FACTOID # 4: Just 1% of the houses in Nevada were built before 1939.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Bristol Taurus
Bristol Taurus engine

The Taurus was a 14_cylinder two_row radial aircraft engine, produced by the Bristol Engine Company starting in 1936. The Taurus was developed by adding cylinders to the existing Aqulia design, creating a design that produced just over 1,000 horsepower (750 kW) with very low weight.


Bristol had originally intended to use the Aquila and Perseus as two of its major designs in the 1930s, but the rapid increase in size and speed of aircraft in the 1930s demanded much larger engines than either of these. The mechanicals from both of these designs were then put into two-row configuations to develop much larger engines, the Aquila becoming the Taurus, and the Perseus becoming the Hercules.


Unlike the earlier engines, where the sleeve valve was a new and untried design, the Taurus was fairly well understood and was delivered running at almost the same power it ended with, at 1,015 hp (760 kW). After several years of development, this improved only to 1,130 hp (840 kW), a tesimonial to how good the first versions were.


The first Taurus engines were delivered just before World War II opened, and found some use primarily in Bristol's own Beaufort torpedo bomber. When the same plane was fitted with the famous Pratt and Whitney R-1830 Twin Wasp, its performance actually fell even though the Twin Wasp was both lighter and more powerful.


Nevertheless by the time the engine was in widespread production, designs had already demanded even higher power settings. The Hercules went on to see fairly widespread use, while the Taurus ended with the Beaufort after only a few years.


Specifications

For all "Bristol" sleeve-valve aero-engines the fuel must be 87 octane value to specification D.T.D.230.


For Taurus II:

Layout: Fourteen-cylinder, double-row radial engine with dual ignition
Medium Supercharged
Bore & Stroke: 5 by 5.625 in (127 by 142.9 mm)
Maximum Take-off Power: 1,010 bhp (753 kW) @ 3,225 rpm
Maximum Power for all-out level flight (5 min): 1,065 bhp (794 kW) @3,225 rpm at 5,000 ft (1,520 m)
Volume: 1,550 in³ (25.4 litres)
Bare Dry Weight to A.M. Schedule E.124/4: 1,300 lb (590 kg)


For Taurus XII:

Layout: fourteen-cylinder, two-row, radial
Bore by stroke: 5 by 5.4 in (127 by 137 mm)
Displacement: 1550 in³ (25.4 L)
Compression ratio: (unknown)
Power: 1,130 hp (840 kW) at 3100 rpm
Weight: 1300 lb (590 kg)

See also

List of Aircraft | Aircraft Manufacturers | Aircraft Engines | Aircraft Engine Manufacturers


Airlines | Air Forces | Aircraft Weapons | Missiles | Timeline of aviation



  Results from FactBites:
 
Bristol Taurus: Definition and Links by Encyclopedian.com (399 words)
The Taurus was developed by adding cylinders to the existing Aqulia design, creating a design that produced just over 1,000 horsepower with very low weight.
Bristol had originally intended to use the Aquila and Perseus as two of its major designs in the 1930s, but the rapid increase in size and speed of aircraft in the 1930s demanded much larger engines than either of these.
Unlike the earlier engines, where the sleeve valve was a new and untried design, the Taurus was fairly well understood and was delivered running at almost the same power it ended with, at 1,015hp.
LivingArt (1478 words)
It is as a direct consequence of the South West Regional Development Agency’s financial support that Taurus Crafts has been able to develop as a prominent centre for the arts and crafts in the Forest of Dean and to establish an Artist in Residency programme over the past years.
Taurus Crafts now occupies what used to be the coach house, farm buildings and yard attached to the original building.
His first exhibition at Taurus was in 1997 and some of the earliest photographs taken in the Restaurant show his works exhibited on the walls.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m