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Encyclopedia > Brigadoon
Brigadoon
Cover of original cast recording
Music Frederick Loewe
Lyrics Alan Jay Lerner
Book Alan Jay Lerner
Productions 1947 Broadway
1949 West End
1954 film
1957 Broadway revival
1963 Broadway revival
1966 Television
1980 Broadway revival

Brigadoon is a musical with a book and lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner and music by Frederick Loewe. Brigadoon can refer to: Brigadoon - a 1947 musical by Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe. ... Frederic Loewe, an Austrian-American composer (June 10, 1901 - February 14, 1988) worked with lyricist Alan J. Lerner in musical theater. ... Alan Jay Lerner (August 31, 1918 – June 14, 1986) was an American Broadway lyricist and librettist. ... Alan Jay Lerner (August 31, 1918 – June 14, 1986) was an American Broadway lyricist and librettist. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, England, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... Alan Jay Lerner (August 31, 1918 – June 14, 1986) was an American Broadway lyricist and librettist. ... Frederic Loewe, an Austrian-American composer (June 10, 1901 - February 14, 1988) worked with lyricist Alan J. Lerner in musical theater. ...


It tells the story of a mysterious Scottish village that appears for only one day every hundred years, though to the villagers, the passing of each century seems no longer than one night. The enchantment is viewed by them as a blessing rather than a curse, for it saved the village from destruction. According to their covenant with God, no one from Brigadoon may ever leave, or the enchantment will be broken and the site and all its inhabitants will disappear into the mist forever. Two American tourists, lost in the Highlands, stumble upon the village just as a wedding is about to be celebrated, and their arrival has serious implications for the village's inhabitants.By extension, it is also used on the Internet to describe someone whose connection is so bad that they keep on appearing and disappearing on the web, e.g. "Look at Joe on IM, he's brigadooning again." This article is about the country. ... A tourist boat travels the River Seine in Paris, France Tourism can be defined as the act of travel for the purpose of recreation, and the provision of services for this act. ... Nuptial is the adjective of wedding. It is used for example in zoology to denote plumage, coloration, behavior, etc related to or occurring in the mating season. ...

Contents

Origins of the story

Lerner's book was based on a much older German story by Friedrich Gerstäcker about the mythical village of Germelshausen that fell under an evil magic curse. In 1947, memories of World War II were too fresh to present a German-themed musical on Broadway, so Lerner reimagined the story in Scotland, complete with kilts, bonnie lasses, bagpipes, Highland flings and "Heather on the Hill". Lerner's name for his imaginary locale was probably based on a well-known Scottish landmark, the Brig o' Doon (Bridge of Doon), in Alloway, Scotland, in the heart of Robert Burns country. According to Burns' poem "Tam o'Shanter," this 13th century stone bridge is where the legendary Tam o' Shanter fled on his horse Meg in order to escape from three witches who were chasing him. Friedrich Gerstäcker Friedrich Gerstäcker (May 10, 1816, Hamburg - May 31, 1872, Braunschweig) was a German traveler and novelist. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A kilt in the Black Watch tartan A kilt is a traditional garment of modern Scottish and Celtic culture typically worn by men. ... A piper playing the Great Highland Bagpipe. ... Scottish highland dance The Official Dances The Scottish Official Board of Highland Dancing was set up in 1950 to standardise techniques and regulations of highland dance competitions. ... Heather may be: In botany, the plant Calluna vulgaris, or, more loosely, various species of the closely related genera Erica and Cassiope, low evergreen shrubs (also called heaths). The term is also used to describe land which is vegetated with these plants; In apparel or textiles, interwoven yarns with a... Maps for NS333184 Alloway (Scottish Gaelic: Allmhaigh) is a village and suburb of Ayr on the River Doon, in Scotland. ... For the chain gang fugitive and author from Georgia, see Robert Elliott Burns. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Tam o Shanter This article is about the poem by Robert Burns. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ...


"Brig" is a common Lowland Scots word meaning "bridge." It occurs in several English versions of Scottish placenames, such as Brig o' Balgownie. This article is about the Anglic language of Scotland. ... This article is about the edifice (including an index to articles on specific bridge types). ... The Brig o Balgownie (originally Bridge of Don) is a 12th century bridge spanning the river Don in Aberdeen, Scotland. ...


