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Encyclopedia > British Army
British Army

Components
British Army
Territorial Army
List of current regiments
Structure of the British Army
Administration
HQ Land Command
HQ Adjutant-General
HQ Northern Ireland
Overseas Deployments
British Forces Germany
British Forces Cyprus
British Forces Gibraltar
British Garrison Brunei
Equipment
British military rifles
Modern Equipment
History
History of the British Army
Timeline of the British Army
Personnel
List of senior officers
Officer rank insignia
Other ranks rank insignia
British Army Portal
Portal to other related sites

The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. It came into being with unification of the Kingdoms of England and Scotland into the United Kingdom of Great Britain in 1707. The new British Army incorporated Regiments that had already existed in England and Scotland and was controlled by the War Office from London. Today it is managed by the Defence Council and the Ministry of Defence. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Territorial Army (TA) is the principal reserve force of the British Army, the land armed forces of the United Kingdom, and composed mostly of part-time soldiers paid at the same rate, while engaged on military activities, as their Regular equivalents. ... This is a current and updated list of regiments of the British Army, changing as new regiments are formed following the defence review Delivering Security in a Changing World. ... The structure of the British Army is broadly similar to that of the Royal Navy and Royal Air Force, being divided into two Commands as top-level budget holders; Land Command and the Adjutant-General. ... Land Command (or HQ Land) is a military command and part of the structure of the modern British Army. ... The Adjutant-General to the Forces, commonly just referred to as the Adjutant-General (AG), is one of the most senior officers in the British Army. ... HQ Northern Ireland is the command formation responsible for the administration of all British Armed Forces stationed in and around Northern Ireland. ... The British Forces Germany (BFG) is the successor of the British Army of the Rhine (BAOR) and Royal Air Force Germany (RAFG), which were disbanded in 1994 after the end of the Cold War. ... UK Sovereign Base Areas (red) British Forces Cyprus is the name given to the British armed forces stationed in the UK sovereign base areas of Dhekelia and Akrotiri on the island of Cyprus. ... British Forces Gibraltar is the name given to the British Armed Forces stationed in the British Overseas Territory of Gibraltar. ... The British Military Garrison Brunei (BGB) is the name given to the British armed forces presence in Brunei. ... The origins of the modern British military rifles are within its predecessor the Brown Bess musket. ... This is a list of some of the equipment currently in use by the British Army. ... The history of the British Army spans three centuries and numerous European, colonial and world wars. ... // 1600-1699 1633 - The Royal Regiment of Foot (later the Royal Scots) is placed on the Scottish Establishment, later becoming the oldest infantry regiment in continious service in the British Army. ... This is a list of senior officers of the British Army. ... In the 17th and 18th centuries, rank was generally denoted by the quantity of lace and through other decoration used on uniforms. ... Enlisted ranks is not a term used in the British Army, and is only used in this articles title for the sake of consistency with rank listings in other countries; not least those of the United States. ... For other uses, see Army (disambiguation). ... The armed forces of the United Kingdom, commonly known as the British Armed Forces or Her Majestys Armed Forces, and sometimes legally the Armed Forces of the Crown[1], encompasses a navy, army, and an air force. ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... Motto Latin: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) (Scots: Wha daur meddle wi me) Capital Edinburgh¹ Language(s) Gaelic, Scots Government Monarchy King/Queen  - 843-860 Kenneth I  - 1587–1625 James VI  - 1702-1714 Anne Legislature Parliament of Scotland History  - United 843  - Union of the... Union Flag (1606-1800 The united Kingdom of Great Britain, also sometimes known as the United Kingdom of Great Britain, was created by the merger of the Kingdom of Scotland and the Kingdom of England under the 1707 Act of Union to create a single kingdom encompassing the whole of... Old War Office Building, seen from Whitehall, London - the former location of the War Office The War Office was a former department of the British Government, responsible for the administration of the British Army between the 17th century and 1963, when its functions were transferred to the Ministry of Defence. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Defence Council of the United Kingdom is the body legally entrusted with the defence of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories and with control over the British armed forces, and is part of the Ministry of Defence. ... The Ministry of Defence (MOD) is the United Kingdom government department responsible for implementation of government defence policy and is the headquarters of the British Armed Forces. ...


As of April 2007, the British Army includes roughly 110,580 regular personnel and 38,460 Territorial Army members. The full time element of the British Army has also been referred to as the Regular Army since the creation of the reservist Territorial Army. The British Army is deployed in many of the world's war zones as part of a fighting force and in United Nations peacekeeping forces. The Territorial Army (TA) is the principal reserve force of the British Army, the land armed forces of the United Kingdom, and composed mostly of part-time soldiers paid at the same rate, while engaged on military activities, as their Regular equivalents. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ...


In contrast to the Royal Navy, Royal Marines and Royal Air Force, the British Army does not include "Royal" in its title, instead many of its constituent Regiments and Corps are styled Royal [1]. This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... The Royal Marines (RM) are the marines and amphibious infantry of the United Kingdom and, along with the Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary, form the Naval Service [2]. They are also the United Kingdoms amphibious force and specialists in mountain and Arctic warfare. ... RAF redirects here. ...

Contents

History

The Battle of Waterloo, one of the greatest victories in British military history, in part due to the sound tactics of their Commander, the Duke of Wellington, and Emperor Napoleon's temperament, which was influenced by the knowledge that even if he won the battle, he was still outnumbered at least three-to-one by his numerous enemies.
The Battle of Waterloo, one of the greatest victories in British military history, in part due to the sound tactics of their Commander, the Duke of Wellington, and Emperor Napoleon's temperament, which was influenced by the knowledge that even if he won the battle, he was still outnumbered at least three-to-one by his numerous enemies.

The British Army came into being with the merger of the Scottish Army and the English Army, following the unification of the two countries' parliaments and the creation of the United Kingdom of Great Britain in 1707. Although England had made many earlier claims to sovereignty in Scotland, there had been no unified British state prior to that time. The new British Army incorporated existing English and Scottish regiments, and was controlled from London. The history of the British Army spans three centuries and numerous European, colonial and world wars. ... The battle of Waterloo, by William Sadler This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The battle of Waterloo, by William Sadler This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Combatants French Empire Seventh Coalition: United Kingdom Prussia United Netherlands Hanover Nassau Brunswick Commanders Napoleon Bonaparte, Michel Ney Duke of Wellington, Gebhard von Blücher Strength 73,000 67,000 Anglo-Allies 60,000 Prussian (48,000 engaged by about 18:00) Casualties 25,000 killed or wounded 7,000... The Thin Red Line of 1854. ... Union Flag (1606-1800 The united Kingdom of Great Britain, also sometimes known as the United Kingdom of Great Britain, was created by the merger of the Kingdom of Scotland and the Kingdom of England under the 1707 Act of Union to create a single kingdom encompassing the whole of... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... “Sovereign” redirects here. ... This article is about the country. ...


From roughly 1763 the United Kingdom has been one of the leading military and economic powers of the world. The British Empire expanded in this time to include colonies, protectorates, and Dominions throughout the Americas, Africa, Asia and Australasia. Although the Royal Navy is widely regarded as having been vital for the rise of Empire, and British dominance of the world, the British Army played important roles in colonisation. Typical tasks for the Army included garrisoning the colonies, capturing strategically important territories and participating in actions to pacify colonial borders, provide support to allied governments, suppress Britain's rivals, and protect against foreign powers and hostile natives. British troops also helped capture strategically important territories for the British, allowing the British Empire to expand throughout the globe. The Army also involved itself in numerous wars meant to pacify the borders, or to prop-up friendly governments, and thereby keep other, competitive, empires away from the British Empire's borders. Among these actions were the Seven Years' War, the American War of Independence, the Napoleonic Wars, the First and Second Opium Wars, the Boxer Rebellion, the New Zealand Wars, the Indian Mutiny, the First and Second Boer Wars, the Fenian raids, the Anglo-Irish War, its serial interventions into Afghanistan (which were meant to maintain a friendly buffer state between British India and the Russian Empire), and the Crimean War (to keep the Russian Empire at a safe distance by coming to Turkey's aid). The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... This article is about a type of political territory. ... This article is about states protected and/or dominated by a foreign power. ... This article is about Dominions of the British Empire and of the Commonwealth of Nations. ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World, consisting of the continents of North America[1] and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... Australasia Australasia is a term variably used to describe a region of Oceania: Australia, New Zealand, and neighbouring islands in the Pacific Ocean. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... For people named Garrison, see Garrison (disambiguation) Garrison House, built by William Damm in 1675 at Dover, New Hampshire Garrison (from the French garnison, itself from the verb garnir, to equip) is the collective term for the body of troops stationed in a particular location, originally to guard it, but... Combatants Kingdom of Prussia Kingdom of Great Britain and its American Colonies Electorate of Hanover Iroquois Confederacy Kingdom of Portugal Electorate of Brunswick Electorate of Hesse-Kassel Philippines Archduchy of Austria Kingdom of France Empire of Russia Kingdom of Sweden Kingdom of Spain Electorate of Saxony Kingdom of Naples and... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... Combatants Austria[a] Portugal Prussia[a] Russia[b] Sicily[c] Sardinia  Spain[d]  Sweden[e] United Kingdom French Empire Holland[f] Italy Etruria[g] Naples[h] Duchy of Warsaw[i] Confederation of the Rhine[j] Bavaria Saxony Westphalia Württemberg Denmark-Norway[k] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack... Combatants Qing China British East India Company Commanders Daoguang Emperor Charles Elliot, Anthony Blaxland Stransham The First Opium War or the First Anglo-Chinese War was fought between the United Kingdom and the Qing Empire in China from 1839 to 1842 with the aim of forcing China to import British... Combatants Qing China United Kingdom French Empire Commanders Unknown Michael Seymour James Bruce, 8th Earl of Elgin Jean-Baptiste Louis Gros The Second Opium War or Arrow War was a war of the United Kingdom and France against the Qing Dynasty of China from 1856 to 1860. ... Combatants Eight-Nation Alliance (ordered by contribution): Empire of Japan Russian Empire British Empire France United States German Empire Kingdom of Italy Austro-Hungarian Empire Righteous Harmony Society Qing Dynasty (China) Commanders Edward Seymour Alfred Graf von Waldersee Ci Xi Strength 20,000 initially 49,000 total 50,000-100... The Māori Wars, now more commonly being referred to as The Land Wars and also as the New Zealand Wars, refers to a series of conflicts that happened in New Zealand between 1845 and 1872. ... An engraving titled Sepoy Indian troops dividing the spoils after their mutiny against British rule gives a contemporary view of events from a British perspective. ... Combatants United Kingdom Transvaal Commanders Major-General Sir George Pomeroy Colley Commandant-General Piet Joubert Strength 1,200 3,000 Casualties 408 killed, 315 wounded 41 killed, 47 wounded The First Boer War (Dutch: Eerste Boerenoorlog, Afrikaans: Eerste Vryheidsoorlog, literally First Freedom War) also known as the First Anglo-Boer... Combatants British Empire Orange Free State South African Republic Commanders Sir Redvers Buller Lord Kitchener Lord Roberts Paul Kruger Louis Botha Koos de la Rey Martinus Steyn Christiaan de Wet Casualties 6,000 - 7,000 (A further ~14,000 from disease) 6,000 - 8,000 (Unknown number from disease) Civilians... Fenian Monument - Queens Park, Toronto Canada ca. ... An Irish War of Independence memorial in Dublin The Anglo-Irish War (also known as the Irish War of Independence) was a guerrilla campaign mounted against the British government in Ireland by the Irish Republican Army under the proclaimed legitimacy of the First Dáil, the extra-legal Irish parliament... The subject of this article was previously also known as Russia. ... Combatants Allies: Second French Empire British Empire Ottoman Empire Kingdom of Sardinia Russian Empire Bulgarian volunteers Casualties 90,000 French 35,000 Turkish 17,500 British 2,194 Sardinian killed, wounded and died of disease ~134,000 killed, wounded and died of disease The Crimean War (1853–1856) was fought...


