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Encyclopedia > Brigham Young University

Brigham Young University

Motto "The glory of God is intelligence"[1]
"Enter to learn, go forth to serve"[2]
"The world is our campus"[3]
Established October 16, 1875
Type Private coeducational
Religious affiliation The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Endowment $589,092,921 [6]
President Cecil O. Samuelson
Faculty 1,600 full-time, 550 part-time
Staff 1,200 full-time, 900 part-time
Students 34,067[4]
Undergraduates 26,928 full-time, 3,314 part-time
Location Provo, Utah, United States
Campus Suburban, 560 acres
Colors Dark blue, White, and Tan[5]                
(royal blue and white until 2000)
Nickname Cougars
Mascot Cosmo the Cougar
Website http://www.byu.edu

Coordinates: 40°14′54″N 111°38′57″W / 40.24833, -111.64917 Download high resolution version (697x697, 348 KB) This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Various Religious symbols, including (first row) Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Bahai, (second row) Islamic, tribal, Taoist, Shinto (third row) Buddhist, Sikh, Hindu, Jain, (fourth row) Ayyavazhi, Triple Goddess, Maltese cross, pre-Christian Slavonic Religion is the adherence to codified beliefs and rituals that generally involve a faith in a spiritual... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Cecil O. Samuelson (born August 1, 1941) has been the 12th president of Brigham Young University since May 1, 2003. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Provo is a city in Utah and the county seat of Utah County, located about 35 miles south of Salt Lake City along the Wasatch Front. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Dark blue is a shade of blue. ... Alternate meanings: White (disambiguation) White is a color (more accurately it contains all the colors of the spectrum and is sometimes described as an achromatic color—black is the absence of color) that has high brightness but zero hue. ... Tan is a brownish, tawny coluor. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Cosmo at the 2006 Fourth of July parade in Provo Cosmo the Cougar is the official mascot of Brigham Young Universitys (BYU) athletic teams. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Brigham Young University (BYU), located in Provo, Utah, is a private coeducational school completely owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon Church) and run under the auspices of its Church Educational System. About 98% of the 34,000 students at BYU are members of the LDS Church, and two-thirds of the students come from outside the state of Utah.[7] About 70% of student tuition is funded by LDS Church tithing funds, making tuition relatively lower than that of similar private universities.[8] The university's primary focus is on undergraduate education, but it also has 68 master's degree and 25 doctoral degree programs, as well as a Juris Doctorate program. The university also offers a wide variety of foreign language courses. Provo is a city in Utah and the county seat of Utah County, located about 35 miles south of Salt Lake City along the Wasatch Front. ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ... The Church Educational System (CES) of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints consists of several institutions that provide religious and secular education for Latter-day Saint elementary, secondary, and post-secondary students and adult learners. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... A tithe (from Old English teogotha tenth) is a one-tenth part of something, paid as a voluntary contribution or as a tax or levy, usually to support a religious organization. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A doctorate is an academic degree of the highest level. ... “J.D.” redirects here. ... A foreign language is a language not spoken by the indigenous people of a certain place: for example, English is a foreign language in Japan. ...

Contents

Academics

Rankings and notability

In 2008, the US News & World Report ranked BYU as #79 in the country overall.[9] The Princeton Review also has ranked BYU in several categories, including one of the best Western colleges and the third best value for college in the United States in 2005[10] and the best value for college in 2007.[11] One other notable national ranking includes BYU as having one of the best libraries in the nation[12] BYU is designated as a Carnegie research university with high research activity, one of the highest classifications by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.[13] BYU is also ranked 19th in the US News and World Report's "Great Schools, Great Prices" lineup, and 12th in lowest student-incurred debt.[14]


The Marriott School of Business has received recognition in several areas, most notably its accounting and business programs. The Marriott School was ranked the number one regional business school according to a 2007 survey by the Wall Street Journal and Harris Interactive.[15] BusinessWeek ranked the Marriott School of Business as the eighth best business program in 2007.[16] Financial Times rated it first in the nation in that year.[17] In ethics emphasis, a 2006 Wall Street Journal article ranked BYU second in the nation.[14] In 2007, the school's accounting department obtained the "Best in Accountancy" title, according to the Financial Times global ranking of business schools.[18] This department has also been highly ranked by the Public Accounting Report for several years. This report ranked both the undergraduate and graduate accounting programs second in the nation for the 2006-2007 school year.[19]U.S. News and World Report ranked BYU's accounting program third in the nation in their 2008 publication.[20] The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ...


BYU scientists have created some notable inventions. Philo T. Farnsworth, inventor of the television, received his education at BYU, and later came back to do fusion research, receiving an honorary degree from the university.[21] Harvey Fletcher, a BYU alumnus, went on to carry out the now famous oil-drop experiment with Robert Millikan, and was later Founding Dean of the BYU College of Engineering.[22] The department of Computer Science developed and currently maintains phpLDAPadmin, an award-winning open source project.[23] BYU students also developed the Magnetic Lasso algorithm found in Adobe Photoshop.[24] This article needs cleanup. ... Harvey Fletcher (September 11, 1884 - July 23, 1981) was an American physicist. ... The purpose of Robert Millikan and Harvey Fletchers oil-drop experiment (1909) was to measure the electric charge of the electron. ... Robert Andrews Millikan (March 22, 1868 – December 19, 1953) was an American experimental physicist who won the 1923 Nobel Prize for his measurement of the charge on the electron and for his work on the photoelectric effect. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... Open source software is computer software which source code is available under a license (or arrangement such as the public domain) that meets the Open_source_definition. ... Photoshop redirects here. ...


Organization

Brigham Young University is a part of the Church Educational System of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. It is organized under a Board of Trustees, with the President of the Church, currently Gordon B. Hinckley, as chairman. The President of BYU, currently Cecil O. Samuelson, works in cooperation with the board.[25] Altogether, BYU has 194 bachelor's degree programs, 68 master's degree programs, 25 Ph.D. programs, and a Juris Doctor program.[26] These degree programs are overseen by 11 colleges:[27] The Church Educational System (CES) of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints consists of several institutions that provide religious and secular education for Latter-day Saint elementary, secondary, and post-secondary students and adult learners. ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ... Gordon Bitner Hinckley (born June 23, 1910) has been the fifteenth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints since March 12, 1995. ... Cecil O. Samuelson (born August 1, 1941) has been the 12th president of Brigham Young University since May 1, 2003. ... “J.D.” redirects here. ...

BYU also manages some courses through the following quasi-college departments: The Ira A. Fulton College of Engineering and Technology represents Brigham Young Universitys engineering discipline and includes the following engineering departments: chemical, civil, electrical and computer, mechanical, and the school of technology. ... The College of Family, Home and Social Sciences is a college located on the Provo, Utah campus of Brigham Young University and is housed in the Spencer W. Kimball Tower. ... The J. Reuben Clark Law School is one of the professional graduate schools of Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. ... The Marriott School of Management is located at Brigham Young University, the largest privately owned, church-sponsored university in the United States. ...

