FACTOID # 14: North Carolina has a larger Native American population than North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > British Invasion
The appearance of The Beatles on The Ed Sullivan Show, February 9, 1964, marked the dramatic start of the British Invasion.

The British Invasion was the term applied by the news media — and subsequently by consumers — to the influx of rock and roll, beat and pop performers from the United Kingdom who became popular in the United States, Australia and Canada. The classic British Invasion period was 1964 to 1967 (roughly bracketed by The Beatles' appearance on Ed Sullivan and the emergence of Jimi Hendrix as a U.S.-born superstar who had his first success in the UK), but the term has also been applied to later "waves" of UK artists that had significant impact on the North American entertainment market. British Invasion may refer to the following: British invasions of the Río de la Plata, military attacks by British forces on Buenos Aires and the Río de la Plata area. ... Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... Beatles together on Ed Sullivan show (fair use) This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... Beatles together on Ed Sullivan show (fair use) This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... The Ed Sullivan Show was an American television variety show that ran from June 20, 1948 to June 6, 1971, and was hosted by former entertainment columnist Ed Sullivan. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... It has been suggested that Merseybeat be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Pop music (disambiguation). ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ...

Contents

History

Background and pre-invasion

Prior to the success of The Beatles, British musical acts had only achieved fleeting success in what was then a relatively insular market. The first major breakthrough was the success of Dame Vera Lynn when she became the first British act to reach #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart in 1952.[1] Other acts in the intervening years had some success, most notably George Shearing, Lonnie Donegan, Petula Clark with The Tornados becoming the first British group to reach #1 with "Telstar" in 1962. Dame Vera Lynn, DBE (born March 20, 1917) is a British singer whose career flourished during World War II, when she was nicknamed The Forces Sweetheart. She is best known for the popular song Well Meet Again. She is one of the last surviving major entertainers of the war... “Hot 100” redirects here. ... George Shearing George Shearing (born 13 August 1919 in London) is a well-known jazz pianist. ... Lonnie Donegan MBE (29 April 1931 – 3 November 2002) was a skiffle musician, possibly the most famous of them all, with more than 20 UK Top 30 hits to his name. ... Petula Clark, CBE (born 15 November 1932), is an English singer, actress and composer best known for her upbeat popular international hits of the 1960s. ... The Tornados EP-cover 1963 The Tornados (in USA they were credited as The Tornadoes) were an English instrumental group of the 1960s, who acted as the in-house back-up group for many of Joe Meeks productions. ... Telstar was a 1962 instrumental record by The Tornados. ...


Like their transatlantic counterparts in the 1950s, British youth heard their future in the frantic beats and suggestive lyrics of American rock and roll, but initial attempts to replicate it failed, as enthusiasts lacked the indigenous basic ingredients of rock and roll, rhythm and blues and country music. Of perhaps more significance was the skiffle craze of the 1950s, acoustic guitar, tea-chest bass and banjo ensembles, similar to jug bands, spearheaded by Scottish-born Lonnie Donegan. Artists who went on to become notable in the following decade (like The Quarrymen, first forerunner of the Beatles) first cut their musical teeth in skiffle bands. They most often sang traditional American folk songs, frequently with more spirit than instrumental polish, although early British skiffle was often played by highly skilled Trad jazz musicians. R&B redirects here. ... Country music, the first half of Billboards country and western music category, is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... Doghouse Skiffle Group Skiffle is a type of folk music with a jazz and blues influence, usually using homemade or improvised instruments such as the washboard, tea chest bass, kazoo, cigar-box fiddle, musical saw, comb and paper, and so forth, as well as more conventional instruments such as acoustic... Playing a steel-string guitar without a pick (fingerpicking). ... The washtub bass is a folk instrument that uses a metal washtub as a resonator. ... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument developed by enslaved Africans in the United States, adapted from several African instruments. ... A jug band is a band employing a jug player and a mix of traditional and home-made instruments. ... This article is about the country. ... Lonnie Donegan MBE (29 April 1931 – 3 November 2002) was a skiffle musician, possibly the most famous of them all, with more than 20 UK Top 30 hits to his name. ... The Quarry Men were a little-known skiffle group formed around Liverpool, England in March 1957 by John Lennon. ... Folk music, in the original sense of the term, is music by and of the people. ... Trad jazz, short for traditional jazz is a music genre popular in Britain and Australia from the 1940s onward through the 1950s and which still has enthusiasts today. ...


Liverpool became the first hotbed of the so-called "beat boom." Because Liverpool was Britain's major Atlantic seaport, Liverpudlian merchant seamen often sailed to the U.S. and returned with the latest American rock-and-roll hits, often before they were made widely available in Britain. With The Beatles, other exuberant male quartets such as The Searchers, The Fourmost, and Gerry and the Pacemakers, and the quintet Billy J. Kramer with The Dakotas launched Merseybeat, so named for the estuary of the River Mersey that runs alongside Liverpool. The Beatles first reached the British record charts in late 1962 (shortly after The Tornados' "Telstar," an instrumental smash that sent word of what was in store by becoming the first British record by a group to top the American singles chart); the rest joined the hit parade in 1963. Not all acts prominent in Britain by the early 1960s necessarily managed to develop a profile in the U.S. Cliff Richard, who remains popular in Britain and active today, has only rarely had chart successes in America. For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in England. ... The Searchers are a British rock act who emerged as part of the 1960s merseybeat scene along with The Beatles, The Swinging Blue Jeans, and Gerry and the Pacemakers. ... The Fourmost was an English Merseybeat band that recorded in the 1960s. ... Gerry & the Pacemakers was a British rock and roll group during the 1960s, and one of the few groups to challenge the Beatles in popularity. ... Billy J. Kramer (born William Howard Ashton, 19 August 1943, in Bootle, Liverpool, England) was a British Invasion / Merseybeat singer. ... The Dakotas is a group of British invasion musicians, which initially convened as a backing band in Manchester, England. ... For the TV program please see Merseybeat Merseybeat, sometimes referred to as Merseysound, was a style of music popular during the 1960s. ... For other meanings, see Estuary (disambiguation) Río de la Plata estuary An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ... The River Mersey is a river in north west England. ... Sir Cliff Richard OBE (born Harry Rodger Webb on 14 October 1940) is an English singer, actor and businessman. ...