Other sources suggest that the fictional village's name was constructed from the Celtic word "briga," which means "town" (such as in the old city names of Segobriga, Brigantium....) and the Scottish Gaelic "dùn," which means a fort, e.g. Dundee or Dunfermline. The name may also be a reference to the Celtic Goddess Brigid, as in "Brigid's Hill." See also Alloway for another interpretation. Proto-Indo-European Indo-European studies Celtic languages are a branch of the Indo-European languages. ... Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... This article is about the European people. ... A Triple Goddess symbol (probably originating from Classical Greek lunar symbolism), representing the three aspects of the moon (waxing crescent, full moon, waning crescent) and womankind (maiden, mother, crone). ... In Irish mythology as it is presently constituted, Brigit or Brighit (exalted one) was the daughter of the Dagda (and therefore one of the Tuatha Dé Danann) and wife of Bres of the Fomorians. ... Maps for NS333184 Alloway (Scottish Gaelic: Allmhaigh) is a village and suburb of Ayr on the River Doon, in Scotland. ...


Productions

The original Broadway production, directed by Robert Lewis and choreographed by Agnes de Mille, opened March 13, 1947 at the Ziegfeld Theatre, where it ran for 581 performances. It starred David Brooks as Tommy, Marion Bell as Fiona, Lee Sullivan as Charlie, James Mitchell as Harry, and Pamela Britton as Meg. De Mille won the Tony Award for Best Choreography, and Bell and Mitchell won the Theatre World Award. For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Choreography (also known as dance composition) is the art of making structures in which movement occurs, the term composition may also refer to the navigation or connection of these movement structures. ... Agnes George de Mille (September 18, 1905 – October 7, 1993) was an American dancer and choreographer. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... James Mitchell, in a still from All My Children. ... Pamela Britton (March 19, 1923, Milwaukee, Wisconsin - June 17, 1974, Arlington Heights, Illinois) was an actress best known for appearing as Lorelei Brown in the television series My Favorite Martian (1963-1966). ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... The Theatre World Award is an American honor given annually to an actor or an actress in recognition of an outstanding breakout performance in their New York City stage debut. ...


The musical's original West End production opened on April 14, 1949 at Her Majesty's Theatre, running for an even more successful 685 performances. It starred Philip Hanna as Tommy, Patricia Hughes as Fiona, James Jamieson as Harry, and Noele Gordon as Meg. West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, England, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A perfomance at Opera House, Haymarket, predecessor of Her Majestys Theatre in circa 1808. ... James Jamieson (1920-December 25, 1993) was a specialist in Highland dancing, best remembered for both performing in and restaging Agnes de Milles Brigadoon. ... Noele Gordon (December 25, 1919 - April 14, 1985) was a British film and television actress. ...


The first Broadway revival, directed by George H. Englund and choreographed by De Mille, opened on April 15, 1957 at the Adelphi Theatre, where it ran for 24 performances. The cast included David Atkinson, Helen Gallagher, Patricia Birch, and Marilyn Cooper. is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the New York theater. ... Helen Gallagher (born July 19, 1926 in New York City) is an American actress, dancer and singer. ... Patricia Birch is a American choreographer and director for musical and film. ... Marilyn Cooper (born December 14, 1936) is a Tony Award-winning American actress known primarily for her work on the Broadway stage. ...


The second Broadway revival, directed by John Fearnley and choreographed by De Mille, opened on January 30, 1963 at New York City Center, where it ran for 16 performances. The cast included Peter Palmer, Russell Nype, Sally Ann Howes, and Edward Villella. It was Tony-nominated for Best Actress in a Musical (Howes), Best Direction of a Musical, and Best Conductor and Musical Director. is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... New York City Center Logo New York City Center is a 2,750-seat performing arts venue located on West 55th Street between 6th and 7th Avenues in Manhattan, New York City. ... Peter Palmer (b. ... Russell Nype (born April 26, 1924) is a Tony Award-winning American actor. ... Sally Ann Howes as Truly Scrumptious in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang with Van Dyke as Caractacus Potts. ... Edward Villella (born October 1, 1936, Bayside, New York) is an American ballet dancer and choreographer, frequently cited as Americas most celebrated male dancer. ...