  • David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies[28]
  • Religious Education[29]
  • Undergraduate Education[30]
  • Graduate Studies[31]
  • Independent Study[32]
  • Continuing Education[33]
  • Honors Program [6]

BYU's Winter semester ends earlier than most universities in April since there is no Spring break, thus allowing students to pursue internships and other summer activities earlier.[34] A typical academic year is broken up into two semester (Fall [Sept. - Dec.] & Winter [Jan. - Apr.]) and two shorter terms during the summer months (Spring [May - Jun.] & Summer [Jul. - Aug.]). This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Study-abroad programs

BYU runs a very large study abroad program, with satellite centers in London, Jerusalem, and Paris, as well as more than 20 other sites.[35] Nearly 2,000 students take advantage of these programs yearly. In 2001, the Institute of International Education ranked BYU as the number one university in the US to offer students study abroad opportunities.[36][37][38][39] The BYU Jerusalem Center, which was closed in 2000 due to student security concerns related to the Second Intifada and, more recently, the 2006 Israel-Lebanon conflict, has recently been reopened to students in the Winter 2007 Semester.[40] This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of France. ... About the Institute of International Education The Institute of International Education (IIE) is a world leader in the international exchange of people and ideas. ... The Brigham Young University Jerusalem Center for Near-Eastern Studies is a study center for Brigham Young University situated on Mount Scopus in East Jerusalem. ... For other uses, see al-Aqsa (disambiguation). ... Combatants Hezbollah Amal LCP  Israel Commanders Hassan Nasrallah (Secretary General of Hezbollah) Imad Mughniyeh (Commander of Hezbollahs armed wing)[5] Dan Halutz (CoS) Moshe Kaplinsky[12] Udi Adam (Regional) Strength 600-1,000 active fighters 3,000-10,000 reservists[6] 30,000 ground troops (plus IAF & ISC)[13...


Admissions

BYU accepted 74% of the 10,010 people who applied for admission in the summer term and fall semester of 2007. [41] The average ACT score and GPA for these admitted students was 27.9 and 3.78, respectively.[41] U.S. News and World Report describes BYU's selectivity as being "more selective"[42] and compares with such universities as the University of Texas[43] and The Ohio State University.[44] Such assessment is "based on a formula that accounts for enrollees' test scores and class standing and the school's acceptance rate (the percentage of applicants who are accepted)."[45] In addition, BYU is ranked 26th in colleges with the most freshman Merit Scholars, with 88 in 2006.[46] The University of Texas System comprises fifteen educational institutions in Texas, of which nine are general academic universities, and six are health institutions. ... This article is about Ohio State; there is also an Ohio University. ... The National Merit Scholarship Program is an academic scholarship competition for recognition and college scholarships administered by National Merit Scholarship Corporation (NMSC), a privately funded, not-for-profit organization. ...


Religion classes

All undergraduate students, regardless of their religion, must take 14 semester hours of religious courses to graduate. Students have a degree of flexibility with these religious courses, although they must take at least two courses covering the Book of Mormon, one covering the Doctrine and Covenants, and one covering the New Testament.[47] The Book of Mormon[1] is one of the sacred texts of the Latter Day Saint movement. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Doctrine and Covenants The Doctrine and Covenants (sometimes abbreviated and cited as D&C) is a part of the open scriptural canon of several denominations of the Latter Day Saint movement. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ...

"This great institution [BYU]... is maintained by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on the premise that out of your experience here will come a love for God, our Eternal Father, and his Only Begotten Son, the Savior and the Redeemer of the World."[7]

— Gordon B. Hinckley, 1990

Foreign languages at BYU

One unique aspect of BYU is its abundance of high quality foreign language study. Over three quarters of the student body have some proficiency in a second language (numbering 107 languages in total).[48] This is partially due to the fact that 45% of the student body at BYU have been missionaries for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and many of them learned a foreign language as part of their mission assignment.[49] During any given semester, about one-third of the student body is enrolled in foreign language classes, a rate nearly four times the national average.[48] BYU offers courses in over 60 different languages,[48] many with advanced courses that are seldom offered elsewhere. Several of its language programs are the largest of their kind in the nation, the Russian[50] program being one example. The university was selected by the United States Department of Education as the location of the national Middle East Language Resource Center, making the school a hub for experts on that region.[50] It was also selected as a Center for International Business Education Research, a function of which is to train business employees in international languages and relations.[48] It has been suggested that Senior Missionaries be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ... The Lyndon Baines Johnson Department of Education Building[1]) , ED headquarters in Washington, DC A construction project to repair and update the building facade at the Department of Education Headquarters building in 2002 resulted in the installation of structures at all of the entrances to protect employees and visitors from...


A few special additions enhance the language-learning experience. For example, BYU's International Cinema, featuring films in several languages, is the largest and longest-running university run foreign film program in the country.[51] As already noted, BYU also offers an intensive foreign language living experience, the Foreign Language Student Residence (FLSR). This is an on-campus apartment complex where students commit to only speak their foreign language of choice while in their apartments.[52] Brigham Young Universitys Foreign Language Student Residence, or FLSR, is considered on-campus housing and focuses on intensive language learning programs for Spanish, Portuguese, French, Italian, German, Chinese, Japanese, Russian and Arabic or Hebrew, depending on student interest. ...


Facilities

Main Provo campus

The main campus sits on approximately 560 acres nestled at the base of the Wasatch Mountains and includes 311 buildings.[53] The buildings feature a wide variety of architectural styles, each building being built in the style of its time.[50] The grass, trees, and flower beds on BYU's campus are impeccably maintained.[54][55] Furthermore, views of the Wasatch Mountains, (including Mount Timpanogos) can be seen from the campus.[53] BYU's Harold B. Lee Library, which the Princeton Review ranked as the #1 "Great College Library" in 2004,[56] has approximately 8½ million items in its collections, contains 98 miles of shelving, and can seat 4,600 people.[57] The Spencer W. Kimball Tower is home to several of the university's departments and programs and is the tallest building in Provo, Utah.[58][59] Furthermore, BYU's Marriott Center, used as a basketball arena, can seat over 22,000 and is one of the largest on-campus arenas in the nation.[60] The Wasatch Range (also seen as Wasatch Mountains and Wahsatch Range) is a mountain range that stretches from southern Idaho and Wyoming south through central Utah in the Western United States. ... Mount Timpanogos is the second highest mountain in Utahs Wasatch Range (second to Mount Nebo). ... The main Library on Brigham Young University campus, the BYU Harold B. Lee Library seats over 4,000 people, and has 98 miles of shelving. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in... The Spencer W. Kimball Tower, often referred to as the SWKT (IPA pronunciation: ) or Kimball Tower, is a 12-story building which houses classrooms and administrative offices on the Brigham Young University campus in Provo, Utah. ... Marriott Center is a 22,700-seat multi-purpose arena in Provo, Utah. ...


The campus is home to several museums containing exhibits from many different fields of study. BYU's Museum of Art, for example, is one of the largest and most attended art museums in the Mountain West. This Museum aids in academic pursuits of students at BYU via research and study of the artworks in its collection. The Museum is also open to the general public and provides educational programming.[61] The Museum of Peoples and Cultures is a museum of archaeology and ethnology. It focuses on native cultures and artifacts of the Great Basin, American Southwest, Mesoamerica, Peru, and Polynesia. Home to more than 40,000 artifacts and 50,000 photographs, it documents BYU's archaeological research.[62] The Earth Science Museum was built in 1976 to display the many fossils found by BYU's Dr. James A. Jensen. It holds many artifacts from the Jurassic Period (210-140 million years ago), and is one the top five collections in the world of fossils from that time period. It has been featured in magazines, newspapers, and on television internationally. The museum receives about 25,000 visitors every year.[63][64] The Monte L. Bean Life Science Museum was formed in 1978. It features several forms of plant and animal life on display and available for research by students and scholars.[65] The Jurassic period is a major unit of the geologic timescale that extends from about 195 million years BP at the end of the Triassic to 135 million years BP at the beginning of the Cretaceous. ...


