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Encyclopedia > Brian Jones (musician)

Brian Jones (born Lewis Brian Hopkin-Jones on 28 February 1942 in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England, died 3 July 1969) was a founding member, lead and rhythm guitarist and backing singer in the British rock group, The Rolling Stones. February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The centre of Cheltenham. ... Gloucestershire (pronounced ; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a county in South West England. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the British Isles Languages English (de facto) Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... July 3 is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 181 days remaining. ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... A guitar is a stringe musical instrument. ... LeAnn Rimes singing in concert A singer is a type of musician who uses his or her voice to produce music. ... Rock band (or rock group) is a generic name to describe a group of musicians specializing in a particular form of electronically amplified music. ... The Rolling Stones are a British rock group who rose to prominence during the 1960s. ...


He was also known for his multi-instrumental skills, fashionable mod image, drug and sexual excesses, and his early death at age 27. The logo of the mod movement was a stylised target, based on the roundel of the Royal Air Force. ...

Contents


Early life

Jones was born in the Park Nursing Home in Cheltenham during World War II, suffering from asthma his entire life. His parents, Louis and Louisa Jones, were of Welsh descent, and middle-class residents of the town. Brian had a sister, Pamela born in 1943, however she died a year later. A second sister, Barbara, was born in 1945. Combatants Allies: • Poland, • UK & Commonwealth, • France/Free France, • Soviet Union, • USA, • China, ...and others• Axis: • Germany, • Italy, • Japan, • ...and others Casualties Military dead: 17 million Civilian dead: 33 million Total: 50 million Full list Military dead: 8 million Civilian dead: 4 million Total: 12 million Full list World War II...


Jones's mother Louisa was a piano teacher and started teaching her son the instrument at a very young age. Eventually he required formal lessons as he progressed too quickly for her to continue teaching him. In addition, he took up the clarinet. When he was 13 he traded in his clarinet for a saxophone and around this time he also started teaching himself how to play the guitar. A bass clarinet, which sounds an octave lower than the more common Bâ™­ soprano clarinet. ... Saxophones of different sizes play in different registers. ... A guitar is a stringe musical instrument. ...


Attending local schools including Cheltenham Grammar School for Boys, Jones was known as an exceptional student, getting very high marks in all of his classes. However he found his schooling to be too regimented and formal, and refused to conform when he reached adolescence. He was known to eschew wearing the school uniforms and anger teachers with his behaviour. As a result, he remained very popular and well-liked with the students. Cheltenham Grammar School for Boys, was originally founded in the mid 16th Century by Richard Pate. ...


All this came to an end, however, when in 1958 (aged 16) Jones impregnated his 16-year-old girlfriend, named Valerie. The child was given to an infertile couple upon its birth and Brian left home, travelling throughout northern Europe and Scandinavia for the summer. During this time he lived something of a bohemian lifestyle, playing guitar on the streets for money and eating and sleeping wherever anyone would let him. World map showing Europe Europe is conventionally considered one of the seven continents of Earth which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiogeographic one. ... See also the Nordic countries. ... Though a Bohemian is a native of the Czech province of Bohemia, a secondary meaning for bohemian emerged in 19th century France. ...


Upon his return, Jones became much more interested in various types of music - he was taught classical music at a young age, and he always preferred blues (particularly Muddy Waters and Robert Johnson), however he soon took an interest in country, jazz and rock 'n roll. He began playing at local blues and jazz clubs in addition working various odd jobs, and used the money he earned to buy more instruments. He was also known to steal small amounts of money to pay for cigarettes, which got him fired from jobs on several occasions. Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ... The blues is a vocal and instrumental form of music based on a pentatonic scale and a characteristic twelve-bar chord progression. ... McKinley Morganfield (April 4, 1915 or 1913–April 30, 1983), better known as Muddy Waters, was an American blues musician and is generally considered the father of Chicago blues. ... Robert Johnson Robert Leroy Johnson (May 8, 1909/1912 – August 16, 1938) can arguably be considered as the most famous Delta blues singer and guitarist in history, and didnt start recording until three years before his death. ... Country music, also called country and western music or country-western, is an amalgam of popular musical forms developed in the Southern United States, with roots in traditional folk music, Celtic Music, Blues, Gospel music, and Old-time music. ... Jazz is an original American musical art form originating around the early 1920s in New Orleans, rooted in Western music technique and theory, and is marked by the profound cultural contributions of African Americans. ... Rock and roll (also spelled rock n roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ...


Despite the unwanted attention he received from impregnating his girlfriend at a young age, Jones showed no signs of changing his lifestyle. A second child, who Jones named Julian Mark Andrews (his mother being Jones' then girlfriend Pat Andrews) was born in 1961.


