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Encyclopedia > British Colombia
British Columbia
Flag of British Columbia Coat of arms of British Columbia
Flag of British Columbia Coat of arms of British Columbia
Motto: Splendor Sine Occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment)
Map of Canada with British Columbia highlighted
Official languages none stated in law; English is de facto
Capital Victoria
Largest city Vancouver
Lieutenant-Governor Iona Campagnolo
Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal)
Parliamentary representation
 - House seat
 - Senate seats

36
6
Area
Total
 • Land
 • Water
   (% of total) 
Ranked 5th
944,735 km²
925,186 km²
19,549 km² (2.1%)
Population
 • Total (2005 estimate)
 • Density
Ranked 3rd
4,220,000
4.34/km²
Confederation July 20, 1871 (7th)
Time zone UTC−8 & −7
Abbreviations
 • Postal
 • ISO 3166-2
 • Postal Code Prefix

BC
CA-BC
V
Web site www.gov.bc.ca

British Columbia, or simply B.C. or BC (French: Colombie-Britannique, C.-B.), is the westernmost of Canada's provinces. It was the sixth province to join Confederation (in 1871). As of 2005, the population estimate is 4,220,000 (British Columbians). Image File history File links Flag_of_British_Columbia. ... British Columbia Coat of Arms This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Flag of British Columbia The Flag of British Columbia is a banner of the provincial arms. ... The coat of arms of British Columbia, known officially as The Arms of Her Majesty in Right of the Province of British Columbia, was begun in its current form when the shield and motto in the achievement were granted on March 31, 1906 by King Edward VII. // Symbols The shield... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Image File history File links British_Columbia-map. ... An official language is a language that is given a privileged legal status in a state, or other legally-defined territory. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... In politics, a capital (also called capital city or political capital — although the latter phrase has an alternative meaning based on an alternative meaning of capital) is the principal city or town associated with its government. ... The arms of Victoria. ... This article refers to the city in British Columbia, Canada. ... Categories: Lieutenant Governors of British Columbia | Lists of office-holders ... Official Portrait of the Hon. ... Categories: Stub | British Columbia premiers ... For the recipient of the Victoria Cross and MP, see Gordon Campbell, VC For the Scottish Conservative politician, see Gordon Campbell, Baron Campbell of Croy Gordon Muir Campbell, BA, MBA, MLA, (born January 12, 1948) is 34th Premier of British Columbia. ... The British Columbia Liberal Party (usually called the BC Liberal Party) is a right-of-centre provincial political party in British Columbia, Canada, differing from some other right-of-centre parties in being fiscally conservative and socially moderate to liberal (or neoliberal), although some social conservatives do exist in the... The Parliament of Canada (French: Parlement du Canada) is Canadas legislative branch, seated at Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario. ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... The Senate (French: Sénat) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, which also includes the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the House of Commons. ... -1... Here is a list of Canadian provinces and territories ranked by area. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Here is a list of Canadian provinces and territories by population as of July 1, 2004. ... We dont have an article called Canadian-confederation Start this article Search for Canadian-confederation in. ... July 20 is the 201st day (202nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 164 days remaining. ... 1871 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Time zones are areas of the Earth that have adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... Coordinated Universal Time or UTC, also sometimes referred to as Zulu time or Z, is an atomic realization of Universal Time (UT) or Greenwich Mean Time, the astronomical basis for civil time. ... Canada Post or Canada Post Corporation (CPC) is the Canadian governments postal service. ... ISO 3166-2 is the second part of the ISO 3166 standard. ... British Columbia - 188 FSAs Categories: Canada Post ... Canada consists of ten provinces and three territories. ... 1871 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents


Geography

Main article: Geography of British Columbia

British Columbia is the westernmost province of Canada, bordered by the Pacific coast. It is bound on the northwest by the U.S. state of Alaska, directly north by Yukon and the Northwest Territories, on the east by Alberta, and on the south by the states of Washington, Idaho, and Montana. The southern border of British Columbia was established by the 1846 Oregon Treaty. British Columbia is the westernmost province of Canada, bordered by the Pacific Ocean. ... For other meanings of Pacific, see Pacific (disambiguation). ... Motto: E pluribus unum (1789 to 1956) (Latin: Out of Many, One) In God We Trust (1956 to present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York, New York Official language(s) None at federal level; English de facto Government  â€¢ President  â€¢ Vice President Federal republic... A U.S. state is any one of the 50 states which have membership of the federation known as the United States of America (USA or U.S.). The separate state governments and the U.S. federal government share sovereignty. ... Official language(s) English Capital Juneau Largest city Anchorage Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 1st 663,267 mi² / 1 717 854 km² 808 mi / 1300 km 1,479 mi / 2380 km 13. ... Motto: none Official languages English Capital Whitehorse Largest city Whitehorse Commissioner Geraldine Van Bibber Premier Dennis Fentie (Yukon Party) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 1 1 Area Total  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water    (% of total)  Ranked 9th 482,443 km² 474,391 km² 8,052 km² (1. ... Motto: None Official languages Dene Suline, Cree, Dogrib, English, French, Gwichin, Inuktitut, Slavey Capital Yellowknife Largest city Yellowknife Commissioner Tony Whitford Premier Joe Handley (Consensus government - no party affiliations) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 1 1 Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 3rd 1,346,106 km² 12. ... Motto: Fortis et Liber (Latin: Strong and free) Official languages English Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Lieutenant-Governor Norman Kwong Premier Ralph Klein (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 28 6 Area Total  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water    (% of total)  Ranked 6th (provinces and territories) 661,848 km² 642,317 km² 19... Official language(s) None Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 18th 184,824 km² 385 km 580 km 6. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boise Largest city Boise Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 14th 216,632 km² 491 km 771 km 0. ... Official language(s) English Capital Helena Largest city Billings Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 4th 381,156 km² 410 km 1,015 km 1 44°26 N to 49° N 104°2 W to 116°2 W Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 44th 902,195 2. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Treaty with Great Britain, in Regard to Limits Westward of the Rocky Mountains (known as the Oregon Treaty or Treaty of Washington) was a bilateral treaty signed between the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and the United States in 1846, and brought an end to the longstanding...


British Columbia's capital is Victoria, located at the southeastern tip of Vancouver Island. BC's most populous city is Vancouver, located in southwest corner of the BC mainland called the Lower Mainland. Other major cities include Surrey, Burnaby, Coquitlam, Richmond, Delta, and New Westminster in the Lower Mainland; Abbotsford and Langley in the Fraser Valley; Nanaimo on Vancouver Island; and Kelowna and Kamloops in the Interior. Prince George is the major city nearest the centre of the province; however, a small town called Vanderhoof, 100 km to the west, is much nearer the geographic centre. The Lower Mainland is the name that residents of British Columbia apply to the region surrounding the City of Vancouver. ... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = The City of Parks City of Surrey, British Columbia, Canadas Location. ... Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada (49°16′N 122°58′W), is a city immediately east of Vancouver. ... Member of Parliament James Moore (City Centre / Westwood Plateau) (Conservative) Paul Forseth (Burquitlam) (Conservative) Member of the Legislative Assembly Diane Thorne (NDP) Mayor Maxine Wilson Councillors Kent Becker Fin Donnelly Louella Hollington Mae Reid Bill LeClair Barrie Lynch Lou Sekora Population (2005) 113,498 Immigrant Population 39,000 (35%) Languages... This page is for the city of Richmond, British Columbia. ... Delta is a district municipality in British Columbia, Canada. ... Member of Parliament Peter Julian (NDP) Paul Forseth (Conservative) Member of the Legislative Assembly Chuck Puchmayr (NDP) Mayor Wayne Wright Councillors Jonathan Cote Calvin Donnelly Bill Harper Betty McIntosh Bob Osterman Lorrie Williams Population (2001) 54,656 Immigrant Population 15,025 (28%) Languages English(Official) 78% French(Official) 1% Non... Nanaimo Harbour There are several federal and provincial electoral districts with the name Nanaimo. ... Motto:Fruitful in Unity Member of Parliament Ron Cannan(Conservative) - Kelowna—Lake Country Members of the Legislative Assembly Al Horning(BC Liberal) - Kelowna-Lake Country Sindi Hawkins (BC Liberal) - Kelowna-Mission Governing Body Kelowna City Council Mayor Sharon Sheperd Land area 283 km² Population (2005) 105,000 Population Density 229. ... Motto:Salus Et Opes [Health and Abundance] Member of Parliament Betty Hinton(Conservative) - Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo Members of the Legislative Assembly Claude Richmond(BC Liberal) - Kamloops Kevin Krueger (BC Liberal) - Kamloops-North Thompson Governing Body Kamloops City Council Mayor Terry Lake (recently elected in November 2005 municipal elections. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


