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Encyclopedia > Brian Jones
Brian Jones
Birth name Lewis Brian Hopkin Jones
Born 28 February 1942(1942-02-28)
Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England
Died 3 July 1969 (aged 27)
Hartfield, Sussex, England
Genre(s) Rhythm and blues, Rock and roll, Psychedelic rock, World
Occupation(s) Musician
Instrument(s) guitar, Appalachian dulcimer, mellotron, harmonica, sitar, tambura, recorder, percussion, saxophone, organ, accordion, theremin, banjo, Autoharp
Years active 1962 – 1969
Label(s) Decca, London
Associated acts The Rolling Stones, Master Musicians of Joujouka
Notable instrument(s)
Vox Mark III
Gibson Firebird
Rickenbacker 360/12
Gretsch
Gibson Les Paul
Fender Telecaster

Lewis Brian Hopkin Jones (28 February 19423 July 1969) was a founding member, guitarist and multi-instrumentalist in the English rock group The Rolling Stones. Brian Jones may refer to: Brian Jones (musician), founding member of The Rolling Stones Brian Jones (aeronaut), balloonist Brian Keith Jones (a. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the parliamentary constituency, see Cheltenham (UK Parliament constituency). ... Gloucestershire (pronounced ; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a county in South West England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Hartfield Parish Church Hartfield Parish, situated in East Sussex, consists of several villages on the edge of Ashdown Forest. ... This article refers to the historic county in England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... R&B redirects here. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that attempts to replicate the mind-altering experiences of hallucinogenic drugs. ... World music is, most generally, all the music in the world. ... “Instrumentalist” redirects here. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... Two Appalachian dulcimers The Appalachian dulcimer is a fretted string instrument of the zither family, typically with three or four strings, although contemporary versions of the instrument can have as many as twelve strings and six courses. ... The Mellotron is an electro-mechanical, polyphonic keyboard originally developed and built in Birmingham, England in the early 1960s. ... A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ... Diagram of some sitar parts. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Pandura. ... Various recorders The recorder is a woodwind musical instrument of the family known as fipple flutes or internal duct flutes — whistle-like instruments which include the tin whistle and ocarina. ... Percussion redirects here. ... The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored musical instrument usually considered a member of the woodwind family. ... Organ in Katharinenkirche, Frankfurt am Main, Germany The organ is a keyboard instrument played using one or more manuals and a pedalboard. ... For other uses, see Accordion (disambiguation). ... Léon Theremin playing an early theremin The theremin (originally pronounced but often anglicized as [1]), or thereminvox, is one of the earliest fully electronic musical instruments. ... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument developed by enslaved Africans in the United States, adapted from several African instruments. ... An Autoharp The Autoharp is a musical string instrument having a series of chord bars attached to dampers which, when depressed, mute all the strings other than those that form the desired chord. ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... It has been suggested that Decca Music Group be merged into this article or section. ... London Records is a record label headquartered in the United Kingdom, originally marketing records in the United States, Canada and Latin America from 1947 through the 1980s. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... The Master Musicians of Joujouka are the Sufi trance musicians most famous for their connections with the Beat Generation and the Rolling Stones founder Brian Jones. ... The Gibson Firebird is a solid-body guitar marketed by Gibson in the late 60s. ... The Rickenbacker 360/12 was among the first electric twelve-string guitars. ... Gretsch is a U.S. musical instrument manufacturer currently being distributed by guitar company Fender and drum craft company Kaman. ... The Gibson Les Paul is a solidbody electric guitar originally developed in the early 1950s. ... The Fender Telecaster, also known as a Tele, is typically a dual-pickup, solid-body electric guitar made by Fender. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Rock band (or rock group) is a generic name to describe a group of musicians specializing in a particular form of electronically amplified music. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ...


Jones was known for his skills on multiple instruments, fashionable mod image, and his excessive drug use. His death at age 27 made him one of the first members of music's 27 Club of those famous who died aged 27. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Drug (disambiguation). ... The 27 Club, also occasionally known as the Forever 27 Club, is a popular culture name for a group of influential rock and blues musicians who all died at the age of 27, sometimes under mysterious circumstances. ...

Contents

Biography

Early life

Jones was born in the Park Nursing Home in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, during World War II. He suffered from asthma all his life. His middle-class parents, Lewis Blount Jones and Louisa Beatrice Jones were of Welsh descent. Brian had two sisters: Pamela, who was born on 3 October 1943 and who died on 14 October 1945 of leukaemia; and Barbara, born in 1946.[1] For the parliamentary constituency, see Cheltenham (UK Parliament constituency). ... Gloucestershire (pronounced ; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a county in South West England. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article is about the country. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Leukemia (leukaemia in Commonwealth English) is a group of blood diseases characterized by malignancies (cancer) of the blood-forming tissues. ...