Forming the Rolling Stones

Jones eventually left home completely and moved to London, where he met and befriended fellow musicians Alexis Korner, future Cream bassist Jack Bruce and pianist Ian Stewart, among others who made up the small London Rythym n' Blues scene that the Rolling Stones soon dominated and spearheaded. He became a proficient blues musician, and Bill Wyman claimed he was one of the first guitarists in the UK to play slide guitar. The Houses of Parliament and the clock tower containing Big Ben Part of the London skyline viewed from the South Bank London (see Wiktionary:London for the name in other languages) is the capital of the United Kingdom and England. ... Alexis Korner (April 19, 1928 - January 1, 1984), was an English blues musician. ... Cream (also The Cream) was a seminal 1960s British rock band which featured guitarist Eric Clapton, bassist Jack Bruce, and drummer Ginger Baker. ... Jack Bruce (born May 14, 1943) is a British musician; a multi-instumentalist, composer, singer and, most importantly, a very influential electric bassist. ... Ian AR Stewart (18 July 1938, Pittenweem, Fife, Scotland – 12 December 1985) was a Scottish rock musician. ... Duane Allmans slide guitar is highly regarded in blues and rock circles. ...


Jones recruited Stewart and singer Mick Jagger into his band - who with Jagger's childhood friend Keith Richards met Jones when he was playing with Korner's band. On his initiative, Jagger brought guitarist Richards with him to the rehearsals and who then joined the band. Jones' and Stewarts' acceptance of Richards and the Chuck Berry songs he wanted to play coincided with the departure of blues purists Geoff Bradford. Throughout much of 1963 Jones, Jagger and Richards shared an apartment in Chelsea, London at 102 Edith Grove with James Pheldge, a future photographer whose last name would later be used in some of the band's writing credits. While they lived there Jones and Richards spend day after day playing guitar while listening to old blues records, and Jones showed Jagger how to play the harmonica properly. Shortly thereafter, Brian would name his band "The Rollin' Stones". The four Rollin' Stones then went searching for a bassist and drummer, and after several auditions and try-outs they settled on Bill Wyman on bass (mainly because he had two large VOX AC30 guitar amps) and Charlie Watts from Alexis Korner on drums, considered by fellow musicians to be one of the best drummers of the London music scene. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Album photograph by Sante D’orazio Keith Richards (born 18 December 1943 in Dartford, Kent, England), is an English guitarist and songwriter, best known for his work with The Rolling Stones. ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... Statue of Thomas More on Cheyne Walk. ... Bill Wyman (born William George Perks on 24 October 1936) was the bassist for the English rock and roll band The Rolling Stones from its founding in 1962 until 1991. ... Charles Robert Charlie Watts (born 2 June 1941, in Islington, London) is the drummer of The Rolling Stones. ...


The group played at local blues and jazz clubs around London, eventually forming a solid fan base despite strong resistance from TradJazz musicians who felt threatened by the Stones' popularity. While Mick Jagger was the lead singer, Jones was the leader, promoting the band, getting them shows around London and negotiating with venue owners. Jones would often act more as an entertainer, playing several instruments including vocals, rhythm guitar, slide guitar and harmonica. While acting as business manager, Jones arranged to have himself paid 5 pounds sterling more than the other members of the group, a practice which did not sit well with the rest of the band. Wikibooks has more about this subject: Harmonica A harmonica is a free reed musical wind instrument (also known, among other things, as a mouth organ, French harp, tin sandwich, blues harp, simply harp, or Mississippi saxophone), having multiple, variably-tuned brass or bronze reeds, each secured at one end over... For details of notes and coins, see British coinage and British banknotes. ...


Fame and fortune

As the Stones' popularity grew, they came to the attention of Andrew Loog Oldham, who met the band in April 1963 at the suggestion of Record Mirror music writer Peter Jones (no relation) and soon became, with Brian Jones, their co-manager. Oldham, who had worked briefly as the Beatles publicist, was an admirer of Anthony Burgess' novel A Clockwork Orange, cultivated an image for the band as unruly and slightly menacing, a kind of blues-inflected, rough-edged answer to the more amiable Beatles, using the novel's protagonist and his gang as his inspiration. Keyboardist Ian Stewart was pushed into the background by Oldham, because his appearance didn't accord with this new image for the band, though he remained the Stones' road manager and principal keyboard player until his death in 1985. Andrew Loog Oldham (born 1944) is a British rock and roll producer, impresario and author. ... Record Mirror was a British weekly music newspaper. ... Anthony Burgess (February 25, 1917 – November 22, 1993) was an English novelist and critic. ... A Clockwork Orange book cover A Clockwork Orange is a science fiction and dystopian 1962 novel by Anthony Burgess, and forms the basis for the 1971 film adaptation by Stanley Kubrick. ... The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ...


