FACTOID # 23: Wisconsin has more metal fabricators per capita than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Bridgwater" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Bridgwater
Bridgwater

Bridgwater shown within Somerset
Population 36,563 (2001 census)
OS grid reference ST305370
District Sedgemoor
Shire county Somerset
Region South West
Constituent country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town BRIDGWATER
Dial code 01278
Police Avon and Somerset
Fire Devon and Somerset
Ambulance South Western
UK Parliament Bridgwater
European Parliament South West England
List of places: UKEnglandSomerset

Coordinates: 51°07′43″N 2°59′38″W / 51.1285, -2.9938 Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... This article is about the county of Somerset in England. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Sedgemoor is a local government district of Somerset in England. ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are one of the four levels of English administrative division used for the purposes of local government. ... This article is about the county of Somerset in England. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... South West England is one of the regions of England. ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping; thus the OECD has used the phrase in reference to the former Yugoslavia[1], the Soviet Union and European institutions such as the Council of... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Monarch Queen Elizabeth II... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... Avon & Somerset Constabulary is a police force in England covering the county of Somerset and the districts of South Gloucestershire, Bristol, North Somerset and Bath and North East Somerset; these districts were the now defunct county of Avon hence the forces name. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service or FRS covering the counties of Somerset and Devon, including the unitary authorities of Plymouth and Torbay, in the south west of England Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service was founded on 1 April 2007... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The South Western Ambulance Service NHS Trust (SWAST) is the authority responsible for providing NHS ambulance services in the counties of Devon, Cornwall, Somerset and Dorset. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Bridgwater is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... The constituency (first used 2004) within England; Gibraltar is in the inset. ... List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in England Lists of places within counties List of places in Bedfordshire List of places in Berkshire List of places in Buckinghamshire List of places in Cambridgeshire List of places in Cheshire List of places in Cleveland List of places... This is a list of cities, towns and villages in the ceremonial county of Somerset, England. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Bridgwater in Somerset, England, is a market town, the administrative centre of the Sedgemoor district, and the leading industrial town in the county. Bridgwater is located on the major communication routes through South West England. This article is about the county of Somerset in England. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Monarch Queen Elizabeth II... The market town is a medieval phenomenon. ... Sedgemoor is a local government district of Somerset in England. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are one of the four levels of English administrative division used for the purposes of local government. ... South West England is one of the regions of England. ...


It is pleasantly situated, on the edge of the Somerset Levels, in a level and well-wooded country, having on the east the Mendip range and on the west the Quantock hills. The town lies along both sides of the River Parrett, 10 miles (16 km) from its mouth, here crossed by a handsome iron bridge. The town is located between two junctions of the M5 motorway, the southern most of which houses a motorway service station. Bridgwater railway station is on the main railway line between Bristol and Taunton. The view towards Brent Knoll from Glastonbury Tor. ... The Mendip Hills (commonly called The Mendips) are a range of limestone hills (karst) situated to the south of Bristol and Bath in north Somerset, England. ... The Quantock Hills are a range of hills west of Bridgwater in Somerset, England. ... The River Parrett has its source in the springs in the hills around Chedington in Dorset in England and flows west through the Somerset Levels to its mouth in the Bristol Channel at Burnham on Sea a town on the edge of Bridgwater Bay, an important Nature Reserve. ... The M5 near J28, Devon This article concerns the M5 motorway in England. ... Bridgwater services is a motorway service station on the M5 motorway near Bridgwater. ... Bridgwater railway station serves Bridgwater in Somerset, England. ... This article is about the English city. ... Taunton is the county town of Somerset, England. ...


Bridgwater had a population of 36,563 according to the 2001 census (up from 22,718 in 1951, 3,634 in 1801, and 7,807 in 1831). Historically, the town had a politically radical tendency, being involved in several events of note on the national stage.


Among several places of worship the chief is St Mary Magdalene's church; this has a north porch and windows dating from the 14th century, besides a lofty and slender spire; but it has been much altered by restoration. It possesses a fine painted reredos. A house in Blake Street, largely restored, was the birthplace of Admiral Blake in 1598. Near the town are the three fine old churches of Westonzoyland, Chedzoy and Middlezoy, containing some good brasses and carved woodwork. The battlefield of the Battle of Sedgemoor, where the Monmouth Rebellion was finally crushed in 1685, is within 3 miles (5 km); while not far off is Charlinch, the home of the Agapemonites. Westonzoyland is a small village on the Somerset Levels, a few miles from Bridgwater. ... Chedzoy is a parish village in Somerset, close to Bridgwater History at British History Categories: | | | ... The Battle of Sedgemoor was fought on 6 July 1685. ... The Monmouth Rebellion of 1685, also known as the Pitchfork Rebellion, was an attempt to overthrow the King of England, James II, who became king when his elder brother, Charles II, died on 6 February 1685. ... Agapemonites or Community or The Son of Man was a religious sect existing from 1846-1956. ...

Contents

Etymology

It is thought that the town was originally called Brigg, meaning Quay. In the Domesday Book the town is listed as Brugie, while Brugia was also used. After the Norman invasion the land was given to Walter Douai (a Norman prince), hence becoming known variously as Burgh-Walter, Brugg-Walter and Brigg-Walter, eventually corrupted to Bridgwater. An alternative version is that it derives from "Bridge of Walter" (i.e. Walter's Bridge).[1] A quay, pronounced key, kay, is a wharf or bank where ships and other vessels are loaded. ... A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ... Norman conquests in red. ... Douai is a city and commune in the north of France in the département of Nord, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ...


History

Bridgwater is mentioned both in the Domesday Book and in earlier Saxon chronicles dating from around 800, owing its origin as a trade centre to its position at the mouth of the chief river in Somerset. It was formerly part of the Hundred of North Petherton. The famous parade helmet found at Sutton Hoo, probably belonging toRaedwald of East Anglia circa 625. ... North Petherton is a small town in Somerset, England, situated on the edge of the eastern foothills of the Quantocks, and close to the edge of the Somerset Levels. ...