By 1962, encouraged by the anyone-can-play populism of skiffle and self-schooled in the music of Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley, Elvis Presley, Little Richard, Eddie Cochran, Buddy Holly, James Brown, and Muddy Waters, some British teens developed a real feel for the rock-and-roll and American blues idioms. Blending that with such local traditions as music hall, pop, and Celtic folk, they formulated original music they could claim, play, and sing with conviction. Young groups with electric guitars began performing and writing up-tempo melodic pop, fiery rock and roll, and Chicago-style electric blues. The rebellious tone and image of American rock and roll and blues musicians also deeply resonated with British youth in the late 1950s, influencing all the British Invasion artists. Charles Edward Anderson Chuck Berry (born 18 October 1926, St. ... Bo Diddley (born December 30, 1928) aka The Originator, is an influential American rock and roll singer, songwriter, and guitarist. ... Elvis redirects here. ... Richard Wayne Penniman (born December 5, 1932), better known by the stage name Little Richard, is an African-American singer, songwriter, and pianist, who began performing in the 1940s and was a key figure in the transition from rhythm & blues to rock and roll in the mid-1950s. ... Ray Edward Eddie Cochran (October 3, 1938 – April 17, 1960) was an American Rock and Roll musician and an important influence on popular music during the late 1950s and early 1960s. ... For the Weezer song, see Buddy Holly (song). ... For other persons named James Brown, see James Brown (disambiguation). ... McKinley Morganfield (April 4, 1915 – April 30, 1983), better known as Muddy Waters, was an American blues musician and is generally considered the Father of Chicago blues. He is also the actual father of blues musician Big Bill Morganfield. ... Music Hall is a form of British theatrical entertainment which reached its peak of popularity between 1850 and 1960. ... Celtic music is a term utilized by artists, record companies, music stores and music magazines to describe a broad grouping of musical genres that evolved out of the folk musical traditions of the Celtic peoples of Northern Europe. ...


Though generally not credited with starting the "Invasion," Dusty Springfield was one of the first British artists to have significant success in the U.S., with her hit single "I Only Want To Be With You," released in November 1963. She appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in early 1964 singing the popular hit, and continued to have several U.S. hits through the rest of the decade. A number of songs by British artists reached #1 on the Billboard Hot 100. Dusty Springfield OBE (16 April 1939–2 March 1999) was a popular English singer whose career spanned four decades. ... For the song by Hootie and the Blowfish, see Only Wanna Be with You. ... The Ed Sullivan Show was an American television variety show that ran from June 20, 1948 to June 6, 1971, and was hosted by former entertainment columnist Ed Sullivan. ... This is a list of number-one hits by British artists in the United States on the Billboard Hot 100 (existent since August 3, 1958). ...


Beatles and the British Invasion

The Beatles' triumphant arrival in New York on February 7, 1964 (three weeks after they had ascended to the top of the Billboard and Cashbox U.S. singles charts) and their appearance on the The Ed Sullivan Show on February 9, 1964, are events widely credited with truly throwing open America's doors to a wealth of British musical talent, and officially beginning what would come to be called the second British Invasion.[2] The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... The Ed Sullivan Show was an American television variety show that ran from June 20, 1948 to June 6, 1971, and was hosted by former entertainment columnist Ed Sullivan. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The term "British Invasion" was coined in 1964 to describe the wave of British rock-and-roll and beat artists (primarily groups) whose popularity spread rapidly to the rest of the English-speaking world, especially the United States and Canada. Rock 'n' roll had evolved as an American musical form in the early 1950s and prior to 1963 very few British artists had had success in that musical genre in the U.S. The Beatles' breakthrough in America (starting with the success of "I Want to Hold Your Hand" in early January 1964) triggered a large wave of British artists who succeeded in the U.S. in their wake. It has been suggested that Merseybeat be merged into this article or section. ... Music sample I Want to Hold Your Hand ( file info) Problems? See media help. ...


