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Encyclopedia > Brig
Brig

The Brig Lady Washington
Type Naval vessel
Place of origin Mediterranean
Specifications
Weight Tonnages up to 350
Length 75 and 130 ft (23-40 m)
Crew Varies, 12 to 16 to sail (more to man cannons and board prizes)


Armour Wood
Primary
armament
10 cannon (pound of ball varies per cannon)
Secondary
armament
Carronades
Speed Varies per conditions, up to 11 knots reported

In nautical terms, a brig is a vessel with two square-rigged masts. During the Age of Sail, brigs were seen as fast and maneuverable and were used as both naval war ships and merchant ships. While their use stretches back before the 1600s the most famous period of the brig was during the 1800s when they were involved in famous naval battles such as the Battle of Lake Erie. Because they required a relatively large crew and the difficulty of sailing into the wind (a trait common to all square-rigged ships), brigs were phased out of use by the arrival of the steam boat. They are not to be confused with a brigantine which has different rigging. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Description In sailing, a brigantine is a vessel with two masts, at least one of which is square rigged. ... The Lady Washington off the coast of Southern California - 2005 File links The following pages link to this file: Lady Washington ... The original The Lady Washington was a 90 ton trading vessel built in Massachusetts around 1750. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... Military vehicles are commonly armoured to withstand the impact of shrapnel, bullets or shells, protecting the soldiers inside from enemy fire. ... A list of nautical terms; some remain current, many date from the 17th-19th century. ... Main-mast of a square-rigged ship, with all square sails set except the course. ... The age of sail is the period in which international trade and naval warfare were both dominated by sailing ships. ... Combatants United Kingdom United States Commanders Robert Heriot Barclay Oliver Hazard Perry Strength 6 warships 9 small warships Casualties 41 dead 94 wounded 6 ships captured 27 dead 96 wounded 1 ship lost The Battle of Lake Erie, sometimes referred to as the Battle of Put-in-Bay, was fought... Paddle steamers - Lucerne-Switzerland Left: original paddlewheel from a paddle steamer on the lake of Lucerne. ... Description In sailing, a brigantine is a vessel with two masts, at least one of which is square rigged. ...

Contents

Rigging

In sailing, a full-rigged brig is a vessel with two square-rigged masts (fore and main).[1] The main-mast of a brig is the aft one. To imporve maneurverability, the mainmast carries a small fore-and-aft sail (also called a a gaff sail).[2] For the songs, see Sailing (song). ... Main-mast of a square-rigged ship, with all square sails set except the course. ... mizzen mast, mainmast and foremast Grand Turk The mast of a sailing ship is a tall vertical pole which supports the sails. ...


Brig sails are named after the masts to which they are attached, the main-sail; above that the main-top-sail; above that the main-top-gallant-sail; and occasionally a very small sail, called the royal, is above that. Behind the main-sail there is a small fore-and-aft sail called the boom-main-sail(it is similar to the main-sail of a schooner). On the fore-mast is a similar sail, called the try-sail. Attached to the respective yards of square-rigged ships are smaller arms, which can be extended, thus lengthening the the yard, thus receiving an additional sailor wing on each side. These are called studding-sails or stun-sails, and are used with fair and light wind only. The wings are named after the sails to which they are fastened, i.e. the main-stun-sails, main-top-stun-sails, and the main-top-gallant-stun-sails, etc.[3]


The brig’s fore-mast is smaller than the main-mast. The fore-mast holds a fore-sail, fore-top-sail, fore-top-gallant-sail, and fore-royal. Between the fore-mast and the bowspirt are the fore-stay-sail, jib, and flying-jib. All the yards are manipulated by a complicated arrangement of cordage named the running-rigging. This is opposed to the standing-rigging which is fixed, and keeps mast and other things rigid. [3]


Hull material

Brigs are “generally built on a larger scale than the schooner, and often approaches in magnitude to the full-sized, three-masted ship.”[3] Brigs vary in length between 75 and 130 ft (23-40 m) with tonnages up to 350.[4] Historically most brigs were made of wood, although some latter brigs were built with hulls and masts of steel or iron (such as the brig Bob Allen[5]).[2] A brig made of pine in the nineteenth century was designed to last for about twenty years (many lasted longer).[2] Two-masted fishing schooner A schooner (IPA: ) is a type of sailing vessel characterized by the use of fore-and-aft sails on two or more masts. ... Italian ship-rigged vessel Amerigo Vespucci in New York Harbor, 1976 A ship is a large, sea-going watercraft. ...


