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Encyclopedia > Bristol Harbour
St Augustine's Reach and Pero's Bridge, during the 2004 Harbour Festival.
St Augustine's Reach and Pero's Bridge, during the 2004 Harbour Festival.

Bristol Harbour is the harbour in the city of Bristol, England. The 70 acre (0.28 km²) harbour was created by installing lock gates on a tidal stretch of the River Avon in the centre of the city, giving it the name Floating Harbour as it is not affected by the tides. The harbour branches from the navigable River Avon at Netham Weir in east Bristol. The first mile of the harbour is the artificial Feeder Canal, the River following its original route. Beside Bristol Temple Meads railway station the harbour rejoins the original route of the Avon and meanders through, Bristol city centre, Canons Marsh and Hotwells, where it rejoins the river and flows into the Avon Gorge. Between Temple Meads and Hotwells, at a distance never more than one kilometre south of the harbour, the Avon flows through the artificial New Cut, reducing currents and silting in the harbour and preventing flooding. St Augustines Reach,Bristol Harbour during the festival, by user:Steinsky, Aug 2004. ... St Augustines Reach,Bristol Harbour during the festival, by user:Steinsky, Aug 2004. ... Peros Bridge is a pedestrian, bascule bridge at St Augustines Reach in Bristol Harbour. ... A harbor (or harbour) or haven is a place where ships may shelter from the weather or are stored. ... Bristol (IPA: ) is a city, unitary authority and ceremonial county in South West England, 115 miles (185 km) west of London and located at With a population of 400,000, and metropolitan area of 550,000, it is Englands sixth, and the United Kingdoms ninth, most populous city... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... An acre is an English unit of area, which is also frequently used in the United States and some Commonwealth countries. ... Canal locks in England. ... The tide is the cyclic rising and falling of Earths ocean surface caused by the tidal forces of the Moon and the Sun acting on the Earth. ... The Avon Gorge and Clifton Suspension Bridge The River Avon is a river in the south west of England. ... Bristol Temple Meads is a major railway station in Bristol, England. ... The central area of the city of Bristol, South West England, is the area south of the central ring road and north of the Floating Harbour, bordered north by St Pauls and Easton, east by Temple Meads and Redcliffe, and west by Clifton and Canons Marsh. ... Millenium Square and the At-Bristol planetarium Canons Marsh is an inner city area of Bristol, England, of approximately one square killometre. ... Hotwells is a district of Bristol, England located in the lee of high ground that Clifton occupies and directly to the north of the City Docks. ... The Avon Gorge and Clifton Suspension Bridge, looking south from the Downs The Avon Gorge (Grid reference ST560743) is a 2. ...


Bristol Harbour was the original Port of Bristol, but as ships, and their cargo, increased in size, it has now been largely replaced by docks at Avonmouth and Portbury, 5 km downstream at the mouth of the River Avon. The harbour is now a tourist attraction, with museums, exhibitions, bars and nightclubs. Old workshops and warehouses have now largely been converted or replaced by cultural uses, such as the Arnolfini art gallery, Watershed media and arts centre, Bristol Industrial Museum and At-Bristol science exhibition center as well as a number of fashionable apartment buildings. Museum boats are permanently berthed in the harbour, including Isambard Kingdom Brunel's SS Great Britain, the first iron hulled, propeller driven ocean liner, a replica of the Matthew, in which John Cabot discovered, in the modern era, North America at what is now known as Newfoundland, and a steam tug, the Mayflower. St Augustines Reach and Peros Bridge, during the 2004 Harbour Festival. ... Categories: Stub | Bristol | Ports and harbours of the UK ... The Royal Portbury Dock The Royal Portbury Dock is part of the Port of Bristol, in England. ... Tourists at Oahu island, Hawaii Tourism is the act of travel for predominantly recreational or leisure purposes, and also refers to the provision of services in support of this act. ... Tourists sit outside a bar in Chiang Mai, Thailand A Depression-era bar in Louisiana. ... Clubbing, also known as a disco A nightclub (often shortened to club) is an entertainment venue which does its primary business after dark. ... The Arnolfini from Peros Bridge. ... Entrance to Watershed Media Centre in the Harbourside area The Watershed Media Centre opened in a disused warehouse in central Bristol in 1982, and claims to be the United Kingdoms first dedicated media centre. ... Categories: United Kingdom-related stubs | Museum stubs | Bristol | Museums in the UK ... At-Bristol is a pioneering public science and technology exploration and education centre in Bristol, England. ... Brunel before the launching of the Great Eastern. ... The SS Great Britain in dry dock in Bristol, 2003. ... Ship sailed by John Cabot in 1497 from Bristol to North America, presumably Newfoundland. ... Giovanni Caboto (c. ... Newfoundland —   (stress on final syllable; for mispronunciations, see Newfoundland travel guide from Wikitravel)— (French: , Irish: ) is a large island off the east coast of North America, and the most populous part of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... In physical chemistry, and in engineering, steam refers to vaporized water. ... The Le Four manoeuvering in Brest harbour A tugboat, or tug, is a boat used to manoeuvre, primarily by towing or pushing other vessels (see shipping) in harbours, over the open sea or through rivers and canals. ...