The Canadian Rockies and the Inside Passage's fjords provide some of British Columbia's renowned and spectacular scenery, which forms the backdrop and context for a growing outdoor adventure and ecotourism industry. The Okanagan area is one of only three wine-growing regions in Canada and also produces excellent ciders, but exports little of either drink. The small rural towns of Penticton, Oliver, and Osoyoos have some of the warmest summer climates in Canada. Wilcox Pass The Canadian Rockies comprise the Canadian segment of the North American Rocky Mountains range. ... Somewhere along the Inside Passage. ... Sognefjorden, Norway A fjord (or fiord) is a narrow inlet of the sea between cliffs or steep slopes, which results from marine inundation of a glaciated valley. ... Ecotourism essentially means ecological tourism, where ecological has both environmental and social connotations. ... A view overlooking Skaha Lake in the Okanagan Valley The regional districts that comprise the Okanagan are shown in red. ... A pint of Strongbow cider. ... A view of Penticton from a viewpoint overlooking Skaha Lake Penticton (49° 29′ 28″ N, 119° 35′ 19″ W) is a city in south central British Columbia between Okanagan Lake and Skaha Lake (at one time known officially as Dog Lake). According to the 2001 census its population is 30... Oliver, British Columbia, is a small town located in the South Okanagan. ... Osoyoos, British Columbia Osoyoos is a small town in the Okanagan Valley on British Columbias southern border with Washington state. ...


Much of Vancouver Island is covered by a temperate rain forest, one of a mere handful of such ecosystems in the world (notable others being on the Olympic Peninsula of Washington and in Chile and Tasmania). The province's mainland has snowy, cold winters, especially in the north. The coast and Vancouver Island are temperate in many places, where the climate is moderated by the Pacific Ocean. In the interior, summer temperatures can be quite warm, even notably hot and there are large semi-arid areas and a few localities classifiable as pocket deserts, including the towns of Osoyoos and Lillooet. There is more than one spot in British Columbia that has recorded peak summer temperatures of 43.3 °C (110 °F) and an ongoing rivalry exists between the Fraser Canyon towns of Lytton and Lillooet for the title of "Canada's Hot Spot". Vancouver Island is separated from mainland British Columbia by the Strait of Georgia and the Queen Charlotte Strait, and from Washington State by the Juan De Fuca Strait. ... A rainforest is a forested biome with high annual rainfall. ... In ecology, the word ecosystem is an abbreviation of the term, ecological system. ... The Olympic Peninsula is the large arm of land in western Washington state that lies across Puget Sound from Seattle. ... Official language(s) None Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 18th 184,824 km² 385 km 580 km 6. ... Motto: Ubertas et Fidelitas (Fertility and Faithfulness) Nickname: The Apple Isle Other Australian states and territories Capital Hobart Government Governor Premier Const. ... Osoyoos, British Columbia Osoyoos is a small town in the Okanagan Valley on British Columbias southern border with Washington state. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... View of Fraser Canyon near Fountain, BC View of Fraser Canyon looking upstream from Fountain, B.C. The Fraser Canyon is a stretch of the Fraser River where it descends rapidly through narrow rock gorges in the Coast Mountains enroute from the Interior Plateau of British Columbia to the Fraser... Lytton in British Columbia sits at the confluence of the Thompson River and Fraser River on the east side of the Fraser. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...

Ten Largest Municipalities in BC by population
Municipality 2001 1996
Vancouver 545,671 514,008
Surrey 347,825 304,477
Victoria 288,346 ?
Burnaby 193,954 179,209
Richmond 164,345 148,867
Abbotsford 115,463 104,403
Coquitlam 112,890 101,820
Saanich 103,654 101,388
Delta 96,950 95,411
Kelowna 96,288 89,422

Members of Parliament Libby Davies, Ujjal Dosanjh, David Emerson, Hedy Fry, Stephen Owen Members of the Legislative Assembly Gordon Campbell, David Chudnovsky, Adrian Dix, Colin Hansen, Jenny Kwan, Lorne Mayencourt, Wally Oppal, Gregor Robertson, Shane Simpson, Carole Taylor Mayor Sam Sullivan City Manager Judy Rogers Governing Body Vancouver City Council... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = The City of Parks City of Surrey, British Columbia, Canadas Location. ... The arms of Victoria. ... Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada (49°16′N 122°58′W), is a city immediately east of Vancouver. ... This page is for the city of Richmond, British Columbia. ... Map of BC showing the location of Abbotsford See Abbotsford for other towns with this name Abbotsford is a Canadian city, in the province of British Columbia. ... Member of Parliament James Moore (City Centre / Westwood Plateau) (Conservative) Paul Forseth (Burquitlam) (Conservative) Member of the Legislative Assembly Diane Thorne (NDP) Mayor Maxine Wilson Councillors Kent Becker Fin Donnelly Louella Hollington Mae Reid Bill LeClair Barrie Lynch Lou Sekora Population (2005) 113,498 Immigrant Population 39,000 (35%) Languages... // Introduction The District of Saanich is a municipality on Vancouver Island in British Columbia. ... Delta is a district municipality in British Columbia, Canada. ... Motto:Fruitful in Unity Member of Parliament Ron Cannan(Conservative) - Kelowna—Lake Country Members of the Legislative Assembly Al Horning(BC Liberal) - Kelowna-Lake Country Sindi Hawkins (BC Liberal) - Kelowna-Mission Governing Body Kelowna City Council Mayor Sharon Sheperd Land area 283 km² Population (2005) 105,000 Population Density 229. ...

History

Main article: History of British Columbia

From 1818 to 1846, British Columbia south of 54°40′ and west of the Rocky Mountains was part of a region named by the Americans (after they started claiming it, even though there were none actually in the territory), the Oregon Country, after an old name for the Columbia River coming from the French word ouragan (hurricane). The land was under the control of - but unlike Rupert's Land not owned by - the Hudson's Bay Company, who had a monopoly within the region on trade with the Indians. Hudson's Bay territories west of the Rockies were divided into the departments of Columbia, vaguely defined as to the (south of the Thompson River) and New Caledonia (north of the river). British Columbia is the western-most province in Canada. ... 1818 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... White Goat Wilderness Area, Alberta, Canada The Rocky Mountains, often called the Rockies, are a broad mountain range in western North America. ... Landscape in Oregon Country, by Charles Marion Russell Oregon Country was a region of western North America that originally consisted of the land north of 42°N latitude, south of 54°40N latitude, and west of the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific Ocean. ... Ruperts Land Ruperts Land was a territory consisting of much of modern Canada. ... The Hudsons Bay Company (HBC. TSX: HBC) is the oldest corporation in Canada (and the second oldest in North America) and is one of the oldest in the world still in existence. ... The Thompson River is a major tributary of the Fraser River in the south-central portion of British Columbia, Canada. ...