Alfred the Great famously burnt cakes when hiding in the marshes of Athelney near Bridgwater, after the Danish invasion in 875, while in 878 there was a major engagement nearby at the Battle of Cannington. Alfred (also Ælfred from the Old English: Ælfrēd //) (c. ... Athelney is a small village located in the Sedgemoor district of Somerset, England. ... The Battle of Cannington, in 878, took place at the fort of Cynwit, now recognised as being on Cannington Hill, near Bridgwater in Somerset, England. ...

A map of Bridgwater from 1946

William de Briwere was granted the lordship of the Manor of Bridgwater by Henry II. Through William's influence, King John granted three charters in 1200; for the construction of Bridgwater Castle, for the creation of a borough, and for a market. Bridgwater castle was a substantial structure built in Old Red Sandstone, covering a site of 8 or 9 acres (32,000 to 36,000 m²). A tidal moat, up to 65 feet (20 m) wide in places, flowed approximately along the current streets of Fore Street and Castle Moat, and between Northgate and Chandos Street. Unusually, the main entrance opposite the Cornhill was built with a pair of adjacent gates and drawbridges. In addition to a keep, located at the south-east corner of what is now King Square, documents show that the complex included a dungeon, chapel, stables and a bell tower. Built on the only raised ground in the town, the castle controlled the crossing of the town bridge. A 12 feet (3.7 m) thick portion of the castle wall and water gate can still be seen on West Quay, and the remains of a wall of a building that was probably built within the castle can be viewed in Queen Street. The foundations of the tower forming the north-east corner of the castle are buried beneath Homecastle House. For the demise of the castle, see below. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (903x630, 810 KB) Reproduced from the 1946 OS map Cleaned by Joe D (t) 15:43, 30 August 2006 (UTC): Rotated 0. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (903x630, 810 KB) Reproduced from the 1946 OS map Cleaned by Joe D (t) 15:43, 30 August 2006 (UTC): Rotated 0. ... Roland pledges his fealty to Charlemagne; from a manuscript of a chanson de geste. ... Generic plan of a mediaeval manor; open-field strip farming, some enclosures, triennial crop rotation, demesne and manse, common woodland, pasturage and meadow Manorialism or Seigneurialism is the organization of rural economy and society in medieval western and parts of central Europe, characterised by the vesting of legal and economic... Henry II of England (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Count of Nantes, and as King of England (1154–1189) and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland, eastern Ireland, and western France. ... This article is about the King of England. ... Look up Borough in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Old Red Sandstone is a rock formation of considerable importance to early paleontology. ... The moated manor house of Baddesley Clinton in Warwickshire, England Moats (also known as a Fosse) were deep and wide water-filled trenches, excavated to provide a barrier against attack upon castle ramparts or other fortifications. ... Drawbridge at the fort of Ponta da Bandeira; Lagos, Portugal A drawbridge is a type of movable bridge typically associated with the entrance of a castle, but the term is often used to describe all different types of movable bridges, like bascule bridges and lift bridges. ... The keep of Scarborough Castle Rochester Castle featuring a massive turreted keep Early 13th century keep (Rouen, France) The 14th century residential keep at Largoët A keep is a strong central tower which normally forms the heart of a castle. ... The dungeons of Blarney Castle. ... Bell Tower is an office tower in Edmonton, Canada. ...


Other charters were granted by Henry III in 1227 (confirmed in 1318, 1370, 1380), which gave Bridgwater a gild merchant. Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was crowned King of England in 1216, despite being less than ten years of age. ...


William de Briwere also founded St John's hospital which, by the time of the Dissolution of the Monasteries under Henry VIII, was worth the substantial sum of almost 121 pounds, as well as starting the construction of the town's first stone bridge. One of William's sons went on to found a Franciscan priory in the town. For the record label, see Hospital Records. ... dissolution see Dissolution. ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland, later King of Ireland, from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... “GBP” redirects here. ... The Order of Friars Minor and other Franciscan movements are disciples of Saint Francis of Assisi. ... A priory is an ecclesiastical circumscription run by a prior. ...


During the 11th century Second Barons' War against Henry III, Bridgwater was held by the barons against the King. The Second Barons War (1264–1267) was a civil war in England between the forces of a number of rebellious barons lead by Simon de Montfort, against the Royalist forces led by Prince Edward (later Edward I of England). ... Baron is a specific title of nobility or a more generic feudal qualification. ...


Bridgwater's peasants under Nicholas Frampton took part in the Peasants' Revolt of 1381, sacking Sydenham House, murdering the local tax collectors and destroying the records. The end of the revolt: Wat Tyler killed by Walworth while Richard II watches, and a second image of Richard addressing the crowd The Peasants Revolt, Tyler’s Rebellion, or the Great Rising of 1381 was one of a number of popular revolts in late medieval Europe and is a...


It was incorporated by charter of Edward IV (1468), confirmed in 1554, 1586, 1629 and 1684. Parliamentary representation began in 1295 and continued until the Reform Act of 1870. A Saturday market and a fair on 24 June were granted by the charter of 1201. Another fair at the beginning of Lent was added in 1468, and a second market on Thursday, and fairs at Midsummer and on the 21st of September were added in 1554. Charles II. granted another fair on the 29th of December. The medieval importance of these markets and fairs for the sale of wool and wine and later of cloth has gone. The shipping trade of the port revived after the construction of the new dock in 1841, and corn and timber have been imported for centuries. Edward IV (April 28, 1442 – April 9, 1483) was King of England from March 4, 1461 to April 9, 1483, with a break of a few months in the period 1470–1471. ... June 24 is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 190 days remaining. ...