As had its predecessor, the English Army, in building the Empire, the British Army fought Spain, France, and the Netherlands for supremacy in North America and the West Indies. It also battled many Native American nations and groups, including the many disgruntled former allies who launched Pontiac's War in response to the wave of British settlers that flooded over the Appalachians following the defeat of France in the Seven Years' War. The British Government's attempt to mollify the Natives by delineating the Appalachians as the westward limit for European settlement was a significant motivator of the American colonies in launching the secessionist American War of Independence. The British Army fought American colonists and their Native and French allies in that war. The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ... Native Americans redirects here. ... Pontiacs Rebellion was a war launched in 1763 by Native Americans (Indians) who were dissatisfied with British rule in the Great Lakes region and the Ohio Country after the British victory in the French and Indian War. ... Combatants Kingdom of Prussia Kingdom of Great Britain and its American Colonies Electorate of Hanover Iroquois Confederacy Kingdom of Portugal Electorate of Brunswick Electorate of Hesse-Kassel Philippines Archduchy of Austria Kingdom of France Empire of Russia Kingdom of Sweden Kingdom of Spain Electorate of Saxony Kingdom of Naples and... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ...


The British army was heavily involved in the Napoleonic Wars in which the army served in Spain, across Europe, and in North Africa. The war between the British and French Empires stretched around the world. The British Army finally came to defeat Napoleon at one of Britain's greatest military victories at the battle of Waterloo. Combatants Austria[a] Portugal Prussia[a] Russia[b] Sicily[c] Sardinia  Spain[d]  Sweden[e] United Kingdom French Empire Holland[f] Italy Etruria[g] Naples[h] Duchy of Warsaw[i] Confederation of the Rhine[j] Bavaria Saxony Westphalia Württemberg Denmark-Norway[k] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack... Combatants French Empire Seventh Coalition: United Kingdom Prussia United Netherlands Hanover Nassau Brunswick Commanders Napoleon Bonaparte, Michel Ney Duke of Wellington, Gebhard von Blücher Strength 73,000 67,000 Anglo-Allies 60,000 Prussian (48,000 engaged by about 18:00) Casualties 25,000 killed or wounded 7,000...

An artist's interpretation of The Battle of Rorke's Drift in which 11 VCs were awarded to British troops. The battle is remarkable in that a hundred well-armed British soldiers managed to defend the small, walled compound of a farmstead and hold a few thousand native wariors and their spears long enough for them to give up and leave them alone

Under Oliver Cromwell, the English Army had been active in the conquest, and the settlement, of Ireland since the 1650s. The Cromwellian campaign was characterised by its uncompromising treatment of the Irish towns (most notably Drogheda) that had supported the Royalists during the English Civil War. It (and subsequently, the British Army) have been almost continuously involved in Ireland ever since, primarily in suppressing numerous Irish revolts and campaigns for self-determination. It was faced with the prospect of battling Anglo-Irish and Ulster Scots settlers in Ireland, who alongside their Irish countrymen had raised their own volunteer army and threatened to emulate the American colonists if their conditions (primarily concerning home rule and freedom of trade) were not met. The British Army found itself fighting Irish rebels, both Protestant and Catholic, primarily in Ulster and Leinster (Wolfe Tone's United Irishmen) in the 1798 rebellion. Image File history File links The_Defence_of_Rorke's_Drift2. ... Image File history File links The_Defence_of_Rorke's_Drift2. ... Combatants Britain Zulu Nation Commanders John Chard Gonville Bromhead Prince Dabulamanzi Strength 139 4,000–5,000 Casualties 17 killed, 10 wounded Around 500-600 dead found in 500 foot perimeter Rorkes Drift was a mission station in Natal, South Africa, situated near a natural ford (drift) on the... For other uses, see Oliver Cromwell (disambiguation). ... Theobald Wolfe Tone, commonly known as Wolfe Tone (June 20, 1763 – November 19, 1798) was a leading figure in the United Irishmen Irish independence movement and is regarded as the father of Irish republicans. ... The Society of the United Irishmen was a political organisation in eighteenth century Ireland that sought independence from Great Britain. ... Combatants United Irishmen French First Republic Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Commanders Local leaders, General Humbert Cornwallis Lake Strength  ? Various, at peak mid-June c. ...


In addition to battling the armies of other European Empires' (and of its former colonies, the United States, in the American War of 1812,) in the battle for global supremacy, the British Army fought the Chinese in the First and Second Opium Wars, and the Boxer Rebellion; Māori tribes in the first of the New Zealand Wars; Indian princely forces and British East India Company mutineers in the Indian Mutiny; the Boers in the First and Second Boer Wars; Irish Fenians in Canada during the Fenian raids; and Irish separatists in the Anglo-Irish War. The North American War of 1812 between the United States and the United Kingdom is one of several wars associated with that year. ... Combatants Qing China British East India Company Commanders Daoguang Emperor Charles Elliot, Anthony Blaxland Stransham The First Opium War or the First Anglo-Chinese War was fought between the United Kingdom and the Qing Empire in China from 1839 to 1842 with the aim of forcing China to import British... Combatants Qing China United Kingdom French Empire Commanders Unknown Michael Seymour James Bruce, 8th Earl of Elgin Jean-Baptiste Louis Gros The Second Opium War or Arrow War was a war of the United Kingdom and France against the Qing Dynasty of China from 1856 to 1860. ... Combatants Eight-Nation Alliance (ordered by contribution): Empire of Japan Russian Empire British Empire France United States German Empire Kingdom of Italy Austro-Hungarian Empire Righteous Harmony Society Qing Dynasty (China) Commanders Edward Seymour Alfred Graf von Waldersee Ci Xi Strength 20,000 initially 49,000 total 50,000-100... This article is about the Māori people of New Zealand. ... The Māori Wars, now more commonly being referred to as The Land Wars and also as the New Zealand Wars, refers to a series of conflicts that happened in New Zealand between 1845 and 1872. ... The British East India Company, sometimes referred to as John Company, was the first joint-stock company (the Dutch East India Company was the first to issue public stock). ... An engraving titled Sepoy Indian troops dividing the spoils after their mutiny against British rule gives a contemporary view of events from a British perspective. ... Combatants United Kingdom Transvaal Commanders Major-General Sir George Pomeroy Colley Commandant-General Piet Joubert Strength 1,200 3,000 Casualties 408 killed, 315 wounded 41 killed, 47 wounded The First Boer War (Dutch: Eerste Boerenoorlog, Afrikaans: Eerste Vryheidsoorlog, literally First Freedom War) also known as the First Anglo-Boer... Combatants British Empire Orange Free State South African Republic Commanders Sir Redvers Buller Lord Kitchener Lord Roberts Paul Kruger Louis Botha Koos de la Rey Martinus Steyn Christiaan de Wet Casualties 6,000 - 7,000 (A further ~14,000 from disease) 6,000 - 8,000 (Unknown number from disease) Civilians... Fenian is a term used since the 1860s for an Irish nationalist who espouses violence, usually by people opposed to their aims. ... Fenian Monument - Queens Park, Toronto Canada ca. ... This article is about the historical army of the Irish Republic (1919–1922) which fought in the Irish War of Independence 1919–21, and the Irish Civil War 1922–23. ... An Irish War of Independence memorial in Dublin The Anglo-Irish War (also known as the Irish War of Independence) was a guerrilla campaign mounted against the British government in Ireland by the Irish Republican Army under the proclaimed legitimacy of the First Dáil, the extra-legal Irish parliament...


Following William and Mary's accession to the throne, England involved itself in the War of the Grand Alliance primarily to prevent a French invasion restoring Mary's father, James II. Following the 1707 union of England and Scotland, and then the 1801 creation of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, British foreign policy, on the continent, was to contain expansion by its competitor powers such as France and Spain. The territorial ambitions of the French led to the War of the Spanish Succession and the Napoleonic Wars. Russian activity led to the Crimean War. Combatants  Denmark Dutch Republic, England,[3]  Holy Roman Empire,  Portugal Duchy of Savoy, Spain,  Sweden France, Jacobites Commanders William III, Prince Waldeck, Duke of Savoy, Duke of Lorraine , Elector of Bavaria, Prince of Baden Louis XIV, Duc de Luxembourg â€ , Duc de Villeroi, Duc de Lorge, Duc de Boufflers, Nicolas Catinat... James II (14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701)[1] became King of England, King of Scots,[2] and King of Ireland on 6 February 1685. ... This article is about the historical state called the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1927). ... Combatants Habsburg Empire England (1701-6) Great Britain (1707-14)[1] Dutch Republic Kingdom of Portugal Crown of Aragon Duchy of Savoy [2] Kingdom of France Kingdom of Spain Electorate of Bavaria Hungarian Rebels [3] Commanders Eugene of Savoy Margrave of Baden Count Starhemberg Duke of Marlborough Marquis de Ruvigny... Combatants Austria[a] Portugal Prussia[a] Russia[b] Sicily[c] Sardinia  Spain[d]  Sweden[e] United Kingdom French Empire Holland[f] Italy Etruria[g] Naples[h] Duchy of Warsaw[i] Confederation of the Rhine[j] Bavaria Saxony Westphalia Württemberg Denmark-Norway[k] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack... Combatants Allies: Second French Empire British Empire Ottoman Empire Kingdom of Sardinia Russian Empire Bulgarian volunteers Casualties 90,000 French 35,000 Turkish 17,500 British 2,194 Sardinian killed, wounded and died of disease ~134,000 killed, wounded and died of disease The Crimean War (1853–1856) was fought...


The vastly increasing demands of imperial expansion, and the inadequacies and inefficiencies of the underfunded, post-Napoleonic Wars British Army, and of the Militia, Yeomanry, and Volunteer Force, led to the Cardwell Reforms of the late 19th century, which gave the British Army its modern shape, and redefined its regimental system. Lebanese Kataeb militia A Militia is an army composed of ordinary [1] citizens to provide defense, emergency or paramilitary service, or those engaged in such activity. ... In the 1790s, the threat of invasion of England was high, with the French Revolution and the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte. ... The Volunteer Force was a citizen army of part-time rifle, artillery and engineer corps, created as a popular movement in 1859. ... A series of reforms of the British Army undertaken by Secretary of State for War (and former soldier) Edward Cardwell in 1870. ... A regiment is a military unit, larger than a company and smaller than a division. ...

British Mark One Tank during World War I. Note the guidance wheels behind the main body which were later scrapped as they were unneccesary. Armoured vehicles of this time still required much infantry and artillery support and still do to a lesser extent even in today's military.
British Mark One Tank during World War I. Note the guidance wheels behind the main body which were later scrapped as they were unneccesary. Armoured vehicles of this time still required much infantry and artillery support and still do to a lesser extent even in today's military.