The Bristol Ferry Boat operates on the harbour, serving landing stages close to most of the harbour-side attractions and also providing a commuter service to and from the city centre and Bristol Temple Meads railway station. Other vessels, including those run by The Bristol Packet Company, provide sightseeing services on the harbour, up the River Avon to Bath and downstream to Avonmouth. The historic vessels of the Industrial Museum (including the Mayflower) are periodically operated. A ferry boat passes the Welsh Back landing stage, with Bristol Bridge in the background The Bristol Ferry Boat operates passenger ferry boat services on Bristol Harbour in the centre of the English city of Bristol. ... For other uses, see Bath (disambiguation). ...


In late July each year, the Bristol Harbour Festival is held, with an influx of interesting boats, for example, tall ships, Royal Navy vessels and lifeboats. The USCGC Eagle. ... The Royal Navy of the United Kingdom is the oldest of the British armed services (and is therefore the Senior Service). ... A lifeboat is a rigid (or inflatable) boat designed to rescue people in trouble at sea. ...

Contents

History

A tallship in the Cumberland lock, Hotwells, during the 2004 Harbour Festival.
A tallship in the Cumberland lock, Hotwells, during the 2004 Harbour Festival.

Bristol grew up on the banks of the Rivers Avon and Frome, and since the 16th century the rivers have been modified for use as docks, including the diversion of the River Frome into Saint Augustine's Reach. Download high resolution version (480x640, 136 KB)A tallship in the Cumberland lock, Bristol Harbour during the 2004 festival, by user:Steinsky File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (480x640, 136 KB)A tallship in the Cumberland lock, Bristol Harbour during the 2004 festival, by user:Steinsky File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Kaskalot at the 2004 Bristol Harbour festival in England. ... The River Frome is a river in the south west of England. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ...


The River Avon, like the River Severn, has heavy tides of about 30 ft (10 m) between high and low, being easily navigable at high-tide but reduced to a muddy channel at low tide in which ships would often run aground in the Avon Gorge. Many ships were deliberately stranded in the harbour for unloading, giving rise to the phrase "shipshape and Bristol fashion" to describe boats capable of taking the strain of repeatedly being stranded.[1] The source of the River Severn on Plynlimon, Wales. ... This article is about tides in the ocean. ... A foot (plural: feet) is any of several old units of distance or length, measuring around a quarter to a third of a meter. ...


In the 18th Century Liverpool grew, developing docks PENIS in competition with Bristol for the tobacco trade. Coastal trade was also important with the area called "Welsh Back" concentrating on trows with cargoes from the Slate industry in Wales, stone and coal.[2] The poor quality of Bristol's docks were causing problems to business so in 1802 William Jessop proposed installing a dam and lock at Hotwells to create the harbour. The UK£ 530,000 scheme was approved by parliament, and construction began in May 1804. The scheme included the construction of the Cumberland Basin, a large wide stretch of the harbour in Hotwells where the Quay walls and bollards have listed building status.[3] (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Template:Warningbox Liverpool is a city and metropolitan borough in North West England, along the eastern side of the Mersey Estuary. ... Species Nicotiana acuminata Nicotiana alata Nicotiana attenuata Nicotiana benthamiana Nicotiana clevelandii Nicotiana excelsior Nicotiana forgetiana Nicotiana glauca Nicotiana glutinosa Nicotiana langsdorffii Nicotiana longiflora Nicotiana obtusifolia Nicotiana paniculata Nicotiana plumbagifolia Nicotiana quadrivalvis Nicotiana repanda Nicotiana rustica Nicotianasuaveolens Nicotiana sylvestris Nicotiana tabacum Nicotiana tomentosa Ref: ITIS 30562 as of August 26, 2005... See also Trowe, a type of troll. ... Splitting of the slate blocks with hammer and chisel to produce roofing slates requires great skill. ... The rocky side of a mountain creek near Orosí, Costa Rica. ... Coal Coal (IPA: ) is a fossil fuel extracted from the ground by underground mining or open-pit mining (surface mining). ... --69. ... William Jessop (23 January 1745 - 18 November 1814) was a noted English civil engineer, particularly famed for his work on canals, harbours and early railways in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