The campus also houses several performing arts facilities. The Pardoe Theatre is BYU's largest and named for T. Earl and Kathryn Pardoe. Students use its stage in a variety of theatre experiments, as well as for Pardoe Series performances. It seats 500 people, and has quite a large stage with a proscenium opening of 19 by 55 feet.[66] The Margetts Theatre was named for Philip N. Margetts, a prominent Utah theatre figure. A smaller, black box theater, it allows a variety of seating and staging formats. It seats 125, and measures 30 by 50 feet.[66] The Nelke Theatre, named for one of BYU's first drama teachers, is used largely for instruction in experimental theater. It seats 280.[66] The interior of the Auditorium Building in Chicago built in 1887. ... The black-box theatre is a relatively recent innovation, consisting of a simple, somewhat unadorned performance space, usually a large square room with black walls and a flat floor. ...


Student housing

One of the earliest student dormitories at BYU, Allen Hall, named for Ray Eugene Allen and his wife Inez Knight, was built in 1938. Originally it was a men's dormitory, but during World War II, a large influx of female students caused the university to make it a women's dorm. In 1962, the building ceased to be a student dormitory altogether, and was used as temporary housing for missionaries while the Church's Language Training Mission was under construction.[67] The success of Allen Hall led to immediate plans for another dormitory, Amanda Knight Hall, named for the wife of Jesse Knight. This served as a home for female students until it was also turned over to the Language Training Mission.[68] Missionary Training Centers (or MTCs) are centers devoted to training missionaries for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ...


Heritage Halls is a twelve-building housing complex on campus which offers apartment-style living. Six of the buildings were built in 1952, and the other six in 1954. The halls received their collective name through a contest among residents. Each of the separate buildings is named after a notable Latter-day Saint woman. Originally, these halls housed only female residents. Today, however, the halls house both male and female students, divided by sex into separate buildings. Each building has ten units capable of holding six people each[69][70] Construction of Helaman Halls followed soon after, with the first five buildings completed in 1958, and three more added by 1970.[71] The Halls recently underwent a 12+ year long renovation, beginning in 1991 and continuing through 2003.[72] In 1965, BYU completed construction of Deseret Towers. "DT", as it is called by students, originally consisted of five towers, with a sixth (V Hall) added in 1969, and a seventh (W Hall) in the late seventies. The Towers were capable of housing over 2000 students. In December 2006, V and W Hall were torn down. The others are to follow in the coming school year, as the Towers no longer meet the needs of BYU residents[73][74][75] Heritage Halls is a Dormitory at Brigham Young University. ...


In 1946, during the postwar BYU growth, President McDonald purchased forty-eight buildings from a nearby Air Force station in order to house students. These buildings were called Wymount Village, and housed both married and single students until 1962.[76] Wymount Village was replaced by Wymount Terrace in that year, intended solely for students with young families. The 24 building complex contains a total of 462 apartments of varying sizes.[77] Another complex originally intended for families was Wyview Park. At first, Wyview was a trailer park,[78] but in 1996 it was razed and rebuilt into an apartment complex.[79] In 2006, the complex began housing single students as well, in order to counteract loss of singles' housing in other areas.[80]


A unique form of housing on campus is found in the Foreign Language Student Residence (FLSR) complex. The twenty-five apartments in this complex provide housing for students in foreign languages. Residents of these apartments agree to speak only their apartment's assigned language during the school year while in the apartment. This immersion experience is available in nine languages, and students are accompanied by a native resident throughout the year to enhance the experience.[81] Brigham Young Universitys Foreign Language Student Residence, or FLSR, is considered on-campus housing and focuses on intensive language learning programs for Spanish, Portuguese, French, Italian, German, Chinese, Japanese, Russian and Arabic or Hebrew, depending on student interest. ...


Helaman Halls is served by a central cafeteria called the Cannon Center.[70] Branches of the BYU Creamery provide basic food and general grocery products for students living in Heritage Halls, Wymount, Wyview, and the FLSR. The store, begun in 1949, has become a BYU tradition and is frequented by visitors to the university and members of the community, as well as students.[82] It was the first on-campus full-time service grocery store in the country.[83] The Brigham Young University Creamery provides basic groceries for BYU students living in Deseret Towers, Heritage Halls, Wymount, and Wyview (all of its University-sponsored housing, excepting Helaman Halls). ...


BYU Salt Lake Center

BYU also has an extension campus, the BYU Salt Lake Center in Salt Lake City, which began in 1959.[84] On 20 August 2007, the Salt Lake Center moved to a new Campus located on Salt Lake's West Temple street. The campus now occupies three floors of the Triad Center, and has a total of 28 classrooms.[85] Admitted BYU students may register for classes the same way as with any class on the main Provo campus. Also, with proper clearance, non-admitted students may also register for classes.[86] However, while these credits can be applied at BYU or transferred to other universities, registration does not constitute admittance to BYU.[86] The Salt Lake Center has some advantages over the Provo Campus, with its tendency toward smaller class sizes. Previous to the move, most classes were held in the evening, and the curriculum was limited in size. Changes are underway to expand class offerings and times.[87] is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Performing Arts

The BYU Centennial Carillon stands at the north end of campus
The BYU Centennial Carillon stands at the north end of campus

BYU has a rich tradition in the performing arts. Altogether, the music, theatre, and dance progams produce approximately 400 performances on campus annually and several of the University's performance teams embark on international tours each summer. Many of BYU's music and dance teams have received national recognition and won numerous awards and the theatre program is regularly represented at the Kennedy Center's American College Theatre Festival. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 682 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Brigham Young University BYU Centennial Carillon Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 682 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Brigham Young University BYU Centennial Carillon Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... The BYU Centennial Carillon stands at the north end of campus The BYU Centennial Carillon is a carillon on the campus of Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. ...


The BYU Ballroom Dance Company is known as one of the best formation ballroom dance teams in the world,[88] having won the United States National Formation Dance Championship every year since 1982.[89] BYU's Ballroom dance team has won first place in Latin or Standard (or both) every single year they have competed at the Blackpool Dance Festival, and they were the first United States team to win a trophy at Blackpool.[90] The NDCA National DanceSport championships have been held at BYU for many years, and BYU holds dozens of ballroom dance classes each semester, totaling thousands of students per semester, making it by far the largest collegiate ballroom dance program in the US.[91] The Blackpool Dance Festival is the worlds first and most famous annual ballroom dance competition of international significance held in Blackpool, England since 1920. ... An amateur dancesport competition at MIT. Dancesport denotes dance as a sport activity. ...


The Young Ambassadors are a song and dance performing group of 50 years. The group began performing at Expo '70 in Japan, and have since performed in over 56 nations. The royalty of Thailand and Jordan, along with persons of high office in countries such as India, has been among their audiences.[92] The Young Ambassadors are a song and dance performing group from Brigham Young University. ... Tower of the Sun Expo 70 (ja. ...


BYU also has a fine tradition in both concert and marching bands. The Wind Symphony has toured many countries including Denmark, Hong Kong, Russia, and the British Isles. The Symphonic Band is also an ensemble dedicated to developing the musician, but with a less strenuous focus on performance. BYU also has a marching band program called the Cougar Marching Band.[93]

Main article: BYU Choirs

BYU has a choral program with over 500 members, one of the largest in the United States. There are four BYU auditioned choirs: The choirs at Brigham Young University consist of four auditioned choirs: Concert Choir, Mens Chorus, Singers, and Womens Chorus. ...