Great Britain's dominance of the world had been challenged by numerous other powers, notably Germany. The UK was allied with France (by the Entente Cordiale) and Russia, and when the First World War broke out in 1914, the British Army sent the British Expeditionary Force to France and Belgium to prevent Germany from occupying these countries. The War would be the most devastating in British military history, with near 800,000 men killed and over 2 million wounded. In the early part of the war, the professional force of the BEF was decimated and, by turns, a volunteer (and then conscripted) force replaced it. Major battles included the Battle of the Somme. Advances in technology saw advent of the tank and advances in aircraft design which were to be decisive in future battles. Trench warfare dominated strategy, and the use of chemical and poison gases added to the devastation. An early model British Mark I male tank, named C-15, near Thiepval, 25 September 1916. ... An early model British Mark I male tank, named C-15, near Thiepval, 25 September 1916. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The Entente Cordiale (cordial understanding) is a series of agreements signed on 8 April 1904 between the United Kingdom and France. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... The British Expeditionary Force (BEF) was the British army sent to France and Belgium in World War I and British Forces in Europe from 1939–1940 during World War II. The BEF was established by Secretary of State for War Richard Haldane following the Second Boer War in case the... For other battles known as Battle of the Somme, see Battle of the Somme (disambiguation). ... Flying machine redirects here. ...


In 1939, the Second World War broke out with the German invasion of Poland. British assurances to the Polish led the British Empire to declare war on Germany. Again an Expeditionary Force was sent to France, only to be hastily evacuated as the German forces swept through the Low Countries and across France in 1940. Only the Dunkirk evacuations saved the entire Expeditionary Force from capture. Later, however, the British would have success defeating the Italians and Germans at the Battle of El Alamein in North Africa, and in the D-Day invasions of Normandy. In the Far East, the British Army battled the Japanese in Burma. World War II saw the British army develop its Commando units including the Special Air Service. During the war the British army was one of the major fighting forces on the side of the allies. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... The British Expeditionary Force (BEF) was the British army sent to France and Belgium in World War I and British Forces in Europe from 1939–1940 during World War II. The BEF was established by Secretary of State for War Richard Haldane following the Second Boer War in case the... This article is about a Second World War battle in 1940, for the 1658 battle of the same name see Battle of the Dunes (1658) Combatants United Kingdom France Belgium Germany Commanders Lord Gort General Weygand Gerd von Rundstedt (Army Group A) Ewald von Kleist (Panzergruppe von Kleist) Strength approx. ... Combatants Allies (mostly British Empire forces) Axis Commanders Claude Auchinleck Erwin Rommel Strength 150,000 troops in 3 army corps, 7 infantry and 3 armoured divisions 1,114 tanks, over 1,000 artillery and over 1,500 planes 96,000 troops (including 56,000 Italians) 8 infantry and 4 armoured...  Northern Africa (UN subregion)  geographic, including above North Africa or Northern Africa is the northernmost region of the African continent, separated by the Sahara from Sub-Saharan Africa. ... This article is about the assault phase of Operation Overlord. ... See also Australian Special Air Service Regiment and New Zealand Special Air Service: The Special Air Service Regiment (SAS) is the principal special forces unit of the British Army. ...


After the end of World War II, the British Empire declined with the independence of India, and other colonies in Africa and Asia. Accordingly the strength of the British military was reduced, in recognition of Britain's reduced role in world affairs. However, a large deployment of British troops remained in Germany, facing the threat of Soviet invasion. The Cold War saw massive technological advances in warfare, and the Army saw more technologically advanced weapons systems installed. There have been two formations named British Army on the Rhine (BAOR). ... CCCP redirects here. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ...


Despite the decline of the British Empire, the Army was still deployed around the world, fighting in the Korean War, the Suez crisis of 1956, and colonial wars in Oman and Malaysia. In 1982 the British Army, alongside the Royal Marines, helped to recapture the Falkland Islands during the Falklands War against Argentina. Combatants  United Nations:  Republic of Korea  Australia  Belgium  Canada  Colombia  Ethiopia  France Greece  Luxembourg  Netherlands  New Zealand  Philippines South Africa  Thailand  Turkey  United Kingdom  United States Medical staff:  Denmark  Italy  Norway  Sweden Communist: Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea  Peoples Republic of China  Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung... Combatants Israel United Kingdom France Egypt Commanders Moshe Dayan Charles Keightley Pierre Barjot Gamal Abdel Nasser Abdel Hakim Amer Strength 175,000 Israeli 45,000 British 34,000 French 70,000 Casualties 197 Israeli KIA 56 British KIA 91 British WIA 10 French KIA 43 French WIA 650 KIA[1... The Royal Marines (RM) are the marines and amphibious infantry of the United Kingdom and, along with the Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary, form the Naval Service [2]. They are also the United Kingdoms amphibious force and specialists in mountain and Arctic warfare. ... Combatants Argentina United Kingdom Commanders President Leopoldo Galtieri Vice-Admiral Juan Lombardo Brigadier-General Ernesto Crespo Brigade-General Mario Menéndez Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher Admiral Sir John Fieldhouse Rear-Admiral John “Sandy” Woodward Major-General Jeremy Moore Casualties 649 killed 1,068 wounded 11,313 taken prisoner 75 fixed...


In the three decades following 1969, the Army was heavily deployed in Northern Ireland, to support the Royal Ulster Constabulary (later the Police Service of Northern Ireland) in their conflict with loyalist and republican paramilitary groups, called Operation Banner. The locally-recruited Ulster Defence Regiment was formed, later becoming the Royal Irish Regiment in 1992. Over 700 soldiers were killed during the Troubles. Following the IRA ceasefires between 1994 and 1996 and since 1997, demilitarisation has taken place as part of the peace process, much reducing the military presence in the area. On June 25th 2007, the Second Battalion Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment vacated the Army complex at Bessbrook Mill in Armagh. This is part of the 'normalisation' programme in Northern Ireland in response to the IRA's declared end to its activities. Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... The Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) was name of the police force in Northern Ireland from 1922 to 2001. ... The Police Service of Northern Ireland (Irish: Seirbhís Póilíneachta Thuaisceart na hÉireann) is the police service that covers Northern Ireland. ... Operation Banner is the operational name for the British Armed Forces support to the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) in counter-terrorism and public order operations to assist the Government in its objective of restoring normality in Northern Ireland [1]. This support has been primarily from the army with... UDR Badge The Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR) was an infantry regiment of the British Army. ... The Royal Irish Regiment (27th (Inniskilling) 83rd and 87th and Ulster Defence Regiment), commonly just called the Royal Irish Regiment (R IRISH), is an infantry unit of the British Army and is the only remaining Irish regiment of the line. ... The Troubles is a term used to describe two periods of violence in Ireland during the twentieth century. ... The Provisional Irish Republican Army (Irish: Óglaigh na hÉireann) (IRA; also referred to as the PIRA, the Provos, or by some of its supporters as the Army or the RA.[2]) is an Irish Republican, left wing[3] paramilitary organisation that, until the Belfast Agreement, sought to end Northern...


As with its return to Afghanistan, following the 2001 Al Qaeda terrorist attacks in the USA, the British Army's current return to Iraq in Operation Telic reflects a tradition of interceding in the region which included the Mesopotamian Campaign of the Great War, the Anglo-Iraq War of 1941 (the first Gulf War), and the Gulf War fought to liberate Kuwait (referred to as Operation Granby). Operation (or Op) TELIC is the codename under which all British operations of the 2003 Invasion of Iraq and after are being conducted. ... Combatants United Kingdom British India  Ottoman Empire Commanders General Nixon, General Maude Khalil Pasha, General von der Goltz Strength 112,000 90,000 ? Casualties 92,000 100,000 ? The Mesopotamian campaign was a campaign in the Middle Eastern theatre of the Great War fought between Allied Powers represented by the... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... C Company, 1 STAFFS, in a live firing exercise, during Operation Granby, 6 January 1991. ...


Recent and current conflicts

Persian Gulf War

Main article: Operation Granby

The ending of the Cold War saw a 40% cut in manpower. Despite this, the Army has been deployed in an increasingly global role. In 1991, the United Kingdom was the second largest contributor to the coalition force that fought Iraq in the Persian Gulf War. The nation supplied just under 50,000 personnel and was the nation put in control of Kuwait after it was liberated. C Company, 1 STAFFS, in a live firing exercise, during Operation Granby, 6 January 1991. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... See also: 2003 invasion of Iraq and Gulf War (disambiguation) C Company, 1st Battalion, The Staffordshire Regiment, 1st UK Armoured Division The Persian Gulf War was a conflict between Iraq and a coalition force of 34 nations led by the United States. ...


Balkans conflicts

Main article: Yugoslav wars

The British Army was deployed to Yugoslavia in 1992. Initially this force formed part of the United Nations Protection Force. In 1995 command was transferred to IFOR and then to SFOR. Currently troops are under the command of EUFOR. Over 10,000 troops were sent. In 1999 British forces under the command of SFOR were sent to Kosovo during the conflict there. Command was subsequently transferred to KFOR. This does not cite any references or sources. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in the Latin alphabet, Југославија in Cyrillic; English: South Slavia, or literary The Land of South Slavs) describes three political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ... Pocket badge of the UNPROFOR. The United Nations Protection Force (UNPROFOR), was the first UN peacekeeping force in Croatia and in Bosnia and Herzegovina during the Yugoslav wars. ... The acronym IFOR may also refer to the International Fellowship of Reconciliation. ... Members of the Dutch, French, German and U.S. military watch as an Italian honour guard hoists the new Stabilisation Force flag during the Stabilisation Force (SFOR) activation ceremony in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, on the 20 of December 1996 Pocket badge of the SFOR The Stabilisation Force (SFOR) was... EUFOR former Commander General David Leakey Soldier of the EUFOR participating in operation Spring Lift, as part of Althea The EUFOR or European Union Force is an international military force under the supervision of the European Council. ... Members of the Dutch, French, German and U.S. military watch as an Italian honour guard hoists the new Stabilisation Force flag during the Stabilisation Force (SFOR) activation ceremony in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, on the 20 of December 1996 Pocket badge of the SFOR The Stabilisation Force (SFOR) was... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see KFOR (disambiguation). ...


Afghanistan

Main article: 2001-present war in Afghanistan

In 2001 The 3rd Division Signal Regiment were deployed in Kabul, Afghanistan to assist in the liberation of the troubled capital. The Royal Marines 3 Commando Brigade also swept the Afghan mountains but this force is part of the Royal Navy. The British Armed forces are currently in charge of NATO forces in the nation. The British Army is today concentrating on fighting Taliban forces and bringing security to Helmand province under NATO control. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The British 3rd Infantry Division was part of the ill-fated British Expeditionary Force evacuated from Dunkirk early in World War II. It was the first British division to land at Sword beach on D-Day. ... For other places with the same name, see Kabul (disambiguation). ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... The Taliban (Pashto: , also anglicized as Taleban) are a Sunni Muslim and ethnic Pashtun movement [2] that ruled most of Afghanistan from 1996 until 2001, when their leaders were removed from power by a cooperative military effort between the Northern Alliance, United States, Canada, Australia and the United Kingdom. ...


Iraq War

Main article: Iraq War

In 2003, the United Kingdom was the only other major contributor to the United States-led invasion of Iraq. There was great disagreement amongst the populace but the government voted for the conflict, with the result of sending over 45,000 army personnel to the region. The British Army is still the major coalition presence in the city of Basra and the Southern regions of Iraq. The British Army is not currently at war, but this is a conflict against groups acting within Iraq. The British Army's main duty in Iraq is peace-keeping. For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... This article is about the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... This article is about the city of Basra. ...