Development of the brig

The word "brig" has been used in the past as an abbreviation of brigantine (which is the name for a principally fore-and-aft two-masted rig with a square rigged foremast). The brig actually developed as a variant of the brigantine. By re-rigging a brigantine with two square sails instead of one it gained greater sailing power. The square-rigged brig's advantage over the fore-and-aft rigged brigand was "that the sails, being smaller and more numerous, are more easily managed, and require fewer men or 'hands' to work them."[3] The variant was so popular that the term "brig" became to exclusively signify a ship with this type of rigging.[6] By the 1600s the British royal navy defined "brig" as having two square rigged masts.[7] Description In sailing, a brigantine is a vessel with two masts, at least one of which is square rigged. ... The mast of a sailing ship is a tall vertical pole which supports the sails. ...


Historic usage

Brigs were used as small warships (carrying about 10 guns)[4] and because of their speed and maneuverability were popular among pirates (though they were rare among American and Caribbean pirates).[3][6] In the 1800s the brig was a standard cargo ship. It was seen as "fast and well sailing", but required a large crew to handle its rigging.[8] A skilled captain on a brig could "maneuver it with ease and elegance; a brig could for instance turn around almost on the spot".[9] The need for large crews is what caused the decline of the production of brigs. They were replaced in commercial traffic by gaffsail schooners (which needed less personnel) and steam boats (which did not have the windward performance problems of square rigged ships).[8] Two-masted fishing schooner A schooner (IPA: ) is a type of sailing vessel characterized by the use of fore-and-aft sails on two or more masts. ... Paddle steamers - Lucerne-Switzerland Left: original paddlewheel from a paddle steamer on the lake of Lucerne. ...


Historic examples

Painting of the brig USS Niagra in the Battle of Lake Erie.
Painting of the brig USS Niagra in the Battle of Lake Erie.