In 1846, the Oregon Treaty divided the territory along the 49th parallel to Georgia Strait, with the area north of this boundary (and all of Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands) becoming exclusively British territory. The Colony of Vancouver Island was created in 1849, with Victoria designated as the capital. New Caledonia — the mainland — continued to be an unorganized territory of British North America, "administered" by individual HBC trading post managers. The Treaty with Great Britain, in Regard to Limits Westward of the Rocky Mountains (known as the Oregon Treaty or Treaty of Washington) was a bilateral treaty signed between the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and the United States in 1846, and brought an end to the longstanding... The 49th parallel of north latitude forms part of the international boundary between Canada and the United States from Manitoba to British Columbia on the Canadian side and from Minnesota to Washington on the U.S. side. ... The Strait of Georgia (also known as Georgia Strait and the Gulf of Georgia) is a 240 km (150 mi)-long strait between Vancouver Island (as well as its nearby Gulf Islands) and the mainland Pacific coast of British Columbia, Canada. ... Vancouver Island is separated from mainland British Columbia by the Strait of Georgia and the Queen Charlotte Strait, and from Washington State by the Juan De Fuca Strait. ... The Gulf Islands is the name collectively given to the islands in the Strait of Georgia between Vancouver Island and the mainland Pacific coast of British Columbia, Canada. ... See main article Vancouver Island Colonial flag of Vancouver Island, consisting of the British Blue Ensign and the great seal of the colony. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The arms of Victoria. ... By 1763, British North America included 19 British colonies and territories on the continent of North America. ... // Indian trade The fur trade (also called the Indian trade) was a huge part of the early history of contact in North America between European-Americans and American Indians (now often called Native Americans in the United States and First Nations in Canada). ...


With the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush in 1858, the mainland was organized into the Colony of British Columbia, with New Westminster as its capital. The name was chosen by Queen Victoria, to differentiate the British part of the Columbia District from that portion lost to the United States, i.e. the remaining US portion of the Oregon Country. The name "Columbia" does not derive directly from Christopher Columbus, as does the name of the country Colombia or as in the District of Columbia, but instead comes from the name of the ship sailed up the Columbia's lower reaches (allegedly) by American Captain Robert Gray. That voyage, foregone by Captain Vancouver a few years before during his charting of the Coast, was one of the determining factors in the final surrender of what had been clearly a British fur dominion into the hands of expanding Americans. Unlike other names in Canada and elsewhere, the name Columbia (as in the river) is not translated in French, since it is a ship's name, although the province secondarily-named for it is rendered la Colombie-Britannique (the province's official name in French). The Gold Rush of British Columbia occurred after gold was discovered in the Fraser River Valley. ... The Colony of British Columbia was a crown colony of British North America from 1858 until 1871. ... The Pattullo Bridge (centre) connects New Westminster (left) with Surrey (right) across the Fraser River. ... Victoria Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819–22 January 1901) was a Queen of the United Kingdom, reigning from 20 June 1837 until her death. ... Landscape in Oregon Country, by Charles Marion Russell Oregon Country was a region of western North America that originally consisted of the land north of 42°N latitude, south of 54°40N latitude, and west of the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific Ocean. ... Christopher Columbus (October 30, 1451? – 20 May 1506) was an explorer and trader who crossed the Atlantic Ocean and reached the Americas on October 12, 1492 under the flag of Castile. ... Nickname: the District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Official website: http://www. ... Captain Robert Gray Robert Gray is also an Australian poet, see Robert Gray (poet) Robert Gray (May 10, 1755 - Summer, 1806). ...


In 1858, in response to the Fraser Canyon gold rush, the mainland portion of the former Oregon Country was organized into the colony of British Columbia as a preventive against the risk of annexation by the American-dominated mining population, many of whom had defied the Governor's orders to enter the Colony via Victoria and instead came overland via Whatcom County and the Okanagan Trail. The Cariboo region ("Central Interior") of British Columbia experienced a gold rush in the years 1862 to 1865. This created a rapid influx of miners and settlers, about 30,000 in all. The colonial authorities feared the gold rush might spread beyond B.C.'s northern border (54°40′ north), so the Stikine Territory was created in 1862. However, the following year this new territory was disestablished, most of its area going to B.C., whose northern limit was increased to its current location, 60° north. 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... View of Fraser Canyon near Fountain, BC View of Fraser Canyon looking upstream from Fountain, B.C. The Fraser Canyon is a stretch of the Fraser River where it descends rapidly through narrow rock gorges in the Coast Mountains enroute from the Interior Plateau of British Columbia to the Fraser... Whatcom County is a county located in the state of Washington. ... The Cariboo is a region of British Columbia along a plateau stretching from the Fraser Canyon to the Cariboo Mountains. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Stikine Territory Stikine Territory (also spelt Stickeen) was a territory that existed in British North America from July 19, 1862 until July of the next year. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


This period in the province's history is acknowledged today in the Gold Rush Trail: historic and other sites along the route from Lillooet to Barkerville and beyond. Some of the towns along this route are numbered according to their distance from the end of the navigable part of the Fraser River at Lillooet. Best known of these is the town of 100 Mile House which, along with the residential hub of 108 Mile Ranch, forms a substantial trading, tourism, and population centre for this region. Lillooet is located on the banks of the Fraser River in British Columbia, Canada. ... Barkerville was a gold rush town in British Columbia, Canada and is currently preserved as a historic town. ... The Fraser River is the longest river in British Columbia, Canada, rising in the Rocky Mountains near Mount Robson and flowing for 1400 km (870 mi), into the Pacific Ocean at the city of Vancouver. ... (Redirected from 100 Mile House) 100 Mile House is a town located in central British Columbia, Canada. ... (Redirected from 108 Mile Ranch) 108 Mile Ranch is a residential community of over 700 homes situated in the heart of the South Cariboo region of British Columbia surrounded by rolling hills, ranches and lakes. ...


After the mainland's gold rushes collapsed and the colony almost went bankrupt from building roads in its interior, the two colonies of Vancouver's Island and British Columbia agreed to merge and share the debt. The merger was effected in 1866, with the name British Columbia being applied to the newly united colony. 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Colonial flag of British Columbia (1870-71), consisting of the British Blue Ensign and the great seal of the colony. ...


Several factors played in the decision of British Columbia to join Canada on July 20, 1871. These included fear of annexation to the United States, the overwhelming debt created by rapid population growth, the need for government-funded services to support this population, and the economic depression caused by the end of the gold rush. The decision was made largely because the Canadian government offered to link British Columbia to the more settled parts of Canada via the Canadian Pacific Railway and offered to pay off the $1,000,000 British Columbian debt. July 20 is the 201st day (202nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 164 days remaining. ... 1871 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR; AAR reporting marks CP, CPAA, CPI), known as CP Rail between 1968 and 1996, is a Canadian Class I railway operated by Canadian Pacific Railway Limited. ...


The completion of the CPR in 1885, and its upgrades during 1886, was a huge boost to Vancouver, the line's terminus founded in 1886, and it rapidly grew to become one of Canada's largest cities. The province became a centre of fishing, mining, and especially of logging throughout the twentieth century. 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) is a common year starting on Friday (click on link to calendar) // Events January 18 - Modern field hockey is born with the formation of The Hockey Association in England. ...


In 1903, British Columbia's territory shrank somewhat after the Alaska Boundary Dispute settled the vague boundary of the Alaska panhandle. 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Alaska Boundary Dispute was a territorial dispute between the United States of America and Canada (then a British dominion), and at a subnational level between the territory of Alaska on the U.S. side vs. ...