Northern Ireland

Main article: Operation Banner

The British Army was initially deployed in Northern Ireland in the wake of Catholic rioting in Derry[2] and Belfast[3] and to prevent sectarian attacks on Catholic communities (mainly in Belfast) and was under Operation Banner between 1969 and 2007 in support of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) and its successor, the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI).[4] There has been a steady reduction in the number of troops deployed in Northern Ireland since the Good Friday Agreement was signed in 1998. In 2005, after the Provisional Irish Republican Army announced an end to armed conflict in Northern Ireland, it was revealed that the British Army would dismantle posts in the province and withdraw many troops and restore troop levels to that of a peace time garrison. Officially Operation Banner ended on 1 August 2007 after 38 years, making it the longest military operation in the history of the British Army. Operation Banner is the operational name for the British Armed Forces support to the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) in counter-terrorism and public order operations to assist the Government in its objective of restoring normality in Northern Ireland [1]. This support has been primarily from the army with... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... For other places with similar names, see Derry (disambiguation) and Londonderry (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in Northern Ireland. ... Sectarianism is an adherence to a particular sect or party or denomination, it also usually involves a rejection of those not a member of ones sect. ... Operation Banner is the operational name for the British Armed Forces support to the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) in counter-terrorism and public order operations to assist the Government in its objective of restoring normality in Northern Ireland [1]. This support has been primarily from the army with... The Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) was name of the police force in Northern Ireland from 1922 to 2001. ... The Police Service of Northern Ireland (Irish: Seirbhís Póilíneachta Thuaisceart na hÉireann) is the police service that covers Northern Ireland. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... The Belfast Agreement (also known as the Good Friday Agreement and, more rarely, as the Stormont Agreement) was signed in Belfast on April 10, 1998 by the British and Irish Governments and endorsed by most Northern Ireland political parties. ... The Provisional Irish Republican Army (Irish: Óglaigh na hÉireann) (IRA; also referred to as the PIRA, the Provos, or by some of its supporters as the Army or the RA.[2]) is an Irish Republican, left wing[3] paramilitary organisation that, until the Belfast Agreement, sought to end Northern...


Tommy Atkins and other nicknames

A long established nickname for a British soldier has been 'Tommy Atkins' or 'Tommy' for short. The origins are obscure but most probably derive from a specimen army form circulated by the Adjutant-General Sir Harry Calvert to all units in 1815 where the blanks had been filled in with the particulars of a Private Thomas Atkins, No 6 Company, 23rd Regiment of Foot. Present day English soldiers are often referred to as 'Toms' or just 'Tom' (The Scots equivalent being 'Jock'). Outside the services soldiers are generally known as 'Squaddies' by the British popular press. The British Army magazine Soldier has a regular cartoon strip, 'Tom', featuring the everyday life of a British soldier. Tommies from the Royal Irish Rifles in the trenches during the First World War. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Junior officers in the army are generally known as 'Ruperts' by the Other ranks. This nickname is believed to be derived from the children's comic book character Rupert Bear who epitomises traditional public school values (see "Inside the British Army" by Antony Beevor ISBN 071134658) Rupert Bear Mary Tourtel, the author, lived in Ivy Lane, Canterbury towards the end of her life Rupert Bear is a cartoon character created by the English artist Mary Tourtel and who first appeared in the Daily Express on November 8, 1920. ... Antony Beevor (born on December 14, 1946) is a British historian, educated at Winchester College and Sandhurst. ...


The term 'Pongo' or 'Perce' is often used by Sailors and Royal Marines to refer to soldiers. It is not considered complimentary.


Today's Army

Statistics

The Challenger 2, the British Army's Main Battle Tank
The Challenger 2, the British Army's Main Battle Tank
British Army statistics[5]
Personnel (Regular Army) 107,730
Personnel (Territorial Army) 38,460
Main Battle Tanks 400 Challenger 2
Infantry fighting vehicles 667 Warrior (789 purchased)
APCs and CVR(T)s 3,230–4,000+
Land Rover Wolf 15,000
Pinzgauer 2,000
Utility Trucks 2,300
Artillery pieces and mortar 2,896
Air Defence 337
Aircraft 300+

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (1728 × 1152 pixel, file size: 667 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Description:A British Challenger 2 Main Battle Tank (MBT) visits Camp Coyote during Operation ENDURING FREEDOM. Source: http://www. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (1728 × 1152 pixel, file size: 667 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Description:A British Challenger 2 Main Battle Tank (MBT) visits Camp Coyote during Operation ENDURING FREEDOM. Source: http://www. ... The Challenger 2 is the most recent main battle tank in service with the United Kingdom and Oman. ... The US M1A1 Abrams tank is a typical modern main battle tank. ... The Territorial Army (TA) is the principal reserve force of the British Army, the land armed forces of the United Kingdom, and composed mostly of part-time soldiers paid at the same rate, while engaged on military activities, as their Regular equivalents. ... The US M1A1 Abrams tank is a typical modern main battle tank. ... The Challenger 2 is the most recent main battle tank in service with the United Kingdom and Oman. ... An M2 Bradley Infantry fighting vehicle. ... The FV510 Warrior tracked vehicle family, are a series of British armoured vehicles originally developed to replace the older FV430 series of armoured vehicles. ... Armoured personnel carriers (APCs) are armoured fighting vehicles developed to transport infantry on the battlefield. ... The Combat Vehicle Reconnaissance (Tracked) —or CVR(T)—is a family of armored fighting vehicles in service with the British Army and others throughout the world. ... The Land Rover Wolf is a military utility vehicle in service with UK Armed Forces and the Dutch Marine Corps. ... Pinzgauer is a high mobility all-terrain 4x4 and 6x6 military utility vehicle manufactured in Guildford, Surrey, United Kingdom, by Automotive Technik (ATL). ... Bedford was the first to use the Griffin logo Bedford Six WLG 2. ... For other uses, see Artillery (disambiguation). ... US soldier loading a M224 60-mm mortar. ... The Army Air Corps is a component of the British Army. ...

Current deployments

'High Intensity' Operations

Country Dates Deployment Details
Afghanistan 2001– 7,000 troops British troops have been based in Afghanistan since the US-led invasion there in 2001. Currently, under Operation Herrick, the Army maintains a battalion in Kabul and most of a brigade in the southern province of Helmand.
Iraq 2003– 5,000 troops As part of Operation Telic (Gulf War 2), the British Army participated in the invasion of Iraq. Following the decision for continued security operations, the UK commands the Multi-National Division (South-East) with a headquarters unit, National Support Element, and a combat brigade (at the moment 1 Mechanised Brigade), along with troops from Italy, Norway, Romania, Denmark, the Netherlands, Czech Republic, Portugal and Lithuania. A large number of Territorial Army soldiers have been deployed for a variety of tasks, both as individuals serving and as formed units. Troop numbers are gradually decreasing, though the UK Government does not have a timetable for a full withdrawal.

For other uses of War in Afghanistan, see War in Afghanistan (disambiguation). ... Operation Herrick is the codename under which all British operations in the war in Afghanistan have been conducted since 2002. ... For other places with the same name, see Kabul (disambiguation). ... Helmand (Pashto: هلمند) is one of the 34 provinces of Afghanistan. ... Operation (or Op) TELIC is the codename under which all British operations of the 2003 Invasion of Iraq and after are being conducted. ... The Territorial Army (TA) is the principal reserve force of the British Army, the land armed forces of the United Kingdom, and composed mostly of part-time soldiers paid at the same rate, while engaged on military activities, as their Regular equivalents. ...

'Low-Intensity' Operations

Country Dates Deployment Details
Cyprus 1960– Two resident infantry battalions, Royal Engineers, 16 Flight Army Air Corps and Joint Service Signals Unit at Ayios Nikolaos as a part of British Forces Cyprus The UK retains two Sovereign Base Areas in Cyprus after the island's independence. The bases serve as forward bases for deployments in the Middle East. British forces are also deployed separately with UN peacekeeping forces on the island.
Falkland Islands 1982– An infantry company group and an Engineers Squadron Previously a platoon-sized Royal Marines Naval Party served as garrison. After 1982 the garrison was enlarged, and bolstered with an RAF base.
Gibraltar 1704– One infantry battalion, Joint Provost and Security Unit as a part of British Forces Gibraltar British Army garrison is provided by an indigenous regiment, the Royal Gibraltar Regiment, which has been on the Army regular establishment since the last British regiment left in 1991.
Kosovo 1999 300 troops After the Kosovo War in 1999, the British Army led the NATO deployment in Kosovo to restore peace to the province. Since then, the UK has withdrawn some forces, as other nations provided troops.
Rest of the Middle East 1990 3,700 troops Since the Gulf War in 1991, the UK has had a considerable military presence in the Middle East. Besides Iraq, there are also an additional 3,500 troops in Saudi Arabia and Kuwait, as well as regular training missions in Oman.
Sierra Leone 1999 About 100 troops The British Army were deployed to Sierra Leone, a former British colony, in 1999 to aid the government in quelling violent uprisings by militiamen, under United Nations resolutions. Troops ( Royal Marines ) remain in the region to provide military support and training to the Sierra Leone government.

The Corps of Royal Engineers, usually just called the Royal Engineers (RE), and commonly known as the Sappers, is one of the corps of the British Army. ... 16 Flight AAC is an Independent Flight within the British Armys Army Air Corps. ... Agios Nikolaos is Greek (Aγιος Nικολαος) and means Saint Nicholas. ... UK Sovereign Base Areas (red) British Forces Cyprus is the name given to the British armed forces stationed in the UK sovereign base areas of Dhekelia and Akrotiri on the island of Cyprus. ... The UK Sovereign Base Areas are those British military base areas located in countries formerly ruled by the United Kingdom which were retained by it and not handed over when those countries attained independence. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... The Royal Marines (RM) are the marines and amphibious infantry of the United Kingdom and, along with the Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary, form the Naval Service [2]. They are also the United Kingdoms amphibious force and specialists in mountain and Arctic warfare. ... British Forces Gibraltar is the name given to the British Armed Forces stationed in the British Overseas Territory of Gibraltar. ... Cap Badge of the Royal Gibraltar Regiment The Royal Gibraltar Regiment is the home defence unit for the British Colony of Gibraltar. ... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ... The term Kosovo War or Kosovo Conflict is often used to describe two sequential and at times parallel armed conflicts (a civil war followed by an international war) in the southern Serbian province called Kosovo (officially Kosovo and Metohia), part of the former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... The Royal Marines (RM) are the marines and amphibious infantry of the United Kingdom and, along with the Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary, form the Naval Service [2]. They are also the United Kingdoms amphibious force and specialists in mountain and Arctic warfare. ...