  • BYU Singers (40 voices), BYU's top choir, has traveled extensively and recorded several CDs. It is conducted by Dr. Ronald J. Staheli. Their best-received albums are Eric Whitacre: The Complete A Cappella Works 1991-2001 in 2002 (Arsis), and most recently My Redeemer Lives in 2003 (Tantara).[94]
  • BYU Concert Choir (85-95 voices) is an advanced large mixed choir.[95] They have recorded several CDs with the most recent recording Beautiful River in 2005 (Tantara) which features Eric Whitacre's 5 Hebrew Love Songs.[96]
  • BYU Men's Chorus (210 male voices) is the largest male collegiate choir in the United States.[97] Men's Chorus is conducted by Rosalind Hall.[98]
  • BYU Women's Chorus (200 female voices) is the women's chorus group on campus.[99]

The BYU Concert Choir The BYU Concert Choir is a mixed chorus of approximately 85 men and women. ... Image:Ew-bw-lowres. ... The BYU Mens Chorus is one of the largest collegiate male choirs in the United States. ...

Sports

LaVell Edwards Stadium
LaVell Edwards Stadium

BYU's mascot is Cosmo the Cougar and its primary conference is the Mountain West Conference. For words to Cougar Fight Song, visit following link:[8]. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 640 KB) Summary LaVell Edwards Stadium. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 640 KB) Summary LaVell Edwards Stadium. ... Cosmo at the 2006 Fourth of July parade in Provo Cosmo the Cougar is the official mascot of Brigham Young Universitys (BYU) athletic teams. ... “Mountain West” redirects here. ...


Football

Main article: BYU Cougars football

BYU's football program has a rich history of tradition, spirit, and honor. It has claimed the NCAA Division I-A National Football Championship (1984), produced several national college football award winners and NFL legends, and is always fighting for a spot in the top 25. BYU has an overall 8-16-1 record in bowl games. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BYU_Cougars_football for more complete information. Head Coach Bronco Mendenhall 2nd Year, 17-8 Home Field LaVell Edwards Stadium Capacity 64,045 Conference Affiliation Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference (1922 - 1937) Mountain States Conference (1938 - 1961) Western Athletic Conference (1962 - 1998) Mountain West Conference (1999 - Present) Team Records All-Time: 470-367-26 Bowl: 8-16-1...

BYU's logo from 1969 until 1998.

Image File history File links BYU_Logo_1969-1998. ... Image File history File links BYU_Logo_1969-1998. ...

Basketball

Main article: BYU Cougars men's basketball

The BYU men's basketball team is ranked among top 25 NCAA programs for all-time total victories. As of 2006, BYU had 82 winning seasons, 26 conference titles, 21 NCAA tournament invites, 10 NIT invites, and 2 NIT titles (1951 and 1966). In 2005, the program was ranked 36th in Street & Smiths "100 greatest College Basketball Programs of All Time," based on NCAA tournament success, NIT success, national championships, conference regular-season and tournament titles, all-time win-loss percentage, graduation percentage, NCAA infractions, NBA first round draft picks, and mascot ferocity. In the 2006-2007 season, the cougars became nationally ranked for the first time since 1994 and won the Mountain West Conference regular season championship outright. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BYU_Cougars_men%27s_basketball for more complete information. The Brigham Young University (BYU) Cougars mens basketball program competes in the Mountain West Conference in NCAA Division I. The Cougars have been a relatively successful program, winning a total of 26 conference championships as a member of the Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference, Skyline Conference, Western Athletic Conference, and...


Other sports

Volleyball: BYU's Men's Volleyball has also won NCAA National Championships in three times (1999, 2001, and 2004) and plays in the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation. The Mountain Pacific Sports Federation is a College Athletic Conference whose member teams are located in the western United States. ...


Lacrosse: BYU Club Men's Lacrosse is consistently ranked in the top 5 in the nation, winning the USL-MDIA (now MCLA) national championship in 1997, 2000, and 2007. The team is a member of the RMLC and plays a national schedule.


Rugby: BYU is a major force in American collegiate rugby union (known as rugby), with several students and alumni providing players to the United States national rugby union team, the Eagles. For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... First international  Australia 12 - 8 United States  (September 16, 1912) Largest win United States  91 - 0  Barbados (July 1, 2006) Worst defeat  England 106 - 8 United States  (August 21, 1999) World Cup Appearances 4 (First in 1987) Best result One win in 1987 and 2003 USA Rugbys mens...


Cross-country: The BYU women's cross-country team won the NCAA National Championship in 1997, 1999, 2001, and 2002.


Soccer: BYU's men's soccer club participates as a university-owned franchise in the United Soccer Leagues' Premier Development League. This article is about the PDL Soccer team representing the university, for other uses see Brigham Young University. ... The United Soccer Leagues (USL) is directly affiliated with the United States Soccer Federation (USSF), United States Adult Soccer Association (USASA) and the Canadian Soccer Association (CSA). ... The USL Premier Development League (PDL) is the amateur league of the United Soccer Leagues in the United States and Canada. ...


Intramurals: BYU also has a strong intramural sports program, offering more than 30 sports and involving more than 10,000 participants each year.


Students and faculty

Demographics

Students from every state in the US and from many foreign countries attend BYU (in the 2005-6 academic year, there were 2,396 foreign students, or 8% of enrollment).[100] Slightly more than 98% of these students are active members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.[101] Those who have never been members of the church are permitted to attend, while former members are excluded from consideration for admittance unless they are reinstated to full church fellowship. There are a number of non-LDS faculty. For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ...


Religious activity

BYU mandates that its students be religiously active.[102] Students and faculty who are LDS are required to submit an affidavit stating that they are active participants in the LDS Church. The affidavit must be signed by LDS church leaders, and it must be resubmitted annually.[103] Non-LDS students are asked to provide a similar endorsement from an ecclesiastic (religious) leader of their choice with their application for admittance, as well as an annual review similar to the one LDS students undergo.[103] For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ...


LDS BYU students can choose to affiliate with the local congregation (ward) where they reside or the corresponding student ward. Most single LDS BYU students are members of student wards, which typically have around 150 members. Some married students also choose to be affiliated with married student wards, although this is less common than among single students. These specialized church units relieve some of the leadership and administrative burden that the student population would otherwise have on local church units. In addition, student wards and stakes typically have programs designed to meet the specific needs of a younger, more transient population. Over 900 rooms on BYU campus are used for the purposes of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints congregations. More than 150 congregations meet on BYU campus each Sunday. "BYU's campus becomes one of the busiest and largest centers of worship in the world" with about 24,000 persons attending church services on campus.[104] For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ...


Most male students and some female students take a hiatus from their undergraduate studies to serve as LDS missionaries. Male students typically go on their missions shortly after turning 19 years old. This often occurs during or at the end of their freshman year. Female students may begin their missionary service anytime after turning 21. For males, a full-time mission is two years in length, and for females it lasts 18 months. It has been suggested that Senior Missionaries be merged into this article or section. ...


Honor code

Main article: Brigham Young University Honor Code
Facing north toward Mt. Timpanogos
Facing north toward Mt. Timpanogos

All students and faculty, regardless of religion, are required to agree to adhere to an honor code. When first implemented in the late 1940s, the code dealt mainly with academic issues, such as cheating and plagiarism. It has since expanded (especially during the 1960s and 1970s) to become one of the most comprehensive and far-reaching honor codes at any college or university, mandating compliance to guidelines regarding chastity, dress, drugs, alcohol, and firearms. A signed commitment to live the honor code is part of the application process, and must be adhered by all students, faculty, and staff. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brigham_Young_University_Honor_Code for more information. The Brigham Young University Honor Code is a set of standards which students and faculty at Brigham Young University, a school owned and operated by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, are required to live by. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 422 KB) Summary Licensing BYU = Brigham Young University (Utah) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Brigham Young University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 422 KB) Summary Licensing BYU = Brigham Young University (Utah) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Brigham Young University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added... An honor code or honor system is a set of rules or principles governing a community based on a set of rules or ideals that define what constitutes honorable behavior within that community. ... For other uses, see Plagiarism (disambiguation). ...