B.C. has long taken advantage of its Pacific coast to have close relations with East Asia. However, this has caused friction, with frequent feelings of animosity towards Asian immigrants. This was most manifest during the Second World War when many people of Japanese descent were interned in the interior of the province. Geographic scope of East Asia East Asia is a subregion of Asia that can be defined in either geographical or cultural terms. ... Combatants Allies: • Soviet Union, • UK & Commonwealth, • USA, • France/Free France, • China, • Poland, • ...and others Axis: • Germany, • Japan, • Italy, • ...and others Casualties Military dead: 18 million Civilian dead: 33 million Full list Military dead: 7 million Civilian dead: 4 million Full list World War II, also known as the Second World...


The post-World War II years saw Vancouver and Victoria also become cultural centres as poets, authors, artists, musicians, as well as dancers, actors, and haute cuisine chefs flocked to the beautiful scenery and warmer temperatures. Similarly, these cities have either attracted or given rise to their own noteworthy academics, commentators, and creative thinkers. Tourism also began to play an important role in the economy. The rise of Japan and other Pacific economies was a great boost to the B.C. economy. Combatants Allies: • Soviet Union, • UK & Commonwealth, • USA, • France/Free France, • China, • Poland, • ...and others Axis: • Germany, • Japan, • Italy, • ...and others Casualties Military dead: 18 million Civilian dead: 33 million Full list Military dead: 7 million Civilian dead: 4 million Full list World War II, also known as the Second World...


Demographics

External link: British Columbia ethno-cultural profile at Statistics Canada


Politics

Legislative Buildings in Victoria, B.C.
Legislative Buildings in Victoria, B.C.

BC has a 79-member elected Legislative Assembly, elected by the First Past the Post system. Legislature builing in Victoria, British Columbia. ... Legislature builing in Victoria, British Columbia. ... Legislature Building in Victoria, BC The Legislative Assembly of British Columbia is located in Victoria. ... The plurality voting system, also known as first past the post, is a voting system used to elect a single winner in a given election. ...


British Columbia's political culture is polarized and has tended to swing between right and left. There is little middle ground between the two main parties, whose core support each is estimated at 15-20%, with the middle fracturing variously towards either side because of few alternatives. Within Canada, BC is viewed much as California is in the United States, prone to unusual politics and scandals. Its electorate is perhaps the most cynical in the country because of the history of sleaze and promise-breaking by temporarily-popular politicians. BC voters are known not to vote for someone or for their party, but against them as voters are generally more motivated to remove old politicians from power than to usher in new ones. As a result elections can produce sudden reversals, as well as overly dominant majorities of extreme left or extreme right. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 3rd 410,000 km² 402. ...


Currently the province is governed by the revived British Columbia Liberal Party under Gordon Campbell, widely perceived as conservative along the lines of the Klein or Harris governments, although Campbell claims to be a centrist. While many Liberal backbenchers and one or two cabinet ministers are, in fact, liberal, the party behaves as a rightist party and makes no secret of their ties to conservative economic policies and conservative governments in other jurisdictions. For a decade before the Campbell government took power, B.C. was governed by the social democratic New Democratic Party (NDP). Before that, the government was led by the right-wing Social Credit Party from 1975 to 1991. However, due to the increasing unpopularity of leader Bill Vander Zalm and mounting scandals, the party was roundly defeated at the polls and collapsed in 1991. From 1972 to 1975 an NDP government led by Dave Barrett held power but was defeated after a showdown with organized labour. Its predecessor was the original Social Credit regime of W.A.C. Bennett, a populist who espoused conservative policies but frequently resorted to state intervention and nationalization of key infrastructure. The British Columbia Liberal Party (usually called the BC Liberal Party) is a right-of-centre provincial political party in British Columbia, Canada, differing from some other right-of-centre parties in being fiscally conservative and socially moderate to liberal (or neoliberal), although some social conservatives do exist in the... For the recipient of the Victoria Cross and MP, see Gordon Campbell, VC For the Scottish Conservative politician, see Gordon Campbell, Baron Campbell of Croy Gordon Muir Campbell, BA, MBA, MLA, (born January 12, 1948) is 34th Premier of British Columbia. ... The Honourable Ralph Phillip Klein MLA (born November 1, 1942), leader of the Alberta Progressive Conservatives, is current premier of the Canadian province of Alberta. ... Michael Deane Harris (born January 23, 1945, in Toronto, Ontario) was the twenty-second Premier of Ontario from June 26, 1995 to April 15, 2002. ... Social democracy is a political ideology emerging in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from supporters of Marxism who believed that the transition to a socialist society could be achieved through democratic evolutionary rather than revolutionary means. ... The New Democratic Party of British Columbia is a social democratic political party in British Columbia, Canada. ... In politics, right-wing, the political right, or simply the right, are terms which refer, with no particular precision, to the segment of the political spectrum in opposition to left-wing politics. ... The British Columbia Social Credit Party, whose members are known as Socreds, was the governing political party of British Columbia, Canada, for more than 30 years between the 1952 provincial election and the 1991 election. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... William Nicholas Vander Zalm (b. ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1972 calendar). ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). ... David Barrett, O.C. (born 2 October 1930 in Vancouver, British Columbia), commonly known as Dave Barrett, was a politician and social worker in British Columbia, Canada. ... The Honourable William Andrew Cecil Bennett, PC , OC (September 6, 1900 - February 23, 1979) was a Premier of the Canadian province of British Columbia. ...


Prior to 1903 there were no political parties in British Columbia, other than at the federal level. Sir Richard McBride was the first Premier to declare a party affiliation (Conservative Party of Canada) and institute conventional party/caucus politics. 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... A political party is a political organization subscribing to a certain ideology or formed around very special issues. ... Sir Richard McBride (December 15, 1870-August 6, 1917) was a British Columbian politician and founder of the British Columbia Conservative Party. ... Image:Gordonc. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a right-of-centre political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ...


Recall and Initiative

British Columbia is the only province in Canada with recall election and initiative legislation. A recall election is a procedure by which voters can remove an elected official from office. ...


Only one recall petition was ever deemed to have had any success, compelling MLA Paul Reitsma to resign his seat hours before he would have been removed from office. Paul Reitsma, former member of the legislative assembly of British Columbia for Parksville-Qualicum. ...


Electoral Reform

A Citizens' Assembly in 2004 recommended replacing the First Past the Post system with a Single Transferable Vote system to be implemented in 2009, and a referendum was held on May 17, 2005 to determine if this change should go ahead. The proposal received majority support (58% of the popular vote), but the government had required 60% to make the proposal binding on them. A second requirement was a simple majority in 60% of the current ridings and 77 of the 79 ridings achieved this, far more than the 48 minimum. The close result has provoked further interest in electoral reform. As a result of this, the Provincial Government has promised a second referendum on the issue to be held in November 2008. The Citizens Assembly on Electoral Reform is a group created by the government of British Columbia, Canada to investigate changes to the provincial electoral system. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The plurality voting system, also known as first past the post, is a voting system used to elect a single winner in a given election. ... This STV ballot for the Australian Senate illustrates group voting tickets. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... May 17 is the 137th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (138th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the political process. ... A simple majority is the most common requirement in voting for a measure to pass, especially in deliberative bodies and small organizations. ... Electoral reform projects seek to change the way that public desires are reflected in elections through electoral systems. ...

British Columbia is a province of Canada. ...

Parks and Protected Areas

There are 14 designations of parks and protected areas in the province that reflects the different administration and creation of these areas in a modern context. There are 141 ecological Reserves, 35 provincial marine parks, 7 Provincial Heritage Sites, 6 National Historic Sites, 4 National Parks and 3 National Park Reserves. 12.5% (114,000 km²) of BC is currently considered 'protected' under one of the 14 different designations that includes over 800 distinct areas.


British Columbia contains seven of Canada's national parks: The Canadian National Parks system encompasses over forty protected areas, including National Parks, National Park Reserves and National Marine Conservation Areas. ...