Oldham's arrival also marked the beginning of Jones' own slow estrangement from the band, one which saw his prominent role progressively diminished as Oldham sought to shift the Stones' centre of gravity away from Jones and towards Jagger and Richards. Oldham, and everybody in the group, recognised the financial lucrativity of writing your own songs with the Lennon/McCartney team, as well as the simple fact that playing covers won't keep in the limelight for years to come. Further, Oldham wanted to make Jagger's onstage charisma and flamboyance a central focus of the band's live performances. Jones saw his influence over the Stone's direction slide as their repertoire comprised fewer of the blues covers he would have preferred and more Jagger-and-Richards-penned originals, and as Oldham began asserting increasing managerial control, displacing Jones from another key role.


In 1964 Jones fathered yet another child out of wedlock, this time to girlfriend Linda Lawrence. Jones named this child Julian Brian Lawrence, and Julian would adopt the surname Leitch after Lawrence later married the folk singer Donovan. Jones is said to have named both sons Julian in tribute to the jazz saxophonist Julian "Cannonball" Adderley. Donovan Leitch Donovan Philips Leitch (usually known simply as Donovan) (born May 10, 1946) is a Scottish musician. ... Julian Edwin Cannonball Adderley (September 15, 1928 - August 8, 1975), originally from Tampa, Florida was a jazz saxophonist of the small combo era of the 1950s and 1960s. ...


Throughout his career Jones showed a musical aptitude, having the ability to play a myriad of instruments, due to his training on the piano and clarinet in his youth. As the 1960's went on, Jones soon started experimenting with different wind and stringed instruments. Throughout his years with the band he played guitar, slide guitar, piano, sitar, tamboura, organ, dulcimer, mellotron, xylophone, marimba, recorder, clarinet and several other instruments. A grand piano A piano is a keyboard instrument, which is widely used in western music for solo performance, chamber music, and accompaniment, and also as a convenient aid to composing and rehearsal. ... Premla Shahane playing a sitar, 1927 The sitar is a Hindustani classical instrument. ... The tambura is a musical instrument used in various places around the world. ... Dulcimer is the name given to two types of stringed musical instrument: The Appalachian dulcimer, a three-course, fretted, plucked instrument which is also referred to as a mountain dulcimer or just a dulcimer, and The Hammered dulcimer, which is a hammer-struck, trapezoid-shaped zither The instruments are quite... Mellotron MK II The Mellotron is an electromechanical polyphonic keyboard musical instrument originally developed and built in Birmingham, England in the early 1960s. ... Xylophone in Bali 1937 The xylophone (from the Greek meaning wooden sound) is a musical instrument in the percussion family which probably originated in Indonesia (Nettl 1956, p. ... // The Modern Instrument The marimba is a musical instrument in the percussion family. ... Various recorders The recorder is a woodwind musical instrument of the family known as fipple flutes—whistle-like instruments which include the tin whistle and ocarina. ... A bass clarinet, which sounds an octave lower than the more common B♭ soprano clarinet. ...


In total he is known to have played at least 15 instruments with the Stones. Brian's signature guitar is a teardrop-shaped prototype Vox Phantom Mark III, though he used many others throughout his career, being fond of Gibson models (various Firebirds and ES-330 models) as well, along with the Rickenbacker 12-String model made famous by George Harrison. In computing, Teardrop is a remote denial-of-service attack (DoS) that affected the Microsoft Windows 3. ... Vox is a musical equipment manufacturer based in Britain, which is most famous for making the AC30 guitar amplifier and the Vox organ. ... Gibson Guitar Corporation is one of the worlds best-known manufacturers of acoustic and electric guitars. ... George Harrison, MBE (February 24, 1943 – November 29, 2001) was a popular British guitarist, singer, songwriter, record producer, and film producer, best known as a member of The Beatles. ...


Brian contributed significantly to the sounds of the mid-1960's sound of the Stones, playing slide guitar on "I Wanna Be Your Man", "Little Red Rooster", "Doncha Bother Me", "No Expectations", "I Can't Be Satisfied" and "I'm Moving On", the main guitar riff on "The Last Time", "Get Off My Cloud", "19th Nervous Breakdown", and "Mona", sitar on "Paint it, Black", tamboura on "Street Fighting Man", marimba on "Under My Thumb", "Out of Time" and "Ride On, Baby", recorder and piano on "Ruby Tuesday", dulcimer on "Lady Jane", accordion and recorder on "Backstreet Girl", mellotron on "2000 Light Years From Home", "She's A Rainbow" and "We Love You", saxophone and mellotron on "Citadel" and autoharp on "You Got the Silver". It was Brian Jones who played blues harp ("harmonica") on most of the Stones' recordings throughout the 1960s. He also contributed saxophone to the Beatles' "(You Know My Name) Look Up The Number".