BYU was ranked as the #1 Most Stone-Cold Sober School in 2008 by The Princeton Review. [9]


Culture

BYU's social and cultural atmosphere is unique. The high rate of enrollment at the university by members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints results in an amplification of LDS cultural norms which are enjoyed and welcomed by students; BYU was ranked as the #14 in 2008 by The Princeton Review for having the happiest students; i.e., the highest quality of life.[10]. However, the quirkiness and sometimes "too nice" culture is often caricatured, for example, in terms of marrying early and being very conservative.


One of the characteristics of BYU most often pointed out is its reputation for emphasizing a "marriage culture". Members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints highly value marriage and family, as well as marriage within the faith. Consequently, the enormous population of LDS single adults in and around Provo makes it a mecca for singles in the church, irrespective of their affiliation with BYU. BYU's reputation as a place to court potential mates is well known both within and without the BYU community, and is encouraged to some extent by the school's administrators and ecclesiastical leaders, who publicly highlight "successful" marriage statistics.


56.3% of the men and 42.4% of the women in BYU's class of 2004 were married (the average age at graduation being 24.3). An earlier study ending in 1990 showed that 65% of matriculated male students ended up graduating, while the rate among matriculated female students was only 35%. Marriage statistics for the state of Utah as a whole indicate that BYU's marriage rate falls well within that of the state in general, with the median age at marriage in Utah being 23 for men, and 21 for women. It should be noted, however, that the percentage of married students at BYU is much higher than at most other universities, and the median age of marriage in Utah is significantly lower than in the United States as a whole. In regard to marriage, BYU is thus best described as a reflection of the cultural practices of the LDS population as a whole, rather than as an outlier.


BYU's large body of students who have served as missionaries for the LDS Church significantly shapes the institution's culture. Young LDS men are strongly requested to serve full-time two-year missions for the LDS Church after turning 19. Consequently, men typically attend BYU for their freshman year and then take a two year break from school to serve a mission. Thus, the average male sophomore at BYU is 21 years old. Although LDS women can also serve full-time missions, the church does not press them to do so. Additionally, missions for LDS females are only 18 months in duration, and females may not serve full-time missions until after reaching 21, so women more often graduate before serving a mission. People of the Church mural on the LDS Conference Center roof with inscription: The Salt Lake Temple appears in reflection. ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ...


Many visitors to BYU, and Utah Valley as a whole, report being surprised by the culturally conservative environment. Brigham Young University's Honor Code, which all BYU students agree to as a condition of studying at BYU, prohibits the consumption of alcoholic beverages, tobacco, etc. As mentioned earlier, The Princeton Review has rated BYU the "#1 stone cold sober school" in the nation for several years running, an honor which LDS Church president Gordon B. Hinckley has commented on with pride. The school's strait-laced reputation is a major selling point in athletic recruiting. As non-LDS players (particularly African-Americans from inner cities) have become ever more important to the school's teams, BYU's wholesomeness is often attractive for prospective students who prefer an academic or social environment without alcohol, illegal drug abuse, and violent crime. According to the Uniform Crime Reports, incidents of crime in Provo are lower than the national average with the exception of rape. Murder is rare, and robberies are about 1/10th the national average.[105] The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in... Gordon Bitner Hinckley (born June 23, 1910) has been the fifteenth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints since March 12, 1995. ... The term inner-city is often applied to the poorer parts at the centre of a major city. ... The Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) contain official data on crime that is reported to law enforcement agencies across the United States, who then provide the data to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). ...


History

Main article: History of Brigham Young University

"I hope to see an Academy established in Provo... at which the children of the Latter-day Saints can receive a good education unmixed with the pernicious atheistic influences that are found in so many of the higher schools of the country." The history of Brigham Young University begins in 1875, when the school was called Brigham Young Academy. ...

— Brigham Young, 1875[106]

Brigham Young Academy (The Precursor to BYU)

BYU's origin can be traced back to 1862. In that year, Warren Dusenberry started a Provo school in a prominent adobe building called Cluff Hall located in the northeast corner of 200 East and 200 North. Dusenberry paid the $50 a month in rent and manufactured the desks for the school himself. In 1865, he left his school to enter into private business and to serve a mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. In 1869, he started another school in Provo with his brother, this time in a different building. This school flourished, so they relocated to a building called the Lewis Building on Center and 300 West.[107] When the student body of the Dusenberry brothers' school hit 300, the school became a part of the University of Deseret, based in Salt Lake City. The school in Provo was called the Timpanogos branch.[106] On October 16, 1875, Brigham Young, the president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, personally purchased the Lewis Building. This is the commonly held founding date of BYU.[108] Young broke the school off from the University of Deseret and christened it "Brigham Young Academy."[106] The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Brigham Young (June 1, 1801 – August 29, 1877) was a leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and was the president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1847 until his death. ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ...


Classes at the new Brigham Young Academy commenced on the 3rd of January, 1876. Reed Smoot was the first of 29 students to register for classes on that day [he graduated from the BYA high school in the Class of 1880]. Warren Dusenberry served as interim principal of the school for several months until April of 1876, when Brigham Young's choice for principal arrived, a German immigrant named Karl Maeser.[108] In January of 1884, a fire started in a chemistry lab and destroyed the Lewis Building. Students temporarily held class in three separate locations before relocating to a warehouse on University Avenue. The students attended class in the ZCMI warehouse until January 1892, when an elaborate brick and sandstone building called the "BY Academy Building" was completed.[108] Another article is about Oliver R. Smoot, eponym of the unit of measurement called the smoot. ... Karl Gottfried Maeser (January 16, 1828—February 15, 1901) was a prominent Utah educator and a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Born in Germany, he joined the LDS Church in Dresden. ...


By this time, Maeser had to be replaced as President by the Board of Trustees. He had been called to oversee the entire LDS education program, and was unable to do both jobs. The Board's initial choice was the twenty-seven year old James E. Talmage, but before they could extend the invitation, he was hired by an LDS college in Salt Lake City. They instead chose a recent graduate of the University of Michigan, Benjamin Cluff, Jr. Cluff's methods as President have been described as nearly opposite those of Maeser. Maeser was insular and conservative in his teaching methods. He kept his teachings well within the LDS world, and adhered to classical education standards. Cluff was more open to new ideas and methods. He also believed that the world outside mormonism had a lot to offer the school.[109] James Edward Talmage (September 21, 1862–July 27, 1933) was a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1911 until his death in 1933. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan, and one of the foremost universities in the United States. ... Benjamin Cluff, Jr. ... Classical education as understood and taught in the Middle Ages of Western culture is roughly based on the ancient Greek concept of Paideia. ...


