of riot shields on British soil outwith Northern Ireland.


The event is often romanticised by miltant anti-fascists as the Battle of Lewisham.[2], along similar lines to the previous Battle of Cable Street against Oswald Mosley. However, as journalist Martin Walker pointed out, the march achieved Tyndall and Webster's aim of causing trouble and ensuring that their opponents took all the blame for it. Militant anti-fascism is a form of anti-fascism that advocates the use of violence against fascism. ... The Battle of Lewisham is the name sometimes given to the events of 13 August 1977, when an attempt by the far-right National Front to march from New Cross to Lewisham in South East London led to counter-demonstrations and violent clashes. ... The Battle of Cable Street or Cable Street Riot took place on Sunday October 4, 1936 in Cable Street in the East End of London. ... Sir Oswald Ernald Mosley, 6th Baronet (November 16, 1896 – December 3, 1980), was a British politician known principally as the founder of the British Union of Fascists. ...


The real damage to the NF at Lewisham was that plenty of its ordinary members began to have second thoughts about the sort of organisation they were in: seeing little attraction in having bricks and smoke bombs rain down on them just so Tyndall and Webster could have excellent propaganda material and prime time media coverage.


1979 was a disastrous year for the National Front. One view is that the rise to prominence of the newly reinvigorated Conservative Party under Margaret Thatcher was a factor. Thatcher's tough right-wing stance on immigration and law and order caused the NF's support to haemorrhage. Many ex-Tories returned to the fold from the NF or its myriad splinter groups. The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first and to date only woman to hold either post. ... In politics, law and order refers to a political platform which supports a strict criminal justice system, especially in relation to violent crime and property crimes, through harsher criminal penalties. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ...


Also Tyndall insisted in using party funds to nominate extra candidates so the NF would be standing in 303 seats in order to give the impression of growing strength. This brought the party to the verge of bankruptcy when all the deposits were lost: for most 'candidates' were candidates in name only, and did no electioneering whatsoever. Notice of closure stuck on the door of a computer store the day after its parent company, Granville Technology Group Ltd, declared bankruptcy (strictly, put into administration—see text) in the United Kingdom. ... A political campaign is an effort to reach a certain political goal. ...


Front deputy leader Martin Webster claimed two decades later that the activities of the Anti-Nazi League played a key part in the NF's collapse at the end of the 1970s, but this claim runs contrary to events: for the Anti-Nazi League collapsed in early 1979 amid claims of financial impropriety, with former celebrity supporters such as Brian Clough disowning the organisation. The NF stood their largest number of parliamentary candidates at the 1979 General Election only a few months later. Furthermore, a damning full set of minutes of National Front Directorate meetings from late 1979 to the 1986 "Third Way" versus "Flag Group" split, deposited by former NF leader Patrick Harrington in the library of the University of Southampton, revealed that during the party's post-1979 wilderness years they were in the habit of "tipping off the Reds" in order to give their activities greater credibility with the public by being attended by hordes of angry protestors. This fact was later confirmed by MI5 mole Andy Carmichael, who was West Midlands Regional Organiser for the NF during the 1990s. Martin Guy Alan Webster (born May 1943) was a leading figure on the far-right in British politics. ... Anti-Nazi League logo The Anti-Nazi League (ANL) was an organisation set up on the initiative of the Socialist Workers Party with some sponsorship (and a few small financial donations) from some trade unions and the endorsement of a list of prominent people in 1977 to oppose the rise... Anti-Nazi League logo The Anti-Nazi League (ANL) was an organisation set up on the initiative of the Socialist Workers Party with some sponsorship (and a few small financial donations) from some trade unions and the endorsement of a list of prominent people in 1977 to oppose the rise... Brian Howard Clough, OBE (21 March 1935 – 20 September 2004) was a successful footballer and subsequently football manager, most notable for his success with Derby County and Nottingham Forest. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1979 was held on 3 May 1979 and is regarded as a pivotal point in 20th century British politics. ... Patrick Pat Harrington (born 1964) is one of four members of the National Executive of the Third Way (UK) and a former leader of the National Front. ... MI5 Logo. ... The West Midlands is an official Region of England, covering the western half of the Midlands. ...


Thus, the three important factors in the NF's collapse were Margaret Thatcher's "swamping" speech designed to cream off the NF vote in key marginals, John Tyndall's rash diktat on the NF standing in 303 seats, and - ironically - the collapse of the ANL. Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first and to date only woman to hold either post. ... John Tyndall John Hutchyns Tyndall (July 14, 1934 – July 19, 2005) was a far-right British nationalist politician best known for leading the National Front in the 1970s and for founding the British National Party in the 1980s. ...