Training Operations

Country Dates Deployment Details
Belize 1981– British Army Training and Support Unit Belize and 25 Flight Army Air Corps British troops have been based in Belize since the country gained independence from the UK in 1981. Until 1994 Belize's neighbour, Guatemala claimed the territory, and British troops were based in Belize to provide a deterrent force
Brunei 1962– One battalion from the Royal Gurkha Rifles, British Garrison, Training Team Brunei (TTB) and 7 Flight Army Air Corps A Gurkha battalion has been maintained in Brunei since the Brunei Revolt in 1962 at the request of Sultan Omar Ali Saifuddin III. The Training Team Brunei (TTB) is the Army's jungle warfare school, while the small number of garrison troops support the battalion. 7 Flight Army Air Corps provides helicopter support to both the Gurkha battalion and the TTB.
Canada 1972– British Army Training Unit Suffield and 29 (BATUS) Flight Army Air Corps Training centre in the Alberta prairie. Conducts regular, major armoured training exercises every year with helicopter support provided by 29 (BATUS) Flight AAC.
Germany 1945– 1st (UK) Armoured Division as part of British Forces Germany and 12 Flight Army Air Corps British forces remained in Germany after the end of World War II. Forces declined considerably after the end of the Cold War, although the lack of accommodation in the UK means forces will continue to be based in Germany.
Kenya British Army Training and Liaison Staff Kenya The Army has a training centre in Kenya, under agreement with the Kenyan government. It provides training facilities for three infantry battalions per year

25 Flight Army Air Corps is one of the Independent Flights within the British Armys Army Air Corps. ... The Royal Gurkha Rifles is a regiment of the British Army, forming part of the Brigade of Gurkhas. ... An independent flight based in Brunei, 7 Flight Army Air Corps supports the British Army jungle warfare training establishment in the Sultanate. ... Combatants United Kingdom Australia New Zealand Malaya Brunei Parti Rakyat Brunei Indonesia Commanders General Sir Nigel Poett Yassin Affandi Strength  ?  ? Casualties  ?  ? The Brunei Revolt broke out on December 8, 1962 and was led by Yassin Affandi and his armed rebels. ... The Sultan of Brunei is the head of state of Brunei. ... Sir Omar Ali Saifuddin Saadul Khairi Waddien (September 23, 1914 - September 7, 1986) was the Sultan of Brunei from June 4, 1950 until October 4, 1967, and was the chief minister of Brunei from July 1947 until 1959. ... The British Army Training Unit Suffield (BATUS) is a unit located at the vast training area of Canadian Forces Base Suffield in Alberta, Canada. ... The 29 (BATUS) Flight Army Air Corps is an independent flight within the British Armys Army Air Corps. ... For other uses, see Alberta (disambiguation). ... The British Forces Germany (BFG) is the successor of the British Army of the Rhine (BAOR) and Royal Air Force Germany (RAFG), which were disbanded in 1994 after the end of the Cold War. ... 12 Flight Army Air Corps is an independent flight within the British Armys Army Air Corps. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ...

Equipment

Main article: Modern equipment of the British Army
The Land Rover Wolf, the backbone of the British Army
The Land Rover Wolf, the backbone of the British Army

The basic infantry weapons of the British Army are the SA-80 assault rifle family, with several variants such as the L86A2 Designated Marksmans Rifle and the short stock variant, issued to tank crews. The general issue sidearm is the Browning L9A1, though a search is currently underway to find a replacement. Support fire is provided by the FN Minimi light machine gun and the L7 GPMG; indirect fire by 51 and 81 mm Mortar, as well as the UGL, mounted under the barrel of the SA80 rifle. Sniper rifles used include the L96A1 7.62 mm, the L115A1 and the AW50F, all produced by Accuracy International. In addition, some units use the L82A1 .50 calibre Barrett sniper rifle. This article is about weapons and equipment. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 350 pixelsFull resolution (1384 × 606 pixel, file size: 702 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 350 pixelsFull resolution (1384 × 606 pixel, file size: 702 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The SA80 (Small Arms for the 1980s) is a family of related arms that include the British Armed Forcess standard combat rifle. ... Warrior Infantry Fighting Vehicle source: http://www. ... Warrior Infantry Fighting Vehicle source: http://www. ... ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1500x1012, 1253 KB) Summary Land Rover Defender 110 patrol vehicles. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1500x1012, 1253 KB) Summary Land Rover Defender 110 patrol vehicles. ... The Land Rover Wolf is a military utility vehicle in service with UK Armed Forces and the Dutch Marine Corps. ... The SA80 (Small Arms for the 1980s) is a family of related arms that include the British Armed Forcess standard combat rifle. ... SA80 (Small Arms for 1980s) is a family of related arms that include the British Armys standard combat rifle. ... The Browning L9A1 is a semi-automatic pistol, firing a 9×19 mm bullet from a 13-round magazine. ... The FN Minimi is a squad automatic weapon — the name coming from Mini-mitrailleuse (French: mini-machine gun. It is a 5. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The L9A1 51 mm Light Mortar is a man-portable mortar system used by the British Army. ... L85A2s fitted with UGLs The Under-slung Grenade Launcher (UGL) L17A1/A2 is the under-barrel 40 mm grenade launcher used by the British Army in conjunction with the L85A2 rifle (L17A2 UGL), and in small numbers with the L119A1 rifle used by the SAS (L17A1 UGL). ... The L96A1 is the name given by the British Army to the Accuracy Arctic Warfare (AW). ... The Super Magnum(L115A1) is a precision rifle or sniper rifle produced by the British firm Accuracy International. ... The AW50F is a . ... Accuracy International is a specialist British firearms manufacturer based in Portsmouth, Hampshire, United Kingdom, and best known for producing the Accuracy International Arctic Warfare series of precision sniper rifles. ... For the assault rifle, see Valmet M82. ...


The British Army commonly uses the Land Rover Wolf and Land Rover Defender; with the Challenger 2 as its Main Battle Tank. The Warrior Infantry Fighting Vehicle is the primary APC, although many variants of the Combat Vehicle Reconnaissance (Tracked) are used, as well as the Saxon APC and FV430 series. The Land Rover Wolf is a military utility vehicle in service with UK Armed Forces and the Dutch Marine Corps. ... The Land Rover Defender is a British four wheel drive Off-road utility vehicle. ... The Challenger 2 is the most recent main battle tank in service with the United Kingdom and Oman. ... General Characteristics (Warrior) Length: 6. ... The Combat Vehicle Reconnaissance (Tracked) —or CVR(T)—is a family of armored fighting vehicles in service with the British Army and others throughout the world. ... The Saxon is an armoured personnel carrier used by the British Army and supplied in small numbers to various overseas organisations. ... The FV430 series covers a number of armoured fighting vehicles of the British Army, all built on the same chassis. ...


The Army uses three main artillery systems; the MLRS, which debuted in Operation Granby and has a range of 30 km: the AS-90, a self-propelled howitzer, and the L118, a 105 mm towed gun-howitzer, used primarily by lighter units and in support of the Royal Marines A Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS) is a form of rocket artillery that can be reused. ... C Company, 1 STAFFS, in a live firing exercise, during Operation Granby, 6 January 1991. ... The AS-90 (Artillery System for the 1990s) is a lightly-armoured self-propelled artillery piece used by the British Army. ... M119A1 The L118 Light Gun is a 105mm towed howitzer, originally produced for the British Army in the 1970s and widely exported since, including to the United States, where it was modified to fire US ammunition and is known as the M119A1. ... The Royal Marines (RM) are the marines and amphibious infantry of the United Kingdom and, along with the Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary, form the Naval Service [2]. They are also the United Kingdoms amphibious force and specialists in mountain and Arctic warfare. ...


The Rapier FSC Missile System is the Army's primary battlefield air defence system, widely deployed since the Falklands War; and the Starstreak HVM is a surface-to-air missile, launched either by a single soldier or from a vehicle-mounted launcher. The Starstreak fills a similar role to the American FIM-92 Stinger Type SAM Surface-to-air missile Nationality UK Era Cold War Launch platform vehicle Target aircraft History Builder British Aerospace now MBDA (UK) Ltd Date of design Production period Service duration Operators United Kingdom, Indonesia, Turkey, Iran, Malaysia, Switzerland, Singapore, Australia Variants Mk1 (Hittile), Mk2B (Missile) Number built ? Specifications Type... Combatants Argentina United Kingdom Commanders President Leopoldo Galtieri Vice-Admiral Juan Lombardo Brigadier-General Ernesto Crespo Brigade-General Mario Menéndez Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher Admiral Sir John Fieldhouse Rear-Admiral John “Sandy” Woodward Major-General Jeremy Moore Casualties 649 killed 1,068 wounded 11,313 taken prisoner 75 fixed... Type short-range surface-to-air missile Nationality UK Era 1990s-Current Launch platform Target History Builder Thales Air Defence Limited Date of design Production period Service duration 1997 Operators Variants Number built 7,000 ordered Specifications Type Diameter 27 cm Wing span Length 1. ... The FIM-92 Stinger is a man portable infra-red homing surface-to-air missile developed in the United States and used by all the US armed services, with whom it entered service in 1981. ...


The Army Air Corps (AAC) provide direct aviation support for the Army, although the RAF also assist in this role. The primary attack helicopter is the Westland WAH-64 Apache; a license-built, modified version of the AH-64 Apache that will replace the Westland Lynx AH7 in the anti-tank role. The Westland Lynx performs several roles including tactical transport, armed escort, reconnaissance and evacuation. It used to also offer the anti-tank warfare roll; it could carry eight TOW anti-tank missiles. The Tow missile system fit, for the Lynx was withdrawn from service by the MOD in December 2005, after the coming in to service of the WAH-64 Apache. The Army Air Corps is a component of the British Army. ... The WAH-64 is a licence-built version of the Boeing AH-64D Apache Longbow attack helicopter, for the British Army. ... The AH-64 Apache is the United States Armys principal attack helicopter, and is the successor to the AH-1 Cobra. ... A tow is an untwisted bundle of continuous filaments. ...


The Bell 212 is used as a specialist utility and transport helicopter, with a crew of two and a transport capacity of twelve troops. The Bell 212 Twin Huey (also known as the Twin Two-Twelve) is a medium civilian helicopter that first flew in 1968. ...


The Westland Gazelle helicopter is a light helicopter, primarily used for battlefield scouting and control of artillery and aircraft. The Gazelle is a helicopter developed as part of an Anglo-French venture between the Westland and Aérospatiale companies in 1968. ...


The Agusta A109 is used for Special Operations Aviation, along with the Gazelle.


The Britten-Norman Islander is a light aircraft used for airborne reconnaissance and command, primarily in Northern Ireland. The Britten-Norman Islander (also known as the BN-2) is a light utility aircraft manufactured by Britten-Norman of the United Kingdom. ...