The 1605 Gunpowder Plot is thought to have been masterminded by Robert Parsons, born in the nearby village of Nether Stowey. To this day Guy Fawkes is celebrated as a local hero during the carnival season, including a grand illuminated procession through Bridgwater town centre, which culminates in the Squibbing. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Robert Parsons (sometimes spelled Persons) (born June 24, 1546, Nether Stowey, Somerset, England, died April 15, 1610, Rome) was a Jesuit priest of equal contemporary fame with Edmund Campion. ... Nether Stowey is a small village in Somerset, South West England. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Samurai by Griffens CC, Burnham on Sea Carnival 2006 Front of Ghost Ship (Deliver Us) by Gremlins CC, Burnham on Sea Carnival 2006. ...


In the English Civil War the town and the castle were held by the Royalists under Colonel Sir Francis Wyndham, a personal acquaintance of the King. British history might have been very different had his wife, Lady (Crystabella) Wyndham, been a little more accurate with a musket shot that missed Cromwell but killed his aide de camp. Eventually, with many buildings destroyed in the town, the castle and its valuable contents were surrendered to the Parliamentarians on July 22, 1645. The castle itself was deliberately destroyed the following year (1645), while in 1651 Colonel Wyndham made arrangements for Charles II to flee to France following the Battle of Worcester. The English Civil War consisted of a series of armed conflicts and political machinations that took place between Parliamentarians (known as Roundheads) and Royalists (known as Cavaliers) between 1642 and 1651. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events January 10 - Archbishop Laud executed on Tower Hill, London. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... The Battle of Worcester was the final battle of the English Civil War. ...


Following the restoration of the monarchy, in 1663 the non-conformist Reverend John Norman, vicar from 1647 to 1660, was one of several 'religious fanatics' confined to their homes by Lord Stawell's militia. A large religious meeting house, thought to have been Presbyterian, was demolished and its furniture burned on the Cornhill [1]. Matters seem to have calmed by 1688 when the Dampiet Street Unitarian chapel was founded. King Charles II, the first monarch to rule after the English Restoration. ... In English history, a non-conformist is any member of a Protestant congregation not affiliated with the Church of England. ... In the broadest sense, a vicar (from the Latin vicarius) is anyone acting as a substitute or agent for a superior (compare vicarious). In this sense, the title is comparable to lieutenant. ... Fanaticism is an emotion of being filled with excessive, uncritical zeal, particularly for an extreme religious or political cause, or with an obsessive enthusiasm for a pastime or hobby. ... Lebanese Kataeb militia A Militia is an organization of citizens to provide defense, emergency or paramilitary service, or those engaged in such activity. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... Historic Unitarianism believed in the oneness of God as opposed to traditional Christian belief in the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). ...


In the 1685 Monmouth Rebellion, the rebel James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth was proclaimed King in various local towns including on the Cornhill in Bridgwater. He eventually lead his troops on a night-time attack on the King's position near Westonzoyland. Unfortunately surprise was lost when a musket was accidentally discharged, and the Battle of Sedgemoor resulted in defeat for the Duke. He later lost his head in the Tower of London, and nine locals were executed for treason. Allegedly, until recently members of the Royal Family would not pass through Bridgwater without drawing the blinds of the Royal Train as a result of this escapade. The Monmouth Rebellion of 1685, also known as the Pitchfork Rebellion, was an attempt to overthrow the King of England, James II, who became king when his elder brother, Charles II, died on 6 February 1685. ... James Crofts, later James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth and of Buccleuch (April 9, 1649 – July 15, 1685), was an English nobleman who was executed in 1685 after making an unsuccessful attempt to claim the British throne, the Monmouth Rebellion. ... Westonzoyland is a small village on the Somerset Levels, a few miles from Bridgwater. ... The Battle of Sedgemoor was fought on 6 July 1685. ... Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress The Tower of London, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically simply as The Tower), is a historic monument in central London, England on the north bank of the River Thames. ... Class 67 67005 Queens Messenger brings up the rear of the Royal Train as it heads along the Dawlish sea front on 15 September 2004. ...


Bridgwater became the first town in Britain to petition the government to ban slavery in 1785. Slave redirects here. ...


In 1896, the trade unionists of Bridgwater's brick and tile industry were involved a number of strikes. The Salisbury government sent troops to the town to clear the barricades by force. This was the first use of the Riot Act in the UK in an industrial dispute, and not the UK miner's strikes of the 1980s as is commonly stated. A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers... Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury (February 3, 1830–August 22, 1903). ... For the album by Pearl Jam see Riot Act (album). ...


Sydenham Manor House

Previously a manor estate with a thousand years of history, the house has been home to many a noteworthy and interesting character; the house that stands has a 510 years history and now stands in the grounds of the former British Cellophane plant. Its owners were on the losing side in the Civil War and again in the Monmouth Rebellion. Allegedly, it boasts a most persistent and almost predictable ghost. An advertisement for the former British Cellophane Limited (from Come to Somerset (Somerset Tourist Board, 1939)). In 1935 British Cellophane Ltd (BCL), a joint venture between La Cellophane SA and Courtaulds opened a major factory producing Cellophane in Bridgwater. ... The English Civil War consisted of a series of armed conflicts and political machinations that took place between Parliamentarians (known as Roundheads) and Royalists (known as Cavaliers) between 1642 and 1651. ... The Monmouth Rebellion of 1685, also known as the Pitchfork Rebellion, was an attempt to overthrow the King of England, James II, who became king when his elder brother, Charles II, died on 6 February 1685. ...


20th century

A by-election in 1938 enabled the town to send a message to the government and Hitler, when an Independent anti-appeasement candidate was elected. Hitler redirects here. ... Appeasement is a policy of accepting the imposed conditions of an aggressor in lieu of armed resistance, usually at the sacrifice of principles. ...