The tidal new cut was constructed from Netham to Hotwells, with another dam installed at this end of the harbour, the Feeder Canal between Temple Meads and Netham provided a link to the tidal river so that boats could continue upstream to Bath. However, the new scheme required a way to equalise the levels inside and outside the Dock for the passage of vessels to and from the Avon, and bridges to cross the water. Jessop built Cumberland Basin with two entrance locks from the tidal Avon, of width 45 feet and 35 feet, and a junction lock (width 45 feet) between the Basin and what became known as the Floating Harbour. This arrangement provided flexibility of operation with the Basin being used as a lock when there were large numbers of arrivals and sailings. The harbour was officially opened on May 1st 1809.[4] Netham is a locality in the English city of Bristol. ...

The Cumberland Basin
The Cumberland Basin

The size of the lock caused problems when the SS Great Britain was launched. Jessop's 45-foot lock could not accommodate Brunel's 48-foot beam SS Great Britain. She was being towed away from her builders to have her engines and interior fitted out on the River Thames but unfortunately was fractionally too big to go through. The ship was moored in the Floating Harbour for a year or more before proceeding into Cumberland Basin, with coping stones and lock gate platforms removed from the Junction Lock.[5] Download high resolution version (750x602, 377 KB)Cumberland Basin, Bristol Harbour, by user:Steinsky, May 2004. ... Download high resolution version (750x602, 377 KB)Cumberland Basin, Bristol Harbour, by user:Steinsky, May 2004. ... The Thames (pronounced []) is a river flowing through southern England, in its lower reaches flowing through London into the sea. ...


The harbour cost more than anticipated and high rates were levied to repay loans, countering any effect the new harbour had at drawing companies back from Liverpool. In 1848 the city council bought the docks company to force down the rates and employed Isambard Kingdom Brunel, who had already built the Bristol Harbour Railway (a branch of his Great Western Railway) to make improvements, including new lock gates, a dredger and a sluice gates designed to reduce siltation. 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Categories: United Kingdom-related stubs | Museum stubs | Bristol | Museums in the UK ... The original Bristol Temple Meads station, first terminus of the GWR, is the building to the left of this picture The Great Western Railway (GWR) was a British railway company, linking South West England, the West Country and South Wales with London. ... ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


In 1867 ships were getting larger, and the meanders in the river Avon prevented boats over 300 ft (90 m) reaching the harbour. A scheme to install a much larger lock at Avonmouth to float the entire river and to straighten the sharper bends was dropped after work began on the much cheaper docks at Avonmouth and Portishead. 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Map sources for Portishead, Somerset at grid reference ST4676 Portishead (IPA: ) is a coastal town in North Somerset, England. ...


The present entrance lock was designed by Thomas Howard and opened in July 1873. This has a 62 foot width and is the only entrance lock now in use at the City Docks.[6]


In 1908 the Royal Edward Dock was built in Avonmouth, and in 1972 the large deepwater Royal Portbury Dock was constructed on the opposite side of the mouth of the Avon, making Bristol Harbour redundant as a freight dock. A sand company was the last to abandon the docks in 1981. 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The old swing bridge was powered by water pressure from the Underfall Yard hydraulic engine house at 750 Pound-force per square inch (psi). The new Plimsoll Bridge, completed in 1965, has a more modern electro-hydraulic system using oil at a pressure of 4,480 psi.[7] A swing bridge is a bridge that has as its primary structural support a vertical locating pin and support ring at or near to its center, about which it can then pivot horizontally as shown in the animated illustration below. ... ... A pressure gauge reading in PSI (red scale) and kPa (black scale) The pound-force per square inch (symbol: lbf/in2) is a non-SI unit of pressure based on avoirdupois units. ...