Tyndall's leadership was challenged by Andrew Fountaine after the disaster. Although Tyndall saw off the challenge, Fountaine and his followers split from the party to form the NF Constitutional Movement. The influential Leicester branch of the NF also split around this time, leading to the formation of the short lived British Democratic Party. In the face of these splits, the NF members finally rebelled and expelled Tyndall. He was replaced ostentatiously by Andrew Brons: but the real leader was Martin Webster, who much to everyone's surprise, backed the expulsion. Tyndall went on to eventually form the British National Party - ironically, Tyndall and his acolytes had been banned from the original BNP). Andrew Fountaine (1918-1997) was a veteran of the far right scene in British politics. ... The Constitutional Movement was a splinter group from the British National Front, formed in 1979 as the National Front Constitutional Movement by Andrew Fountaine. ... Leicester city centre, looking towards the Clock Tower Leicester (pronounced ) is the largest city and unitary authority in the English East Midlands. ... The British Democratic Party was a short-lived far-right party formed in 1979 when the Leicester branch of the National Front broke away from the main party under the leadership of Anthony Read Herbert. ... Andrew Brons was a veteran of far right politics in Britain. ... Martin Guy Alan Webster (born May 1943) was a leading figure on the far-right in British politics. ... The British National Party (BNP) is a white nationalist political party in the United Kingdom. ...


1980s: two National Fronts

The party rapidly declined during the 1980s, although it retained some support in the West Midlands and in parts of London (usually centred around the entourage of Terry Blackham). The party tried in vain to gain support in Northern Ireland on several occasions.


The party effectively split into two halves during the 1980s, after they'd successfully expelled Martin Webster and his partner Peter Salt from the NF. On one side were the Political Soldier ideas of young radicals such as Nick Griffin, Patrick Harrington, Phil Andrews, Derek Holland and, slightly later on, Troy Southgate, who were known as the Third Way. They had little interest in contesting elections, preferring a revolutionary strategy. Martin Guy Alan Webster (born May 1943) was a leading figure on the far-right in British politics. ... Political Soldier was a political group within Britains National Front, centred on young radicals Nick Griffin, Patrick Harrington and Derek Holland, that began to emerge in the late 1970s with new destinations in mind for the movement. ... Nicholas John Nick Griffin (born 1959) is a British far-right politician. ... Patrick Pat Harrington (born 1964) is one of four members of the National Executive of the Third Way (UK) and a former leader of the National Front. ... Derek Holland is a figure on the European far-right. ... Troy Southgate is a leading National-Anarchist activist based in the United Kingdom - indeed the concept of National-Anarchism seems to be largely his invention. ... Third way can refer to: The Third Way, an economic and political idea that positions itself between democratic socialism and laissez-faire capitalism, combining the ordoliberal social market with neo-liberalism. ...


The opposition NF Flag Group however contained the traditionalists such as Ian Anderson, Martin Wingfield, Tina 'Tin-Tin' Wingfield, Joe Pearce (initially associated with the Third Way faction) and Steve Brady, who ran candidates under the NF banner in the 1987 general election. The Flag faction did some political dabbling of their own, and the ideas of Social Credit and Distributism were popular, but the chief preoccupation was still race relations. The Flag Group represented aone of the two wings of the British National Front in the 1980s and stood in opposition to the Political Soldier wing. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Martin Wingfield is a long-standing figure on the extreme right in British politics. ... Joe Pearce was a leading member of the National Front during the 1980s and was variously associated with both the Political Soldier and Flag Group wings. ... Margaret Thatcher David Steel Election 1987 Titles The United Kingdom general election of 1987 was held on 11 June 1987 and was the third consecutive victory for the Conservative Party under the leadership of Margaret Thatcher. ... Social Credit (often called Socred for short) is an economic ideology and a social movement which started in the early 1920s. ... Distributism, also known as distributionism and distributivism, is a third-way economic philosophy formulated by such Roman Catholic thinkers as G. K. Chesterton and Hilaire Belloc to apply the principles of social justice articulated by the Roman Catholic Church, especially in Pope Leo XIIIs encyclical Rerum Novarum[1] and...


Having two parties within one saved the NF from oblivion after 1979, when the phrase "let a thousand initiatives bloom" was coined to allow internal diversity in the hope of recapturing success, but inevitably it led to clashes bordering on high farce: at the Vauxhall by-election Patrick Harrington stood as the Official National Front candidate against Ted Budden for the Flag NF, both sides cat-calling at one another during the declaration of the result. A by-election for the UK House of Commons was held in the constituency of Vauxhall on the 15th June 1989, following the resignation of sitting member Stuart Holland. ... The Official National Front was the leading movement within the British National Front during the 1980s and stood opposed to the Flag Group. ... Edward Budden (died 2000) was a veteran of the far right in the United Kingdom who was well-known in such circles for his satirical columns that appeared in a number of publications down the years. ...