Rock, which in the past hadn't been played much on British radio, swept Britain. By 1964, London could claim The Kinks, The Rolling Stones, The Yardbirds, The Who, The Pretty Things, Dusty Springfield, Petula Clark, The Dave Clark Five, Peter and Gordon, Chad and Jeremy, John Mayall and the Bluesbreakers, and Manfred Mann. Manchester had The Hollies, Wayne Fontana and the Mindbenders, Freddie and the Dreamers, Davy Jones of The Monkees, and Herman's Hermits; Newcastle was home to The Animals; and Birmingham had The Spencer Davis Group (featuring Steve Winwood) and The Moody Blues. Bands sprang up from Belfast (Them, with frontman Van Morrison), to St Albans (The Zombies), to Essex (The Tremeloes). This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Kinks were an English rock group formed in 1963 by lead singer-songwriter Ray Davies, his brother, lead guitarist and vocalist Dave Davies, and bassist Pete Quaife. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... Not to be confused with Yard Birds. ... The Who are a British rock band that first formed in 1964, and grew to be considered one of the greatest[1] and most influential[2] bands in the world. ... The Pretty Things are a 1960s and 1970s rock and roll band from London. ... Dusty Springfield OBE (16 April 1939–2 March 1999) was a popular English singer whose career spanned four decades. ... Petula Clark, CBE (born 15 November 1932), is an English singer, actress and composer best known for her upbeat popular international hits of the 1960s. ... The Dave Clark Five (abbreviated as DC5) were an English Beat group in the 1960s, and one of the few that were able to present something of a commercial threat to The Beatles, the dominant group of the period. ... Peter & Gordon were a British Invasion-era performing duo, formed by Peter Asher and Gordon Waller, that rocketed to fame with 1964s A World Without Love. Peter Ashers sister (the actress Jane Asher) was dating Paul McCartney (of the Beatles), and so Peter & Gordon recorded several songs written... Chad and Jeremy were a singing folk rock duo in the 1960s, composed of Chad Stuart (born David Stuart Chadwick, 10 December 1941, Windermere, Cumbria) and Jeremy Clyde (born Michael Thomas Jeremy Clyde, 22 March 1941, Dorney, Buckinghamshire). ... John Mayall and the Bluesbreakers with Eric Clapton album cover John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers was a pioneering British blues band, led by singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist John Mayall, that included such luminaries as: Eric Clapton and Jack Bruce (both later in Cream), Peter Green, John McVie and Mick Fleetwood... Cock-A-Hoop Manfred Mann was a British R&B and pop band of the 1960s, named after its keyboard player, who later led the successful 1970s follow-on group Manfred Manns Earth Band. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... Hollies redirects here. ... The Mindbenders (originally Wayne Fontana and the Mindbenders) was a 1960s British Invasion band founded by Wayne Fontana (born Glyn Ellis 28 October 1945 in Manchester). ... Freddie and the Dreamers were a British musical band who had a number of hit records between May 1963 and November 1965. ... Davy Jones, 1967 Davy Jones, an actor and singer, was born David Thomas Jones on December 30, 1945 in Manchester, England. ... The Monkees were a pop-rock quartet created and based in Los Angeles in 1965 for an NBC American television series of the same name. ... Hermans Hermits were an English rock band in the 1960s, formed in Manchester in 1963. ... This article is about a city in the United Kingdom. ... The US edition of The Animals self-titled debut album. ... This article is about the British city. ... You Put the Hurt On Me The Spencer Davis Group was formed in Birmingham, England in the early 1960s as The Rhythm and Blues Quartet. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Moody Blues are a British rock band originally from Birmingham, England. ... This article is about the city in Northern Ireland. ... Them was a Northern Irish band formed in Belfast in April 1964, best known for the garage rock standard Gloria and launching singer Van Morrisons career. ... George Ivan Morrison OBE (generally known as Van Morrison) (born August 31, 1945) is a Grammy Award-winning Irish singer, songwriter, author, poet and multi-instrumentalist, who has been a professional musician since the late 1950s. ... , St Albans is the main urban area of the City and District of St Albans in southern Hertfordshire, England, around 22 miles (35km) north of central London. ... The Zombies, formed in 1961 in St Albans, were an English rock band. ... Here Comes My Baby: The Ultimate Collection cover. ...


From 1964 to 1966 the United Kingdom sent a stream of hits across the Atlantic. Behind the conquering Beatles, Peter and Gordon ("A World Without Love"), the Animals ("House of the Rising Sun"), Manfred Mann ("Do Wah Diddy Diddy"), Petula Clark ("Downtown"), Freddie and the Dreamers ("I'm Telling You Now"), Wayne Fontana and the Mindbenders ("Game of Love"), Herman's Hermits ("Mrs. Brown You've Got a Lovely Daughter"), the Rolling Stones ("I Can't Get No Satisfaction" and others), the Troggs ("Wild Thing"), and Donovan's ("Sunshine Superman") all topped Billboard's singles chart. REDIRECT[[]]A World Without Love was a chart-topping song written by Lennon/McCartney (Northern Songs Ltd. ... The House of the Rising Sun is a United States folk song. ... Do Wah Diddy Diddy is a song performed by 1960s British R&B and pop band Manfred Mann. ... Downtown is a pop song composed by Tony Hatch following a first-time visit to New York City. ... Mrs Brown, Youve Got a Lovely Daughter is a popular song written by Trevor Peacock. ... Listen to this article (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-04-20, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... The Troggs were a successful English rock band of the 1960s, who had a number of hits in Britain and America, including their most famous song, Wild Thing. The Troggs were from the town of Andover in southern England. ... Wild Thing is a hit song written by New York-born songwriter Chip Taylor and originally recorded by The Wild Ones in 1965 (United Artists 947) (see external link below). ... For other uses, see Donovan (disambiguation). ... Sunshine Superman is the title of a 1965 song written and recorded by British popular musician Donovan; it is also became title track of his 1966 album of the same name. ... Billboard can refer to: Billboard magazine Billboard (advertising) Billboard antenna In 3D computer graphics, to billboard is to rotate an object so that it faces the viewer. ...