BC also contains a large network of provincial parks, run by BC Parks of the Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection. Glacier National Park is one of seven national parks in British Columbia, Canada. ... Gulf Islands National Park Reserve is Canadas 40th National Park. ... The Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve and Haida Heritage Site is a combination of a national park reserve and a heritage site located in British Columbia, Canada. ... Ottertail River, found in Kootenay National Park Kootenay National Park is located in southeastern British Columbia, Canada covering 1,406 km² (543 mi²) in the Canadian Rockies and is a World Heritage Site. ... Mount Revelstoke National Park is located adjacent to the city of Revelstoke, British Columbia in Canada. ... Pacific Rim National Park is a Canadian national park reserve made up of three separate regions: Long Beach, the Broken Group Islands, and the West Coast Trail. ... Natural Bridge Yoho National Park is located in the Canadian Rocky Mountains along the western slope of the Continental Divide in southeastern British Columbia. ...


Recreation

Given its varied mountainous terrain and its coasts, lakes, rivers, and forests, British Columbia has long been enjoyed for pursuits like hiking and camping, rock climbing and mountaineering, hunting and fishing.


Much of the province is wild or semi-wild, so that populations of very many mammalian species that have become rare in much of the United States still flourish in B.C. Watching animals of various sorts, including a very wide range of birds, has also long been popular. Bears (grizzly and black) live here, as do deer, elk, moose, caribou, big-horn sheep, mountain goats, beavers, muskrat, coyotes, wolves, mountain lions, eagles, ospreys, herons, Canada geese, swans, loons, hawks, owls, ravens, and many sorts of ducks. Smaller birds (robins, jays, grosbeaks, chickadees, etc.) also abound. Orders Many - see section below. ... Genera Ailuropoda Ursus Tremarctos Arctodus(extinct) A bear is a large mammal of the order Carnivora, family Ursidae. ... Trinomial name Ursus arctos horribilis (Ord, 1815) The Grizzly Bear, sometimes called the Silvertip Bear, has traditionally been treated as a subspecies, Ursus arctos horribilis, of the brown bear living in North America. ... Binomial name Ursus americanus The American Black Bear (Ursus americanus), also known as simply the black bear or cinnamon bear, is the most common bear in North America. ... Subfamilies Capreolinae Cervinae Hydropotinae Muntiacinae A deer is a ruminant mammal belonging to the family Cervidae. ... Binomial name Cervus elaphus Linnaeus, 1758 Subspecies Numerous - see text. ... Binomial name Alces alces (Linnaeus, 1758) Moose range map Alces alces, called the moose in North America and the elk in Europe (see also elk for other animals called elk) is the largest member of the deer family Cervidae, distinguished from other members of Cervidae by the form of the... Binomial name Rangifer tarandus The reindeer, known as caribou in North America, is an Arctic-dwelling deer (Rangifer tarandus). ... Species See text. ... Mountain Goats redirects here. ... Species C. canadensis C. fiber Beavers are semi-aquatic rodents native to North America and Europe. ... [[{{{diversity_link}}}|Diversity]] {{{diversity}}} Binomial name Ondatra zibethicus (Linnaeus, 1766) Trinomial name {{{trinomial}}} Type Species {{{type_species}}} {{{subdivision_ranks}}} Muskrat range (native range in red, introduced range in green) Synonyms {{{synonyms}}} Muskrat lodge, middle Patuxent River marsh, Maryland The Muskrat or Musquash (Ondatra zibethicus), the only species in genus Ondatra, is a large... Binomial name Canis latrans Say, 1823 The coyote (Canis latrans, meaning barking dog, also prairie wolf[1]) is a member of the Canidae (the dog family) and a relative of the domestic dog. ... Wolf Wolf Man Mount Wolf Wolf Prizes Wolf Spider Wolf 424 Wolf 359 Wolf Point Wolf-herring Frank Wolf Friedrich Wolf Friedrich August Wolf Hugo Wolf Johannes Wolf Julius Wolf Max Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf Maximilian Wolf Rudolf Wolf Thomas Wolf As Name Wolf Breidenbach Wolf Hirshorn Other The call... Binomial name Puma concolor (Linnaeus, 1771) The puma (Puma concolor) is a type of large cat found in North, Central and South America. ... Genera Several, see below. ... Binomial name Pandion haliaetus (Linnaeus, 1758) The Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) is a medium large raptor which is a specialist fish-eater with a worldwide distribution. ... Genera Ardea Zebrilus Philherodias Tigrisoma Ardeola Bubulcus Egretta Agamia Butorides Tigriornis Tigrisoma Gorsachius Syrigma Zonerodius Nycticorax see also: Bittern Heron and reeds, Haronobu Suzuki (1754-1770) Herons are medium to large long-legged, long-necked wading birds of the family Ardeidae, which also includes the egrets and bitterns. ... Other uses: Goose (disambiguation) Genera Anser Branta Chen Cereopsis † see also: Swan, Duck Anatidae Goose (plural geese) is the general English name for a considerable number of birds, belonging to the family Anatidae. ... Genera Cygnus Coscoroba Swans are large water birds of the family Anatidae, which also includes geese and ducks. ... Species Gavia stellata Gavia arctica Gavia pacifica Gavia immer Gavia adamsii The loon (N.Am. ... The term hawk refers to birds of prey in any of three senses: Strictly, to mean any of the species in the genera Accipiter, Micronisus, Melierax, Urotriorchis, and Megatriorchis. ... Families Strigidae Tytonidae An owl is a member of any of some 220+ (222 currently known) species of solitary, mainly nocturnal birds of prey in the order Strigiformes. ... Species See text Many large black birds of the genus Corvus are called ravens. ... The given name Robin was originally a diminutive of Robert, derived from Rob and the diminutive Old French suffix -in. ... Genera Many, see text Jay is a common name for several species of medium sized, usually colorful and noisy passerine or perching birds in the family Corvidae, or crow family, closely allied to the magpies (the names jay and magpie are to a certain extent interchangeable, not reflecting any genuine... Grosbeak is the name given to several species of seed-eating passerine bird with large bills, in the finch and cardinal families. ... Genera see text The tits, chickadees, and titmice, family Paridae, are a large family of small passerine birds which occur in the northern hemisphere and Africa. ...


Healthy populations of many sorts of fishes are found in the waters (including, of course, salmonids such as several species of salmon, trout, char, etc.). Besides salmon and trout, sport-fishers in B.C. also catch halibut, steelhead, bass, and sturgeon. Atlantic herring, Clupea harengus: the most abundant species of fish in the world. ... The Chinook or King Salmon is the largest salmon in North America and can grow up to 58 long and 126 pounds. ... Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Biwa trout (Oncorhynchus masou subsp) Trout is the common name given to a number of species of freshwater fishes belonging to the salmon family, Salmonidae. ... Char may mean: A piece of charred substance A character Certain fish in the genus Salvelinus The Char 2C, a tank Char (StarCraft) Tea This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... A large halibut A halibut is a type of flatfish. ... Binomial name Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum, 1792 The Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), also called steelhead trout, is a single species of trout native to the Pacific Ocean and in North American rivers and lakes west of the Rocky Mountains. ... Largemouth Bass Bass (IPA /bæs/) is a name shared by many different species of popular game fish. ... Species See text Sturgeon (Acipenser) is a genus of fish, of which some twenty different species are known, from European, Asiatic and North American rivers. ...