Brigham Young Academy was still more like a present-day high school than a university. Some Academy students were at the elementary level and received tutoring from older students.[108] Cluff, however began implementing several changes to the school according to his experiences at Michigan. He began separation of the college from the high school, giving older students access to higher level materials. He also introduced an athletics program, which was quickly closed by the Board of Trustees (Many colleges at this time frowned on athletics programs).[109] The school was privately supported by members of the community, and was not absorbed and sponsored officially by the LDS Church until July 18, 1896.[110]


Cluff continued his somewhat unusual tactics in 1902, when he took a group of students on an expedition to Mexico to explore the lands of the Book of Mormon and discover Zarahemla. At the Mexican border, Cluff and his group were met by Heber J. Grant, a member of the Church's Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. Grant disapproved of the expedition and asked Cluff to go back, but he refused. What followed was an eighteen month adventure through jungle, full of illness, and including a stay in Mexican prison. Cluff and his group eventually returned to the university in 1904. For another two years he served the school successfully, seeing it double in size. However, Walter Wolfe, one of the men who had come on the Mexican expedition, accused Cluff of mismanagement, misrepresentation, misappropriation of funds, and immorality, all having allegedly occurred in Mexico. Although Cluff was cleared of all charges, the damage done to his reputation required the Board to hire a new President.[109] The Book of Mormon[1] is one of the sacred texts of the Latter Day Saint movement. ... Depiction of the Land of Zarahemla from the Latter-day Saint film The Testaments According to the Book of Mormon, the Land of Zarahemla (popularly attributed to Biblical Hebrew זֶרַע חֶמְלָה seed of compassion) was the Nephite capital for many years, and it was discovered by Mosiah sometime between 323 and 130... Heber Jeddy Grant (November 22, 1856 – May 14, 1945) was the seventh President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church; see also Mormonism). ... The current Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in the LDS Church. ...


In his last official act, Cluff proposed to the Board that the Academy be named "Brigham Young University". At first there was a large amount of opposition to this. Many members of the Board thought that the school wasn't large enough to be a University. However, the decision ultimately passed. One opponent to the decision, Anthon H. Lund, later said, "I hope their head will grow big enough for their hat."[109]


Becoming a University

In 1903, Brigham Young Academy was dissolved, and was replaced by two institutions: Brigham Young High School, and Brigham Young University.[110] (The BY High School class of 1907 was ultimately responsible for the famous giant "Y" that is to this day embedded on a mountain near campus.[110]) The Board elected George H. Brimhall as the new President of BYU by a narrow margin, as his health during Cluff's tenure had been failing. Brimhall did not have the education of previous leaders of the school. He had not received a high school education until he was forty. Nevertheless, he was an excellent orator and organizer.[109] The M over the University of Montana in Missoula Hillside letters are giant letters emblazoned on hundreds of hillsides. ... George H. Brimhall December 9, 1852 - July 29, 1932) was President of Brigham Young University. ...


In 1904, the new Brigham Young University bought 17 acres of land from Provo.[110] This land was called "Temple Hill," and many people had presumed that The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints would build a temple on this property. Because of this expectation, some people were opposed to BYU buying the land. But thanks to the leadership of a BYU student named Byron Owen Colton, the opposition to the land purchase was assuaged and the deal was consummated.[111] It was on this Temple Hill land, north of the BY Academy Building, that present-day BYU was begun. In 1909, construction began on the first building on the current campus, the Karl G. Maeser Memorial.[112] For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ...


By 1910, Brimhall had hired several new faculty with high credentials, many of them Ph.Ds in their fields. This was an unprecedented step for the school, as Cluff had previously been the most educated member of the staff, with a Masters degree earned while he was in office. Brimhall, like many of the Presidents before him, believed in delegation, and distributed many of his duties among the new faculty. Eventually, problems began to arise. Several of the faculty believed that the school should teach organic evolution, while others disagreed. The ensuing contention ended with a decision not to teach evolution issued by President of the Church Joseph F. Smith, two faculty members being fired, and several others resigning out of sympathy for those discharged. History seems to show that the two faculty members were fired for an inability to compromise with the rest of the group, rather than their pro-evolution agenda, although this has been disputed. Many wondered whether the school would survive this crisis. A few have described the school at this time as nothing more than a "religious seminary". However, many of its graduates at this time would go on to great success and renown in their fields.[109] This article is about evolution in biology. ... Joseph Fielding Smith, Sr. ...


Expanding Its Reach

Franklin S. Harris was appointed President of the University in 1921. He was the first President of BYU to have a doctoral degree. Harris made several important changes to the school, lifting it from its somewhat dismal status at the end of Brimhall's tenure into a new era. Harris reorganized the college into a true University, whereas before its organization had remnants of the Academy days. He also began work on achieving accreditation for the school. At the beginning of his tenure, the school was not officially recognized as a university by any accreditation organization. By the end of his term, the school was accredited under all major accrediting organizations at the time. He served twenty-four years, longer than any other BYU President, before resigning in 1945 to work at Utah State.[109] Franklin S. Harris (b. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Utah State Universitys main campus is located in Logan, Utah. ...


Harris was replaced by President Howard S. McDonald, who had received his doctorate from the University of California. McDonald was used to an organization which placed the President at the head of decision-making, rather than a Board of Trustees. Because of this, he had a lot of trouble working with the Board, who at BYU had more power than he was accustomed to. However, he achieved several valuable things in his four-year tenure. When he first received the position, the Second World War had just ended, and thousands of students were flooding into BYU. By the end of his stay, the school had grown nearly five times to an enrollment of 5,440 students. The University did not have the facilities to handle such a large influx, so he bought part of an Air Force Base in Ogden, Utah, and rebuilt it to house some of the students. McDonald also did several other things. When asked by Church leaders whether support for the college be dropped, he answered an adamant no, putting an end to the last real question of the school's survival. He also began a significant building program which was continued by his successors. McDonald resigned in 1949 in order to work at a Los Angeles College fitting his administrative style better.[109] Howard S. McDonald (b. ... Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Ogden sign over Washington Boulevard at the Ogden River; toward downtown Ogden is the county seat of Weber County,GR6 Utah, United States. ...


After a one-and-a-half year period in which Christen Jensen temporarily filled the position of President, Ernest L. Wilkinson was called by the Board of Trustees. Wilkinson's administration was a period of intense growth, as the school adopted an accelerated building program. Wilkinson was responsible for the building of over eighty structures on the campus, many of which still stand to this day.[113] During his tenure, the student body increased six times, making BYU the largest private school of the time. The quality of the students also increased, leading to higher educational standards at the school.[109] Finally, President Wilkinson reorganized the LDS church units on campus, with ten stakes and over 100 wards being added during his administration.[113] Ernest L. Wilkinson was President of Brigham Young University. ... A stake is an administrative unit composed of multiple congregrations in sects of the Latter Day Saint movement. ... In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, a ward is the larger of two types of local congregations (the smaller being a branch). ...


1970 to Present

Dallin H. Oaks replaced Wilkinson as President in 1971. Oaks continued the expansion of his predecessor, adding a law school and proposing plans for a new School of Management. During his administration, a new library was also added, doubling the library space on campus. Oaks was called to the Church's Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in 1984,[114] and was replaced by Jeffrey R. Holland as President. Holland encouraged a combination of educational excellence and religious faith at the university. He believed that one of the school's greatest strengths was its religious nature, and believed that should be taken advantage of, rather than hid. During his administration, the university added a campus in Jerusalem, now called the BYU Jerusalem Center. When the new campus faced local opposition, Holland personally visited protesters and promised, in writing, that nobody associated with the new campus would proselyte, leading to the Center's successful completion. In 1989, Holland was replaced by Rex E. Lee.[115] Lee was responsible for the Benson Science Building and the Museum of Art on campus.[116] A cancer survivor, Lee is honored annually at BYU during a cancer fundraiser called the Rex Lee Run.[117] Dallin Harris Oaks (b. ... The current Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in the LDS Church. ... Jeffrey R. Holland Jeffrey Roy Holland (born December 3, 1940) was ordained an Apostle of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on June 23, 1994, following the death of President Ezra Taft Benson, and sustained to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles on October 1, 1994. ... The Brigham Young University Jerusalem Center for Near-Eastern Studies is a study center for Brigham Young University situated on Mount Scopus in East Jerusalem. ... Proselyte, from the Koine Greek προσήλυτος/proselytos, is used in the Septuagint for stranger, i. ... Rex E. Lee (February 27, 1935 - March 11, 1996) from St. ...