Jones and Keith Richards created the guitar weaving technique that has become a signature part of the sound of the Rolling Stones. It involves both guitarists switching between rhythm and lead parts. The 1966 album Aftermath, the 1967 albums Between the Buttons and Their Satanic Majesties Request and the 1968 album Beggars Banquet showcase Jones's multi-instrumental talents throughout. 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... Aftermath is the fourth UK and sixth US studio album by The Rolling Stones, released in 1966. ... Between the Buttons is the fifth UK and seventh US studio album by The Rolling Stones and was released in 1967 as the follow-up to the ambitious Aftermath. ... Their Satanic Majesties Request is a psychedelic rock album by The Rolling Stones recorded and released in 1967. ... For the record label, see Beggars Banquet Records. ...


Around this time Jones purchased Cotchford Farm in East Sussex, the former home of Winnie the Pooh author A. A. Milne. Winnie-the-Pooh in a drawing by E. H. Shepard. ... A.A. Milne. ...


Estrangement from the Rolling Stones

The hard days on the road, the money and fame and the feeling of being alienated from the group resulted in Jones' greater and greater indulgence in drugs and alcohol. He frequently used LSD and cocaine, and was known to be a heavy drinker, though he was also known to avoid heroin. Jones was arrested for drug use for the first time in May 1967, shortly after the Redlands incident 1 involving Richards. Authorities found marijuana, cocaine and methamphetamine in Jones' possession. He confessed to marijuana use but claimed he did not use hard drugs. Along with his bandmates, protesters appeared outside the court demanding that Jones be freed, and he was not kept in jail for long. He was fined, given probation and made to see a counselor. For other uses, see LSD (disambiguation). ... This article is about the drug Cocaine. ... Heroin or diacetylmorphine (INN) is a semi-synthetic opioid. ... The Rolling Stones are a British rock group who rose to prominence during the 1960s. ... Species Cannabis indica Cannabis ruderalis Cannabis sativa Cannabis is a genus of flowering plant that includes one or more species. ... The examples and perspective in this article may not represent a worldwide view. ...


In June 1967, Jones attended the Monterey Pop Festival. He attended the festival with singer Nico, with whom he had a brief romantic relationship. Here he met Jimi Hendrix, Frank Zappa and Dennis Hopper, and went on stage to introduce the Jimi Hendrix Experience. The Monterey International Pop Music Festival took place from June 16 to June 18, 1967. ... For the sequel to Ico see Shadow of the Colossus Nico Christa Päffgen (October 16, 1938 – July 18, 1988) was a singer-songwriter, fashion model, actress and Warhol superstar, best known by her pseudonym Nico. ... James Marshall Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American musician, singer, songwriter, guitarist, and cultural icon. ... Frank Vincent Zappa (December 21, 1940 – December 4, 1993) was an American composer, guitarist, singer, film director, and satirist. ... Dennis Hopper (born May 17, 1936) is an American actor and film-maker. ... Jimi Hendrix James Marshall Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 - September 18, 1970) was an American guitarist, singer, songwriter and producer who is widely considered to be the most important electric guitarist in the history of popular music. ...


Jagger and Richards grew increasingly hostile towards Jones, and Jones became alienated from the rest of the group. By many accounts Jones was often a warm, friendly and outgoing person, yet these same people - including Bill Wyman - commented that Jones could often be an extremely difficult and mean person to get along with. Tensions grew, partly due to Jones's inebriated states. Other observers, again including Bill Wyman, find some fault with Jagger and Richards, claiming they were deliberately trying to push Brian out of the group. However, Jones maintained close relationships with many others outside of the Stones camp, including Bob Dylan, John Lennon, Jimi Hendrix, George Harrison and Steve Marriot. Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman on May 24, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter, musician and poet whose enduring contributions to American song are often compared, in fame and influence, to those of Stephen Foster, Irving Berlin, Woody Guthrie, and Hank Williams. ... John Winston Lennon (later John Ono Lennon) (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980) was best known as a singer, songwriter, poet and guitarist for the British rock band The Beatles. ... James Marshall Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American musician, singer, songwriter, guitarist, and cultural icon. ... George Harrison, MBE (February 24, 1943 – November 29, 2001) was a popular British guitarist, singer, songwriter, record producer, and film producer, best known as a member of The Beatles. ...