Water sports, both motorized and non-motorized, are enjoyed in many places. Sea kayaking opportunities abound on the B.C. coast with its fjords. Whitewater rafting and kayaking are popular on many inland rivers. Sailing and sailboarding are widely enjoyed. For the Dutch rock band of the same name see Kayak (band) Two whitewater kayakers running the Numbers section of the Arkansas River. ... Lysefjorden in Norway A fjord (pronounced FEE-ord or fyord, SAMPA: [fi:3:d] or [faI3:d]; sometimes written fiord) is a glacially overdeepened valley, usually narrow and steep-sided, extending below sea level and filled with salt water. ... Rafting is a recreational activity utilizing a raft to navigate a river or other body of water. ... Wooden sailing boat Sailing is the skillful art of controlling the motion of a sailing ship or smaller boat, across a body of water using wind as the source of power. ... Windsurfing in Essex, England Windsurfing (also called boardsailing) is a sport involving travel over water on a small 2-4. ...


In winter, cross-country and telemark skiing are much enjoyed, and in recent decades high-quality downhill skiing has been developed in the Coast Mountain range and the Rockies, as well as in the southern areas of the Shuswap Highlands and the Columbia Mountains. Snowboarding has mushroomed in popularity since the early 1990s. The 2010 Winter Olympics downhill events will be held in Whistler-Blackcomb area of the province, while the indoor events will be in the Vancouver area. The 2010 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXI Olympic Winter Games, are the next Winter Olympics, scheduled to be held in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada in 2010. ... Whistler-Blackcomb is a ski resort located in Whistler, British Columbia which comprises a village with several large hotels, eateries and bars, condominiums, and expensive homes. ... Members of Parliament Libby Davies, Ujjal Dosanjh, David Emerson, Hedy Fry, Stephen Owen Members of the Legislative Assembly Gordon Campbell, David Chudnovsky, Adrian Dix, Colin Hansen, Jenny Kwan, Lorne Mayencourt, Wally Oppal, Gregor Robertson, Shane Simpson, Carole Taylor Mayor Sam Sullivan City Manager Judy Rogers Governing Body Vancouver City Council...


In Vancouver and Victoria (as well as some other cities), opportunities for joggers and bicyclists have been developed. Cross-country bike touring has been popular since the ten-speed bike became available many years ago. Since the advent of more robust mountain bikes, trails in more rugged and wild places have been developed for them. Some of the province's retired rail beds have been converted and maintained for hiking, biking, and cross-country skiing.


Horseback riding is enjoyed by many British Columbians. Opportunities for trail riding, often into especially scenic areas, have been established for tourists in numerous areas of the province. horse, see Horse (disambiguation). ... Trail riding is riding on trails as opposed to riding on roads or courses. ...


Of course, British Columbians have not failed to enjoy all the traditional sports, like golf, tennis, soccer, hockey, rugby, softball, basketball, curling, figure skating, and so on. B.C. has produced many outstanding athletes, especially in aquatic and winter sports. Also, today programs of training and toning systems like aerobics and hatha yoga are widespread. Most communities of several thousand people or more have developed facilities for these (as, in some cases, have communities of even a few hundred). Golf (gowf in Scots) is a game where individual players or teams hit a ball into a hole using various clubs, and is one of the few ball games that does not use a fixed standard playing area. ... Tennis ball This article is about the sport. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Image from a test-match between Ireland and the New Zealand All Blacks. ... Softball is a team sport in which a ball, eleven to twelve inches (28 to 30. ... Sara Giauro shoots a three-point shot, FIBA Europe Cup for Women Finals 2005 Basketball is a sport in which two teams of five players each try to score points by throwing a ball through a hoop (the basket) under organized rules. ... Curling, is a precision team sport similar to bowls or bocce, played on a rectangular sheet of prepared ice by two teams of four players each, using heavy polished granite stones which they slide down the ice towards an archery-like target called the house. ... Figure skating is an ice skating sporting event where individuals, mixed couples, or groups perform spins, jumps, and other moves on the ice, often to music. ... Aerobics is an effective physical exercise which is often done to music. ... Hatha Yoga posture performed at a Hindu temple. ...


Consistent with both increased tourism and increased participation in diverse recreations by British Columbians themselves has been the proliferation of lodges, chalets, bed and breakfasts, motels, hotels, fishing camps, and park-camping facilities in recent decades. Tourist redirects here; for the album by Athlete, see Tourist (album) Tourism is the act of travel for the purpose of recreation and business, and the provision of services for this act. ... A typical gate keepers lodge at Mentmore, Buckinghamshire, England Lodge has several meanings that, in most cases, relates to a place of meeting: A place of residence, often informal or recreational, rather then permanent domicil A hunting lodge- some are true palaces, where a court and its unting guests... A chalet (pronounced ), also called Swiss chalet, is a type of building in the Alpine region. ... A bed and breakfast, often referred to as a B&B, is a lodging typically operated out of a large single family residence where guests can be accommodated at night in private bedrooms (which may or may not be equipped with private baths) and where breakfast, sometimes Continental and sometimes... The word motel originates from the Motel Inn of San Luis Obispo, first built in 1925 by Arthur Heinman. ... A hotel is an establishment that provides paid lodging, usually on a short-term basis and especially for tourists. ...


In certain areas, there are businesses, non-profit societies, or municipal governments dedicated to promoting ecotourism in their region. Ecotourism essentially means ecological tourism, where ecological has both environmental and social connotations. ...


Recreational Cannabis

In recent years there has also been a rise of 'marijuana culture' in many parts of BC, to the extent that the production and sale of the drug is now estimated by the provincial Organized Crime Agency to be among the province's largest industries[1]. In Vancouver there are several open-to-the-public "brown cafe"-style coffee houses where people can meet and openly smoke marijuana. Though police may tend to turn a blind eye to pot use in some urban areas, the drug remains illegal throughout the province, and controlling its spread remains an ongoing and much-debated legal issue in the province. Issues such as the rise of marijuana "grow ops" in suburban communities and their related ties to organized crime continue to be a concern, though there is also a large and vocal pro-legalization lobby. Nevertheless, the quality, assortment and price of marijuana in BC sometimes makes it a destination for those taking an interest in cannabis. Species Cannabis indica Cannabis ruderalis Cannabis sativa Cannabis is a genus of flowering plant that includes one or more species. ... Organized crime is crime carried out systematically by formal criminal organizations. ... Species Cannabis indica Cannabis ruderalis Cannabis sativa This is one of several related articles about cannabis. ...