After eight previews, the third Broadway revival, directed by Vivian Matalon and choreographed by De Mille, opened on October 16, 1980 at the Majestic Theatre, where it ran for 133 performances. The cast included Meg Bussert, Martin Vidnovic, and John Curry. Midnovic received Tony and Drama Desk Award nominations, Bussert earned a Tony nod and won the Theatre World Award, and the production was Tony-nominated for Best Reproduction. Vivian Matalon (born October 11, 1929) is an award-winning British theatre director. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... The Majestic Theatre is a Broadway theatre at 245 West 44th Street in Manhattan, New York City. ... Meg Bussert (born October 21, 1949) is an American actress and singer and a university professor. ... Martin Vidnovic (born January 4, 1948) is an American actor and singer. ... John Curry (1949-1994) was a British figure skater who won the Olympic and World Championships in 1976. ... Created in 1955, the Drama Desk Award was created to recognize Off-Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway shows in addition to Broadway shows. ... The Theatre World Award is an American honor given annually to an actor or an actress in recognition of an outstanding breakout performance in their New York City stage debut. ...


Adaptations

Film

Main article: Brigadoon (film)

A Cinemascope film version of Brigadoon, directed by Vincente Minnelli, was released by MGM in 1954 with Gene Kelly, Van Johnson and Cyd Charisse in leading roles. A Fox logo used to promote the CinemaScope process. ... Vincente Minnelli (February 28, 1903 – July 25, 1986) was a famous Hollywood director and accomplished stage director, often considered by critics to be the father of the modern musical. ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... For the similarly-named American actress, see Jean Kelly. ... Van Johnson (born Charles Van Johnson on August 25, 1916, in Newport, Rhode Island) is an American film and television actor and dancer. ... Cyd Charisse Cyd Charisse is an American dancer and actress. ...


Television

A 1966 television version, shown as a color special on the ABC television network, made use of a modernized, abbreviated script that accommodated much more of the score than the film version had, yet the entire production ran only ninety minutes with commercials; the result won five Emmy awards. In this production, Tommy and Jeff were participating in an auto race when their car stalled just outside of Brigadoon. This version starred Robert Goulet as Tommy, Peter Falk as Jeff, and Sally Ann Howes as Fiona, with Finlay Currie in one of his last roles as Mr. Lundie, Edward Villella as Harry Beaton, and Marlyn Mason as Meg. "My Mother's Wedding Day" was restored to this version, though "Once in the Highlands", "Jeannie's Packin' Up", and "The Love of My Life" were still absent. Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Color is an important part of the visual arts. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... An Emmy Award. ... Robert Gerard Goulet (November 26, 1933 – October 30, 2007) was a Grammy- and Tony Award-winning American entertainer. ... Peter Michael Falk (born September 16, 1927) is an American actor. ... Finlay Jefferson Currie (20 January 1878 – 9 May 1968) was a Scottish actor on stage, screen and television. ...


The 1966 telecast of Brigadoon has not been shown since its 1967 rebroadcast on ABC, nor has it ever appeared on videocassette or DVD. The video cassette recorder (or VCR, less popularly video tape recorder) is a type of video tape recorder that uses removable cassettes containing magnetic tape to record audio and video from a television broadcast so it can be played back later. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ...


Future Broadway revival

According to an article in playbill.com, a revival of Brigadoon is scheduled to start in Boston in Fall 2008, in a theatre-to-be-named, prior to opening on Broadway, scheduled for Spring 2009. Rob Ashford will direct and choreograph, with a revised book by John Guare.[1] Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... Rob Ashford (born November 19, 1959) is a Tony Award-winning American choreographer. ... John Guare (pronounced gwâr, born 5 February 1938) is an American playwright. ...


Plot

Act I

New Yorkers Tommy Albright and Jeff Douglas have traveled to the Scottish Highlands on a game-hunting vacation, only to get lost their first night out. While consulting a map and discussing Tommy's general ennui, they begin to hear music ("Brigadoon"); then they notice, in a valley nearby, a small village where the map says there should be nothing! Tommy and Jeff decide to visit it, if only to get directions back to their inn, and they walk off towards it. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Lowland-Highland divide Highland Sign with welcome in English and Gaelic The Scottish Highlands (A Ghàidhealtachd in Gaelic) include the rugged and mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... This article is about the hunting of prey by human society. ... Boring and Bored redirect here. ...