By 1990, the Political Soldiers had fallen out with one another, splintering into Harrington's Third Way (UK), and Griffin's International Third Position (ITP), leaving the Flag Group under Ian Anderson and Martin Wingfield to continue alone. Griffin's pamphlet "Attempted Murder" gave a very colourful - if biased and somewhat bitter - overview of this period of the NF's history. Third Way General Election poster displayed by Party supporters in their windows National Liberal Party - The Third Way poster The Third Way is a British political party that was formed on 17 March 1990. ... International Third Position (ITP) was a United Kingdom group formed by the Italian Roberto Fiore and as a continuation of the Political Soldier movement that originated in the Third Positionist British National Front in the early 1980s. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Martin Wingfield is a long-standing figure on the extreme right in British politics. ...


Its opponents viewed it during the 1980s and 1990s as a white power skinhead party with barely concealed neo-Nazi views — something that the Front denied. Despite popular and tabloid media perceptions (and the line propagated by Searchlight), the NF actually lost a lot of racist skinhead support as a result of the group's support for non-white radicals such as Louis Farrakhan and Ayatollah Khomeini. The former supporters either moved to the British National Party, the rapidly declining British Movement, or simply to the White Noise umbrella group Blood and Honour. Meanwhile, leftist and non-political skinheads — particularly those in Oi! bands such as the Angelic Upstarts, Peter and the Test Tube Babies and the Toy Dolls — spoke out against the NF's racist views or made it clear they had no interest in politics. Around this time, one pro-NF skinhead fanzine asked the Macc Lads to perform at a White Noise fundraiser even though their guitarist, The Beater, was Asian.[citation needed] Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The terms Neo-Nazism and Neo-Fascism refer to any social or political movement to revive Nazism or Fascism, respectively, and postdates the Second World War. ... Searchlight is a British publication which describes itself as an international anti-fascist magazine, and publishes material critical of far-right political parties. ... Louis Farrakhan (born Louis Eugene Walcott, May 11, 1933), is the head of the Nation of Islam (NOI). ... Ayatollah Khomeini founded the first modern Islamic republic Ayatollah Seyyed Ruhollah Khomeini (آیت‌الله روح‌الله خمینی in Persian) (May 17, 1900 – June 3, 1989) was an Iranian Shia cleric and the political... The British National Party (BNP) is a white nationalist political party in the United Kingdom. ... The British Movement was a British neo-Nazi group. ... Blood and Honour logo, featuring Ian Stuart Donaldson. ... Skinheads, named for their close-cropped or shaven heads, are a working-class subculture that originated in the United Kingdom in the late 1960s, and then spread to other parts of the world. ... Oi! is a working class street-level subgenre of punk rock that originated in the United Kingdom in the 1970s. ... The Angelic Upstarts were a staunchly anti-fascist, anti-police, pro-IRA, Socialist working class oi! punk band of late 1970s and early 1980s. ... Peter and the Test Tube Babies are a punk rock band formed around Brighton in 1977 and still touring today. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A fanzine (see also: zine) is a nonprofessional publication produced by fans of a particular subject for the pleasure of others who share their interest. ... The Macc Lads - the self proclaimed rudest crudest lewdest drunkest band in Christendom - formed in the late 1970s in Macclesfield, UK, playing a fusion of punk and hard rock. ...


Nick Griffin and Derek Holland even tried to enlist the financial aid of Libya's Colonel Gadaffi, but this was promptly rejected once the Libyans found out about the NF's reputation as fascist (a third of Libya's male population was exterminated by Mussolini's fascist troops during World War II). However, the NF received five thousand copies of Gadaffi's Green Book, which influenced Phil Andrews into leaving the NF to form the successful Isleworth Community Group, the first of several such "grassroots" groups in English local elections whereby nominally independent candidates stand under a collective flag of convenience to appear more attractive to voters.[3] Colonel Muammar al-Qaddafi Muammar Abu Minyar al-Qaddafi 1 (Arabic: معمر القذافي Mu`ammar al-Qadhdhāfī) (born 1942), leader of Libya since 1970 and a controversial Arab statesman. ... Fascism is an authoritarian political ideology (generally tied to a mass movement) that considers individual and other societal interests subordinate to the needs of the state, and seeks to forge a type of national unity, usually based on, but not limited to, ethnic, cultural, or racial attributes. ... Cover of English language edition published by the Libyan government There are multiple Green Books. ... The Community Group, also known as the Independent Community Group (ICG), and registered with the Electoral Commission as The Community (London Borough of Hounslow), is a small political party based in Isleworth, in the London Borough of Hounslow. ...