In World War II the Bridgwater and Taunton Canal formed part of the Taunton Stop Line, designed to prevent the advance of a German invasion. Pillboxes can still be seen along its length. The first bombs fell on Bridgwater on August 24, 1940, destroying houses on Old Taunton Road, and three men, three women and one child were killed. Later a prisoner of war camp was established at Colley Lane, holding Italian prisoners. During the preparations for the invasion of Europe, American troops were based in the town. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Bridgwater and Taunton Canal is a canal in the south west of England between Bridgwater and Taunton, linking with the River Parrett and the River Tone. ... The Taunton Stop Line was a World War II defensive line in southwest England. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... Combatants United Kingdom United States Canada Free France Poland Germany Commanders Dwight Eisenhower (Supreme Allied Commander) Bernard Montgomery (land) Bertram Ramsay (sea) Trafford Leigh-Mallory (air) Omar Bradley (U.S. 1st Army) Miles Dempsey (UK 2nd Army) Harry Crerar (Canadian 1st Army) Gerd von Rundstedt (OB WEST) Erwin Rommel (Heeresgruppe...


1950 saw the start of a significant increase in post-war housebuilding, with council house estates being started at Sydenham and Rhode Lane and the former cooperative estate near Durleigh. The first council estate to be built was in the 1930s at Kendale Road, followed by those at Bristol Road. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


The 1973 national reform of local government removed the historic status of Bridgwater as a Borough, as it became part of the district of Sedgemoor. Look up Borough in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Sedgemoor is a local government district of Somerset in England. ...


Industry

West Quay and the River Parrett

The River Parrett was until recently at the centre of Bridgwater's trade, and the town grew to become a major seaport for the south west of England. The 30 feet (9 m) tidal range on the river allowed ships of up to 300 tonnes to reach the town centre. Image File history File links BridgwaterWestQuayAndRiverParrett(PatrickMackie)Apr2006. ... Image File history File links BridgwaterWestQuayAndRiverParrett(PatrickMackie)Apr2006. ... The River Parrett has its source in the springs in the hills around Chedington in Dorset in England and flows west through the Somerset Levels to its mouth in the Bristol Channel at Burnham on Sea a town on the edge of Bridgwater Bay, an important Nature Reserve. ...


As early as 1300, the port exported maize, peas and beans to Ireland, France and Spain, and by 1400 was also exporting cloth from Somerset and the adjoining counties. By 1500 it was the largest port in Somerset, later becoming the fifth largest in England until eclipsed by Bristol in the 18th century. In its heyday, imports included wine, grain, fish, hemp, coal and timber. Exports included wheat, wool, cloth, cement, bricks and tiles. Unlike Bristol, Bridgwater was never involved in the slave trade and, in 1797, was the first town in Britain to petition the government to ban it. This article is about the English city. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


The Bridgwater ship the Emanuel was one of three that took part in Martin Frobisher's 1577 search for the Northwest Passage. In 1828, 40 ships were registered in the port, averaging 60 tons each. Martin Frobisher by Cornelis Ketel. ... Northwest Passage routes For other uses, see Northwest Passage (disambiguation). ...


Canal, docks, railway and port

As trade expanded with the Industrial Revolution, Bridgwater was linked to Taunton by the Bridgwater and Taunton Canal (1827), although initially it ran from a basin south of Bridgwater at Huntworth. The Industrial Revolution was a major shift of technological, socioeconomic, and cultural conditions that occurred in the late 18th century and early 19th century in some Western countries. ... Taunton is the county town of Somerset, England. ... The Bridgwater and Taunton Canal is a canal in the south west of England between Bridgwater and Taunton, linking with the River Parrett and the River Tone. ... A dock is an area of water between two piers or alongside a pier, forming a chamber used for building or repairing one ship. ... Huntworth is a small hamlet and farming community (population approximately 50) one mile east of the M5 motorway three miles from Bridgwater, Somerset, England. ...


As trade grew docks were built in the town (the only ones in Somerset), linked to an extension of the canal, with both opening in 1841.The docks was dredged by a scraper-dredger Bertha similar to the one Brunel had designed for the Bristol Floating Harbour. June 14, 1841 saw the opening of the Bristol and Exeter Railway from Bristol to Bridgwater. The railway also opened a coach and wagon works in the town; the last of the buildings is currently in 2005 scheduled for demolition. Bridgwater railway station, designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel is now a Grade II listed building. A dock is an area of water between two piers or alongside a pier, forming a chamber used for building or repairing one ship. ... Bertha, a noun meaning a kind of collar or cape worn by ladies, has also been applied as a proper name for people and other objects, apparently unrelated to its garment-related meaning. ... June 14 is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... William Spreats print shows the original St Davids station, built by the Hoopers in Pennyroyal Fields in 1844. ... Bridgwater railway station serves Bridgwater in Somerset, England. ... Isambard Kingdom Brunel, FRS (9 April 1806 – 15 September 1859) (IPA: ), was a British engineer. ... Buckingham Palace, a Grade I listed building. ...


An end to the unequal competition between rail and canal came in 1867 when the Bristol and Exeter railway purchased the canal. Four years later, in 1871, the River Parrett was spanned by a unique steam-powered telescopic bridge, to allow the railway to serve the docks, last used in 1953(?). A number of local branches were also built, for example to serve the Northgate Brewery (now replaced by a car park north of Angel Crescent) and the former British Cellophane factory. The Somerset and Dorset branch line to Edington was opened in 1890. Its former Bridgwater station is now occupied by J Sainsbury. // The term steam engine may also refer to an entire railroad steam locomotive. ... The entrance of a brewery. ... The Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway (S&DJR) was an English railway company jointly owned by the Midland Railway and the London and South Western Railway. ... A branch line is a relatively minor railway line which branches off a more important through route. ... Edington is a lovly rural village, situated on the north side of the Polden Hills in the Sedgemoor district of Somerset. ... J Sainsbury HQ in Holborn Circus J Sainsbury plc is the parent company of Sainsburys Supermarkets Ltd, commonly known as Sainsburys, which is a chain of supermarkets in the United Kingdom. ...


