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Encyclopedia > Bristol Temple Meads railway station
Bristol Temple Meads
Bristol Temple Meads railway station. The current station has a dramatic curved train shed with a wrought-iron roof structure.
Location
Place Bristol
Local authority Bristol
Operations
Managed by First Great Western
Platforms in use 13
Annual entry/exit 5.641 million **
History
1840
1878
Opened
Extended
National Rail - UK railway stations

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T
U V W X Y Z  
Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2288x1712, 1249 KB) [edit] Summary The interior of the 1871–8 train shed at Bristol Temple Meads, with platform 3/4 in the foreground and platform 5/6 on the right. ... Bristol (IPA: ) is a city, unitary authority and ceremonial county in South West England, 115 miles (185 km) west of London and between the cities of Bath, Gloucester and the borough of Swindon. ... Bristol (IPA: ) is a city, unitary authority and ceremonial county in South West England, 115 miles (185 km) west of London and between the cities of Bath, Gloucester and the borough of Swindon. ... First Great Western is the operating name of First Greater Western Ltd,[1] a British train operating company owned by First Group, which operates services in the west and south west of England and South Wales. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... National Rail uses the BR double-arrow logo National Rail is a brand name of the Association of Train Operating Companies (ATOC). ... Station Name Postcode External links to Map of station at MultiMap Code External links to livedepartureboards. ... Categories: | ... Categories: British railway stations | Lists of places ... Station Name Postcode External links to Map of station at MultiMap Code External links to livedepartureboards. ... Station Name Postcode External links to Map of station at MultiMap Code External links to livedepartureboards. ... Categories: ... Station Name Postcode External links to Map of station at MultiMap Code External links to livedepartureboards. ... Station Name Postcode External links to Map of station at MultiMap Code External links to livedepartureboards. ... Categories: British railway stations | Lists of places ... Categories: British railway stations | Lists of places ... Categories: British railway stations | Lists of places ... Station Name Postcode External links to Map of station at MultiMap Code External links to livedepartureboards. ... Station Name Postcode External links to Map of station at MultiMap Code External links to livedepartureboards. ... See also List of closed railway stations in Britain Categories: Railway stations in the United Kingdom | Lists of places ... Categories: British railway stations | Lists of places ... Categories: British railway stations | Lists of places ... Categories: British railway stations | Lists of places ... Station Name Postcode External links to Map of station at MultiMap Code External links to livedepartureboards. ... Categories: Railway stations in the United Kingdom | Lists of places ... Station Name Postcode External links to Map of station at MultiMap Code External links to livedepartureboards. ... Categories: British railway stations | Lists of places ... Categories: British railway stations | Lists of places ... Station Name Postcode External links to Map of station at MultiMap Code External links to livedepartureboards. ... Categories: British railway stations | Lists of places ...

** based on sales of tickets in 2004/05 financial year which end or originate at Bristol Temple Meads. Disclaimer (PDF)


Bristol Temple Meads railway station is a major rail transport hub in Bristol, England. It is situated about a mile south-east of the city centre, and is the main station for central Bristol. Bristol's other main-line station, Bristol Parkway, is on the northern outskirts of the city. Bristol (IPA: ) is a city, unitary authority and ceremonial county in South West England, 115 miles (185 km) west of London and between the cities of Bath, Gloucester and the borough of Swindon. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... Bristol Parkway railway station is a railway station on the northern edge of Bristol (England), at Stoke Gifford in South Gloucestershire. ...


The station is served by express services on the Great Western route from London Paddington, Virgin Cross-Country express services between the north of England and the south west, and local and regional trains. Due to the layout of the lines around the station, trains to Wales, the Midlands, the north, London and the south coast all exit at the east end of the station. Only trains heading for Cornwall exit at the west end. The station has its platforms numbered 1-15, excluding 14; most of the platform faces have two numbers, with platform 4 (for example) being the south end of platform 3. Categories: Rail stubs | British railway lines ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Paddington Station, March 2005 during rush hour Paddington station or London Paddington station is a major National Rail and London Underground station complex in the Paddington area of London. ... Virgin Trains is a train operating company in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the country. ... Cornwall (Cornish: Kernow) is a county in South West England, United Kingdom, on the peninsula that lies to the west of the River Tamar. ...

Contents

History

The name of the site where the station was built derives from the nearby Temple (or Holy Cross) Church, which was built by the Knights Templar in the 12th century, rebuilt in the 14th century, and gutted by bombing during World War II. The site was within the boundaries of the old city, but some way distant from the commercial centre, and on the far side from fashionable Clifton. It did have the advantage of facing onto the Floating Harbour for transhipment of goods onto boats. The city's cattle market had been built on neighbouring land in 1830. The Seal of the Knights Templar This article is about the medieval military order. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... Combatants Allied Powers Axis Powers Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000,000 Total dead: 50,000,000 Military dead: 8,000,000 Civilian dead: 4,000,000 Total dead 12,000,000 World War II (abbreviated WWII), or the Second World War, was a worldwide conflict... The crowded Princess Victoria Street lies at the heart of Clifton Village Clifton is an inner suburb of the English port city of Bristol. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...