Famous British Columbians

This article is about the singer. ... Pamela Anderson on board aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan in 2004 Pamela Denise Anderson (born July 1, 1967) is a Canadian-American international television actress, model, producer, and author. ... Gil Bellows (born June 28, 1967 in Vancouver, British Columbia) is a Canadian film and television actor. ... Earle Alfred Birney (May 13, 1904 – September 3, 1995) was a distinguished Canadian poet and twice winner of the Governor Generals Award for Literature (for David, 1942, and for Now Is Time, 1945). ... Michael Bublé (born 9 September 1975) is a Canadian crooner and pop jazz singer and actor. ... Raymond Burr Raymond William Stacey Burr (May 21, 1917 – September 12, 1993) was an actor, most known for his roles in the television dramas Perry Mason and Ironside. ... --142. ... Yvonne De Carlo Yvonne De Carlo (born September 1, 1922) is a Canadian-born American film and television actress. ... Kim Cattrall (born on August 21, 1956, in Liverpool, England, UK) is an Anglo-Canadian actress. ... Hayden Christensen at the world premiere of Star Wars: Revenge of the Sith in Cannes on May 15, 2005 Hayden Christensen (born April 19, 1981) is a Canadian actor. ... James Doohan as Scotty on Star Trek James Montgomery Doohan (March 3, 1920 – July 20, 2005) was an Irish-Canadian character and voice actor best known for his portrayal of Scotty in the television and movie series Star Trek. ... Peter Stefan Dyakowski (born April 19, 1984, in Vancouver, British Columbia) is a back up offensive lineman for the LSU Tigers football team. ... Atom Egoyan and wife Arsinee Khanjian at the Golden Apricot Film Festival in Yerevan, Armenia. ... Arthur Charles Erickson OC (born June 14, 1924, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) is a Canadian architect of Swedish descent. ... Judith Doris Forst (born November 7, 1943) is a Canadian mezzo-soprano. ... David Foster, OC, OBC , LL.D. born 1950 in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, is a multi Grammy Award winning musician, producer, and composer. ... Matthew Good Matthew Frederick Robert Good (born June 29, 1971, Burnaby, British Columbia) is a Canadian rock musician. ... Michael J. Fox on the cover of his book, Lucky Man Michael J. Fox (born June 9, 1961) is a Canadian-born actor, made famous by his roles as Marty McFly in the Back to the Future trilogy and as Alex P. Keaton on the sitcom Family Ties. ... Terry Fox on his Marathon of Hope cross-country run. ... Don Francks or Iron Buffalo (born February 28, 1932 in Vancouver, British Columbia) is a legendary Canadian actor, vocalist and jazz musician. ... Nelly Furtado (pron. ... Nancy Green in 2000. ... // Biography Born in Port Alberni, Hansen grew up in Williams Lake, BC. He was a young athlete who had won all-star awards in five sports when he was paralyzed at the age of 15, after he was thrown from the back of a truck. ... Silver 2004 The Paralympic Games are an official equivalent of the Olympics for athletes with physical disabilities. ... The term disability, as it is applied to humans, refers to any condition that impedes the completion of daily tasks using traditional methods. ... Doug Ivan Hepburn was born in Vancouver, Canada on September 16, 1926. ... Ben Heppner OC (born January 14, 1956) is a Canadian tenor, specializing in opera and classical symphonic works for voice. ... Joshua Carter Jackson (born June 11, 1978) is an actor in American television and movies. ... Paul Kariya at the 1994 Winter Olympics. ... Joey Shithead Keithley is a punk musician with the band D.O.A. He ran in the 2001 British Columbia provincial election for the Green Party of British Columbia. ... Gene Kiniski was a professional wrestler. ... Diana Krall, as pictured on the cover of her album The Look of Love Diana Jean Krall, OC , DFA (born November 16, 1964) is a popular Jazz pianist and singer. ... Seventeen Magazine picture of a 20 year old Kristin Kreuk. ... Silken Laumann is a Canadian rower, born on November 14, 1964 in Mississauga, Ontario Silken had early plans to compete as a gymnast due to her idol, Nadia Comaneci, although her size (5 feet 10 inches, 110 pounds, precluded those dreams. ... Malcolm Lowry (July 28, 1909 – June 26, 1957) was an English poet and novelist. ... Sarah McLachlan Sarah Ann McLachlan, OC, OBC (born January 28, 1968) is a Canadian musician, singer and songwriter. ... Leon Mandrake, (1911 - 1993) - Canadian-born magician. ... Greg Moore (born April 22, 1975; died October 31, 1999) was a Canadian race car driver. ... Carrie-Anne Moss as Trinity in The Matrix Reloaded Carrie-Anne Moss, born August 21, 1967 in Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada, is an actress who achieved worldwide fame following her appearances in The Matrix trilogy. ... Stephen John Nash (born February 7, 1974 in Johannesburg, British Columbia) is a star Canadian basketball player. ... The National Basketball Association, more commonly referred to as the NBA, is the worlds premier mens professional basketball league and one of the major professional sports leagues of North America. ... In American sports, a Most Valuable Player (MVP) award is an honor typically bestowed upon the best performing player or players on a specific team, in an entire league, or for a particular contest or series of contests. ... Cam Neely Cameron Cam Michael Neely (born June 6, 1965, in Comox, British Columbia) played right wing in the National Hockey League from 1983 to 1996. ... Scott Niedermayer (born August 31, 1973, in Cranbrook, British Columbia) is a professional ice hockey hockey player with the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim in the NHL. Standing 6 ft 1 in, 200 pounds (91 kg), Niedermayer is considered to be one of the top defencemen in the league. ... Rob Niedermayer (b. ... James (Jimmy) Allen Pattison, born October 1, 1928 is a Vancouver-based entrepreneur who is the Chairman, President, CEO, and sole owner of the Jim Pattison Group, one of the largest privately held Canadian companies. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... Tony Pep (born April 19, 1964) is a boxer from New Westminster, British Columbia. ... Alfred Wellington Purdy (December 30, 1918_April 21, 2000) is one of the most popular and important Canadian poets of the 20th century. ... Jason Priestley as Jack Harper in Tru Calling Jason Priestley (born August 28, 1969), actor, was born in North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... Ryan Reynolds Ryan Rodney Reynolds (born October 23, 1976 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) is a Canadian actor. ... Joseph Steven Å akić (born July 7, 1969 in Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada) is a professional ice hockey player who is the captain of the Colorado Avalanche of the National Hockey League. ... Jack L. Shadbolt (1909 – November 22, 1998) was a Canadian artist. ... Alternate meanings: see Michael Shanks (archaeologist) Michael Shanks Michael Garrett Shanks (born December 15, 1970 in Vancouver, British Columbia) is a Canadian actor who achieved fame for his role as Dr. Daniel Jackson on the television series Stargate SG-1. ... Dorothy Stratten For Dorothy Stratton, USCG, confer the article Dorothy C. Stratton Dorothy Stratten (born Dorothy Ruth Hoogstraten) (February 28, 1960 - August 14, 1980) was born in a Salvation Army hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... David Suzuki Dr. David Takayoshi Suzuki CC , OBC , Ph. ... Margaret Sinclair Trudeau Kemper (born September 10, 1948 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) was the wife of Pierre Trudeau, the 15th Prime Minister of Canada. ... Name Pierre Elliott Trudeau Number Fifteenth First term April 20, 1968–June 4,1979 Second term March 3, 1980–June 30, 1984 Predecessor Lester Bowles Pearson Successors Joe Clark John Napier Turner Date of birth October 18, 1919 Place of birth Montreal, Quebec Date of death September 28, 2000 Spouse... Larry Kenneth Robert Walker (born December 1, 1966 in Maple Ridge, British Columbia, Canada) was a right fielder in Major League Baseball. ... Steve Yzerman Stephen Gregory Yzerman (born May 9, 1965, in Cranbrook, British Columbia, Canada) is a professional ice hockey forward for the Detroit Red Wings of the National Hockey League. ...

Maps

British Columbia map from the Atlas of Canada
British Columbia map from the Atlas of Canada

Image:Bcmap.PNG Map of British Columbia, from the Atlas of Canada Source: [1] Copyright: http://atlas. ... Map of British Columbia, from the Atlas of Canada Source: [1] Copyright: http://atlas. ... Download high resolution version (373x634, 23 KB)BC Map I, the creator of this image, hereby release it into the public domain. ...