The importance of shipping and the docks started to decline after 1886, the year in which the opening of the Severn Tunnel caused a severe drop in coal imports by sea. The situation worsened as the railways were extended into Somerset and beyond, and ships became too big for the port. The last commercial use of the docks was when coal imports ceased on July 31, 1971, and although they now house a marina they are currently little used. The surrounding quays have been developed for housing, although the remains of wooden quays on the riverbank can still be seen. All but a small remnant of the mump (a huge mound of spoil from the original dock excavations) was removed in the 1980s to make way for the development on the north side of the dock. The approach to the tunnel. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ...


Due to the port, ship building was also an important industry, and around 140 ships were built in the town during the 19th century by companies including David Williams, Joseph Gough, Watsons and William Lowther. F J Carver and Son owned a small dry dock on East Quay and constructed the last ship to built in the town - the Irene - which has its own web site. The former associated industry of rope making is commemorated in street furnishings and paving on East Quay and in the name of Ropewalk street. Shipbuilding is the construction of ships. ... U.S. Navy submarine USS Greeneville in dry dock following collision with a fishing boat. ... Coils of rope used for long-line fishing A rope (IPA: ) is a length of fibers, twisted or braided together to improve strength for pulling and connecting. ... Street furniture is a collective term for objects and pieces of equipment installed on streets and roads for various purposes, including benches, bollards, post boxes, phone boxes, streetlamps, street lighting, traffic lights, traffic signs, bus stops, grit bins, tram stops, taxi stands, public lavatories, fountains and memorials, and waste receptacles. ...


Under an 1845 Act of Parliament the Port of Bridgwater extends from Brean Down to Hinkley Point in Bridgwater Bay, and parts of the rivers Parrett (to Bridgwater), River Brue and River Axe, Somerset. Although no ships now dock in the town, in 2001 103,613 tonnes of cargo were handled within the area of the Port Authority (compared to more than 200,000 tons in 1878), most of which were stone products through Dunball An Act of Parliament or Act is law enacted by the parliament (see legislation). ... Brean Down is a promontory off the coast of North Somerset standing 320 feet high and extending 1½ miles into the Bristol Channel between Weston-super-Mare and Burnham on Sea. ... There are two Nuclear power stations at Hinkley Point on the Somerset coast Hinkley Point A is located on a 19. ... Bridgwater Bay is on the estuary of the River Severn, near Bridgwater in Somerset, United Kingdom at the mouth of the River Parrett. ... The River Parrett has its source in the springs in the hills around Chedington in Dorset in England and flows west through the Somerset Levels to its mouth in the Bristol Channel at Burnham on Sea a town on the edge of Bridgwater Bay, an important Nature Reserve. ... River Brue originates in the parish of Brewham. ... The River Axe is a river in south west England. ... Dunball is a small hamlet east of the village of Puriton and close to the town of Bridgwater, Somerset. ...


Manufacturing

An advertisement for the former British Cellophane Limited (from Come to Somerset (Somerset Tourist Board, 1939)).
An advertisement for the former British Cellophane Limited (from Come to Somerset (Somerset Tourist Board, 1939)).

Bridgwater was the leading industrial town in Somerset. A major manufacturing centre for clay tiles and bricks in the 19th century, including the famous "Bath brick", were exported through the port. In the 1890s there were a total of 16 brick and tile companies, and 24 million bricks were exported during that decade alone. John Sealy & Co exhibited their product range at the 1851 Great Exhibition. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (482x760, 59 KB) 1939 advertisement for British Cellophane Ltd, Bridgwater, Somerset, UK File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (482x760, 59 KB) 1939 advertisement for British Cellophane Ltd, Bridgwater, Somerset, UK File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The bath brick, patented in 1823 by William Champion and John Browne, was a predecessor of the scouring pad used for cleaning and polishing. ... The Great Exhibition: Paxtons Crystal Palace enclosed full-grown trees in Hyde Park. ...


These industries collapsed in the aftermath of World War II due to the failure to introduce mechanisation, although the automated Chiltern Tile Factory, which produced up to 5 million tiles each year, lasted until 1968. The importance of the Bath Brick declined with the advent of detergents and other cleaning products. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Mechanization is the use of machines to replace manual labour or animals and can also refer to the use of powered machinery to help a human operator in some task. ... Laundry detergents are just one of many possible uses for detergents Detergent is a compound, or a mixture of compounds, intended to assist cleaning. ...


During the 19th century, Castle House (originally named Portland Castle after Portland cement), reputedly the first domestic house in the UK to be built from concrete, was constructed in 1851 by John Board, a local brick and tile manufacturer. The building is now Grade II* listed and in 2004 was featured in the BBC television programme Restoration. Sampling fast set Portland cement Portland cement is the most common type of cement in general usage, as it is a basic ingredient of concrete, mortar and plaster. ... Concrete being poured, raked and vibrated into place in residential construction in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Buckingham Palace, a Grade I listed building. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... Restoration was a 2003 BBC television series in which viewers chose which of the United Kingdoms most important but neglected buildings that were nominated were to be awarded a Heritage Lottery Grant of £3m. ...


In the 19th century, Bridgwater was also home to a number of iron foundries. George Hennet's Bridgwater Iron Works (closed 1878) worked on bridges, railways and machinery for Brunel and Robert Stephenson, while W&F Wills Ltd produced steam locomotives and fingerposts. General Name, Symbol, Number iron, Fe, 26 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 8, 4, d Appearance lustrous metallic with a grayish tinge Standard atomic weight 55. ... A foundry is a factory which produces castings of metal, both ferrous and non-ferrous. ... George Hennet supplied the atmospheric traction pipes to the South Devon railway, then brought them back for scrap when the system was removed. ... Statue of Robert Stephenson at Euston Station, London Robert Stephenson FRS (October 16, 1803–October 12, 1859) was an English civil engineer. ... Great Western Railway No. ... Unused traffic signs in Austria Most countries post signage, known as traffic signs or road signs, at the side of roads to impart information to road users. ...