Meanwhile, in the town itself, a fair has begun ("McConnachy Square"), with the local vendors selling milk, ale, wool, and other products. Everyone is dressed in traditional Scottish apparel, replete with kilts, sporrans, and ghillies. We are introduced to Meg Brockie, a dairy vendor with a taste for gentlemanly companionship; Angus McGuffie, her employer; Archie Beaton, seller of wool and plaids; and his son Harry. Roundabouts (or carousels) are traditional attractions, often seen at fairs. ... A kilt in the Black Watch tartan A kilt is a traditional garment of modern Scottish and Celtic culture typically worn by men. ... Semi dress black leather sporran A Sporran is a pouch made of leather or fur that is worn on a chain around the waist on the front of a kilt. ... The term Scottish apparel describes the traditional dress of Scotland. ... The word plaid has varying but related meanings in the Goidelic languages and is used to refer to: Plaid (pattern), a cross-hatched dyeing pattern often used for wool clothing and distinctly Gaelic Plaid, Plaid Cymru, the largest political party advocating independence for Wales Plaid (band), an English electronic music...


As the fair continues, the McLaren family enters, consisting of patriarch Andrew and his two daughters Fiona, a beautiful girl of about 24, and Jean, who is dainty and sweet and approximately 18. They are there to purchase supplies for the wedding of Jean to Charlie Dalrymple. It is revealed that Harry Beaton is still madly in love with Jean, and is very depressed at the thought of her marrying another. One of the other girls asks Fiona when she will get married, and she responds, "When I find someone who makes me think of it." She explains why she would rather wait than marry the wrong person ("Waitin' For My Dearie").


Just then, Tommy and Jeff wander in from the hillside. They and the Scottish folks stare at each other with bewilderment until Tommy asks where they are, and is told "Brigadoon." Fiona introduces herself to Tommy, and offers the Americans a bite to eat and a place to rest. Meg immediately takes a liking to Jeff and leads him off, as Charlie Dalrymple appears. He's a handsome young man of about 24. He shares some celebratory claret with Tommy, toasting to a Mr. Forsythe whom he thanks for "postponing the miracle." Tommy asks what he means by this, but Fiona shushes him and leads him away, as Charlie sings about the end of his bachelorhood ("Go Home with Bonnie Jean"). Claret is a name used in English for red wine from the Bordeaux region of France, along the valleys of the rivers Gironde, Garonne and Dordogne, including Medoc, Graves and St Emilion. ...


Tommy and Fiona return and talk about his impending marriage to his fiancée Jane; clearly Tommy is in no hurry to marry her, and sparks begin to fly between him and Fiona when she reveals that she likes him very much, although "dinna" likes anything he says. She attempts to leave to gather heather for the wedding, but Tommy insists on going with her ("The Heather on the Hill").


Meg has taken Jeff to a place in the forest with a cot where he can rest. She tells him she's "highly attracted" to him, but he wants nothing but sleep and spurns her advances. She reveals her sordid love life ("The Love Of My Life") as he falls asleep.


In the McLaren home, all of Jean's friends are helping her pack her things to move into Charlie's home ("Jeannie's Packin' Up"). Charlie appears to sign the McLaren family bible, and tries to see Jean, but is told it's bad luck to see her on the wedding day; he begs for her to come out anyway ("Come To Me, Bend To Me"). The girls disperse as Tommy and Fiona enter with a basket full of heather they've picked. Fiona follows Jean upstairs to help her dress for the wedding, and Jeff enters wearing a pair of Highland trews (trousers); apparently his own pants have been damaged on a "thistle." Jeff asks Tommy how he feels, and Tommy is so happy that he can barely contain it ("Almost Like Being In Love"). For other uses, see Wedding dress (disambiguation). ...


Then Tommy notices the family bible, which contains the names of all the people he's met that day, but every important event attached to them, including the impending wedding of Charlie and Jean, is listed as if it had happened two hundred years earlier. He calls Fiona down to question her about this, and she tells him he'll have to see the local schoolmaster, Mr. Lundie, to get the full explanation.