Firearms
L85A2 5.56 mm IW
L86A2 5.56 mm DMR
L110A1 5.56 mm LMG
L9A1 Browning
L7A2 7.62 mm GPMG
L96A1 7.62 mm
L115A1 8.6 mm LRR
Armoured Fighting Vehicles (AFV)
FV4043 Challenger 2 MBT
Warrior IFV
CVR(T)
FV432 APC
Artillery Systems
AS-90 155 mm Self-Propelled Gun
MLRS
L118 Light Gun
Rapier FSC Missile System
Starstreak HVM
L121 Field Howitzer
Cobra Artillery Location Radar
Aircraft
Apache AH.Mk.1
Gazelle AH.Mk.1
Lynx AH.Mk.7
Bell 212
Britten-Norman Islander
Agusta A109
Logistics Vehicles
DROPS
Land Rover (TUL/TUM)
ATMP
Information & Communication systems (ICS)
MSTAR
Bowman
Skynet 5
Spyglass Thermal Imager

The SA80 (Small Arms for the 1980s) is a family of related arms that include the British Armed Forcess standard combat rifle. ... The SA80 (Small Arms for the 1980s) is a family of related arms that include the British Armed Forcess standard combat rifle. ... The FN Minimi is a squad automatic weapon — the name coming from Mini-mitrailleuse (French: mini-machine gun. It is a 5. ... The Browning L9A1 is a semi-automatic pistol, firing a 9×19 mm bullet from a 13-round magazine. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Accuracy International Arctic Warfare rifle is a family of bolt-action sniper rifles designed and manufactured by the British company Accuracy International. ... The AWM (Arctic Warfare Magnum) is a sniper rifle manufactured by Accuracy International. ... The Challenger 2 is the most recent main battle tank in service with the United Kingdom and Oman. ... The FV510 Warrior tracked vehicle family, are a series of British armoured vehicles originally developed to replace the older FV430 series of armoured vehicles. ... The Combat Vehicle Reconnaissance (Tracked) —or CVR(T)—is a family of armored fighting vehicles in service with the British Army and others throughout the world. ... The FV432 is the armoured personnel carrier variant of the British Armys FV430 series of armoured fighting vehicles. ... AS90 Braveheart The AS-90 (Braveheart) is an armoured fighting vehicle used by the British Army. ... The M270 MLRS conducts a rocket launch. ... The L118 Light Gun is a 105 mm towed howitzer, originally produced for the British Army in the 1970s and widely exported since, including to the United States, where a modified version is known as the M119A1. ... Type SAM Surface-to-air missile Nationality UK Era Cold War Launch platform vehicle Target aircraft History Builder British Aerospace now MBDA (UK) Ltd Date of design Production period Service duration Operators United Kingdom, Indonesia, Turkey, Iran, Malaysia, Switzerland, Singapore, Australia Variants Mk1 (Hittile), Mk2B (Missile) Number built ? Specifications Type... Starstreak is a British short range surface-to-air missile, also known as Starstreak HVM where HVM stands for High Velocity Missile. ... FH 70 Type Long range gun Nationality UK, Germany, Italy Era Modern Target general, History Date of design Production period Number built Service duration 1978 Operators see text War service Specifications Carriage Split trail, auxiliary engine Calibre 155 mm Barrel length 39 calibres Weight 7,800-9,600 kg Ammunition... The WAH-64 is a licence-built version of the Boeing AH-64D Apache Longbow attack helicopter, for the British Army. ... The Gazelle is a helicopter developed as part of an Anglo-French venture between the Westland and Aérospatiale companies in 1968. ... The Westland Lynx is a helicopter designed by Westland and built at Westlands factory in Yeovil, first flying on 21 March 1971 as the Westland WG.13. ... The Bell 212 Twin Huey (also known as the Twin Two-Twelve) is a medium civilian helicopter that first flew in 1968. ... The Britten-Norman Islander (also known as the BN-2) is a light utility aircraft manufactured by Britten-Norman of the United Kingdom. ... The Agusta A109 is a helicopter manufactured by Agusta (now AgustaWestland) of Italy. ... A series of logistics vehicles operated by the British Army. ... Land Rover was the name of one of the first British civilian all-terrain utility vehicles, first produced by Rover in 1947. ... The UK All Terrain Mobility Platform is commonly known by the name of its manufacturer Supacat. ... Man-portable Surveillance and Target Acquisition Radar (MSTAR) External Links British Army Equipment - MSTAR ... Bowman is the name of the new tactical communications system being deployed by the British Armed Forces. ... Skynet 5 is a military satellite project led by the UK Ministry of Defence to provide a new generation of strategic communication services among the three branches of the UK Armed Forces, replacing the existing Skynet 4 system. ...

Formation and structure

British Army Arms and Services

Combat Arms
Royal Armoured Corps
Infantry
Guards Division
Scottish Division
King's Division
Queen's Division
Prince of Wales' Division
Royal Irish Regiment
Parachute Regiment
Brigade of Gurkhas
The Rifles
Army Air Corps
Special Air Service Regiment
Combat Support Arms
Royal Regiment of Artillery
Corps of Royal Engineers
Royal Corps of Signals
Intelligence Corps
Combat Services
Royal Army Chaplains Department
Royal Logistic Corps
Army Medical Services
Royal Army Medical Corps
Royal Army Dental Corps
Royal Army Veterinary Corps
Queen Alexandra's Royal
Army Nursing Corps
Corps of Royal Electrical and
Mechanical Engineers
Adjutant General's Corps
Army Legal Services Branch
Royal Military Police
Military Provost Staff Corps
Small Arms School Corps
Army Physical Training Corps
General Service Corps
Corps of Army Music

See main article: Structure of the British Army Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Royal Armoured Corps (RAC) is currently a collection of ten regular regiments, mostly converted from old horse cavalry regiments, and four Yeomanry regiments of the Territorial Army. ... The British Armys Infantry is comprised of 55 battalions of Infantry, from 32 Regiments. ... The Guards Division is an administrative unit of the British Army responsible for the administration of the regiments of Foot Guards. ... The Scottish Division is a British Army Infantry command, training and administrative apparatus designated for all Scottish infantry units. ... The Kings Division is a British Army command, training and administrative apparatus designated for all land force units in the North of England. ... The Queens Division is a British Army command, training and administrative apparatus designated for has the regiments from the east of England and the remaining regiment of Fusiliers. ... The Prince of Waless Division is a British Army command, training and administrative apparatus designated for all land force units in the West of England and Wales. ... The Royal Irish Regiment (27th (Inniskilling) 83rd and 87th and Ulster Defence Regiment), commonly just called the Royal Irish Regiment (R IRISH), is an infantry unit of the British Army and is the only remaining Irish regiment of the line. ... The Parachute Regiment redirects here, for the Indian regiment, see The Parachute Regiment (India) The Parachute Regiment is the Airborne Infantry element of the British Army. ... Gurkha Soldiers (1896) The Brigade of Gurkhas is the collective term for British Army units that are composed of Nepalese soldiers. ... For the band The Rifles, see The Rifles (band). ... The Army Air Corps is a component of the British Army. ... See also Australian Special Air Service Regiment and New Zealand Special Air Service: The Special Air Service Regiment (SAS) is the principal special forces unit of the British Army. ... Tactical Recognition Flash of the Royal Artillery The Royal Regiment of Artillery, generally known as the Royal Artillery (RA), is, despite its name, a corps of the British Army. ... The Corps of Royal Engineers, usually just called the Royal Engineers (RE), and commonly known as the Sappers, is one of the corps of the British Army. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Intelligence Corps (also known as Int Corps) is one of the corps of the British Army. ... The Royal Army Chaplains Department (RAChD) is an all-officer corps that provides ordained clergy to minister to the British Army. ... The Royal Logistic Corps is the British Army corps that provides the logistic support for the Army. ... The Army Medical Services is an umbrella organisation responsible for administering the four separate units responsible for supplying medical and nursing services in the British Army. ... The Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC) is a specialist corps in the British Army which provides medical services to all British Army personnel and their families in war and in peace. ... Cap badge of the Royal Army Dental Corps The Royal Army Dental Corps (RADC) is a specialist corps in the British Army that provides dental care services to British Army personnel and their families in war and in peace. ... Cap badge of the Royal Army Veterinary Corps The Royal Army Veterinary Corps (RAVC) is an administrative and operational branch of the British Army responsible for the provision, training and care of animals. ... Cap Badge of the Queen Alexandras Royal Army Nursing Corps The Queen Alexandras Royal Army Nursing Corps (QARANC) is part of the Army Medical Services in the British Army. ... The Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers (REME; pronounced phonetically as Reemee) is a corps of the British Army that has responsibility for the maintenance, servicing and inspection of almost every electrical and mechanical piece of equipment within the British Army from Challenger II main battle tanks and AH64... The Adjutant Generals Corps is a corps in the British Army responsible for many of its general administrative services. ... The Army Legal Services Branch (ALS) is a branch of the Adjutant-Generals Corps (AGC) in the British Army. ... The Royal Military Police (RMP) is the branch of the British Army responsible for the policing of service personnel and providing a military police presence on service property, operations and exercises. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Adjutant Generals Corps. ... The Small Arms School Corps is a small corps of the British Army responsible for maintaining the proficiency of the army in the use of small arms and support weapons. ... Bold textLink title Headline text Insert non-formatted text here ... Cap Badge of the General Service Corps The General Service Corps (GSC) is a corps of the British Army. ... The Corps of Army Music is a corps of the British Army. ... The structure of the British Army is broadly similar to that of the Royal Navy and Royal Air Force, being divided into two Commands as top-level budget holders; Land Command and the Adjutant-General. ...


The structure of the British Army is complex, due to the different origins of its various constituent parts. It is broadly split into the Regular Army (full-time soldiers and units) and the Territorial Army (part-time soldiers and units). The Territorial Army (TA) is the principal reserve force of the British Army, the land armed forces of the United Kingdom, and composed mostly of part-time soldiers paid at the same rate, while engaged on military activities, as their Regular equivalents. ...


In terms of its military structure it has two parallel organisations, one Administrative and one Operational.


Administrative

  • Divisions administrating all military units, both Regular and TA, within a geographical area e.g 5 Div based in Shrewsbury.

Symbol of the Polish 1st Legions Infantry Division in NATO code A division is a large military unit or formation usually consisting of around ten to twenty thousand soldiers. ... For other places with the same name, see Shrewsbury (disambiguation). ... In military science a brigade is a military unit that is part of a division and includes regiments (where that level exists), or (in modern armies) is composed of several battalions (typically two to four) and directly attached supporting units. ... In military science a brigade is a military unit that is part of a division and includes regiments (where that level exists), or (in modern armies) is composed of several battalions (typically two to four) and directly attached supporting units. ... Bulford is a village and civil parish in the Salisbury of Wiltshire, England, close to Salisbury Plain. ...

Operational

The three major commands are Land Command, Headquarters Adjutant General, and Headquarters Northern Ireland. Land Command (or HQ Land) is a military command and part of the structure of the modern British Army. ... The Adjutant-General to the Forces, commonly just referred to as the Adjutant-General (AG), is one of the most senior officers in the British Army. ...


Corps made up of two or more Divisions (now unlikely to be deployed as a purely national formation due to the size of the British Army) e.g. the ARRC. A corps (plural same as singular; a word that migrated from the French language, pronounced IPA: (cor), but originating in the Latin corpus, corporis meaning body) is either a large military unit or formation, an administrative grouping of troops within an army with a common function (such as artillery or... The Headquarters Allied Command Europe Rapid Reaction Corps, (HQ ARRC or ARRC) was created in 1992 based on the former British I Corps. ...

or: Symbol of the Polish 1st Legions Infantry Division in NATO code A division is a large military unit or formation usually consisting of around ten to twenty thousand soldiers. ... Major General or Major-General is a military rank used in many countries. ... In military science a brigade is a military unit that is part of a division and includes regiments (where that level exists), or (in modern armies) is composed of several battalions (typically two to four) and directly attached supporting units. ... Brigadier (IPA pronunciation: ) is a military rank, the meaning of which has a considerable variation. ... Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO military graphic symbols This article is about the military unit. ... In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ...

  • Battlegroup. This is a mixed formation of armour, infantry, artillery, engineers and support units, and its structure is task specific. It is formed around the core of either an Armoured Regiment or Infantry Battalion, and has other units added or removed from it as necessary. A Battlegroup will typically consist of between 600 and 700 soldiers under the command of a Lieutenant Colonel.