The success of British acts of the time led to a major cultural realignment with acts such as The Byrds and numerous Anglophone garage bands subsequently changing their sound and style. The influence continued on subsequent Anglophile groups such as Big Star, Sparks and Todd Rundgren amongst others[3]. The Byrds (formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1964) were an American rock band. ... Look up garage in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Big Star was an American rock and roll band of the early 1970s whose work is often cited as a prime example of power pop. ... Sparks is an American rock and pop music band formed in Los Angeles in 1970 by brothers Ron (keyboards) and Russell Mael (vocals). ... Todd Harry Rundgren (born June 22, 1948 in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania, USA), is an American musician, singer, songwriter and record producer. ...


Other British invasion personalities

The Anglomania at the time provided a boost for other cultural exports such as films, art and television. Noted Disc Jockey John Peel recalls in his memoirs how he was able to break into American radio purely on the basis of his Merseyside accent. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... British Art is the art of the island of Britain. ... British television broadcasting has a range of different broadcasters, broadcasting multiple channels over a variety of distribution media. ... For other meanings of DJ, see DJ (disambiguation). ... For other persons named John Peel, see John Peel (disambiguation). ... Merseyside is a metropolitan county in North West England, with a population of 1,365,900. ...


In 1964 films featuring James Bond portrayed by Sean Connery became popular in America as did Julie Andrews in Mary Poppins. That year the Beatles' first film A Hard Day's Night further painted England as the center of the (rock) universe. American media took the bait and made Carnaby Street, London's trendy fashion center in the mid-1960s, a household name. British television shows such as The Avengers that deliberately emphasized British identity were also popular. This article is about the spy series. ... Sir Thomas Sean Connery (born 25 August 1930) is a retired Scottish actor and producer who is perhaps best known as the first actor to portray James Bond in cinema, starring in seven Bond films. ... Dame Julie Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is an award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ... This article is about the Mary Poppins series of childrens books. ... A Hard Days Night (1964) is a British comedy film originally released by United Artists, written by Alun Owen and starring The Beatles during the height of Beatlemania. ... Londons Carnaby Street is in the district of Soho and just to the east of Regent Street. ... The Avengers is a British 1960s television series featuring secret agents in a fantasy 1960s Britain. ...


Second British Invasion

More than a decade following the first invasion, the punk movement of the late 1970s resulted in an influx of British bands such as Sex Pistols, The Clash, Squeeze and Elvis Costello and the Attractions. While punk had a lasting influence on the U.S. popular music scene, it never broke through in the U.S. at that time to the same extent as in the UK. Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Sex Pistols are an iconic and highly influential English punk rock band, formed in London in 1975. ... This article is about the English punk rock band. ... For other uses, see Squeeze (disambiguation). ... Elvis Costello Declan Patrick Aloysius McManus (born August 25, 1954), better known by his stage name, Elvis Costello, is a popular British musician, singer, and songwriter of Irish descent. ...


For a time in 1980 and 1981 it seemed that apart from a few exceptions such as The Police, Dire Straits, Gary Numan, and The Psychedelic Furs, British acts and musical movements such as New Wave, New Romantics and Synthpop were being bypassed in favor of homegrown soft rock and heavy metal. This article is about the rock band. ... This article is about the band. ... For the video game programmer Garry Newman, see Garrys Mod. ... The Psychedelic Furs are an influential English post-punk band founded in the late 1970s. ... The New Wave was a movement in American, Australian and British popular music, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, growing out of the New York City musical scene centered around the club CBGB. The term itself is a source of much confusion. ... New Romantic was a New Wave music subgenre and fashion movement that occurred primarily in the United Kingdom during the early 1980s. ... Synthpop is a subgenre of New Wave in which the synthesizer is the dominant musical instrument. ... Soft rock, also referred to as light rock or easy rock, is a style of music which uses the techniques of rock and roll to compose a softer, supposedly more ear-pleasing sound for listening, often at work or when driving. ... Heavy metals, in chemistry, are chemical elements of a particular range of atomic weights. ...