British Cellophane Ltd, a joint venture between La Cellophane SA and Courtaulds opened a major factory producing cellophane in Bridgwater 1937. The factory produced Bailey Bridges during World War II for the invasion of Europe. Bought by UCB Films in 1996, the factory closed in the summer of 2005. An advertisement for the former British Cellophane Limited (from Come to Somerset (Somerset Tourist Board, 1939)). In 1935 British Cellophane Ltd (BCL), a joint venture between La Cellophane SA and Courtaulds opened a major factory producing Cellophane in Bridgwater. ... Samuel Courtauld (1793-21 March 1881) was an American-born industrialist and Unitarian, chiefly remembered as the driving force behind the early 19th century growth of the Courtauld textile business. ... Cellophane is a thin, transparent sheet made of processed cellulose. ... Bailey bridge over the Coppename river at Witagron, Suriname. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Innovia Films is the worlds leading supplier of biaxially-oriented polypropylene (BOPP) and cellulose films for speciality packaging, labelling, graphic arts and industrial products. ...


At the start of World War II, the government built a factory to manufacture high explosives at Puriton near Bridgwater. Called ROF Bridgwater, the plant is today owned by BAE Systems and is scheduled to close by the end of 2007. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Puriton is a village at the westerly end of the Polden hills in the Sedgemoor district of Somerset, UK. The village still has a full range of village facilities such as a primary school, church, village pub, post office, village shop (general store and newsagents), butchers and hairdressers. ... Royal Ordnance Factory (ROF) Bridgwater) is a factory which produced high explosives for munitions. ... BAE Systems plc is the worlds fourth largest defence contractor,[3] the largest in Europe and a commercial aerospace manufacturer. ...


Present

Bridgwater is now a major centre of industry in Somerset, with industries including the production of plastics, engine parts, industrial chemicals, and foods. Bowerings Animal Feed Mill is now the only industry still located at the docks.


Employment in the town suffered a blow in 2005 when Innovia Films closed the cellophane factory. At one time the factory employed around 3,000 people, although at the time of closure this had been reduced to just 250. However recovery has begun with the establishment of new businesses on the Express Park business park including the relocation of Gerber Juice and new enterprise Toolstation. Innovia Films is the worlds leading supplier of biaxially-oriented polypropylene (BOPP) and cellulose films for speciality packaging, labelling, graphic arts and industrial products. ... An advertisement for the former British Cellophane Limited (from Come to Somerset (Somerset Tourist Board, 1939)). In 1935 British Cellophane Ltd (BCL), a joint venture between La Cellophane SA and Courtaulds opened a major factory producing Cellophane in Bridgwater. ...


Being close to the M5 motorway and half way between Bristol and Exeter, Bridgwater is also home to two major distribution centres. The Excel centre for the NHS Logistics Authority is located on the Express Park business park, while retailer Argos has a regional distribution centre based at Huntworth. The M5 near J28, Devon This article concerns the M5 motorway in England. ... This article is about the English city. ... The city of Exeter is the county town of Devon, in the southwest of England, also known as the West Country. ... , the information in this article describes the current English public health service. ... Argos store. ... Huntworth is a small hamlet and farming community (population approximately 50) one mile east of the M5 motorway three miles from Bridgwater, Somerset, England. ...


Work on the new Regional Agricultural Business Centre is due to start in 2006/7.


Bridgwater is home to the Somerset Brick and Tile Museum, built on part of the former Barham Brothers site (brick and tile manufacturers between 1857 and 1965).


Education

Listed in alphabetical order


Further Education colleges

  • Bridgwater College (formerly Bridgwater Technical School)

Secondary schools

  • Robert Blake Science College (formally The Blake School)
  • Brymore School
  • Chilton Trinity Technology College
  • Dr Morgan's Grammar School For Boys (closed)
  • East Bridgwater Community School (Formerly Sydenham School)
  • Haygrove School
  • Westover Senior Council School

Special schools

Elmwood School can refer to: Elmwood School, a private girls school in Ottawa Elmwood School in Berkeley, California Elmwood Normal School in New Zealand Categories: | ...

Primary schools

  • Eastover Community Primary School
  • Hamp Community Junior School
  • Sedgemoor Manor School
  • St John & St Francis Primary School
  • St Joseph's Catholic Primary School
  • St Mary's Primary School
  • Somerset Bridge Primary School
  • Spaxton CofE Primary School
  • Westover Green Primary School

St. ...

Nursary and infants schools

  • Hamp Nursery and Infants School

Arts

Nearing Bridgwater on the M5 motorway it is possible to see the Willow Man sculpture, a striding human figure constructed from willow, sometimes called the Angel of the South (see also Angel of the North). Standing 12 m (39') tall, it was created by sculptor Serena de la Hey and is the largest known sculpture in willow, a traditional local material. The M5 near J28, Devon This article concerns the M5 motorway in England. ... Willow Man is a large outdoor sculpture by Serena de la Hey, situated in a field by the M5 motorway near Bridgwater in Somerset. ... Species About 350, including: Salix acutifolia - Violet Willow Salix alaxensis - Alaska Willow Salix alba - White Willow Salix alpina - Alpine Willow Salix amygdaloides - Peachleaf Willow Salix arbuscula - Mountain Willow Salix arbusculoides - Littletree Willow Salix arctica - Arctic Willow Salix atrocinerea Salix aurita - Eared Willow Salix babylonica - Peking Willow Salix bakko Salix barrattiana... Angel of the North Angel of the North is a modern sculpture created by Antony Gormley, which stands just outside Gateshead, England. ... A sculpture is a three-dimensional object, which for the purposes of this article is man-made and selected for special recognition as art. ...