Cities

Half of all British Columbians live in the Greater Vancouver Regional District, which includes Vancouver, New Westminster, Surrey, West Vancouver, North Vancouver, Burnaby, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Maple Ridge, Langley, Delta, Pitt Meadows, White Rock, Richmond, Port Moody, Anmore, Belcarra, Lions Bay and Bowen Island. Motto: Building a sustainable region Area: 2,878. ... This article refers to the city in British Columbia, Canada. ... Member of Parliament Peter Julian (NDP) Paul Forseth (Conservative) Member of the Legislative Assembly Chuck Puchmayr (NDP) Mayor Wayne Wright Councillors Jonathan Cote Calvin Donnelly Bill Harper Betty McIntosh Bob Osterman Lorrie Williams Population (2001) 54,656 Immigrant Population 15,025 (28%) Languages English(Official) 78% French(Official) 1% Non... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = The City of Parks City of Surrey, British Columbia, Canadas Location. ... West Vancouver is a Canadian city in the province of British Columbia. ... North Vancouver is a suburb of Vancouver, Canada located to the north side of the Burrard Inlet in British Columbia. ... Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada (49°16′N 122°58′W), is a city immediately east of Vancouver. ... Member of Parliament James Moore (City Centre / Westwood Plateau) (Conservative) Paul Forseth (Burquitlam) (Conservative) Member of the Legislative Assembly Diane Thorne (NDP) Mayor Maxine Wilson Councillors Kent Becker Fin Donnelly Louella Hollington Mae Reid Bill LeClair Barrie Lynch Lou Sekora Population (2005) 113,498 Immigrant Population 39,000 (35%) Languages... Member of Parliament James Moore (Conservative) Member of the Legislative Assembly Mike Farnworth (NDP) Mayor Scott Young Councillors Mike Bowen Arlene Crowe Mike Forrest Greg Moore Darrell Penner Michael Wright Land Area 28. ... Maple Ridge is a District Municipality in British Columbia, located east of Vancouver, on the Fraser River. ... Langley, British Columbia can mean the following: Township of Langley City of Langley This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Delta is a district municipality in British Columbia, Canada. ... Pitt Meadows is a District Municipality in southwestern British Columbia, Canada. ... The white rock in White Rock With a population of 18,250, White Rock is located in the southwest corner of the Lower Mainland of British Columbia, Canada, forty-five kilometers from Vancouver and is flanked on the south by the Canada/US border and Blaine, Washington. ... This page is for the city of Richmond, British Columbia. ... Members of Parliament James Moore (Conservative) Paul Forseth (Conservative) Member of the Legislative Assembly Iain Black (Liberal) Mayor Joe Trasolini Councillors Mike Clay Diana Dilworth Bob Elliott Meghan Lahti Karen Rockwell Shannon Watkins School Trustees Keith Watkins Melissa Hyndes Land area 26. ... Anmore, British Columbia, is a small community in the Greater Vancouver Regional District, north of the city of Port Moody and along the shores of the Indian Arm. ... Categories: British Columbia communities | Stub ... Lions Bay is located north of Vancouver, British Columbia, on Highway 99. ... Bowen Island lies near Vancouver, British Columbia in Howe Sound. ...


Other cities:

Map of BC showing the location of Abbotsford See Abbotsford for other towns with this name Abbotsford is a Canadian city, in the province of British Columbia. ... Colwood is a city located on Vancouver Island to the southwest of Victoria, capital of British Columbia. ... Courtenay is a city on the east coast of Vancouver Island, in the province of British Columbia, Canada. ... The city of Dawson Creek is a small city in northeastern British Columbia, Canada. ... Fort Saint John (more common spelling Fort St. ... Motto:Salus Et Opes [Health and Abundance] Member of Parliament Betty Hinton(Conservative) - Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo Members of the Legislative Assembly Claude Richmond(BC Liberal) - Kamloops Kevin Krueger (BC Liberal) - Kamloops-North Thompson Governing Body Kamloops City Council Mayor Terry Lake (recently elected in November 2005 municipal elections. ... Motto:Fruitful in Unity Member of Parliament Ron Cannan(Conservative) - Kelowna—Lake Country Members of the Legislative Assembly Al Horning(BC Liberal) - Kelowna-Lake Country Sindi Hawkins (BC Liberal) - Kelowna-Mission Governing Body Kelowna City Council Mayor Sharon Sheperd Land area 283 km² Population (2005) 105,000 Population Density 229. ... Nanaimo Harbour There are several federal and provincial electoral districts with the name Nanaimo. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Quesnel is a town in the north of British Columbia, Canada. ... The arms of Victoria. ... Williams Lake within British Columbia Williams Lake is a city in British Columbia, Canada. ... This is a list of communities in British Columbia, a province in Canada. ...

See also

The Colony of British Columbia was a crown colony of British North America from 1858 until 1871. ... Colonial flag of British Columbia (1870-71), consisting of the British Blue Ensign and the great seal of the colony. ... See main article Vancouver Island Colonial flag of Vancouver Island, consisting of the British Blue Ensign and the great seal of the colony. ... Stikine Territory Stikine Territory (also spelt Stickeen) was a territory that existed in British North America from July 19, 1862 until July of the next year. ... The Oregon boundary dispute arose as a result of rival British and American claims to the Oregon Country, a region of western North America, in the first half of the 19th century. ... This is a list of British Columbia-related topics. ... This is a list of notable people born, raised, or long-time resident to British Columbia. ... This is a list of the premiers of British Columbia, Canada, since it joined Confederation in 1871. ... Categories: Lieutenant Governors of British Columbia | Lists of office-holders ... This is a list of communities in British Columbia, a province in Canada. ... The Canadian Province of British Columbia is divided into Regional Districts, analogous to counties in other jurisdictions. ... This article lists all existing numbered highways in British Columbia. ... The province of British Columbia, Canada is home to the following public universities: Royal Roads University (Victoria) Simon Fraser University (Burnaby) University of British Columbia (Vancouver) University of Northern British Columbia (Prince George) University of Victoria (Victoria) Malaspina University-College, Nanaimo, BC Kwantlen University College, Richmond, BC University College of... Flag of B.C. Same-sex marriage in British Columbia: In May 2003, the British Columbia Court of Appeals ruled that denial of marriage licences to same-sex couples was a violation of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. ... British Columbia Ferry Services Inc. ... BC Hydro is a public utility that is the major provider of electricity in British Columbia, Canada. ... British Columbia is the westernmost province of Canada, bordered by the Pacific Ocean. ... The British Columbia Coast is one of Canadas two continental coastlines, the other being the coastline from the Beaufort Sea of the Arctic Ocean via the Northwest Passage and Hudson Bay to the Ungava Peninsula and Labrador and the Gulf of St. ... The Interior Plateau comprises a large region of central British Columbia, and lies between the Cariboo and Monashee Mountains on the east, and the Hazelton Mountains, Coast Mountains and Cascade Range on the west. ... The Lower Mainland is the name that residents of British Columbia apply to the region surrounding the City of Vancouver. ... The Queen Charlotte Islands or Haida Gwaii are an archipelago off the north-west coast of British Columbia, Canada, consisting of two main islands: Graham Island in the North, and Moresby Island in the south. ... Vancouver Island is separated from mainland British Columbia by the Strait of Georgia and the Queen Charlotte Strait, and from Washington State by the Juan De Fuca Strait. ... Canada is a federation of ten provinces which, together with three territories, comprise the worlds second largest country. ... Here is a list of the symbols of Canadian provinces and territories. ... This is a list of incorporated cities of Canada in alphabetical order by province. ...

External links


Provinces and territories of Canada Flag of Canada
Provinces: British Columbia | Alberta | Saskatchewan | Manitoba | Ontario | Quebec | New Brunswick | Nova Scotia | Prince Edward Island | Newfoundland and Labrador
Territories: Yukon | Northwest Territories | Nunavut
Flag of British Columbia British Columbia
Regional Districts Alberni-Clayoquot - Bulkley-Nechako - Capital - Cariboo - Central Coast - Central Kootenay - Central Okanagan - Columbia-Shuswap - Comox-Strathcona - Cowichan Valley - East Kootenay - Fraser Valley - Fraser-Fort George - Greater Vancouver - Kitimat-Stikine - Kootenay Boundary - Mount Waddington - Nanaimo - North Okanagan - Northern Rockies - Okanagan-Similkameen - Peace River - Powell River - Skeena-Queen Charlotte - Squamish-Lillooet - Stikine - Sunshine Coast - Thompson-Nicola
Main cities Abbotsford - Burnaby - Chilliwack - Coquitlam - Fort St. John - Kamloops - Kelowna - Maple Ridge - Nanaimo - New Westminster - North Vancouver - Port Coquitlam - Prince George - Prince Rupert - Richmond - Surrey - Vancouver - Victoria - West Vancouver

 
 

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