Life continued to become much more difficult for Jones. In the summer of 1967, Jones's girlfriend Anita Pallenberg ran off with Richards while Jones was in hospital. By this point, Jones was alienated from the band, while he was being harassed by the police and suffering paranoia. Jones last real sessions with the Stones were in the spring and summer of 1968, when the Stones produced the classic "Jumpin' Jack Flash" and the Beggars Banquet album. A relaxed and sober Jones can be seen in the Jean-Luc Godard movie Sympathy For The Devil, playing acoustic guitar, chatting and sharing cigarettes with Richards. The film chronicles the making of the song "Sympathy for the Devil". While he played an acoustic guitar for the backing track, it is not included in the final version. Anita Pallenberg (born January 25, 1944 in Rome, Italy) is a model, actress and fashion designer who was the common-law wife of Rolling Stone guitarist Keith Richards from 1967 to 1977. ... For the record label, see Beggars Banquet Records. ... Jean-Luc Godard. ... This article is about a song. ...


Jones' last formal appearance with the Stones was in the December 1968 The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus, a part-concert, part-circus act film organized by the band. It went unreleased for 25 years due to Mick Jagger being unhappy with the band's performance when compared to other bands in the film, such as Jethro Tull, The Who and Taj Mahal. In the film, Jones appears somewhat bored but enjoys the interaction with the audience. At most times during the film his instruments are inaudible, but you can hear his signature lead slide guitar riff on "No Expectations". Look up December in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Special Theatre Version: The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus, 2004. ... Jethro Tulls fourth album, Aqualung Jethro Tull is a progressive rock band that formed in Blackpool, England in the 1960s. ... The Who are a British rock band that first came to prominence in the 1960s. ... Taj Mahal (born May 17, 1942) is a United States blues musician. ...


Other contributions

In 1966 Jones produced, played on and wrote the soundtrack for the film "Mord und Totschlag" (aka "A Degree Of Murder"), an avant-garde German film his then-girlfriend Anita Pallenberg. He hired various musicians to play on the soundtrack, among them guitarist Jimmy Page. Jones and Pallenberg attracted controversy during the making of the film when Jones posed in a Nazi uniform while standing on a naked doll for a photograph, along with Pallenberg. Jones was by no means sympathetic to the Nazis, however many were offended by the photographs. James Patrick Jimmy Page OBE, (born January 9, 1944) is widely considered one of the greatest and most influential guitarists in rock music. ...


Jones played percussion on an unreleased version of Bob Dylan's All Along the Watchtower together with a handful of jams with Jimi Hendrix and Dave Mason of Traffic in early 1968, in addition to playing the alto saxophone on a Beatles song, "You Know My Name (Look Up The Number)." In 1968, Jones recorded the Morocco-based ensemble, the Master Musicians Of Joujouka. This is known to many as the birth of interest in World Music. All Along the Watchtower is a song written by folk-rock musician Bob Dylan. ... Dave Mason (born May 10, 1946) is a musician from Birmingham, England who found fame with rock band Traffic. ... In many parts of the world traffic is generally organized, flowing in lanes of travel for a particular direction, with interchanges, traffic signals, or signage at intersections to facilitate the orderly and timely flow of traffic. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Alto (high or tall in Portuguese, Spanish, Italian, and stop in Portuguese) may refer to: a singing voice below Soprano : see Alto (voice); a high-register musical instrument, such as the alto viola, alto saxophone (both often shortened to alt), alto horn or other; Alto, Michigan; Alto (youthculture) a youthculture... The Master Musicians of Joujouka are a musical ensemble from the village of Joujouka (or Jajouka) in the Rif Mountains of northern Morocco. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


In 1971, Brian Jones Presents The Pipes Of Pan At Joujouka was posthumously released; it remains a World Music landmark. Mick Jagger and Keith Richards returned to Jajouka in 1989 to record most of backing for the track "Continental Drift" for the Stones album Steel Wheels. This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... A sunset in Joujouka Joujouka (or Jajouka) is a village in the southern Rif Mountains, populated by the Ahl-Sherif tribe in northern Morocco. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ...


The son of the leader of the Joujouka musicians that Brian Jones had recorded had co-incidentally written to the Rolling Stones at that time, and Jagger and Richards (along with Matt Clifford who was working on the album with them) flew off to meet him. The encounter is documented in a rarely seen BBC film called "Rolling Stones : World Music".


Death

Jones was arrested a second time in 1968, this time for marijuana possession. Jones claimed the marijuana was left behind by previous owners of his home, but he was facing a long jail sentence if found guilty, due to his probation. Bill Wyman commented "The fact that the police had secured a warrant with no evidence showed the arrest was part of a carefully orchestrated plan. Brian and the Stones were being targeted in an effort to deter the public from taking drugs". The jury found him guilty, yet the judge had sympathy for Jones, instead giving him a fine and warning him, "for goodness sake, don't get into trouble again or it really will be serious." The prosecution's case was very weak, relying on testimony of police who were later found to be corrupt. (The same corrupt officers who harassed Jones would go on to harass Jagger in 1969.)