A number of elements of the British Army use alternative terms for Battalion, Company and Platoon. These include the Royal Armoured Corps,Corps of Royal Engineers, Royal Logistics Corps, and the Royal Corps of Signals who use Regiment(Battalion), Squadron(Company) and Troop(Platoon). The Royal Artillery are unique in using the term Regiment in place of both Corps and Battalion, they also replace Company with Battery and Platoon with Troop. The battlegroup is the basic building block of an armys fighting formation. ... Standard NATO code for a friendly infantry company. ... Major is a military rank the use of which varies according to country. ... Platoon of the German Bundeswehr. ... Second Lieutenant is the lowest commissioned rank in many armed forces. ... Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... This article is about the military rank. ... The Royal Armoured Corps (RAC) is currently a collection of ten regular regiments, mostly converted from old horse cavalry regiments, and four Yeomanry regiments of the Territorial Army. ... The Corps of Royal Engineers (RE), commonly known as the Sappers, is one of the corps of the British Army. ... The Royal Logistic Corps is a British military unit that provides the logistics for other units in the British military. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Tactical Recognition Flash of the Royal Artillery The Royal Regiment of Artillery, generally known as the Royal Artillery (RA), is, despite its name, a corps of the British Army. ... A corps (plural same as singular; a word that migrated from the French language, pronounced IPA: (cor), but originating in the Latin corpus, corporis meaning body) is either a large military unit or formation, an administrative grouping of troops within an army with a common function (such as artillery or... Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO military graphic symbols This article is about the military unit. ... Remains of a battery of English cannon from Youghal, County Cork. ...


Aviation components

The British Army operates alongside the Royal Air Force as part of a Joint Force, but the army also has its own Army Air Corps. RAF redirects here. ... The Army Air Corps is a component of the British Army. ...


The AAC has in its arsenal:

The WAH-64 is a licence-built version of the Boeing AH-64D Apache Longbow attack helicopter, for the British Army. ... The Westland Lynx is a helicopter designed by Westland and built at Westlands factory in Yeovil, first flying on 21 March 1971 as the Westland WG.13. ... The Gazelle is a helicopter developed as part of an Anglo-French venture between the Westland and Aérospatiale companies in 1968. ... The Bell 212 Twin Huey (also known as the Twin Two-Twelve) is a medium civilian helicopter that first flew in 1968. ... The Britten-Norman Islander (also known as the BN-2) is a light utility aircraft manufactured by Britten-Norman of the United Kingdom. ... The Agusta A109 is a helicopter manufactured by Agusta (now AgustaWestland) of Italy. ...

Special Forces

The British Army contributes two of the three special forces formations within the United Kingdom Special Forces Command; the Special Air Service Regiment and the Special Reconnaissance Regiment. The United Kingdom Special Forces (UKSF) is an umbrella directorate overseeing the Special Forces units of the British Armed Forces. ... For other uses, see Special forces (disambiguation). ... The United Kingdom Special Forces (UKSF) is an umbrella directorate overseeing the Special Forces units of the British Armed Forces. ... See also Australian Special Air Service Regiment and New Zealand Special Air Service: The Special Air Service Regiment (SAS) is the principal special forces unit of the British Army. ... The Special Reconnaissance Regiment (SRR) is a Special Forces Regiment of the British Armed Forces, which conducts special reconnaissance, predominantly, but not exclusively, in a Counter-Terrorism posture. ...


The most famous formation is the Special Air Service Regiment. Formed in 1941, the SAS is considered the role model for many other special force Regiments in the world[citation needed]. See also Australian Special Air Service Regiment and New Zealand Special Air Service: The Special Air Service Regiment (SAS) is the principal special forces unit of the British Army. ... For other uses, see Special forces (disambiguation). ...


The SAS comprises one regular Regiment and two Territorial Army Regiments and is headquartered at Duke of York Barracks, London. The Territorial Army (TA) is the principal reserve force of the British Army, the land armed forces of the United Kingdom, and composed mostly of part-time soldiers paid at the same rate, while engaged on military activities, as their Regular equivalents. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


The regular Regiment, 22 SAS Regiment has its headquarters and depot located in Hereford and consists of five squadrons: A, B, D, G and Reserve and a training wing. The regiment has battlespace roles in deep reconnaissance, target identification and indication and target destruction and denial. In its Counter Terrorism role it is seen as one of the prime anti-terrorist, hostage rescue and target capture units in the world.[citation needed] For other uses, see Hereford (disambiguation). ...


The two reserve SAS Regiments; 21 SAS Regiment and 23 SAS Regiment have a more limited role, focusing on the battlespace, with tasks including Long Range Reconnaissance Patrols and Combat Search and Rescue; rather than Counter-Terrorism.[citation needed] The 21st Special Air Service Regiment (Artists) (Volunteers) is a special forces regiment of the British Territorial Army. ... 23 SAS (23 Special Air Service regiment) is one of the Territorial Armys special forces regiments. ...


The Special Reconnaissance Regiment (SRR) which was formed in 2005, from existing assets, undertakes close reconnaissance and special surveillance tasks.[citation needed] The Special Reconnaissance Regiment (SRR) is a Special Forces Regiment of the British Armed Forces, which conducts special reconnaissance, predominantly, but not exclusively, in a Counter-Terrorism posture. ...


Formed around 1st Battalion the Parachute Regiment, with attached Royal Marines and RAF Regiment assets, the Special Forces Support Group are under the Operational Control of Director Special Forces to provide operational manoeuvre support to the elements of United Kingdom Special Forces. The Parachute Regiment redirects here, for the Indian regiment, see The Parachute Regiment (India) The Parachute Regiment is the Airborne Infantry element of the British Army. ... The Royal Marines (RM) are the marines and amphibious infantry of the United Kingdom and, along with the Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary, form the Naval Service [2]. They are also the United Kingdoms amphibious force and specialists in mountain and Arctic warfare. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Special Forces Support Group (SFSG) is a unit of the United Kingdom Special Forces. ...


Recruitment

The Army mainly recruits within the United Kingdom, and normally has a recruitment target of around 25,000 soldiers per year.


Low unemployment in Britain has resulted in the Army having difficulty in meeting its target[citation needed] , and in the early years of the 21st century there has been a marked increase in the number of recruits from other (mostly Commonwealth) countries, who as of mid-2004 comprised approximately 7.5% of the Army's total strength[citation needed]. By 2005 this number had risen to almost 10%[citation needed]. The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2007 Headquarters Marlborough House, London, UK Official languages English Membership 53 sovereign states Leaders  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Secretary-General Kamalesh Sharma Appointed 24 November 2007 Establishment  -  Balfour Declaration 18 November 1926   -  Statute of Westminster 11 December 1931   -  London Declaration 28 April 1949  Area  -  Total...


There were 6,460 foreign soldiers from 54 countries in the Army (not counting over 3,000 Nepalese Gurkhas). After Nepal, the nation with most citizens in the British Army is Fiji, with 1,965, followed by Jamaica with 975; soldiers also come from more prosperous countries such as Australia and South Africa (650) (However, recent proposals by the South African government may in future bar South African citizens from serving within the militaries of foreign states. The British government has appealed against this move). More New Zealanders are joining the British Army than the New Zealand Army with over 450 applying for the British Army each year, quite a number of which are New Zealand expatriates living in the United Kingdom. The Caribbean island of St Lucia, which has a population of just over 150,000, provides 220 soldiers.[6] Gurkha, also spelled as Gorkha, are people from Nepal and parts of North India, who take their name from the eighth century Hindu warrior-saint Guru Gorakhnath. ... Ngāti Tumatauenga or New Zealand Army is the land armed force of the New Zealand military and comprises around 4,500 regular personnel and 2,500 non-regulars and civilians. ... West Indies redirects here. ...


The minimum recruitment age is 16 years (but only after the end of GCSEs), although soldiers may not serve on operations below 18 years; the maximum recruitment age was raised in January 2007 from 26 to 33 years. The normal term of engagement is 22 years.[7]


There has been a strong and continuing tradition of recruiting from Ireland including what is now the Republic of Ireland. Almost 150,000 Irish soldiers fought in the First World War; 49,000 died. More than 60,000 Irishmen, more than from Northern Ireland, also saw action in the Second World War; like their compatriots in the Great War, all were volunteers. There were more than 400 men serving from the Republic in 2003.[8] Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ...


Oath of allegiance

Troops of the Grenadier Guards on guard at Buckingham Palace, Various army regiments supply troops to guard the Royal residences
Troops of the Grenadier Guards on guard at Buckingham Palace, Various army regiments supply troops to guard the Royal residences

All soldiers must take an oath of allegiance upon joining the Army, a process known as "attestation". Those who believe in God use the following words: Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1977x1317, 544 KB) Guards march out of Buckingham Palace (London, England) at the end of the Changing of the Guard ceremony. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1977x1317, 544 KB) Guards march out of Buckingham Palace (London, England) at the end of the Changing of the Guard ceremony. ... The Grenadier Guards is the most senior regiment of the Guards Division of the British Army, and, as such, is the most senior regiment of infantry. ... Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ...

I swear by Almighty God that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, her heirs and successors and that I will as in duty bound honestly and faithfully defend Her Majesty, her heirs and successors in person, crown and dignity against all enemies and will observe and obey all orders of Her Majesty, her heirs and successors and of the generals and officers set over me. [1]

Others replace the words "swear by Almighty God" with "solemnly, sincerely and truly declare and affirm". Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... The British monarch or Sovereign is the monarch and head of state of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories, and is the source of all executive, judicial and (as the Queen_in_Parliament) legislative power. ...


Training establishments[9]

ATR Bassingbourn
ATR Winchester
ATR Pirbright
ITC Catterick
ATR Lichfield
AFC Harrogate
Regional Training Centres
Tri Service Police College
Welbeck Defence Sixth Form College
Royal Military Academy Sandhurst (RMAS)
An Army Training Regiment (ATR) is a unit of the British Army which conducts basic training for new recruits. ... An Army Training Regiment (ATR) is a unit of the British Army which conducts basic training for new recruits. ... An Army Training Regiment (ATR) is a unit of the British Army which conducts basic training for new recruits. ... The Infantry Training Centre (ITC) is a unit of the British Army administered by HQ School of Infantry. ... An Army Training Regiment (ATR) is a unit of the British Army which conducts basic training for new recruits. ... An Army Training Regiment (ATR) is a unit of the British Army which conducts basic training for new recruits. ... Regional Training Centres were created from the previously existing Specialist Training Teams to provide training for the United Kingdom Territorial Army (TA). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... New College, Royal Military Academy Sandhurst New Colours are presented to RMAS, June 2005. ...


Flags and ensigns

 Flag Ratio: 3:5. The official flag of the Army.
Flag Ratio: 3:5. The official flag of the Army.
The non-ceremonial flag of the British Army. Sometimes the word "Army" in gold letters appears below the badge.
The non-ceremonial flag of the British Army. Sometimes the word "Army" in gold letters appears below the badge.

The British Army does not have its own specific ensign, unlike the Royal Navy, which uses the White Ensign, and the RAF, which uses the Royal Air Force Ensign. Instead, the Army has different flags and ensigns, for the entire army and the different regiments and corps. The official flag of the Army as a whole is the Union Flag, flown in ratio 3:5. A non-ceremonial flag also exists, which is used at recruiting events, military events and exhibitions. Whilst at war, the Union Flag is always used, and this flag represents the Army on the Cenotaph in Whitehall, London (the UK's memorial to war dead). A British Army ensign also exists for vessels commanded by a commissioned officer, the Blue Ensign defaced with the Army badge. Army Vessels are operated by the Maritime element of the RLC. Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom_(3-5). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom_(3-5). ... Image File history File links FIAV_001000. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The White Ensign. ... Royal Air Force Ensign The Royal Air Force Ensign is the official flag which used to represent the Royal Air Force. ... Union Jack redirects here. ... The Cenotaph, London A ceremony at the Cenotaph, London, on Sunday 12th June 2005, remembering Irish war dead Memorial Cenotaph, Hiroshima, Japan A cenotaph is a tomb or a monument erected in honor of a person or group of persons whose remains are elsewhere. ... Whitehall, London, looking south towards the Houses of Parliament. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... RFA Brambleleaf flying the square Blue Jack based on the Blue Ensign The Blue Ensign is a flag, one of several British ensigns, used by certain organisations or territories associated with the United Kingdom. ... RLC may refer to: The Royal Logistic Corps, the largest corps in the British Army. ...