Brunel's original station now houses the Empire and Commonwealth Museum.
A Class 220 Voyager at Bristol.
A Class 220 Voyager at Bristol.

The original terminal station was built for the Great Western Railway (GWR) and was designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, the engineer of the GWR. The 72'-wide (22 m) train shed has a wooden box-frame roof and cast-iron columns disguised as hammerbeams above Tudor arches. The station also included a more utilitarian engine shed, and is fronted by an office building in the Tudor style. It is the oldest railway terminus in the world, and is regarded as one of the best Victorian station buildings. Services to Bath started on 31 August 1840 and to London Paddington in 1841. This part of the station was closed in 1965, and fell into disrepair for over twenty years. From 1989 until 1999 it was the home of The Exploratory, an interactive science centre, and is now the British Empire and Commonwealth Museum. It is a grade I listed building. Frontage of Brunels original Bristol Temple Meads station Photograph taken by user:rbrwr in October 2002 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Frontage of Brunels original Bristol Temple Meads station Photograph taken by user:rbrwr in October 2002 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 630 KB) Virgin Voyager Class 220 DEMU 220003 arrives into Bristol Temple Meads station. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 630 KB) Virgin Voyager Class 220 DEMU 220003 arrives into Bristol Temple Meads station. ... The original Bristol Temple Meads station, first terminus of the GWR, is the building to the left of this picture The Great Western Railway (GWR) was a British railway company, linking South West England, the West Country and South Wales with London. ... Brunel before the launching of the Great Eastern. ... Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her Ascension to the Throne, 20 June 1837) gave her name to the historic era The Victorian Era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British industrial revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... Statistics Population: 84,000 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: ST745645 Administration District: Bath and North East Somerset Region: South West England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Somerset Historic county: Somerset Services Police force: Avon and Somerset Fire and rescue: Avon Ambulance: South Western Post office... August 31 is the 243rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (244th in leap years), with 122 days remaining. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Paddington Station, March 2005 during rush hour Paddington station or London Paddington station is a major National Rail and London Underground station complex in the Paddington area of London. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... The British Empire and Commonwealth Museum is a museum in Bristol, United Kingdom which explores the history of the British empire and the impact that British colonial rule had on the rest of the world. ... Buckingham Palace, a Grade I listed building. ...


The adjacent through station, which is still used by trains, was built between 1871 and 1878 under the direction of Brunel's former associate Matthew Digby Wyatt.There have been a number of references to Matthew Digby Wyattt's involvement with the rebuilding of 1871-1876 but there is no documentary evidence in the Minutes of the Joint Committee or on the drawings. The only signature on the drawings is that of Francis Fox (1818-1914) who was the Engineer to the Bristol and Exeter Railway. The curved train shed is 500' (154 m) long on the platform edge and has a wrought-iron roof structure by engineer Francis Fox. It replaced the 1844 station of the Bristol and Exeter Railway, which was perpendicular to the GWR station. The Bristol and Exeter's office building, by S. C. Fripp, still stands alongside the station approach. At the same time the Brunel terminus was extended eastward to join up with the new building; since the closure of the terminal station in 1965 this extension has served as a covered car park. The through station was further extended on the east side in the 1930s by architect P. E. Culverhouse, with the addition of two further platform islands, allowing the removal of a narrow island platform in the middle of the 1870s train shed. The through station is also a grade I listed building. 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Sir (Matthew) Digby Wyatt (1820 – 1877) was a British architect and art historian who became Secretary of the Great Exhibition, Surveyor of the East India Company and the first Slade Professor of Fine Art at the University of Cambridge. ... A railway platform is a section of pathway, alongside rail tracks at a train station, metro station or tram stop, at which passengers may board or alight from trains or trams. ... Francis Fox was an English civil engineer born in Derby in the nineteenth century. ... 1844 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... William Spreats print shows the original St Davids station, built by the Hoopers in Pennyroyal Fields in 1844. ... The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known in Europe as the World Depression. ...

The original station (left) closed in 1965. All services now run from the 1870s extension (right).

The GWR's goods yard was built on the north-west side of the station, between the passenger station and the Floating Harbour, allowing transhipment of goods onto boats (though not onto ships, as the wharf was upstream of Bristol Bridge). In 1872 a further connection to the harbour was made in the form of the Bristol Harbour Railway, which ran between the passenger station and the goods yard, onto a bridge over the street outside, and then descended into a tunnel under the churchyard of St. Mary Redcliffe on its way to a wharf in a more convenient position downstream of Bristol Bridge. The bridge outside the station remained in use until 1964, but has now, along with the goods yard, been entirely swept away. Bristol Temple Meads railway station with Isambard Kingdom Brunels original terminal station on the left and Matthew Digby Wyatts through station on the far right. ... Bristol Temple Meads railway station with Isambard Kingdom Brunels original terminal station on the left and Matthew Digby Wyatts through station on the far right. ... St Augustines Reach and Peros Bridge, during the 2004 Harbour Festival. ... 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Categories: United Kingdom-related stubs | Museum stubs | Bristol | Museums in the UK ... St Mary Redcliffe is a great Anglican parish church in the City of Bristol, England. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ...