Sections, quays & harbourside features

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2040x525, 250 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Bristol Harbour User talk:Rodw/Archive 1 ...

  1. Prince's Wharf, including the Bristol Harbour Railway and Industrial Museum
  2. Dry docks, SS Great Britain
  3. St Augustine's Reach, Pero's Bridge
  4. Bathurst Basin
  5. Queen's Square
  6. Bristol Temple Meads railway station
  7. Castle Park
  8. Redcliffe Quay
  9. Baltic Wharf marina
  10. Cumberland Basin & Brunel Locks
  11. The New Cut
  12. Netham Locks, entrance to the Feeder Canal
  13. Marsh Basin
  14. Temple Quay
  15. St Augustine's Parade
  16. Canons Marsh, including Millennium Square and At-Bristol
  17. Underfall Yard
  18. Bristol Bridge

Categories: United Kingdom-related stubs | Museum stubs | Bristol | Museums in the UK ... The SS Great Britain in dry dock in Bristol, 2003. ... Peros Bridge is a pedestrian, bascule bridge at St Augustines Reach in Bristol Harbour. ... Bristol Temple Meads is a major railway station in Bristol, England. ... The Observatory on Clifton Down. ... Millennium Square and the At-Bristol planetarium Canons Marsh is an inner city area of Bristol, England, of approximately one square killometre. ... At-Bristol is a pioneering public science and technology exploration and education centre in Bristol, England. ... View of Bristol Bridge across the harbour from Welsh Back. ...

Underfall Yard

The damming of the river to make the harbour had created new land where the docks maintenance facility was established and remains today. William Jessop had created a weir in the dam at Underfall to allow surplus water to flow back into the New Cut, this was known as the 'Overfall'. By the 1830s the Floating Harbour was suffering from severe silting so Isambard Kingdom Brunel devised a solution. In place of the Overfall he constructed three shallow sluices and one deep scouring sluice between the harbour and the New Cut, together with a dredging vessel. This drag boat would scrape the silt away from the quay walls. When the deep sluice opened at low tide, a powerful undertow sucked the silt into the river to be carried away on the next tide. The shallow sluices enabled adjustment of the dock water level according to weather conditions.[8]


Several old buildings, from the 1880s, remain at Underfall Yard and have listed building status. The octagonal brick and terracotta chimney of the hydraulic engine house dates from 1888, and is grade II* listed,[9] as is the Hydraulic engine house its self. It is built of red brick with a slate roof and contains hydraulic pumping machinery dated 1907 by Fullerton, Hodgart and Barclay of Paisley, and powers the docks hydraulic system of cranes, bridges and locks.[10] The former pattern-maker's shop and stores dates from the same period and are grade II listed,[11] as are the Patent slip and quay walls.[12] Buckingham Palace, a Grade I listed building. ... Octagonal was a champion New Zealand bred thoroughbred racehorse, affectionately called the big O. In 1995 Octagonal was crowned the Champion Australian Two Year Old. ... An old brick wall in English bond laid with alternating courses of headers and Brick is an artificial stone made by forming clay into rectangular blocks which are hardened, either by burning in a kiln or sometimes, in warm and sunny countries, by sun-drying. ... Terra cotta is a hard semifired waterproof ceramic clay used in pottery and building construction. ... A chimney is a system for venting hot gases and smoke from a boiler, stove, furnace or fireplace to the outside atmosphere. ... Hydraulics is a branch of science and engineering concerned with the use of liquids to perform mechanical tasks. ...