Each line regiment (which does not include the Rifle Regiments) also has its own flags, known as the Colours - the Regimental Colour and the Queen's Colour. These Colours have been taken into battle in the past and give pride to the regiment. There is great variation in the designs of different Regimental Colours. Typically the colour has the Regiment's badge in the centre.
// Origins The practice of carrying standards, to act both as a rallying point for troops, and to mark the location of the commander, is thought to have originated in Egypt some 5,000 years ago. ...


Ranks, specialisms and insignia

NATO Code OF-10 OF-9 OF-8 OF-7 OF-6 OF-5 OF-4 OF-3 OF-2 OF-1 OF-D- Student Officer
Flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom
Edit
No Equivalent
Field Marshal1 General Lieutenant General Major General Brigadier Colonel Lieutenant Colonel Major Captain Lieutenant Second Lieutenant Officer Cadet
Abbreviation FM Gen. Lt-Gen. Maj-Gen. Brig. Col. Lt-Col. Maj. Capt. Lt. 2nd Lt.
  • 1 Now an honorary or wartime rank only.
NATO Code OR-9 OR-8 OR-7 OR-6 OR-5 OR-4 OR-3 OR-2 OR-1
Flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom
Edit
No
Insignia
Warrant Officer Class One (Conductor) Warrant Officer Class One Warrant Officer Class Two (Quartermaster Sergeant) Warrant Officer Class Two (Sergeant Major) Staff Sergeant/
Colour Sergeant
Sergeant Corporal/
Bombardier
Lance-Corporal/
Lance-Bombardier
Private/regimental equivalent

Every regiment and corps has its own distinctive insignia, such as cap badge, beret and stable belt. Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links UK-Army-OF1d. ... Field Marshal Viscount Slim in his Field Marshals uniform, holding a marshals baton. ... UK insignia for a full General General is a rank in the British Army and Royal Marines. ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Major General or Major-General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Brigadier (IPA pronunciation: ) is a military rank, the meaning of which has a considerable variation. ... Please see Colonel for other countries which use this rank Colonel is a rank of the British forces, ranking just below brigadiers. ... Insignia of a British Army Lieutenant Colonel Lieutenant-Colonel is a British rank used in several Commonwealth countries superior to Major and subordinate to Colonel. ... Please see Major for other countries which use this rank Major is a military rank of the British Army which is used by both the British Army and Royal Marines. ... Please see Captain for other versions of this rank Captain is a rank in the British armed forces that is used in the Army, Royal Navy, and the Royal Marines. ... First Lieutenant is a military rank. ... Second Lieutenant is the lowest commissioned rank in many armed forces. ... Officer Cadet is a rank held by military cadets during their training to become commissioned officers. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links UK-Army-OR9. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Conductor (Cdr) is an appointment held by a few selected Warrant Officers Class 1 in the Royal Logistic Corps and is the most senior appointment that can be held by a warrant officer in the British Army. ... For Warrant Officers in the United States military, see Warrant Officer (United States). ... For Warrant Officers in the United States military, see Warrant Officer (United States). ... For Warrant Officers in the United States military, see Warrant Officer (United States). ... United States Military Staff Sergeant insignia (U.S. Air Force) Staff Sergeant is the fifth enlisted rank in the U.S. Air Force, just above Senior Airman and below Technical Sergeant. ... Colour Sergeant (CSgt or C/Sgt) is an non-commissioned rank in the Royal Marines, ranking above Sergeant and below Warrant Officer Class 2. ... For other uses, see Sergeant (disambiguation). ... This article is about the military rank. ... For Bombardier Group, Canada see: Bombardier United Kingdom Bombardier and lance-bombardier are British Army ranks used in the Royal Artillery instead of (respectively) corporal and lance-corporal. ... Lance Corporal is a military rank used by some elements of the United States and United Kingdom Armed Forces, police, and other uniformed organizations. ... In the British Army, a Lance Bombardier (LBdr or L/Bdr) is the Royal Artillery equivalent of a Lance Corporal. ... A Private is a soldier of the lowest military rank (equivalent to Nato Rank Grades OR-1 to OR-3 depending on the force served in). ... A cap badge, also known as head badge or hat badge, is a badge worn on uniform headgear and distinguishes the wearers organisation. ... Basque style Beret Black beret with military emblem A beret (pronounced in English, except in North America where it is pronounced ) is a soft round cap, usually of wool felt, with a flat crown, which is worn by both men and women. ... Clip art of a pre-2007 Stable Belt of the Royal Air Force. ...


Throughout the army there are many official specialisms. They do not affect rank, but they do affect pay bands.

Band 2 Specialisms: Band 3 Specialisms:
Bandsman Survey Technician
Farrier Lab Technician
Driver Tank Transporter Registered General Nurse
Radar Operator Telcom Op (Special)
Meteorologist Aircraft Technician
Bomb Disposal Engineer SAS Soldier
Telcom Op (Linguist)
Operator Special Intelligence
Construction Materials Technician
Gun Fitter
Driver Specialist
Vehicle Electrician
Armoured Engineer

Royal Navy and RAF infantry units

The other armed services have their own infantry units which are not part of the British Army. The Royal Marines are amphibious light infantry forming part of the Royal Navy, and the Royal Air Force has the RAF Regiment used for airfield defence, force protection duties and Forward Air Control. The Royal Marines (RM) are the marines and amphibious infantry of the United Kingdom and, along with the Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary, form the Naval Service [2]. They are also the United Kingdoms amphibious force and specialists in mountain and Arctic warfare. ... Traditionally light infantry (or skirmishers) were soldiers whose job was to provide a skirmishing screen ahead of the main body of infantry, harassing and delaying the enemy advance. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... RAF redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Overseas Territories Military Units

Numerous military units were raised historically in British territories, including self-governing and Crown colonies, and protectorates. Few of these have appeared on the Army List, and their relationship to the British Army has been ambiguous. Whereas Dominions, such as Canada and Australia, raised their own armies, Crown possessions (like the Channel Islands), and colonies (now called Overseas Territories) were, and are, legally part of the UK, and their defence remains the responsibility of the National (i.e., United Kingdom) government. All military forces of overseas territories are, therefore, under the direct command of the UK Government, via the local Governor and Commander-In-Chief. Many of the units in colonies, or former colonies, were also actually formed at the behest of the UK Government as it sought to reduce the deployment of the British Army on garrison around the world at the latter end of the 19th century. Today, three overseas territories retain locally-raised military units, Bermuda, Gibraltar, and the Falkland Islands. The units are patterned on the British Army, are subject to review by the Ministry of Defence, and are ultimately under the control of the British government, not the local governments of the territories (though day-to-day control may be delegated to Ministers of the territorial governments). Despite this, the units may have no tasking or funding from the MOD, and are generally raised under acts of the territorial assemblies.

The Bermuda Regiment Band A Command Centre during IS training. ... Cap Badge of the Royal Gibraltar Regiment The Royal Gibraltar Regiment is the home defence unit for the British Colony of Gibraltar. ... The Falkland Islands are an overseas territory of the United Kingdom and, as such, rely on the UK for guarantee of their security. ...

See also

This is a list of planned British Army regiments in the aftermath of the defence white paper Delivering Security in a Changing World in 2004. ... The Ministry of Defence (MOD) is the United Kingdom government department responsible for implementation of government defence policy and is the headquarters of the British Armed Forces. ... Depiction of a British soldier in 1742 Red coat is a term often used to refer to a soldier of the historical British Army, because of the colour of the military uniforms formerly worn by the majority of regiments. ... The Territorial Army (TA) is the principal reserve force of the British Army, the land armed forces of the United Kingdom, and composed mostly of part-time soldiers paid at the same rate, while engaged on military activities, as their Regular equivalents. ... The Home Service Force was a Home Guard type force established in the United Kingdom in 1982. ... The Volunteer Army was a citizen army of part-time rifle corps, created as a popular movement in the 19th. ... British military history is a long and varied topic, extending from the prehistoric and ancient historic period, through the Roman invasions of Julius Cæsar and Claudius and subsequent Roman occupation; warfare in the Mediaeval period, including the invasions of the Saxons and the Vikings in the Early Middle Ages... British Territorial Army Casualties During Operation Telic The following is a list of British Territorial Army casualties suffered during Operation Telic, the US led invasion of Iraq. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... RAF redirects here. ... The United Kingdom Special Forces (UKSF) is an umbrella directorate overseeing the Special Forces units of the British Armed Forces. ... This is a list of some of the equipment currently in use by the British Army. ... This is a list of topics related to the United Kingdom. ... The Army Rugby Union (ARU) was formed on 31st December 1906 and marked the fulfilment of Lieutenant JEC ‘Birdie’ Partridge’s (Welch Regiment) idea to have a body to administer the playing of rugby in the British Army. ... // Eastbourne Redoubt was built at what is now Royal Parade, Eastbourne, East Sussex, England between 1804 and 1810 to support the associated Martello Towers. ... The Royal Sussex Regiment, a regiment in the British Army , was formed in 1881 from the 35th (Royal Sussex) Regiment of Foot and the 107th Regiment of Foot (Bengal Light Infantry) . // [edit] History [edit] 1st Battalion 1881 - 1914 Following its formation the 1st Battalion was sent to the Sudan... The Queens Royal Irish Hussars, normally reffered to by the abbriviation QRIH, was a United Kingdom cavalry regiment formed from the amalgamation of the 4th Queens Own Hussars and the 8th Kings Royal Irish Hussars in Hohne, Germany in 1958. ... The Queens Royal Hussars (The Queens Own and Royal Irish), (QRH), is the senior United Kingdom light cavalry regiment. ... For other uses, see Victoria Cross (disambiguation). ... The Army Rumour Service (ARRSE) is an unofficial British Army website & forum. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ http://www.regiments.org/about/faq/royalsvc.htm
  2. ^ Bloomfield, K Stormont in Crisis (Belfast 1994) p 114
  3. ^ PRONI:Cabinet conclusions file CAB/4/1460
  4. ^ McKernan, Michael (2005). Northern Ireland Yearbook 2005. Stationery Office, p. 17. ISBN 978-0954628420. 
  5. ^ Armed forces.co.uk
  6. ^ Wilson, Graeme (2006-04-13). One in 10 Soldiers is Recruited Overseas. The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved on 2007-01-12.
  7. ^ Recruitment Age for Army Raised. BBC News (2007-01-06). Retrieved on 2007-01-12.
  8. ^ ‘Ian's death brought people together' in the Daily Telegraph 19 March 2003
  9. ^ http://www.army.mod.uk/unitsandorgs/trestabl/index.htm

Sir Kenneth Bloomfield (born April 15 1931) is a former head of the Northern Ireland Civil Service and a member of the Northern Ireland Victims Commission and the Independent Commission for the Location of Victims Remains. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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