Lee was replaced in 1996 by Merrill J. Bateman.[118] From 1996 to 1999, Bateman oversaw the expansion of the Harold B. Lee Library. He also strengthened the foundations of several buildings on campus in case of an earthquake. Later in his term, he began plans for the Joseph F. Smith Building, which was constructed between 2002 and 2004. All in all, Bateman was responsible for the building of 36 new buildings for the University both on and off campus, including the Barlow Center in Washington D. C.. This center was a place for students to stay, as well as and important BYU presence in the city. Athletics programs also saw development under Bateman. Under him, the woman's softball team came into being. He was also one of several key college leaders who brought about the creation of the Mountain West Conference, which BYU's athletics program joined. Previously, BYU had been in the Western Athletic Conference. Bateman was instrumental in a push to rename "Cougar Stadium", "LaVell Edwards Stadium" in 2000, in honor of BYU football coach LaVell Edwards. He also led a push among several universities to reverse an NCAA ruling that games could be scheduled on Sunday (an effort which was unsuccessful). Overall, sports programs flourished under Bateman's tenure. In the computing and technology area, Bateman directed a merging of BYU's computer systems with the LDS church's, as well as enlarging the resources available to computing majors. A BYU satellite TV network also opened in 2000, under his leadership. Bateman was also president during the September 11th attacks in 2001. The planes crashed on a Tuesday, mere hours before the weekly devotional normally held at BYU. Previous plans for the devotional were altered, as Bateman led the student body in a prayer for peace.[119] Bateman was followed by Cecil O. Samuelson in 2003, who is the current president.[120] Merrill J. Bateman Merril Joseph Bateman (b. ... The main Library on Brigham Young University campus, the BYU Harold B. Lee Library seats over 4,000 people, and has 98 miles of shelving. ... This article is about the natural seismic phenomenon. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, D.C. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the... “Mountain West” redirects here. ... The Western Athletic Conference (commonly referred to as the WAC, pronounced wack) was formed on July 27, 1962, making it the sixth oldest of the 11 college athletic conferences currently participating in the NCAAs Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS; formerly Division I-A). ... LaVell Edwards Stadium is a stadium on the campus of Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... BYU TV (also known as BYU Television) is a sister cable/satelite station for Provo, Utahs KBYU-TV station. ... The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Cecil O. Samuelson (born August 1, 1941) has been the 12th president of Brigham Young University since May 1, 2003. ...


Recent events

In 2007 the The First Presidency invited George W. Bush to speak as the commencement speaker. When it became evident that he would be unable to attend, Dick Cheney accepted the invitation instead.[121] The invitation generated controversy that was covered by all major news outlets.[122] The University's Board of Trustees issued a statement explaining that the invitation to Vice President Cheney should be viewed "as one extended to someone holding the high office of vice president of the United States rather than to a partisan political figure."[123] However, BYU permitted a protest to occur so long as it did not "attack [the] BYU administration, the Church or the First Presidency."[124] On April 26, 2007, Dick Cheney delivered a largely apolitical speech and was greeted warmly by over 20,000. All three members of the first presidency were in attendance.[125] The leader of the protest was invited to appear on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart but did not do so because, "It wouldn't be a big deal if they were to make fun of our club, because it is funny, but it's something else if it's BYU or the church."[126] A group of students held an alternative commencement off campus at a different time featuring Ralph Nader as a speaker.[127] Thomas S. Monson, Gordon B. Hinckley, and James E. Faust, the recent members of the First Presidency of the LDS Church. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... The Daily Show (currently The Daily Show with Jon Stewart) is a Peabody and Emmy Award-winning American satirical television program produced by and airing on Comedy Central. ... Not to be confused with John Stewart or John Stuart. ... Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an American attorney and political activist in the areas of consumer rights, humanitarianism, environmentalism and democratic government. ...


In two separate forum assemblies in October 2007, BYU also hosted US Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (a Democrat) and U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts as forum speakers. During his speech, Harry Reid presented his reasons for his political beliefs, his thoughts on the Iraq war, and his condemnation of those who attacked Mitt Romney for his religious (as compared to his political) beliefs. Roberts spoke about the powers and limitations placed on the federal judiciary by the United States Constitution. Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party. ... This article is about the Chief Justice of the United States. ... Willard Mitt Romney (born March 12, 1947) was the 70th Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      In the law, the judiciary or judicial system is the system of courts which administer justice in the name of the sovereign or state, a mechanism for the resolution of disputes. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ...


University Dialogue

Academic freedom issues

Looking North from the Kimball Tower toward Mount Timpanogos
Looking North from the Kimball Tower toward Mount Timpanogos
Main article: Academic freedom at Brigham Young University

Public domain, taken by me. ... Public domain, taken by me. ... Academic freedom at Brigham Young University has been the subject of several controversies regarding the school, mostly focusing on its religious nature. ...

University standards

In 1992, the university drafted a new Statement on Academic Freedom.[128] After receiving comment from faculty and others, the document was implemented by BYU administrators on September 14, 1992. This document specified that: "Because the gospel encompasses all truth and affirms the full range of human modes of knowing, the scope of integration for LDS scholars is, in principle, as wide as truth itself."[128] However, citing BYU's role as a religious institution, the document allowed limitations to be placed upon "expression with students or in public that: is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ...

  1. contradicts or opposes, rather than analyzes or discusses, fundamental Church doctrine or policy;
  2. deliberately attacks or derides the Church or its general leaders; or
  3. violates the Honor Code because the expression is dishonest, illegal, unchaste, profane, or unduly disrespectful of others.

"...The ultimate responsibility to determine harm to the University mission or the church, however, remains vested in the University's governing bodies—including the University president and central administration and, finally, the board of Trustees."[128]


Also in 1992, the university began including a clause in its faculty contracts requiring LDS faculty to "accept the spiritual and temporal expectations of wholehearted Church membership".[128] In 1993, contracts further required LDS faculty to "maintain standards of conduct consistent with qualifying for temple privileges"[129] (referring to entry into LDS temples, for which one must meet standards of activity and behavior in the LDS Church). In 1996, LDS faculty were required, as a condition of employment, to obtain the yearly endorsement of their local ecclesiastical leaders certifying that the faculty were temple-worthy.[129] The Salt Lake Temple is the most well-known Mormon Temple. ...


Northwest Association

In 1996, the Northwest Association of Schools and of Colleges and Universities (the "Northwest Association") reviewed the University's academic freedom statement and renewed its accreditation. The Northwest Association specifically approved the University's academic freedom statement. Such accreditation standards permit "religious colleges and universities to place limitations on academic freedom so long as they publish those limitations candidly."[130] In addition, the Northwest Association investigated "almost all" of the allegations that the AAUP had asserted regarding other individuals, concluding that the University had not violated academic freedom.[130]


American Association of University Professors

Like many other religious schools, BYU's academic freedom policies have been criticized by the American Association of University Professors ("AAUP") (a non-accrediting organization).[130] In 1997, the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) issued a report documenting the cases of several professors concluding "that infringements on academic freedom are distressingly common and that the climate for academic freedom is distressingly poor."[131] The American Association of University Professors (AAUP) is an organization of professors and other academics in the United States. ... The American Association of University Professors (AAUP) is an organization of professors and other academics in the United States. ...