In early June 1969, Jones was visited by Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Charlie Watts and was told the group would continue without him. He was replaced by virtuoso guitarist Mick Taylor, who started sessions with the Stones right away. Look up June in Wiktionary, the free dictionary June is the sixth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with a length of 30 days The month is named after the Roman goddess Juno, wife of Jupiter and equivalent to the Greek goddess Hera. ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... Mick Taylors debut solo album originally released in 1979. ...


On 3 July 1969, Brian Jones was discovered dead in his swimming pool at his home in Hartfield, Sussex, England. The coroner's report stated "Death by misadventure," and noted that his liver and heart were heavily enlarged by drug and alcohol abuse. July 3 is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 181 days remaining. ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... 50 meter indoor swimming pool A swimming pool, swimming bath, or wading pool is an artificially enclosed body of water intended for recreational or competitive swimming, diving, or for other bathing activities that do not involve swimming, e. ... Hartfield Parish Church Hartfield Parish, situated in East Sussex, consists of several villages on the edge of Ashdown Forest. ... Sussex is a traditional county in south-eastern England, corresponding roughly in area to the ancient Kingdom of Sussex. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the British Isles Languages English (de facto) Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... A coroner is either the presiding officer of a special court, a medical officer or an officer of law responsible for investigating deaths, particularly those happening under unusual circumstances. ...


However, his then-girlfriend Anna Wohlin claimed in 2000 that he had been murdered by a builder who had been staying with them renovating the house the couple shared. The builder, Frank Thorogood, reputedly confessed to the murder on his death bed but passed away before a confession could be recorded by the authorities. However, this apparent confession was later recanted by Tom Keylock.


Many items, such as instruments and expensive furniture, were stolen from the home after Jones' death, most likely by Thorogood, driver Tom Keylock, and others who worked on the property. Rumours also exist that demo recordings made by Jones for his future projects were stolen as well, but to date nothing has ever surfaced.


Upon his death, Pete Townshend wrote a poem titled "A Normal Day For Brian, A Man Who Died Every Day" (printed in The Times), Jimi Hendrix dedicated a song to him on US television, and Jim Morrison of The Doors wrote a published poem entitled Ode To L.A. While Thinking Of Brian Jones, Deceased. James Marshall Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American musician, singer, songwriter, guitarist, and cultural icon. ... For other people named James or Jim Morrison, see James Morrison James Douglas Jim Morrison (December 8, 1943 – 3 July 1971) was a singer, songwriter, writer, and poet. ... The Doors, Legacy (Clockwise from top right): Jim Morrison, John Densmore, Robby Krieger, Ray Manzarek The Doors (formed in 1965 in Los Angeles, California) were a popular and influential American rock band. ...


When asked by a newspaper reporter his reaction to Jones' death, George Harrison responded, "When I met him I liked him quite a lot. He was a good fellow you know. I got to know him very well, I think, and I felt very close to him: you know how it is with some people, you feel for them, feel near to them. He was born on 28 February 1942, and I was born on 25 February 1943, and he was with Mick and Keith, and I was with John and Paul in the groups, so there was a sort of understanding between the two of us. The positions were similar, and I often seemed to meet him in his times of trouble. There was nothing the matter with him that a little extra love wouldn't have cured. I don't think he had enough love or understanding. He was very nice and sincere and sensitive, and we must remember that's what he was." George Harrison, MBE (February 24, 1943 – November 29, 2001) was a popular British guitarist, singer, songwriter, record producer, and film producer, best known as a member of The Beatles. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... February 25 is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) is a common year starting on Friday. ...


The Rolling Stones performed a free concert in Hyde Park on 5 July 1969, two days after his death. Even though the concert was scheduled weeks earlier to present the new guitarist, critics accused the group of being callous and uncaring about their former bandmate. Supporters retorted that the group dedicated the concert to him. Before the concert began, Jagger read a poem by Percy Shelley and released thousands of butterflies. Though The Stones then opened with a Johnny Winter song that was one of Brian's favorites, "I'm Yours And I'm Hers", many would say that their concert that day was the worst that they have ever given. July 5 is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 179 days remaining. ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... Percy Bysshe Shelley Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 - July 8, 1822) was one of the major English Romantic poets. ... Johnny Winter album cover Johnny Winter (born 23 February 1944) is an American blues guitarist and singer, well known for his albinism. ...