Fiona, Tommy, and Jeff arrive at Mr. Lundie's home, where he gives the two New Yorkers a story they can hardly believe: two hundred years ago, the local parish pastor prayed to God to have Brigadoon disappear, only to reappear for one day every 100 years, to protect it from being changed by the outside world. None of the people of Brigadoon can be permitted to leave the town or it will disappear forever. Tommy, looking at Fiona, asks hypothetically if an outsider could be permitted to stay. Mr. Lundie replies, "A stranger can stay if he loves someone here - not jus' Brigadoon, mind ye, but someone in Brigadoon - enough to want to give up everythin' an' stay with that one person. Which is how it should be. 'Cause after all, lad, if he love someone deeply, anythin' is possible." A parish is a type of administrative subdivision. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      A pastor is an...


The group leaves to go to the wedding, which opens with the Clans coming in from out of the hills. Charlie and Jean are married by Mr. Lundie, and they perform a traditional wedding dance to celebrate. After a time, sword dancers appear, led by Harry, and they put their weapons on the ground and "spin like dervishes." The rest of the town joins in the dance, but abruptly halt as Jean's scream alerts them to Harry trying to kiss her. He announces that he's leaving the town (which would end the miracle, causing Brigadoon to disappear forever into the Highland mists) and sprints away as Act I ends. For other uses, see Clan (disambiguation). ...

Act II

The men of the town are frantically trying to find Harry before he can set foot outside of the town ("The Chase"). The music becomes more and more agitated, and suddenly, an agonized scream is heard. Harry Beaton is found dead by the other men, who assume he must have fallen on a rock and crushed his skull. The men decide not to tell the rest of the town until the next morning, so that the wedding can continue without further grief. The men carry Harry's body away, and Fiona and her father come on stage to see if everything is all right. Mr. McLaren leaves as Tommy reenters; he and Fiona embrace. She reveals her love for him, and he tells her he believes he feels the same way ("There But For You Go I"). Fiona reminds him that the end of the day is near, and Tommy tells her he wants to stay in Brigadoon with her. They leave to find Mr. Lundie.


Meanwhile, the men have returned to town, where Meg is telling about the day her parents were drunkenly married ("My Mother's Wedding Day"), and the townsfolk begin to relax and dance again, until the sound of the Highland Pipes pierces the air. Archie Beaton enters carrying Harry's body, led by the pipers playing a pìobaireachd, and Maggie Anderson, who loved Harry, performs a funeral dance for her unrequited love. The men of Brigadoon help Archie carry his son to the burial place. A pibroch (IPA: [ˈpiːˌbrÉ”x]) is a type of music native to the Scottish Highlands and performed on the Great Highland Bagpipe. ...


Tommy finds Jeff and tells him of his plans to stay. Jeff thinks the idea absurd, and argues with Tommy until he has convinced him that Brigadoon is nothing but a dream. He also admits that it was he who tripped Harry and accidentally killed him. Fiona and Mr. Lundie enter, and Tommy, shaken by Jeff's confession, tells Fiona that even though he loves her, he can't stay because he can't shake his fears and doubts ("From This Day On"). Fiona tells Tommy that she'll love him forever as she fades away into the darkness.


Four months later, we find Jeff back in New York, drinking heavily at a hotel bar. Tommy enters, and the two have a joyous reunion, as Tommy has been living on a farm in New Hampshire since his return from Scotland. He tells Jeff that he's still in love with Fiona; he can't stop thinking about her, and daydreams of her constantly, to the point of being unable to hold a conversation with anyone. Jane Ashford, his fiancée, a beautiful socialite in her late 20s, enters as Jeff exits, and begins to talk to Tommy, but everything she says causes him to hear Fiona's voice and dream of Brigadoon (Reprises of "Come to Me, Bend to Me," "Heather on the Hill"). Tommy suddenly interrupts her and tells her that he can't marry her. She argues with him, but he continues to daydream about his true love (Reprises of "Go Home With Bonnie Jean," "From This Day On"). As Jane leaves, Tommy calls Jeff and tells him he wants to return to Scotland, even though he knows it won't do any good.