Image File history File links Battle_small. ... Image File history File links Battle_small. ... Combatants United Kingdom United States Commanders Robert Heriot Barclay Oliver Hazard Perry Strength 6 warships 9 small warships Casualties 41 dead 94 wounded 6 ships captured 27 dead 96 wounded 1 ship lost The Battle of Lake Erie, sometimes referred to as the Battle of Put-in-Bay, was fought... William Henry Bully Hayes (c. ... The United States Exploring Expedition was an exploring and surveying expedition of the Pacific Ocean (the Southern Seas) conducted by the United States Navy from 1838–1842. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732–December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and was later elected the first President of the United States. ... This article is about the naval officer. ... Combatants United Kingdom United States Commanders Robert Heriot Barclay Oliver Hazard Perry Strength 6 warships 9 small warships Casualties 41 dead 94 wounded 6 ships captured 27 dead 96 wounded 1 ship lost The Battle of Lake Erie, sometimes referred to as the Battle of Put-in-Bay, was fought... Combatants United States Native Americans Great Britain, Canadian provincial forces Native Americans First Nations Peoples Commanders James Madison Henry Dearborn George Prevost Tecumseh† Isaac Brock† Strength •U.S. Regular Army: 35,800 •Rangers: 3,049 •Militia: 458,463* •US Navy & US Marines: (at start of war): •Frigates:6 •Other vessels... HMS Beagle was a Cherokee class 10-gun brig of the Royal Navy, named after the beagle, a breed of dog. ... Charles Robert Darwin (12 February 1809 – 19 April 1882) was an eminent English naturalist who achieved lasting fame by convincing the scientific community that species develop over time from a common origin. ... The first USS Argus was a brig in the United States Navy during the First Barbary War and the War of 1812. ... Combatants United States Barbary States ( Ottoman Empire regencies) Commanders Richard Dale William Eaton Edward Preble Hassan Bey Strength 7 Ships 10 US Marines and Soldiers 70 Christian Mercenaries 4000 400 Arab Mercenaries Casualties 2 Ships destroyed 2 Marines killed, 3 wounded 9 Christian Mercenaries killed and wounded Unknown The First... Combatants United States Native Americans Great Britain, Canadian provincial forces Native Americans First Nations Peoples Commanders James Madison Henry Dearborn George Prevost Tecumseh† Isaac Brock† Strength •U.S. Regular Army: 35,800 •Rangers: 3,049 •Militia: 458,463* •US Navy & US Marines: (at start of war): •Frigates:6 •Other vessels... Six ships of the United States Navy have borne the name USS Somers in honor of Master Commandant Richard Somers who was killed at Tripoli in action against the Barbary pirates. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia Strength 7,000 - 43,000 18,000 - 40,000 Casualties KIA: 1,733 Total dead: 13,283 Wounded: 4,152 25,000 killed or wounded (Mexican government... This article is about Robert Jenkins of 166 State Street, Brooklyn. ... Dotted line shows the route of Spanish treasure fleet. ... USS Reprisal, 18, was the first ship of what was to become the United States Navy to be given the name promising hostile action in response to an offence. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress The American Revolution was a political movement during the last half of the 18th century that ended British control of the... A painting of the Amazon (later renamed Mary Celeste) by an unknown artist. ... A ghost ship, in fiction, is a ship crewed by the not-living. ...

Brigs in fiction

Cover of Richard Woodman's book from the Nathaniel Drinkwater series
Cover of Richard Woodman's book from the Nathaniel Drinkwater series
 
 
 

Image File history File links N83631. ... Image File history File links N83631. ... Richard Woodman (1944 - ) is an English novelist and naval historian who retired in 1997 from a 30 year naval career, mainly working for Trinity House, to write full time. ... Nathaniel Drinkwater is a fictional officer in the British Royal Navy during the Napoleonic Wars, the protagonist of a series of novels by Richard Woodman. ... Joseph Conrad. ... William Henry Giles Kingston (1814 - 1880), writer of tales for boys, born in London, but spent much of his youth in Oporto, where his father was a merchant. ... The original The Lady Washington was a 90 ton trading vessel built in Massachusetts around 1750. ... Star Trek: Generations (Paramount Pictures, 1994, see also 1994 in film) is the seventh feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... The original The Lady Washington was a 90 ton trading vessel built in Massachusetts around 1750. ... Horatio Hornblower, 1st Viscount Hornblower, GCB (4 July 1776 - 12 January 1857) is a fictional character, an officer in the British Royal Navy during the Napoleonic Wars, originally the protagonist of a series of novels by C. S. Forester, and later the subject of films and television programs. ... The cover of the 1974 paperback edition of one of Foresters non-fiction titles: Hunting The Bismarck Cecil Scott Forester was the pen name of Cecil Louis Troughton Smith (August 27, 1899 – April 2, 1966), an English novelist who rose to fame with tales of adventure with military themes. ... Master and Commander (1971) is a novel by Patrick OBrian, the first in the Aubrey–Maturin series. ... Patrick OBrian (December 12, 1914 – January 2, 2000; original name Richard Patrick Russ) was a novelist and translator, best known for his Aubrey–Maturin series of novels set in the Royal Navy during the Napoleonic Wars and centered on the friendship of Captain Jack Aubrey and an Irish–Catalan... Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World is a 2003 film directed by Peter Weir and starring Russell Crowe as Jack Aubrey, with Paul Bettany as Stephen Maturin. ... Cooper portrait by John Wesley Jarvis, 1822 James Fenimore Cooper (September 15, 1789 – September 14, 1851) was a prolific and popular American writer of the early 19th century. ... Nathaniel Drinkwater is a fictional officer in the British Royal Navy during the Napoleonic Wars, the protagonist of a series of novels by Richard Woodman. ... Richard Woodman (1944 - ) is an English novelist and naval historian who retired in 1997 from a 30 year naval career, mainly working for Trinity House, to write full time. ...