Jones was buried in a lavish silver and bronze casket sent for his funeral in Cheltenham, England by friend Bob Dylan. The Stones asked fans to stay away, and only Watts and Wyman among the group attended the funeral. Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Anita Pallenberg didn't attend Jones' funeral. Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman on May 24, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter, musician and poet whose enduring contributions to American song are often compared, in fame and influence, to those of Stephen Foster, Irving Berlin, Woody Guthrie, and Hank Williams. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Album photograph by Sante D’orazio Keith Richards (born 18 December 1943 in Dartford, Kent, England), is an English guitarist and songwriter, best known for his work with The Rolling Stones. ... Anita Pallenberg (born January 25, 1944 in Rome, Italy) is a model, actress and fashion designer who was the common-law wife of Rolling Stone guitarist Keith Richards from 1967 to 1977. ...


Writing credits

To date, only one officially released song is officially credited to Jones, the 30 second "Rice Krispies," jingle for the Kellogg's company, co-written with J.W. Thompson and which the group performed incognito as a commercial (which was common practice for bands to earn money). A second song "Sure I Do" was written completely by Jones, but the only known copy of it remains in Bill Wyman's "Sticky Fingers" restaurant. J.W. Thompson worked for a advertising agency who was hired for the Kellogs Cornflakes campaign in 1963 and 1964. ...


Unfortunately, nobody has ever heard this song. A handful of early Stones recordings were credited to "Nanker Phelge," a pseudonym indicating that all members of the group (including Jones) authored the song. Nanker Phelge (aka Nanker/Phelge) was a pseudonym used for early Rolling Stones group compositions. ... A pseudonym (Greek: false name) is a fictitious name used by an individual as an alternative to his or her legal name. ...


Nanker was a strange face Jones and Richards would often make, and Phelge came from their former roommate James Pheldge.


Among the Nanker Phelge (aka Jagger/Jones/Richards/Watts/Wyman) songs are the following Stones compositions: Charles Robert Charlie Watts (born 2 June 1941, in Islington, London) is the drummer of The Rolling Stones. ... Bill Wyman (born William George Perks on 24 October 1936) was the bassist for the English rock and roll band The Rolling Stones from its founding in 1962 until 1991. ...

  • Stoned
  • Now I've Got A Witness
  • And Mr Spector And Mr Pitney Came Too (co-written with Phil Spector)
  • Little By Little (co-written with Phil Spector)
  • 2120 South Michigan Avenue
  • Stewed And Keef (Brian's Blues)
  • The Under Assistant West Coast Promotion Man

It is disputed as to whether or not Jones should have earned co-writing credits for some songs. Some of the big hits of the Stones clearly have Brian Jones stamped all over them. One of the best examples of the dispute is "Ruby Tuesday". Brian's piano and recorder (a flute) are the key ingredients to this song, and some fans suggest Jones should have received a writing credit. Still other sources say Jones composed a significant portion of it; Jagger himself stated "Beautiful lyrics and music, neither which I wrote". Harvey Phillip Phil Spector (born December 26, 1940) is a highly influential American record producer who turned out some of the best-known popular music of the 1960s and 1970s. ...


"Paint It Black" was supposedly a much different song when Jagger and Richards alone had composed it. Mick Jagger wrote the lyrics and Keith Richards the chords. It didn't became the monster hit as we know it until Bill Wyman suggested to use the bass pedals of the organ for the polka-rhythm, and Brian Jones suggested to play a melody on the sitar. It can be argued whether or not Nanker Phelge should be credited with the song, although the song to date remains a Jagger-Richards composition. For the Philadelphia hardcore punk band, see Paint It Black (band) Paint It Black (also Paint It, Black) is a song recorded by The Rolling Stones in 1966. ...


The song "Gomper" from the band's album Their Satanic Majesties Request, while also credited to Jagger-Richards, features Jones playing all percussive instruments, sitar, tamboura, flute, and organ in a fairly long instrumental section. An argument can be made that Jones deserves a writing credit for this song as well. Their Satanic Majesties Request is a psychedelic rock album by The Rolling Stones recorded and released in 1967. ...


In addition, rumors persist that Jones himself authored the riff to "Honky Tonk Women". Keith Richards claims he took the riff from Ry Cooder, and to date Cooder accuses Keith Richards of "ripping him off". Cooder now refuses to talk about his sessions with the Stones. Honky Tonk Women was a 1969 hit song by the Rolling Stones. ... Ryland Ry Cooder (March 15, 1947—) is a guitarist especially well known for his slide guitar work. ...


Public image and Legend

Jones' biggest achievement, probably even more important than being a musician, was his status as a fashion icon, exemplified by his rebellious, outlandish fashion sense. As the most photogenic member of the Rolling Stones, his style of dress and manner did more to influence the fashion scene of swinging 1960s London than perhaps any other musician. The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ...