Both Jones's parents were interested in music and their interest had a profound effect on him. In addition to his job as an aeronautical engineer, Lewis Jones played piano and organ and led the choir at the local church and Louisa was a piano teacher. Jones eventually took up the clarinet, becoming first clarinet in his school orchestra at 14.[2] Aerospace engineering is the branch of engineering that concerns aircraft, spacecraft and related topics. ... Two soprano clarinets: a Bâ™­ clarinet (left, with capped mouthpiece) and an A clarinet (right, with no mouthpiece). ... For other uses, see Orchestra (disambiguation). ...


In 1957, Jones was exposed to the jazz musician Charlie Parker and developed a lifelong interest in jazz. Jones persuaded his parents to buy him a saxophone, and two years later his parents gave him his first acoustic guitar as a 17th birthday present.[3] For other persons of the same name, see Charles Parker. ... The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored musical instrument usually considered a member of the woodwind family. ... A steel string acoustic guitar is a modern form of guitar descended from the classical guitar, but strung with steel strings for a brighter, louder sound. ...


Jones attended local schools, including Dean Close School, from 1949 to 1953 and Cheltenham Grammar School for Boys, which he entered in September 1953 after passing the Eleven-plus exam. He was an exceptional student, earning high marks in all of his classes while doing little work. He enjoyed badminton and diving but otherwise was not skilled at sports. In 1957, Jones reportedly obtained nine O-levels passes. Despite academic ability, however, he found school regimented and he refused to conform. He was known to eschew wearing the school uniforms and angered teachers with his behaviour, though he was popular among students. His hostility to authority figures got him suspended from school on two occasions.[4] Dean Close School is a co-educational independent school in Cheltenham, England. ... Pates Grammar School is a voluntary aided, selective grammar school in the Hesters Way area of Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, United Kingdom catering for pupils aged 11 to 18. ... The Eleven Plus is an examination which was given to students in their last year of primary education in the United Kingdom under the Tripartite System. ... This article is about the sport. ... A sport consists of a physical activity or skill carried out with a recreational purpose: for competition, for self-enjoyment, to attain excellence, for the development of a skill, or some combination of these. ... The General Certificate of Education or GCE is an academic qualification, often divided into two levels: Ordinary level (O-level) and Advanced level (A-Level), although other categories exist. ...


According to Dick Hattrell, a childhood friend:

He was a rebel without a cause, but when examinations came he was brilliant.[4]

In the spring of 1959, Jones's 14-year-old girlfriend, a Cheltenham schoolgirl named Valerie Corbett, became pregnant. She later married one of Jones' friends, Graham Ride, an author. Jones encouraged her to have an abortion. As a result, she wanted no contact with Jones and placed the baby boy for adoption. The child was given to an infertile couple and never knew his father.[3]


Brian quit school in disgrace and left home, travelling through northern Europe and Scandinavia for a summer. During this period, he lived a bohemian lifestyle, busking and playing guitar on the streets for money, living off the kindness of others. While Jones was fond of telling others about his trip throughout Europe, it remains uncertain how much of his descriptions were embellishment. Other friends claimed Jones merely stayed with friends and relatives outside the UK. [5] For other uses, see Bohemian (disambiguation). ... Busking is the practice of doing live performances in public places to entertain people, usually to solicit donations and tips. ...


Jones grew up listening to classical music, but supposedly always preferred blues, (particularly Elmore James and Robert Johnson). He began playing at local blues and jazz clubs in addition to busking and working odd jobs. He was also known to steal small amounts of money to pay for cigarettes, which tended to get him fired.[6] Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ... Blues music redirects here. ... Elmore James (January 27, 1918 – May 24, 1963) was an American blues singer and guitarist. ... Robert Johnson, born Robert Leroy Johnson (May 8, 1911 – August 16, 1938) is among the most famous of Delta blues musicians. ...


In November 1959, Jones went to the Wooden Bridge Hotel in Guilford to see a band. He met a young, married woman named Angeline, and the two had a one-night stand that resulted in a pregnancy. Angeline and her husband decided to have the baby.[5]


In October of 1961, Jones became father of a third child, Julian Mark Andrews, the mother being Jones's girlfriend Pat Andrews. Jones sold his record collection to buy flowers for Pat and clothes for the newborn and lived with them for a while.[5]


Forming The Rolling Stones

Jones left Cheltenham and moved to London where he became friends with fellow musicians Alexis Korner, future Manfred Mann singer Paul Jones, future Cream bassist Jack Bruce and others who made up the small London rhythm'n'blues scene that the Rolling Stones soon dominated. He became a blues musician, for a brief time calling himself "Elmo Lewis", and Bill Wyman claimed he was one of the first guitarists in the UK to play slide guitar.[6] This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Alexis Korner (born Alexis Andrew Nicholas Korner, 19 April 1928 in Paris, France - died on 1 January 1984 in Westminster, London, England) Korner is probably best remembered as the Founding Father of British Blues and a pioneering blues musician. ... Cock-A-Hoop Manfred Mann was a British R&B and pop band of the 1960s, named after its keyboard player, who later led the successful 1970s follow-on group Manfred Manns Earth Band. ... Paul Jones (born Paul Pond, 24 February 1942, in Portsmouth, England) is an English singer, actor, harmonica player, and radio and television presenter. ... Cream were a 1960s British rock band comprising guitarist Eric Clapton, bassist Jack Bruce and drummer Ginger Baker. ... John Symon Asher Jack Bruce (born May 14, 1943) is a Scottish-born musician, composer and singer. ... Bill Wyman (born William George Perks on 24 October 1936) was the bassist for the English rock and roll band The Rolling Stones from its founding in 1962 until 1993. ... For the technique, see Slide (guitar technique). ...