1990s and 2000s

In the 1990s, the NF declined as the BNP began to grow. As a result of this, Ian Anderson decided to change the party name and in 1995 relaunched it as the National Democrats. The move proved unpopular (and the name change ballot result much disputed). Over half of the 600 members continued the NF under the reluctant leadership of previous deputy leader John McAuley. He later passed the job onto Tom Holmes. The National Democrats continued to publish the old NF newspaper The Flag for a while, and beat the NF at the Uxbridge by-election of 1997 in which the candidates were the respective party leaders. The rump NF rump launched a new paper The Flame, which is still published irregularly, but Anderson kept all the old NF printing equipment. The British National Party (BNP) is a white nationalist political party in the United Kingdom. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... The National Democrats is the name of a right wing nationalist party in the United Kingdom that has campaigned vigorously against immigration and asylum. ... Thomas Frank Holmes (born 1930s) is the current chairman of the far-right British political party, the National Front and a long standing member of the movement. ... Uxbridge is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


The party fielded seven candidates at the 1997 General Election, and 13 candidates at the 2005 General Election, none of whom saved their deposit. The NF's current National Chairman remains Tom Holmes. The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ... It has been suggested that Marginal constituencies in the United Kingdom be merged into this article or section. ... Thomas Frank Holmes (born 1930s) is the current chairman of the far-right British political party, the National Front and a long standing member of the movement. ...


The National Front gained a local council seat on 3 May 2007 when candidate Simon Deacon was elected unopposed to Markyate Parish Council, near St Albans (there were 10 vacancies but only 9 candidates). It is 32 years since the NF's only previous elected councillor. The NF had hoped that Tom Holmes could also win the Nelson ward council seat on Great Yarmouth Borough Council; he polled 22.9% of the votes cast. At the end of August 2007, Deacon announced that he had joined the BNP. is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Thomas Frank Holmes (born 1930s) is the current chairman of the far-right British political party, the National Front and a long standing member of the movement. ...


Party logo

NF protesting "Homosexual Marriage" at Gay Pride 2007
NF protesting "Homosexual Marriage" at Gay Pride 2007

The party's conjoined letters logo is well known. The original version leaned to the right and some versions had a right leaning split level Union Flag to the left side of it (a style later copied by the airline company Air UK for their own logo). Allegedly it was A. K. Chesterton himself that came up with the design, taking the idea from the then logo for InterCity trains - however it also bears a strong resemblance to the old "Ministry of Food" logo from World War Two. Other logos have been used (including a ghostly figure holding a shield, and a slobbering vicious bulldog for the Young NF, but the "Siamese twin" lettering remains the better known. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 671 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (751 × 671 pixel, file size: 159 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 671 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (751 × 671 pixel, file size: 159 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... “Union Jack” redirects here. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Arthur Keneth Chesterton (1896 — August 16, 1973) was an ultra right-wing politician and journalist, instrumental in founding a number of right-wing organisations in Britain, primarily in opposition to the break-up of the British Empire, and later adopting a broader anti-immigration stance. ... A Romanian InterCity train, run by Romanian Railways, at Arad station in May 2003 InterCity is a name for the inter-city rail services in Europe. ... A shield is a protective device, meant to intercept attacks. ... For other uses, see Bulldog (disambiguation). ... The name National Front, is used by a number of political parties and coalitions. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


See also

The British National Fronts election results in parliamentary elections are shown below. ... British Nationalism is the term given to describe a political movement that has been in existence in the United Kingdom since the end of the Second World War. ... The British National Party (BNP) is a white nationalist political party in the United Kingdom. ...

Footnotes

For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Bibliography

  • Billig, M. (1978). Fascists: A social psychological view of the National Front. London: Academic Press. Very much an 'academic' book on the NF, with statistical as much as political/sociological analysis.
  • Walker, Martin (1977) The National Front (also Expanded Edition 1978) Fontana/Collins. This was written by a Guardian journalist of the period who had unlimited access to all the key players within the NF circa 1967-1977: ie. Rosine de Bounevialle, Rodney Legg, John O'Brien, Roy Painter, John Kingsley Read, John Tyndall and Martin Webster, as well as the widow of Arther K Chesterton. By his own admission in the book, Walker's shadowing of the NF was to have an unintended influence on events within the party.

External links


 
 

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