This changed in 1981 with the formation and influence of MTV. Needing videos to broadcast, the channel used a disproportionately large number by British acts, whose videos were generally more image conscious and entertaining and acted as short films far more than their American counterparts at the time.(Which were usually just video taped concert performances.) This led to the hysteria generated by the dominance of Birmingham's Duran Duran in the US charts throughout the 80's (a British act who still retain global popularity), and also brought various distinctly British acts to the attention of American audiences, such as Def Leppard, Human League, Adam Ant, A Flock of Seagulls, The Fixx, Naked Eyes, Thompson Twins, Eurythmics, Bananarama, Culture Club, Spandau Ballet, Wham and later Depeche Mode, Tears for Fears, OMD, Pet Shop Boys, The Cure, New Order, Dead Or Alive and others. Once again, British acts came to dominate American charts, this time to an even greater degree than in the first British Invasion. The high point of this second invasion was in July 1983 when 18 of the singles in the top 40 were by British artists and over 50 percent of the Billboard Hot 100 was accounted for by overseas artists.[4] This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... A music video is a short film or video that accompanies a complete piece of music, most commonly a song. ... A short film (also short or short subject) is a motion picture that is shorter than the average feature film. ... Def Leppard are an English hard rock band from Sheffield who formed in 1977 as part of the New Wave of British Heavy Metal movement. ... The Human League are an English synthpop band formed in 1977, who, after several changes in line up, achieved great popularity in the 1980s and a limited comeback in the mid-1990s. ... For similar terms like Adam Adamant, Atom Ant, adamant, adamantium, etc, see Adamant (disambiguation). ... For the bands self-titled debut album, see A Flock of Seagulls (album). ... The cover of The Fixs first single from 1981: Subsequently the band would change their name to The Fixx, after learning of another band with a prior claim on the name The Fix. ... Naked Eyes is an English synthpop band, best known for their singles, a cover of the Burt Bacharach / Hal David standard (Theres) Always Something There to Remind Me (Bacharach himself has cited the cover as a personal favourite), and their subsequent hit the Paul McCartney like Promises, Promises. // Naked... The Thompson Twins were an English New Wave/pop band normally associated with the 1980s. ... For the approach to music education, see Eurhythmics. ... Bananarama are a British girl group who have had success on the pop and dance charts since 1982. ... Culture Club is a popular English new romantic rock group, that achieved considerable global success in the 1980s. ... Spandau Ballet was a popular English band in the 1980s. ... Wham! can mean one of two things: Wham!, a 1980s British pop duo formed by George Michael and Andrew Ridgeley. ... Depeche Mode (pronounced ) are an electronic music band formed in 1980, in Basildon, Essex, England. ... Tears for Fears (sometimes abbreviated to TFF) are a popular English pop band formed in the early 1980s by Roland Orzabal and Curt Smith, which emerged after the dissolution of their first band, the mod-influenced Graduate. ... Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark (often abbreviated to OMD) are a synth pop group whose founder members are originally from the Wirral Peninsula, UK. OMD record for Virgin Records (originally for Virgins DinDisc subsidiary). ... Pet Shop Boys are a Grammy Award nominated British synthpop/pop music/electronic music duo, consisting of Neil Tennant who provides main vocals, keyboards and very occasionally guitar, and Chris Lowe on keyboards and occasionally on vocals. ... This article is about the band. ... This article is about the alternative rock/electronic band New Order. ... Dead or Alive is a British New Wave band from Liverpool that rose to popularity during the 1980s. ...


Around the same time American acts such as Michael Jackson, Blondie, Madonna, Prince, Cyndi Lauper, Bruce Springsteen, and The Pointer Sisters found success on the charts in the UK as well. Michael Joseph Jackson (August 29, 1958), commonly known as MJ as well as the King of Pop, is an American musician, entertainer, and pop icon whose successful career and controversial personal life have been a part of pop culture for the last three decades. ... Blondie is the name of an American rock band that first gained fame in the late 1970s, and which has sold over 140 million records. ... Look up Madonna in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The term prince, from the Latin root princeps, is used for a member of the highest ranks of the aristocracy or the nobility. ... Cynthia Ann Stephanie Cyndi Lauper (born June 22, 1953) is an American Grammy Award- winning singer, MTV VMA-winning video and Emmy Award-winning film, television and theatre actress. ... Springsteen redirects here. ... The Pointer Sisters was an American vocal group and recording act that achieved great success during the 1970s and 1980s. ...


Subsequent years

This second invasion of the 1980s remains (to date) the most recent major upsurge of British talent on the American charts. The continued splintering of the music market into different genres makes a follow-up, mass-appeal movement such as the British Invasion currently unlikely.


Following the highwater years of 1982 to 1986, success by British acts gradually dwindled to such a degree that at one point in May 2002 there were no British artists on the US singles chart, the first time this had occurred since 1963.


The reasons for this are many and varied. One can argue that the success of the acts in the second British invasion can be explained by MTV's need for a pool of videos to fill its programming, since at that time the most distinctive and most available videos were by British acts.


After the mid 1980s, tastes in the U.S. and UK diverged, the schism occurring most markedly in the late '80s and early '90s. In the UK, Dance music became hugely popular, but this movement was by and large ignored in the U.S., partly as a hangover from the Disco sucks campaign of the early '80s but also due to other social and cultural factors. There was a brief mini-invasion in 1991 with the success of Soul II Soul, Jesus Jones and EMF, but this was a blip in a downward trend only mitigated by the unexpected success of Morrissey's Your Arsenal (1992), which yielded him a moderate cult success in the States. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Discothèque redirects here. ... Soul II Soul is a dance/funk/soul act that emerged at the end of the 80s from London. ... Jesus Jones on the cover of their album London Jesus Jones is a British London-based rock group that recorded and performed in the late 1980s, throughout the 1990s, and into the 2000s. ... EMF is a British indie dance band which came to prominence at the end of the 1980s and the early 1990s. ... For other uses, see Morrissey (disambiguation). ... Following up on the poorly-received album Kill Uncle, singer Morrissey released the album Your Arsenal in 1992 (see 1992 in music). ...


In addition, the rise in the U.S. of glam metal in the late '80s, and grunge and most notably hip-hop in the '90s, meant that British acts would struggle in the U.S. The Britpop movement of the mid-1990s, which could be seen as a stylistic continuation of the original British Invasion of the 1960s, mixed with music of the 70s and 80s, failed to catch America's imagination, being perceived as too parochial and backward-looking, though some acts, notably Oasis, Elastica, Radiohead, and Blur, achieved niche success in the American market. Glam metal is a sub-genre of heavy metal music that arose in the late 1970s - early 1980s in the United States. ... Grunge music (sometimes also referred to as the Seattle Sound) is an independent-rooted music genre that became a commercially successful offshoot of hardcore punk, thrash metal, and alternative rock in the late 1980s and early 1990s. ... For other uses, see Hip hop (disambiguation). ... Britpop was a mid-1990s British alternative rock genre and movement. ... Oasis are an English rock band, formed in Manchester in 1991, led by lead guitarist and primary songwriter Noel Gallagher and his younger brother, lead vocalist and songwriter Liam Gallagher. ... Elastica were a Britpop band who were popular in the 1990s, formed by Justine Frischmann after leaving Suede in 1991. ... Radiohead are an English alternative rock band from Oxfordshire. ... Blur are an English rock band formed in Colchester in 1989. ...