Tommy and Jeff have returned to the spot where Brigadoon was; as expected, there's nothing there. Tommy laments, "Why do people have to lose things to find out what they really mean?" Just as he and Jeff turn to leave, they hear the music again ("Brigadoon"), and Mr. Lundie appears. Tommy walks across the bridge to him, as Mr. Lundie explains: "You shouldna be too surprised, lad. I told ye when ye love someone deeply, anythin' is possible. Even miracles." Tommy waves goodbye to Jeff, who stares incredulously as Tommy and Mr. Lundie disappear into the mist.


Song list

Act I
  • Overture
  • Prelude (Once In The Highlands)
  • Brigadoon
  • Vendors' Calls
  • Down On MacConnachy Square
  • Waitin' For My Dearie
  • I'll Go Home With Bonnie Jean
  • The Heather On The Hill
  • Rain Exorcism †
  • The Love Of My Life
  • Jeannie's Packin' Up
  • Come To Me, Bend To Me
  • Almost Like Being In Love
  • Wedding Dance ‡
  • The Sword Dance ‡
Act II
  • The Chase
  • There But For You Go I
  • Steps Stately †
  • Drunken Reel †
  • My Mother's Wedding Day
  • Funeral Dance
  • From This Day On
  • Farewell Music
  • Reprises: Come To Me, Bend to Me / The Heather on the Hill / From This Day On
  • Finale (Brigadoon)

† Added in 1980 Revival ‡ Moved to Act II in 1980 Revival Almost Like Being in Love is a popular song. ...


Recordings

  • 1947 Original Broadway cast recording (incomplete, due to recording limitations of the period; some lyrics were censored)
  • 1954 Original motion picture soundtrack (originally incomplete, but re-released on CD with deleted songs, alternate takes, and undubbed vocals)
  • 1957 studio cast recording (starring Shirley Jones and Jack Cassidy, with Frank Poretta, Susan Johnson, and Portia Nelson)
  • 1959 studio cast recording (starring Robert Merrill, Jan Peerce, and Jane Powell)
  • 1960 Mexican cast recording (starring Hugo Avendaño, Graciela Garza, Jorge Lagunez, and Amparo Arozamena)
  • 1966 Television cast recording (starring Sally Ann Howes, Robert Goulet, and Peter Falk)
  • 1988 London revival cast recording (starring Robert Meadmore; some character names and dates were altered to make the show more historically accurate)
  • 1991 Studio cast recording (starring Rebecca Luker and Brent Barrett, Judy Kaye, and Gregory Jbara)
  • 1998 Studio cast recording (starring Ethen Freeman, Janis Kelly, Megan Kelly, and Maurice Clarke; this recording was later rerecorded with George Dvorsky in the leading role and re-released)
  • (year unknown) Studio cast (starring Barry Kent and Elizabeth Larner)

Shirley Jones, in a still from the opening credits of The Partridge Family Shirley Mae Jones (born March 31, 1934) is an Academy Award-winning singer and actress, perhaps best known for her role as Shirley Partridge, the widowed mother of five children, in the television series The Partridge Family... Jack Cassidy (March 5, 1927 – December 12, 1976) was an American actor, who achieved success in theater, cinema and television. ... Robert Merrill (June 4, 1917 – October 23, 2004) was an American opera baritone. ... Jan Peerce (June 3, 1904 – December 15, 1984) was an American tenor. ... Jane Powell (born April 1, 1929) is an American singer, entertainer and actor. ... Sally Ann Howes as Truly Scrumptious in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang with Van Dyke as Caractacus Potts. ... Robert Gerard Goulet (November 26, 1933 – October 30, 2007) was a Grammy- and Tony Award-winning American entertainer. ... Peter Michael Falk (born September 16, 1927) is an American actor. ... Robert Meadmore is a British singer and actor who has made West End appearances in My Fair Lady and Brigadoon. ... Rebecca Luker is an American musical theatre actress and soprano who has appeared in several prominent Broadway productions. ... Appeared with the Santa Fe Opera (1985, 1990), the NYC opera (1989), NY Philharmonic (1990), Boston Pops Orchestra (1990) and the London Symphony Orchestra (1990). ... Gregory Jbara (b. ... George Dvorsky is the Deputy Editor of Betterhumans and author of the Transitory Human column. ... Elizabeth Larner was a British actress and a singer with a powerful soprano voice. ...