He was of small stature at 5'8", with blue-green eyes and blonde hair, yet he was a pioneer in molding the "rock star" image. He was known for deliberately walking around crowded streets until girls would recognize him and start chasing him, at which point he would run away as fast as he could (à la The Beatles in the film A Hard Day's Night). The Beatles were a pop and rock music group from Liverpool, England, who continue to be held in the very highest regard for their artistic achievements, their huge commercial success, and their groundbreaking role in the history of popular music. ... // The British release A Hard Days Night was The Beatles third album, released in 1964 as the soundtrack to their first film of the same name. ...


Jones, along with Jagger, was very politically-inclined, and stated in an interview that abortion and recreational drug use should be legal, and expressed his support for the gay rights movement. He gave interviews frequently and is often regarded as the most eloquent member of the group. His intellect, combined with his outspoken dislike of socially imposed constraints, made him one of the earliest English rock stars, and a role model for the British Invasion. The appearance of The Beatles on the The Ed Sullivan Show, February 9, 1964, marked the dramatic start of the British Invasion. ...


References

  • Geoffrey Giuliano, Paint It Black: The Murder Of Brian Jones.
  • Gered Mankowitz, Brian Jones: Like a Rollin' Stone
  • R. Weingartner, A tribute to Brian Jones
  • Terry Rawlings (1994), Who Killed Christopher Robin?: The Life and Death of Brian Jones, ISBN 0752209892
  • Laura Jackson (1992), Golden Stone: The Untold Life and Tragic Death of Brian Jones, ISBN 0312098200
  • R. Chapman, "The bittersweet symphony", Mojo, 68 (July 1999), pg.62-84
  • Bill Wyman and Ray Coleman, Stone Alone, ISBN 0670828947
  • Alan Clayson, Brian Jones, ISBN 1-86074-544-X
  • Bill Wyman, Rolling With The Stones

External links

  • http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/Brain_jones/

Fans: Yahoo discussion group of Brian Jones and other '60's stars

  • http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/brian_jones_fans/ Brian Jones Fans: Yahoo group for Brian with a lots of photos.
  • http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/brian_jones_fans_2/ Brian Jones Fans 2: Second part of the group with more photos od Brian.
  • Brian Jones: A Rollin' Stone
  • Master Musicians of Joujouka
  • Rolling Stones BRIAN JONES BRIAN JONES Rolling Stones
  • Brian Jones at Find-A-Grave


The Rolling Stones
Mick Jagger | Keith Richards | Charlie Watts | Ron Wood
Brian Jones | Bill Wyman | Mick Taylor | Ian Stewart | Chuck Leavell | Darryl Jones | Dick Taylor
Andrew Loog Oldham | Allen Klein
Related articles
Discography | The Glimmer Twins | Nanker Phelge | Rolling Stones Records
Categories
The Rolling Stones | Members | Albums | Singles | Songs


The Rolling Stones are a British rock group who rose to prominence during the 1960s. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Album photograph by Sante D’orazio Keith Richards (born 18 December 1943 in Dartford, Kent, England), is an English guitarist and songwriter, best known for his work with The Rolling Stones. ... Charles Robert Charlie Watts (born 2 June 1941, in Islington, London) is the drummer of The Rolling Stones. ... Ron Wood performing onstage with The Band in the 1976 film The Last Waltz. ... Bill Wyman (born William George Perks on 24 October 1936) was the bassist for the English rock and roll band The Rolling Stones from its founding in 1962 until 1991. ... Mick Taylors debut solo album originally released in 1979. ... Ian AR Stewart (18 July 1938, Pittenweem, Fife, Scotland – 12 December 1985) was a Scottish rock musician. ... Chuck Leavell is an American keyboards player, most known for being a member of The Allman Brothers Band, a founding member of Sea Level, a frequently-employed session musician, and later, the supporting keyboardist for The Rolling Stones. ... Darryl Jones (born December 11, 1961 in Chicago, Illinois, USA) is a highly regarded bassist in both jazz and rock music. ... Dick Taylor was an early bass player for the Rolling Stones. ... Andrew Loog Oldham (born 1944) is a British rock and roll producer, impresario and author. ... Allen Klein (born December 18, 1931) is a business manager. ... This is an annotated listing of the recordings of The Rolling Stones. ... The Glimmer Twins is a nickname given to Mick Jagger and Keith Richards of The Rolling Stones. ... Nanker Phelge (aka Nanker/Phelge) was a pseudonym used for early Rolling Stones group compositions. ... Rolling Stones Records is the record label formed by The Rolling Stones in 1970, after their recording contract with Decca Records expired. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Brian Jones (2503 words)
Brian Jones was born and raised in upper class Cheltenham, England.
Brian Jones' relationship with women was callous from the onset and he developed a reputation as a ladies man when just a teen.
Jones' downward spiral was not immediate and was indeed a long and painful process that lasted roughly from 1966 up until his official departure from the band in 1969.
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