By the late '90s British acts were struggling to break through in America, with the most successful acts being long established artists such as Sting, Elton John and Eric Clapton. The most notable breakthroughs at that time were the Spice Girls, Seal and Charlotte Church. This article is about the musician. ... The Spice Girls are a British all-female pop group, formed in London in 1994. ... Seal (born February 19, 1963) is a British soul vocalist. ... Charlotte Church (born Charlotte Maria Reed on February 21, 1986) is a Welsh singer and television presenter who rose to international fame in childhood as a popular classical singer with a precociously mature dramatic operatic voice, in particular in its tonal qualities. ...


Since the start of the millennium, new artists from Britain have started to establish themselves in America. While it is not yet a third invasion, this decade has been the most successful period for British acts since the early 1990s. The most successful of these artists are probably Coldplay, who broke through in 2000 with their debut album Parachutes. Subsequently other acts have followed in their footsteps. Coldplay are an English rock band. ... Parachutes is the debut album by English rock band Coldplay, released on July 10, 2000 in the UK and on November 7 in the U.S., making it the only Coldplay album to have a delayed release in America. ...


In early 2006, James Blunt reached #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 with his single "You're Beautiful", the first British artist to do so since Elton John with "Candle In The Wind" in 1997. For the American Civil War general, see James G. Blunt. ... Youre Beautiful is a pop song co-written by British singer James Blunt, Sasha Skarbek and Amanda Ghost[1] for Blunts debut album Back to Bedlam (2004). ... Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a five-time Grammy and one-time Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... Candle in the Wind is a song with music by Elton John and lyrics by Bernie Taupin. ...


In 2006, acts such as KT Tunstall, Muse and Keane have achieved success in the US. Newcomer Corinne Bailey Rae achieved acclaim for her self titled album which debuted at #17 in the U.S. Snow Patrol also broke through, reaching the US Top 10 with the single "Chasing Cars", and more recently Amy Winehouse reached the U.S. top 10 with her single "Rehab." Kate KT Tunstall (born 23 June 1975) is a Scottish singer and songwriter. ... For other uses, see Muse (disambiguation). ... Keane (IPA: /kin/) are an English piano rock band, first established in Battle, East Sussex in 1995, taking their current name in 1997. ... Corinne Bailey Rae (born February 26, 1979) is an English singer-songwriter from Leeds who released her eponymous debut album Corinne Bailey Rae in February 2006. ... Corinne Bailey Rae is the eponymous debut album by English singer Corinne Bailey Rae. ... Snow Patrol are a Grammy Award-nominated alternative rock band which formed in Scotland, with the majority of their members being from Bangor and Belfast, Northern Ireland. ... Chasing Cars is the third single from Snow Patrols fourth album, Eyes Open. ... Amy-Jade Winehouse (born 14 September 1983) is an English soul, jazz, R&B singer and songwriter. ... Amy Winehouse U.S. singles chronology You Know Im No Good (2007) Rehab (2007) Tears Dry on Their Own (2007) Rehab is a soul/jazz/R&B song written by English singer Amy Winehouse for her second studio album, Back to Black (2006). ...


Natasha Bedingfield enjoyed success in the United States in 2005 and 2006 with singles like "These Words", which reached #17 in the U.S. charts, and "Unwritten", which peaked inside the U.S. top 10 at #5 and became the second most played song on U.S. radio in 2006. Her debut album also reached #26. In January 2008 Bedingfield released her second US album Pocketful of Sunshine which peaked at #3 on the Billboard Top 200, the lead single from her second album Love Like This reached #11 in the same week. Natasha Anne Bedingfield (born 26 November 1981) is an English singer and songwriter who debuted in the 1990s as a member of the Christian dance/electronic group The DNA Algorithm with her siblings Daniel Bedingfield and Nikola Rachelle. ... These Words (also known as These Words (I Love You, I Love You) and These Words (I Love You)) is a song by Natasha Bedingfield, and is the second European single (the first North American) from her debut album Unwritten. ... Unwritten is a single from English singer Natasha Bedingfield, co-written by her, Danielle Brisebois and Wayne Rodrigues. ... Natasha Bedingfield Switzerland singles chronology Soulmate (2007) Love Like This (2007) ... Sean Kingston singles chronology Me Love (2007) Love Like This (2007) Big Girls Dont Cry (remix) (2007) Love Like This is a pop song performed by Natasha Bedingfield and Sean Kingston for Bedingfields second North American album...


Despite success for Amy Winehouse and Natasha Bedingfield, it was English Alternative Rock band Radiohead who reached #1 on the Billboard Top 200 in January 2008 with their album "In Rainbows", proving still to be the biggest British act in America. It was their second #1 album stateside after their 2000 album Kid A. Alternative music redirects here. ... Radiohead are an English alternative rock band from Oxfordshire. ... In Rainbows is the seventh album by the English alternative rock band Radiohead. ... This article is about the Radiohead album. ...