The Bridgwater Arts Centre was opened on October 10, 1946, the first community arts centre opened in the UK with financial assistance from the newly established Arts Council of England. It is situated in a Grade II listed building in the architecturally protected Georgian Castle Street, designed by Benjamin Holloway for the Duke of Chandos, and built over the site of the former castle. Holloway was also the architect of the Baroque Lyons building on West Quay, constructed around 1730. is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Arts Council of England was formed in 1994 when the Arts Council of Great Britain was divided into three separate bodies for England, Scotland and Wales. ... Buckingham Palace, a Grade I listed building. ... Section of the dome of Florence Cathedral. ... The title Baron Chandos has been created twice in the Peerage of England. ... An architect at his drawing board, 1893 An architect is a person who is involved in the planning, designing and oversight of a buildings construction. ... Adoration, by Peter Paul Rubens. ...


Bridgwater Arts Centre was the venue for the first post-war meeting of the Congres Internationaux d'Architecture Moderne in 1947. REDIRECT Congrès Internationaux dArchitecture Moderne ...


Castle Street was used as a location in the 1963 film Tom Jones. Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...


Horror writer and film journalist Kim Newman was educated at Dr Morgan's school in Bridgwater, and set his 1999 experimental novel Life's Lottery in a fictionalised version of the town (Sedgwater). Kim Newman (born July 31, 1959) is an English journalist, film critic, and fiction writer. ...


A sailor who had sailed "from Bridgwater with bricks" and found "There was lice in that bunk in Bridgwater" features in James Joyce's Ulysses (Chapter 16). James Augustine Aloysius Joyce (Irish Séamus Seoighe; 2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish expatriate writer, widely considered to be one of the most influential writers of the 20th century. ... Ulysses is a novel by James Joyce, first serialized in parts in the American journal The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920, and then published in its entirety by Sylvia Beach on February 2, 1922, in Paris. ...


Sport

Bridgwater Town F.C. are a football club based at Fairfax Park. The original version of the club was founded in 1898. The club currently plays in the Southern League Division One South and West. Bridgwater Town are a football club who play in the Toolstation Premier League division based around South Western England and inparticular the county of Wiltshire. ... Fairfax Park is the home of Bridgwater Town F.C. Inside Bridgwater the club can be found by Bath Road and College Way. ... The Southern League Division One South and West is a football league covering southern and western England. ...


Annual events

"Genghis Khan" float by Wick CC, parading in the Bridgwater Guy Fawkes Carnival

Bridgwater is now best known for the illuminated "Bridgwater Guy Fawkes Carnival" that attracts around 150,000 people from around the country and overseas. Now held annually on the Friday after the first Thursday of November (ie - the nearest Friday to November 5). It consists of a dazzling display of over 100 large vehicles up to 100 feet long, festooned with dancers and up to 22,000 lightbulbs, that follows a 2.5 mile route over 2 to 3 hours. Later in the evening of the Carnival, there is the simultaneous firing of large fireworks (known as squibs) in the street outside the town hall, known as "squibbing". Image File history File links Burnham_on_Sea_Carnival_2006_-_Genghis_Khan_by_Wick_CC.jpg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Bridgwater Float (parade) West Country Carnival ... Image File history File links Burnham_on_Sea_Carnival_2006_-_Genghis_Khan_by_Wick_CC.jpg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Bridgwater Float (parade) West Country Carnival ... Samurai by Griffens CC, Burnham on Sea Carnival 2006 Front of Ghost Ship (Deliver Us) by Gremlins CC, Burnham on Sea Carnival 2006. ... Samurai by Griffens CC, Burnham on Sea Carnival 2006 Front of Ghost Ship (Deliver Us) by Gremlins CC, Burnham on Sea Carnival 2006. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Fireworks. ...


Bridgwater Fair normally takes place in September - it starts on the last Wednesday in September and lasts four days. The fair takes place on St Matthew's Field, better known locally as the Fair Field. The fair is now a funfair, ranked as second largest in England after the Nottingham Goose Fair. It originated in 1249 as a horse and cattle fair, lasting for eight days near St Matthew's day (September 21), giving the venue its name. A travelling funfair has many attractions, including adult or thrill rides, childrens rides, and sideshows consisting of games of skill, strength, or luck. ... The Nottingham Goose Fair is an annual travelling fair held in Nottingham, UK, during the first week of October. ... Roundabouts (or carousels) are traditional attractions, often seen at fairs. ... Matthew the Evangelist (מתי Gift of the LORD, Standard Hebrew and Tiberian Hebrew Mattay; Septuagint Greek Ματθαιος, Matthaios) is traditionally believed to be the author of the Gospel of Matthew. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


During the first weekend of July, the annual "Somerfest" arts festival is held in Bridgwater. The event includes an extensive program of rock, jazz and classical music, dance, drama and visual arts with national and local participants.


Notable people

The statue of Admiral Robert Blake at Cornhill, Bridgwater, with St Mary's Church in the background (1998).
The statue of Admiral Robert Blake at Cornhill, Bridgwater, with St Mary's Church in the background (1998).
  • Henry Phillpotts, Bishop of Exeter, born in Bridgwater in 1778.
  • James Sully, psychologist, born in Bridgwater in 1842.
  • Andrew Plimer, portrait miniature artist, born in Bridgwater 1763.
  • Donald Crowhurst (1932-69), who tried to fake a round-the-world solo yacht journey, set up his business in the town and was a Town Councillor.
  • Jean Rees, artist and co-founder of the Bridgwater Arts Centre. b 1914
  • David Luckes MBE England and Great Britain hockey player - 1989-2000 brought up in Bridgwater
  • Simon (1981) and Richard Mantell (1984), brothers and field hockey players for England, were both born in Bridgwater.
  • Sergeant Ben Knight, Bridgwater airman who died in an Afghanistan RAF Nimrod plane crash. Sgt Knight was only 25 when he was killed along with 13 comrades from the 120 Squadron when the Nimrod came down near Kandahar on September 2, 2002