Warehouses

A large number of warehouses were built around the harbour for storage and trade. Many survive today and some are being converted into apartment blocks but many have been demolished as part of the regeneration of the area. One which has survived is the "A Bond Tobacco Warehouse", which was built in 1905 and was the first of the 3 brick Bonds in the Cumberland Basin, and is a grade II listed building.[13] Inside Green Logistics Co. ... Species Nicotiana acuminata Nicotiana alata Nicotiana attenuata Nicotiana benthamiana Nicotiana clevelandii Nicotiana excelsior Nicotiana forgetiana Nicotiana glauca Nicotiana glutinosa Nicotiana langsdorffii Nicotiana longiflora Nicotiana obtusifolia Nicotiana paniculata Nicotiana plumbagifolia Nicotiana quadrivalvis Nicotiana repanda Nicotiana rustica Nicotianasuaveolens Nicotiana sylvestris Nicotiana tabacum Nicotiana tomentosa Ref: ITIS 30562 as of August 26, 2005...


The Arnolfini art gallery occupies Bush House, a 19th century Grade II* listed tea warehouse.[14] and the Watershed Media Centre occupies another disused warehouse. The Arnolfini from Peros Bridge. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Buckingham Palace, a Grade I listed building. ... Tea leaves in a Chinese gaiwan. ... Entrance to Watershed Media Centre in the Harbourside area The Watershed Media Centre opened in a disused warehouse in central Bristol in 1982, and claims to be the United Kingdoms first dedicated media centre. ...


The harbourside today

The Watershed and Pero's Bridge
The Watershed and Pero's Bridge

Since the 1980s millions of pounds have been spent regenerating the harbourside, including the construction of Pero's footbridge, linking the brand new At-Bristol exhibition with other Bristol tourist attractions, and private investors constructing studio apartment buildings. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2576x1952, 1967 KB) The Watershed and pedestrian bridge, Bristol Floating Harbour. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2576x1952, 1967 KB) The Watershed and pedestrian bridge, Bristol Floating Harbour. ... Peros Bridge is a pedestrian, bascule bridge at St Augustines Reach in Bristol Harbour. ...


The Cumberland basin is used by a variety of small boats from sailing clubs and is surrounded by tourist attractions. The old hydraulic pumping station has been converted into a public house and is a grade II listed building.[15]


The Bristol Harbour Railway and Industrial Museum runs along Prince's Wharf and Wapping Wharf (grade II listed[16] Categories: United Kingdom-related stubs | Museum stubs | Bristol | Museums in the UK ...


Gallery

No file by this name exists; you can upload it. ...

References

  1. ^ Ship-shape and Bristol fashion. The phrase finder. Retrieved on 2006-08-25.
  2. ^ Pearson, Michael (2003). Kennet & Avon Middle Thames:Pearson's Canal Companion. Rugby: Central Waterways Supplies. ISBN 090786497X.
  3. ^ Quay walls and bollards. Images of England. Retrieved on 2006-08-18.
  4. ^ The creation of Bristol City docks. Farvis. Retrieved on 2006-08-18.
  5. ^ The creation of Bristol City docks. Farvis. Retrieved on 2006-08-18.
  6. ^ The creation of Bristol City docks. Farvis. Retrieved on 2006-08-18.
  7. ^ The creation of Bristol City docks. Farvis. Retrieved on 2006-08-18.
  8. ^ Underfall Boatyeard history. Retrieved on 2006-08-18.
  9. ^ Chimney of hydraulic engine house. Images of England. Retrieved on 2006-08-18.
  10. ^ hydraulic engine house. Images of England. Retrieved on 2006-08-18.
  11. ^ former pattern-maker's shop and stores. Images of England. Retrieved on 2006-08-18.
  12. ^ Patent slip and quay walls. Images of England. Retrieved on 2006-08-18.
  13. ^ A Bond Tobacco Warehouse. Images of England. Retrieved on 2006-08-18.
  14. ^ Bush House. Images of England. Retrieved on 2006-08-18.
  15. ^ The Pump House Public House. Images of England. Retrieved on 2006-08-18.
  16. ^ Prince's Wharf and Wapping Wharf. Images of England. Retrieved on 2006-08-18.

brin white is a transsexual 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 25 is the 237th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (238th in leap years), with 128 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 18 is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 18 is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 18 is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 18 is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 18 is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 18 is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 18 is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 18 is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 18 is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 18 is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 18 is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 18 is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 18 is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 18 is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


External links

  • Bristol City Council: Harbour events and attractions Marine and waterway services
  • About Bristol: History of the Harbour
  • A history of the docks
  • Bristol Packet Boat Trips
  • Bristol City Docks

Photographs

  • The Floating Harbour

 
 

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