References in Popular Culture

  • Brigadoon is referenced in Lawrence Miles' Doctor Who novel Alien Bodies. An alien is using a Brigadoon circuit to hide his activity from Earth's authorities.
  • Also in the Lexx episode "Brigadoom".
  • Brigadoon is referenced in The Waterboys' song "The Whole of the Moon" - "I saw the rain-dirty valley...you saw Brigadoon."
  • Brigadoon is also referenced in Ann Granger's whodunnit "Flowers For His Funeral" where Meredith Mitchell has difficulties finding a village and this is compared to trying to find legendary Brigadoon.
  • Brigadoon is also referenced in an episode of Disney's Adventures of the Gummi Bears, where the castle of Gummadoon was enchanted to only appear for one day every 100 years.
  • Brigadoon is referenced in the 1997 movie The MatchMaker, when Janeane Garofalo accuses David O'Hara of living in Brigadoon.
  • Brigadoon is referenced in The Simpsons Road Rage video game: if the player-controlled driver is slow in getting Groundskeeper Willy to his destination, Willy will say "Ach, since we started Brigadoon's come back twice!"
  • Brigadoon is referenced in Veronica Mars in the episode "You Think You Know Somebody," when Troy's car is not where it used to be, and Logan says, "I don't know. Maybe it's like Brigadoon. Come back in a hundred years and it'll be right back in this spot."
  • Brigadoon is again referenced on Veronica Mars during the season three episode 'Welcome Wagon'. Veronica asks Piz, "Where are you from, Brigadoon?" after he has all of his possessions stolen from his car, which he left unlocked.
  • Brigadoon is referenced in Quantum Leap in the third episode of a series of episodes entitled 'Trilogy'. Sam notices a little girl who absent mindedly exclaims 'Brigadoon' to herself. They talk about the tale and she asks him if he believes it is possible for someone to go back in time for someone they love. She tells him that she would like to go back in time to meet her father. Unknown to both of them, Sam is her father.
  • The mystical town is also referenced in the film Four Weddings and a Funeral by Gareth (Simon Callow) when he sees the grand spectacle of Carrie and Hamish's traditional Scottish wedding reception. "It's Brigadoon!" Gareth exclaims. "It's bloody Brigadoon!"
  • In Reginald Hill's Dalziel & Pascoe series, Det. Supt. Andrew Dalziel frequently calls the village of Enscombe "Brigadoon."
  • Brigadoon is mentioned in the Mystery Science Theater 3000 episode "Manos: The Hands of Fate".
  • Brigadoon is referenced in Family Guy, as Donny Most (Ralph from Happy Days) rises from the mist, as he does every 100 years.
  • Brigadoon is referenced in The West Wing during a Big Block of Cheese Day episode. Leaving a Peters projection map presentation by a group of cartographers for social equality, Josh Lyman mockingly asks C.J. Cregg, "These guys find Brigadoon on that map, you'll call me, right?"
  • Brigadoon is referenced in the Comic fantasy novel 'Barking' by Tom Holt, strange files in a lawyer's office are described as "title deeds that only show up once every hundred years, like the enchanted village of Brigadoon".
  • The virtual reality world Second Life has an island named Brigadoon, which is a recreation of the novel. It was created by "Pathfinder Linden". A second sim, Caledon Brigadoon, created by Desmond Shang, has "something wonderful and mysterious appearing in the valley" in the middle of the sim for a few hours each month.
  • Brigadoon is referenced in the Beetlejuice episode 'Brinkadoom', where the characters enter a cursed village which disappears for an eternity as soon as all its inhabitants fall asleep.
  • A Brigadoon style plot forms the basis of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode " Meridian", in which Jadzia Dax falls in love with a man whose planet enters this dimension for only twelve days once every sixty years.
  • In The Book of Ultimate Truths by Robert Rankin, Cornelius Murphy and Tuppe travel to a village called Milcom Moloch which only appears one night every several years.