Modern recreations

The recreation of the the brig USS Niagra
The recreation of the the brig USS Niagra
 
 
 
 

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1450x2251, 286 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Brig U.S. Brig Niagara (replica) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1450x2251, 286 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Brig U.S. Brig Niagara (replica) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... The original The Lady Washington was a 90 ton trading vessel built in Massachusetts around 1750. ... U.S. Brig Niagara in port The replica U.S. Brig Niagara is a museum ship and sail training vessel located in Erie, Pennsylvania at the Erie Maritime Museum. ... The Pilgrim was a sailing brig (180 tons, 86. ...

See also

Description In sailing, a brigantine is a vessel with two masts, at least one of which is square rigged. ... USS Constellation, a United States Navy sloop-of-war. ... This article is about snow, the merchant vessel. ...

External links

The Pacific Northwest from space This page is about the region that includes parts of Canada and the US. For the US only region, see Northwestern United States The Pacific Northwest (abbreviated PNW, or PacNW) or Cascadia is a region in the northwest of North America. ...

References

  1. ^ Schooner In The Sand (JANUARY 2002). Retrieved on Jan. 12, 2007
  2. ^ a b c Sailing ships. Retrieved on Jan. 12, 2007
  3. ^ a b c d e R.M. Ballantyne. Man on the Ocean. Retrieved on Jan. 12, 2007
  4. ^ a b The Texas Navies. Retrieved on Jan. 12, 2007
  5. ^ a b Bob Allen. Retrieved on Jan. 12, 2007
  6. ^ a b Pirate Ships. Retrieved on Jan. 12, 2007
  7. ^ Brig or Brigantine. Retrieved on Jan. 13, 2007
  8. ^ a b c The "Stockholm Brig" Tre Kronor. Retrieved on Jan. 12, 2007
  9. ^ Brig.Retrieved on Jan. 12, 2007
Types of sailing vessels and rigs
Barque | Barquentine | Bermuda rig | Bilander | Brig | Brigantine | Caravel | Carrack | Catamaran | Catboat | Clipper | Dutch Clipper | Cog | Corvette | Cutter | Dhow | Fifie | Fluyt | Fore & Aft Rig | Frigate | Full Rigged Ship | Gaff Rig | Galleon | Gunter Rig | Hermaphrodite Brig | Jackass-barque | Junk | Ketch | Longship | Mersey Flat | Multihull | Nao | Norfolk Wherry | Pink | Pocket Cruiser | Polacca | Pram | Proa | Sailing hydrofoil | Schooner | Ship of the Line | Sloop | Smack | Snow | Square Rig | Tall Ship | Thames Sailing Barge | Trimaran | Wherry | Windjammer | Windsurfer | Xebec | Yacht | Yawl

  Results from FactBites:
 
Brig - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (107 words)
In sailing, a brig is a vessel with two masts at least one of which is square rigged.
In modern parlance, a brig is square rigged on both masts, and this is the standard name for such a vessel.
Previously, "brig" has been used as an abbreviation of "brigantine", which in modern parlance is the standard name for a principally fore-and-aft two-masted rig with a square rigged foremast but which also has other historical meanings.
Brig - Battlestar Wiki (684 words)
In the episodes in which the brigs have made appearances, there is usually a Marine guard standing watch inside the room.
The new brig was constructed with maximum security in mind; instead of having simple bars, its walls consist of metal grid screens welded tightly together, reinforced by plexiglass (a telephone is used to communicate between the inside and outside of the cell).
The Number Six copy known as Gina was ruthlessly tortured in Pegasus's brig for an extended period, before her escape.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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