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Prose is writing distinguished from poetry by its greater variety of rhythm and its closer resemblance to everyday speech. ...

Early British Invasion artists

British artists which reached number-one on the Hot 100, 1964-1966 This is a list of number-one hits by British artists in the United States on the Billboard Hot 100 (existent since August 3, 1958). ...

The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... The US edition of The Animals self-titled debut album. ... Peter & Gordon were a British Invasion-era performing duo, formed by Peter Asher and Gordon Waller, that rocketed to fame with 1964s A World Without Love. Peter Ashers sister (the actress Jane Asher) was dating Paul McCartney (of the Beatles), and so Peter & Gordon recorded several songs written... Cilla Black OBE (born 27 May 1942) is an English singer-songwriter and television personality, born Priscilla Maria Veronica White to a Protestant father and a Catholic mother in Liverpool. ... The Dave Clark Five (abbreviated as DC5) were an English Beat group in the 1960s, and one of the few that were able to present something of a commercial threat to The Beatles, the dominant group of the period. ... Petula Clark, CBE (born 15 November 1932), is an English singer, actress and composer best known for her upbeat popular international hits of the 1960s. ... For other uses, see Donovan (disambiguation). ... The Mindbenders (originally Wayne Fontana and the Mindbenders) was a 1960s British Invasion band founded by Wayne Fontana (born Glyn Ellis 28 October 1945 in Manchester). ... Freddie and the Dreamers were a British musical band who had a number of hit records between May 1963 and November 1965. ... Hermans Hermits were an English rock band in the 1960s, formed in Manchester in 1963. ... The Kinks were an English rock group formed in 1963 by lead singer-songwriter Ray Davies, his brother, lead guitarist and vocalist Dave Davies, and bassist Pete Quaife. ... Cock-A-Hoop Manfred Mann was a British R&B and pop band of the 1960s, named after its keyboard player, who later led the successful 1970s follow-on group Manfred Manns Earth Band. ... The New Vaudeville Band was a group created by songwriter Geoff Stephens in 1966 to record his novelty composition Winchester Cathedral, a song inspired by the dance bands of the 1920s. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... The Troggs were a successful English rock band of the 1960s, who had a number of hits in Britain and America, including their most famous song, Wild Thing. The Troggs were from the town of Andover in southern England. ... The Who are a British rock band that first formed in 1964, and grew to be considered one of the greatest[1] and most influential[2] bands in the world. ... Not to be confused with Yard Birds. ...

Second British Invasion artists

For similar terms like Adam Adamant, Atom Ant, adamant, adamantium, etc, see Adamant (disambiguation). ... Asia is an arena rock/progressive rock group. ... Bananarama are a British girl group who have had success on the pop and dance charts since 1982. ... For other uses, see Big Country (disambiguation). ... Billy Idol (born William Michael Albert Broad) is an British musician and singer. ... This article is about the English punk rock band. ... Culture Club is a popular English new romantic rock group, that achieved considerable global success in the 1980s. ... This article is about the band. ... Depeche Mode (pronounced ) are an electronic music band formed in 1980, in Basildon, Essex, England. ... This article is about the band. ... Duran Duran are an award-winning English rock band notable for a long series of popular singles and vivid music videos. ... For the approach to music education, see Eurhythmics. ... The Raw and the Cooked (1989) Fine Young Cannibals were an English band best known for its 1989 hits She Drives Me Crazy and Good Thing. Formed in Birmingham, England, by vocalist Roland Gift and former The Beat members David Steele and Andy Cox. ... Look up madness in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the rock band. ... The Pretenders are an Anglo-American rock band. ... Simple Minds is a rock band from Scotland, which had its greatest worldwide popularity from the mid-1980s to the early-1990s. ... For other uses, see Squeeze (disambiguation). ... Wham! (often written WHAM!) was a pop band formed in 1981 by George Michael and Andrew Ridgeley. ...