The station was built for the GWR's broad gauge, and in 1844 broad gauge trains of the Bristol and Gloucester Railway began running from the station. In 1846 the B&G was taken over by the Midland Railway, and by 1853 it had been converted to standard gauge, with mixed gauge track running into Temple Meads. Great Western Railway broad gauge steam locomotives awaiting scrapping in 1892 after the conversion to standard gauge. ... 1844 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Bristol and Gloucester Railway opened in 1844 between Bristol and Gloucester, meeting the Birmingham and Gloucester Railway. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Midland Railway (MR) was a railway company in the United Kingdom, which existed from 1844 to 1922. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... As railways developed and expanded one of the key issues to be decided was that of the rail gauge (the distance between the two rails of the track) which should be used. ... Sunlight reflects off dual-gauge tracks near Chur, Switzerland Mixed-gauge track and pointwork (1435 mm and 1067 mm) at Odawara in Japan Dual-gauge or mixed-gauge railway is a special configuration of railway track, allowing trains of different gauges to use the same alignment. ...


The original Joint Committee set up in 1865 comprised Great Western, Bristol and Exeter and Midland Railways, hence the three main entrance arches. The capital costs of the work were split 4/14 Great Western/B&E and 10/14 Midland Railway. The ongoing costs were split GWR 3/8, Midland 3/8 and B&E 2/8. Hence when the GWR absorbed the B&E in 1876 the split was GWR 5/8 and Midland (later LMS) 3/8 until Nationalisation in 1948.The station remained a joint GWR-Midland (later GWR-LMS) operation until nationalisation. It was converted to standard gauge when the GWR finally abandoned broad gauge in 1892. The London, Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS1) was a British railway company. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


The former Bath Road Depot was situated to the immediate south of the station. Bristol Bath Road TMD was a railway Traction Maintenance Depot situated in Bristol. ...


Station Layout

In general, platforms are arranged in pairs, with odd-numbered platforms located at the east end of platform faces, and even-numbered at the west end. Platforms 1-4 are located on the main concourse; platforms 1 and 2 being bay platforms. The other platforms are on three islands, containing platforms 4-7, 8-11, and 13 and 15 respectively.


Further reading

  • John Binding: Brunel's Bristol Temple Meads ISBN 0-86093-563-9
  • A. Gomme, M. Jenner, B. Little: Bristol: an Architectural History ISBN 0-85331-409-8 (out of print)

See also

The majority of public transport in the Bristol Urban Area is by bus, although rail has experienced signigicant growth and does play a large part, particularly in peak hours. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Bristol Temple Meads
  • Panorama of Bristol Temple Meads railway station
  • Photos of Bristol Temple Meads railway station
Preceding station National Rail Following station
Terminus   South West Trains
London Waterloo-Bristol
  Bath Spa
Bath Spa   First Great Western
Intercity services
Great Western Main Line
  Nailsea & Backwell
Terminus   First Great Western
Local services
Bristol-Penzance
  Bedminster
Filton Abbey Wood   First Great Western
Local services
Cardiff-Portsmouth Harbour
  Bath Spa
Terminus   First Great Western
Local services
Bristol-Worcester
  Filton Abbey Wood
Terminus   First Great Western
Local services
Severn Beach Line
  Lawrence Hill
Terminus   First Great Western
Local services
Bristol-Filton Abbey Wood peak
  Lawrence Hill
Terminus   First Great Western
Local services
Wessex Main Line
  Keynsham
Taunton   Virgin Trains
Cross-Country Route
  Bristol Parkway
Newport   Virgin Trains
Cross-Country Route
 
Weston Super Mare
Limited Service
  Virgin Trains
Cross-Country Route
  Bristol Parkway
Railway stations in Bristol, Bath and South Gloucestershire:
Avonmouth | Bath Spa | Bedminster | Bristol Parkway | Bristol Temple Meads | Clifton Down | Filton Abbey Wood | Lawrence Hill
Keynsham | Montpelier | Oldfield Park| Parson Street | Patchway | Pilning | Redland | St Andrews Road | Sea Mills | Severn Beach
Shirehampton | Stapleton Road | Yate
Major UK railway stations
Managed by Network Rail: Birmingham New Street • Edinburgh Waverley • Gatwick Airport • Glasgow Central • Leeds City • Liverpool Lime Street • Manchester Piccadilly
Managed by train operator: Aberdeen • Belfast Central • Birmingham Snow Hill • Brighton • Bristol Temple Meads • Cardiff Central • Crewe  • Derby • Doncaster • Dundee • Glasgow Queen Street • Hull • Manchester Victoria • Newcastle Central • Nottingham • Reading • Sheffield • York
Railway stations of London: Central area | Greater London
Managed by Network Rail: Cannon StreetCharing CrossEustonFenchurch StreetKing's CrossLiverpool StreetLondon BridgePaddingtonVictoriaWaterloo
Managed by train operator: BlackfriarsMaryleboneMoorgateSt Pancras

 
 

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