Robert Blake, General at Sea, 1599–1657 by Henry Perronet Briggs, painted 1829. ... Lord Nelson Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson (September 29, 1758 – October 21, 1805) was a British admiral who won fame as a leading naval commander. ... For other uses, see Admiral (disambiguation). ... A grammar school is a school that may, depending on regional usage as exemplified below, provide either secondary education or, a much less common usage, primary education (also known as elementary). Grammar schools trace their origins back to medieval Europe, as schools in which university preparatory subjects, such as Latin... The title page to The Historians History of the World. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1072x1584, 223 KB)Statue of Admiral Robert Blake, Bridgwater, Somerset. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1072x1584, 223 KB)Statue of Admiral Robert Blake, Bridgwater, Somerset. ... Henry Phillpotts (1778–1869), or Henry of Exeter, as he was commonly called, was one of the most striking figures in the English Church of the 19th century. ... The Bishop of Exeter is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Exeter in the Province of Canterbury. ... James Sully (March 3, 1842 - 1923) was an English psychologist. ... Andrew Plimer was a British artist, born in Bridgwater in 1763 and died in Brighton in 1837. ... Donald Crowhurst, pictured just prior to setting out in the Sunday Times Golden Globe Race in 1968. ... Jean Rees (1914-2004) was a British artist. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Richard Mantell (born on August 17, 1981 in Bridgwater, Somerset) is an English field hockey full back, who made his international senior debut for the national squad on February 10, 2003. ... The Nimrod is a maritime patrol aircraft developed in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the city in Afghanistan. ... September 2 is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...

Members of Parliament

The Bridgwater constituency has been represented in Parliament since 1295. After the voting age was lowered in January 1970, Susan Wallace became the first 18-year-old person to vote in the UK, during the 1970 Bridgwater by-election that elected Tom King. Bridgwater is one of the oldest Parliamentary Constituencies in the House of Commons, having elected Members of Parliament since 1295. ...


Members of parliament have included:

Robert Blake, General at Sea, 1599–1657 by Henry Perronet Briggs, painted 1829. ... The Short Parliament (April 13-May 5, 1640) of King Charles I is so called because it lasted only three weeks. ... Robert Blake, General at Sea, 1599–1657 by Henry Perronet Briggs, painted 1829. ... The Barebones Parliament came into being on July 4, 1653. ... Vernon Bartlett (30 April 1894, Tiverton, Devon - January 18, 1983) was a British politician and journalist. ... Appeasement is a policy of accepting the imposed conditions of an aggressor in lieu of armed resistance, usually at the sacrifice of principles. ... Sir Gerald Wills, MBE (3 October 1905 – 31 October 1969) was a British Barrister and politician who was Member of Parliament for Bridgwater from 1950. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... G-Unit member Thomas Jeremy King, Baron King of Bridgwater, CH , PC (born June 13, 1933), Educated Sheriff House, Rugby School, is a British Conservative politician who was Member of Parliament for Bridgwater in Somerset, from 1970 until 2001. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

Natural environment

Bridgwater sits near the edge of the Somerset Levels and the Quantock Hills on the River Parrett, which in turn discharges into the Bridgwater Bay National Nature Reserve. The view towards Brent Knoll from Glastonbury Tor. ... The Quantock Hills are a range of hills west of Bridgwater in Somerset, England. ... The River Parrett has its source in the springs in the hills around Chedington in Dorset in England and flows west through the Somerset Levels to its mouth in the Bristol Channel at Burnham on Sea a town on the edge of Bridgwater Bay, an important Nature Reserve. ... Bridgwater Bay is on the estuary of the River Severn, near Bridgwater in Somerset, United Kingdom at the mouth of the River Parrett. ... National Nature Reserves in England are managed by Natural England and are key places for wildlife and natural features in England. ...


Twinning

Bridgwater is twinned with:

Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Czech_Republic. ... Uherské Hradiště (-Czech, German: Ungarisch Hradisch) is a town in the southeastern Czech Republic on the Morava river in the Zlin Region, Moravia. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... La Ciotat La Ciotat is a commune in the Bouches-du-Rhône département and the Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur region in southern France. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Homberg is a small town in northern Hesse with about 15,000 inhabitants, and it is the seat of the Schwalm-Eder district. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Malta. ... Marsa is a town south of Malta. ...

References

  • "Bridgwater with and without the 'e' " ', Roger Evans, ISBN 0-9525674-0-7
  • A History of Bridgwater, J.C. Lawrence, ISBN 1-86077-363-X
  • Bridgwater Victorian Days, Philip James Squibbs, ISBN 0-9501022-1-0
  • Somerset in the Age of Steam, Peter Stanier, ISBN 0-86183-481-X
  • "Remember Remember". The Story of Bridgwater Carnival, written by Chris Hocking who is president of Bridgwater Guy Fawkes Carnival Committee
  • A History of the County of Somerset: Vol 6: Bridgwater (1992)
  • The Somerset Urban Archaeological Survey: Bridgwater, by Clare Gathercole
  1. ^ Robinson, Stephen (1992). Somerset Place Names. Wimbourne: The Dovecote Press Ltd. ISBN 1874336032. 

External links

  • Sedgemoor District Council
  • BBC Somerset

Arts, entertainment and social

Historic

  • Port of Bridgwater
  • Historical list of Bridgwater people

Tourism

  • Somerset by the Sea commercial tourism website

  Results from FactBites:
 
Bridgwater | British History Online (0 words)
The Bridgwater and Taunton canal, which from 1827 provided an alternative to the Tone and Parrett navigation, was extended from the terminating lock and basin at Huntworth in North Petherton parish by a loop west of Bridgwater which led to a large dock north of the town linked to the river by a tidal basin.
of underwood on Bridgwater manor and 3 a.
In 1381 Bridgwater was the scene of a serious disturbance when St. John's hospital was attacked and the master forced to surrender bonds held against townsmen.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m