References

  1. ^ [http://www.billboard.com/bbcom/bio/index.jsp?pid=23036 Vera Lynn Bio, Billboard.com, retrieved 2007-11-05
  2. ^ The British Invasion, Survey of American Popular Music, retrieved 2007-11-05
  3. ^ [http://www.musicianguide.com/biographies/1608001697/Todd-Rundgren.html Todd Rundgren Bio, Musicianguide.com, retreieved 2007-11-05
  4. ^ OUP, retrieved 2007-11-05
This article is about the genre. ... Alternative music redirects here. ... Genres: Alternative - Classical - Dance - Folk - Hip hop - Jazz - Military - Ottoman - Opera - Pop - Religious - Rock Awards Kral MV, MÜ-YAP, MGD Charts Billboard Charts Music Festivals Istanbul International Music Festival, Istanbul International Jazz Festival, Izmir European Jazz Festival, Aspendos International Opera and Ballet Festival Media Rolling Stone (Türkiye), MTV (T... Arena rock, also called stadium rock or anthem rock, is a loosely-defined term describing a rock era. ... Art rock is a term used to describe a subgenre of rock music with experimental or avant-garde influences that emphasizes novel sonic texture. ... It has been suggested that Merseybeat be merged into this article or section. ... Blues Rock or Blues-rock is a fusion genre of music which combines elements of the blues with rock and roll. ... Boogaloo (shing-a-ling, popcorn music) is a genre of Latin music and dance that was very popular in the United States in the late 1960s. ... The Canterbury Scene (or Canterbury Sound) is a term used to loosely describe the group of progressive rock musicians that were based around the city of Canterbury, Kent, England during the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... Christian rock (occasionally abbreviated CR) is a form of rock music played by bands whose members are Christian and who often focus the lyrics on matters concerned with the Christian faith. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde on Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... Frat rock was an early influential American subgenre of rock and roll / roots rock. ... Garage rock is a raw form of rock and roll that was first popular in the United States and Canada from about 1963 to 1967. ... Glam rock (also known as glitter rock), is a style of rock music, which initially surfaced in the post-hippie early 1970s. ... Hard Rock redirects here. ... Heavy metal redirects here. ... Instrumental rock and roll is a type of rock and roll music which emphasises musical instruments, and which features no or very little singing. ... The term jam band is commonly used to describe psychedelic rock-influenced bands whose concerts largely consist of bands reinterpreting their songs as springboards into extended improvisational pieces of music. ... Jangle pop is a musical genre that began in United States during the middle of the 1960s, combining angular, chiming guitars and power pop structures. ... Krautrock, also known as Kosmische Musik, is a generic name for the experimental music scene that appeared in Germany in the late 1960s and gained popularity throughout the 1970s. ... For other uses, see Pop rock (disambiguation). ... Power pop is a long-standing musical genre that draws its inspiration from 1960s British and American pop music. ... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that attempts to replicate the mind-altering experiences of hallucinogenic drugs. ... Pub rock was a mid- to late-1970s musical movement, largely centred around North London and South East Essex, particularly Canvey Island and Southend on Sea. ... Pub rock is a style of Australian rock and roll popular throughout the 1970s and 1980s, and still influencing contemporary Australian music today. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Rap rock is a hybrid of rap and rock music. ... Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, and emerged in the early-1950s. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Samba-rock - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Soft rock, also referred to as light rock or easy rock, is a style of music which uses the techniques of rock and roll to compose a softer, supposedly more ear-pleasing sound for listening, often at work or when driving. ... Southern rock is a subgenre of rock music. ... Stoner rock and stoner metal are interchangeable terms describing sub-genres of rock and metal music. ... In the early 1960s, one of the most popular forms of rock and roll was surf rock. ... This is a list of music genres derived from rock and roll, including major rock, metal and punk genres: Categories: | ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... The massive popularity and worldwide scope of rock and roll resulted in an unprecedented level of social impact. ... For other uses, see Pop rock (disambiguation). ... Arena rock, also called stadium rock or anthem rock, is a loosely-defined term describing a rock era. ... Baroque pop as a style originated in the mid 1960s as the flipside of sunshine pop. ... Bubblegum pop (bubblegum rock, bubblegum music, youth music, or simply bubblegum) is a genre of pop music. ... Glam metal is a sub-genre of heavy metal music that arose in the late 1970s - early 1980s in the United States. ... Glam punk is glam rock and punk rock music. ... Glam rock (also known as glitter rock), is a style of rock music, which initially surfaced in the post-hippie early 1970s. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... New Wave was a music genre that existed during the late 1970s and the early-to-mid 1980s. ... Piano rock, sometimes referred to as piano pop, is a term for a style of rock music that is based around the piano, and sometimes around piano-related instruments, such as the Fender Rhodes, the Wurlitzer electric piano, and keyboard-based synthesizers, rather than the guitar as is the case... Power pop is a long-standing musical genre that draws its inspiration from 1960s British and American pop music. ... Pop punk is used for two separate subgenres of punk rock music: the kind typically found on Lookout! Records, which stray very little from the three-chord formula that The Ramones pioneered, as well as a newer subgenre of melodic, more emotional punk, which includes by bands like NOFX and... Soft rock, also referred to as light rock or easy rock, is a style of music which uses the techniques of rock and roll to compose a softer, supposedly more ear-pleasing sound for listening, often at work or when driving. ... Sunshine pop, also known as sunshine rock, is a musical movement originating in California with its most famous exponents being The Beach Boys and The Mamas and the Papas. ... In the early 1960s, one of the most popular forms of rock and roll was surf rock. ... Synthpop is a subgenre of New Wave in which the synthesizer is the dominant musical instrument. ... Defining characteristics of synthpunk (also known as synth-punk) bands include being founded at the same time (late 1970s) and place (California) as many US punk bands, performing with those same punk bands, in those same punk clubs, with records released on those same punk labels, preferring electronic instruments such...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Rock Lyrics Database for Real Rocker - RockLyricsdb.com (1154 words)
The classic British Invasion was in 1964-1966, but the term may also be applied to later "waves" of UK artists to significantly impact entertainment markets outside of Britain.
The original British Invasion peaked in late 1965-early 1966, and had essentially played out by 1967, when the recording styles of British and US artists had essentially ceased to be distinct from one another.
The sound of the British Invasion led directly to developments such as acid rock, heavy metal, and progressive rock, and would also be echoed in the punk rock, power pop and New Wave movements of the 1970s and 1980s.
!!! british invasion ringtones verizon !!! verizon lg vx 8100 v 7 ringtones, verizon lg vx 3200 free ringtones (496 words)
british invasion ringtones verizon verizon lg vx 3200 free ringtones
I knew british invasion ringtones verizon he british invasion ringtones verizon would "crack his trademark bucket british invasion ringtones verizon hats in March 25, 2004.
british invasion ringtones verizon Ronan Keating also british invasion ringtones verizon operated in the british invasion ringtones verizon word 'engadget' and licenses which british invasion ringtones verizon service to be.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m