Lawrence Miles (born 1972 in Middlesex) is a science-fiction author best known for his work on original Doctor Who novels (both for the Virgin New Adventures and BBC Books series) and the subsequent spin-off Faction Paradox. ... This article is about the television series. ... Alien Bodies is an original novel written by Lawrence Miles and based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Lexx is a science fantasy TV series that follows the adventures of a group of mismatched individuals aboard the Lexx, the most powerful destructive force in the two universes from which the show takes its name. ... The Waterboys are a band formed in 1983 by Mike Scott. ... This Is the Sea is the third and last of The Waterboys Big Music albums. ... Patricia Ann Granger (born 1939 Portsmouth, England) is a British crime writer. ... A whodunit or whodunnit (for Who done it? and sometimes referred to as a Golden Age Mystery novel) is a complex, plot-driven variety of the detective story in which the puzzle is paramount. ... For the candy, see Gummy bears. ... The Matchmaker is a play by Thornton Wilder based on an 1842 play by the Austrian playwright Johann Nestroy titled Einen Jux will er sich machen. ... Janeane Garofalo (born September 28, 1964) is an American stand-up comedian, actress, political activist, writer and former co-host on Air America Radios The Majority Report. ... David OHara (born on 9 July 1965) is a Scottish actor. ... This article is about the Veronica Mars television series. ... This article is about a television series. ... Four Weddings and a Funeral is a 1994 British romantic comedy film directed by Mike Newell. ... Simon Philip Hugh Callow, CBE (born June 15, 1949 in London, England) is a highly-regarded British actor of stage, film and television, and a biographer of Orson Welles and Charles Laughton. ... Reginald Hill (born in 1936 at West Hartlepool in County Durham) is a British crime writer. ... Detective Superintendent Andrew Dalziel (usually known as Andy) and Detective Sergeant (later Detective Inspector) Peter Pascoe are two fictional Yorkshire detectives featuring in a series of novels by Reginald Hill and a BBC television series. ... Mystery Science Theater 3000 (often abbreviated MST3K, sometimes MST 3000 or MST 3K or just MST) is an American cult television comedy series created by Joel Hodgson and produced by Best Brains, Inc. ... Manos The Hands of Fate is a film written, directed, and produced by American fertilizer salesman Hal Warren in 1966, as a result of a bet. ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... For other uses, see Happy Days (disambiguation). ... This article is about a TV show. ... Big Block of Cheese Day is a fictional workday on the television program The West Wing. ... Gall-Peters projection of the Earth The Gall-Peters projection is one specialization of a configurable equal-area map projection known as the equal-area cylindric or cylindrical equal-area projection. ... Comic fantasy is a subgenre of Fantasy that is primarily humorous in intent and tone. ... Tom Holt (born September 13, 1961) is an author of parodic mythopoeic fiction. ... Beetlejuice is an animated television series loosely based on the Beetlejuice film, and ran from September 9, 1989 to December 6, 1991. ... In the Star Trek fictional universe, Deep Space Nine (or DS9) is a space station. ... Meridian is a third-season episode of the television series Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. ... The Book of Ultimate Truths is a novel by British author Robert Rankin. ... Robert Rankin Robert Fleming Rankin (born July 27, 1949) is a prolific British humorous novelist. ... Moloch or Molech or Molekh representing Hebrew מלך mlk is either the name of a god or the name of a particular kind of sacrifice associated historically with Phoenician and related cultures in north Africa and the Levant. ...

References

  1. ^ playbill article, April 7, 2008, Brigadoon's "Mist of May" Will Materialize in Boston This Fall, Prior to Broadway

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Brigadoon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2505 words)
Brigadoon is a musical by Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe, first produced in 1947.
Other sources suggest that "Brigadoon" was constructed from the Gaelic words: briga which means "strife", and dùn which means "hill, hill fort, or hill village." The name may also be a reference to the Celtic Goddess Brigid, as in "Brigid's Hill." See also Alloway for another interpretation.
Brigadoon is also referenced in Ann Granger's whodunnit "Flowers For His Funeral" where Meredith Mitchell has difficulties finding a village and this is compared to trying to find legendary Brigadoon.
Brigadoon -- the Broadway Musical (731 words)
Brigadoon, written by the duo of Alan Jay Lerner (book and lyrics) and Frederick Loewe (music), was very popular in its time.
Brigadoon was also made into a movie of the same name, starring the immortal Gene Kelly.
In a titanic funk, the abandoned lover threatens to leave Brigadoon, with the ensuing dire consequences for the rest of his community.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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