The AAUP report also contained, as an appendix, a response authored by the BYU administration, which argued that BYU had the right to limit academic freedom in order to preserve the religious character of the school, a right implied by a 1940 AAUP statement and generally followed until 1970. In particular, BYU compared itself to Gonzaga University, a Jesuit institution which prohibited "open espousal of viewpoints which contradict explicit principles of Catholic faith and morals."[131] BYU also stated that the academic freedom judgement process lacked transparency and objectivity.[131] The AAUP's decision remained, however. In 1965, the AAUP had stated that "satisfactory conditions of academic freedom and tenure now prevail at Gonzaga."[132] In 1970, the AAUP had adopted a statement of Interpretive Comments in which the AAUP had stated, "Most church-related institutions no longer need or desire the departure from the principle of academic freedom implied in the 1940 Statement, and we do not endorse such a departure".[133] In 1998, the AAUP voted to censure BYU, and remains on a list of censured institutions together with 46 other universities.[134]


The AAUP's refusal to accommodate religiously affiliated institutions of higher learning in connection with desires to protect religious traditions in line with its own 1940 statement - in contrast to that accommodation by the Northwest Association - has been criticized.[133] Some suggest that BYU "should be revered" for allowing far freer discussion of religious topics than most universities.[135] And many BYU professors have expressed appreciation for academic freedoms at BYU that they have not experienced elsewhere.[135]


Case studies

Soon after adopting their statement on academic freedom in 1992, BYU took actions which some have viewed as related to the implementation of the new academic freedom policy. For example, in late 1992, the university's board of trustees vetoed without comment a BYU proposal to invite Pulitzer Prize winner and Harvard University professor Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, an active feminist, to address the annual BYU Women's Conference.[136] Since then, the University has also dismissed, denied continuing status, or censured faculty members who have taken critical positions relating to official church policy or leadership.[131] The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Harvard redirects here. ... Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, an American professor, historian and author, received a 1991 Pulitzer Prize in history for A Midwife’s Tale: The Life of Martha Ballard based on her diary, 1785–1812. ...


For example, in 1993, BYU denied continuing status to Cecilia Konchar Farr, who had publicly advocated a pro-choice position on abortion. Farr was hired as an English instructor and some felt her positions of pro-choice were irrelevant to her assignment with the school.[131] And to David Knowlton, who had discussed the church's missionary system at an independent Mormon forum.[131] In 1996, BYU dismissed Gail T. Houston, a feminist who advocated prayer to a Heavenly Mother, despite positive votes from her English Department and the College Committee.[131] Also in 1996, professor Brian Evenson resigned in protest after receiving a warning from BYU administration over some violent images in one of his short stories.[131] Most recently, in 2006, part-time faculty instructor Jeffrey Nielsen's contract was not renewed after he wrote an op-ed piece in the June 4 Salt Lake Tribune which criticized and opposed the Mormon Church's stance on same-sex marriage.[137] Officially, BYU spokespeople generally framed the actions in the cases of Farr, Knowlton, and Houston as relating to the quality of the professors' scholarship, and sometimes to unspecified misbehavior, rather than the controversial content of the affected professor's academic activities.[138] Nevertheless, some critics viewed these dismissals as a kind of purge.[131] In some religions, Heavenly Mother (also referred to as Mother in Heaven) is the wife and feminine counterpart of God the Father. ... Brian Evenson (born August 12, 1966, in Ames, Iowa) is an American academic and writer of literary fiction. ... Jeffrey Nielsen was a part-time instructor at Brigham Young University. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Marquis of the Salt Lake Tribune on the Tribune Building in Downtown Salt Lake City The Salt Lake Tribune is Salt Lake City, Utahs largest-circulated local daily newspaper. ... One of four newly wedded same-sex couples in a public wedding at Taiwan Pride 2006. ...


BYU's academic freedom controversy has not always been limited to religious matters. BYU placed physics professor Steven E. Jones on paid leave in connection with an internal investigation that a paper he authored on the causes finding that the World Trade Center towers fell on 9/11 because of pre-set explosives might not have met "scientific standards of peer review" and his failure of "appropriately distancing himself" from the University in his statements regarding his explosive theory.[139] Mr. Jones retired while the investigation was in its early stages.[139] A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... Steven E. Jones For other uses, see Stephen Jones. ...


Notable alumni

Many BYU graduates have achieved success in fields such as business, athletics, and entertainment. The following is a partial list of notable Brigham Young University people. ...


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  139. ^ a b BYU professor in dispute over 9/11 will retire [5]

Gordon Bitner Hinckley (born June 23, 1910) has been the fifteenth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints since March 12, 1995. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Michael W. McConnell (born in Louisville, Kentucky, 1955) is a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit, having been nominated by President George W. Bush on September 4, 2001, and confirmed by the United States Senate on November 15, 2002. ...

See also

Brigham Young University of Hawai‘i is located at the historically Latter-day Saint town of Lā‘ie on the island of O‘ahu. ... Brigham Young University–Idaho (BYU-Idaho or BYU-I) is a four-year college owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... Brigham Young University Arboretum, also known as Harrison Arboretum, is an arboretum located at 800 North Street on the campus of Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, USA. It includes native plants from both eastern and western regions of the United States. ... Media:Example. ... This article should belong in one or more categories. ... Frank William Abagnale, Jr. ... An impostor is a person who pretends to be somebody else, often to try to gain financial or social advantages through social engineering, but just as often for purposes of espionage or law enforcement. ... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge [1]) is the systematic and scientific study of society, including patterns of social relationships, social action, and culture[2]. Areas studied in sociology can range from the analysis of brief contacts between anonymous... An academic term is the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ... Museum of Art (MOA), Brigham Young Universitys primary art museum, is one of the largest art museums between Denver and San Francisco. ...

External links

BYU's 11 academic colleges

Additional BYU resource links

  • Official BYU athletics site
  • Official Brigham Young High School site
  • BYU-Idaho, a sister school located in Rexburg, Idaho
  • BYU-Hawaii, a sister school located in Lā'ie, Hawai'i
  • LDS Business College
  • BYU High School Alumni
  • BYU Jerusalem Center
  • The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints — BYU's sponsoring institution
  • American Association of University Professors list of censured administrations
  • BYU Speeches - given by Latter-day Saints at BYU, Provo, addressed to BYU students
  • BYU Television - Church affiliated TV-Channel operated by BYU, Provo
  • BYU Studies (historical and academic articles, sermons) some past issues online
  • LDS Library includes BYU Studies, 1959-2004
  • BYU Photographs from 1875 to 1975
  • Brigham Young Academy Alumni - A growing list of Academy graduates 1876 to 1903
  • Collegiate Entrepreneurs' Organization at BYU
  • A Pictorial History of BYU

  Results from FactBites:
 
BYU - Brigham Young University Home (165 words)
BYU's focus on undergraduate education has led to mentored learning, a program that allows students to work as partners with faculty on research.
The university is No. 8 in the nation for the number of undergraduates who go on to earn doctoral degrees.
Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602, (801) 422-4636.
Brigham Young University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4731 words)
Brigham Young University, often referred to as "BYU" or, incorrectly, as "BYU-Provo," is the flagship university of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church).
BYU was once the largest private university in the United States, but has since been surpassed by the nationwide University of Phoenix (240,000), which has campuses around the world; it remains one of the world's largest church-affiliated universities, with an enrollment of roughly 30,200 undergraduate students during the 2004-05 school year.
BYU is wholly owned and operated by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and the church provides it with a large subsidy from Latter-day Saint funds, providing roughly 70% of the cost of education at BYU.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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