In spring 1962, Jones recruited Ian "Stu" Stewart and singer Mick Jagger into his band — who, with Jagger's childhood friend Keith Richards, met Jones when he and Paul Jones were playing Elmore James' "Dust My Broom" with Korner's band at The Ealing Club.[7] Ian AR Stewart (18 July 1938 – 12 December 1985) was a Scottish rock musician. ... Sir Michael Phillip Mick Jagger (born July 26, 1943) is a English rock musician, actor, songwriter, record and film producer and businessman. ... Keith Richards (born 18 December 1943) is an English guitarist, songwriter, singer and a founding member of The Rolling Stones in 1962. ... Paul Jones (born Paul Pond, 24 February 1942, in Portsmouth, England) is an English singer, actor, harmonica player, and radio and television presenter. ... Elmore James (January 27, 1918 – May 24, 1963) was an American blues singer and guitarist. ... I Believe Ill Dust My Broom Vocalion 03475 Dust My Broom is a blues standard originally recorded by Robert Johnson, the legendary Mississippi Delta blues singer and guiarist, on November 23, 1936 in San Antonio, Texas. ... The former Ealing Jazz Club. ...


On his initiative, Jagger brought guitarist Richards to rehearsals; Richards then joined the band. Jones' and Stewart's acceptance of Richards and the Chuck Berry songs he wanted to play coincided with the departure of blues purists Geoff Bradford and Brian Knight, who had no tolerance for Chuck Berry. [8] Charles Edward Anderson Chuck Berry (born 18 October 1926, St. ...


As Keith Richards tells it, Jones came up with the name "The Rollin' Stones" (later with the 'g') while on the phone with a venue owner.

The voice on the other end of the line obviously said, 'What are you called?' Panic. 'The Best Of Muddy Waters' album was lying on the floor — and track one was 'Rollin' Stone Blues.'[9]

The Stones had their first gig on 12 July 1962 in the Marquee Club in London with Jagger, Richards, Jones, Stewart, bass player Dick Taylor (later of The Pretty Things) and drummer Mick Avory (later of The Kinks).[10] is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Marquee is a legendary music club first located at 165 Oxford Street, London, England when it opened in 1958 with a range of jazz and skiffle acts. ... Dick Taylor performing with The Pretty Things in 1999. ... The Pretty Things are a 1960s and 1970s rock and roll band from London. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Kinks were an English rock group formed in 1963 by lead singer-songwriter Ray Davies, his brother, lead guitarist and vocalist Dave Davies, and bassist Pete Quaife. ...


Throughout 1962 and 1963 Jones, Jagger and Richards shared an apartment (referred to by Richards as "a beautiful dump")[9] in Chelsea, London at 102 Edith Grove, Chelsea, with James Phelge, a future photographer whose last name was used in some of the band's writing credits. Jones and Richards spent day after day playing guitar while listening to blues records (notably Jimmy Reed, Muddy Waters & Howlin' Wolf), and Jones showed Jagger how to play harmonica. Statue of Thomas More on Cheyne Walk. ... Jimmy Reed James Jimmy Mathis Reed (September 6, 1925 - August 29, 1976) was an important United States blues singer notable for bringing his distinctive style of blues to mainstream audiences. ... McKinley Morganfield (April 4, 1915 – April 30, 1983), better known as Muddy Waters, was an American blues musician and is generally considered the Father of Chicago blues. He is also the actual father of blues musician Big Bill Morganfield. ... Chester Arthur Burnett (June 10, 1910 – January 10, 1976), better known as Howlin Wolf or sometimes, The Howlin Wolf, was an influential blues singer, guitarist and harmonica player. ...


The four Rollin' Stones went searching for a bassist and drummer and after auditions settled on Bill Wyman on bass because he had a spare VOX AC30 guitar amp and cigarettes. After playing with Mick Avory, Tony Chapman and Carlo Little for a few gigs, they chose jazz-influenced Charlie Watts, considered by fellow musicians to be one of the best drummers in London, from the Alexis Korner group Blues Incorporated. Bill Wyman (born William George Perks on 24 October 1936) was the bassist for the English rock and roll band The Rolling Stones from its founding in 1962 until 1993. ... The Vox AC30 is a guitar amplifier manufactured by Vox. ... A cigarette will burn to ash on one end. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Charles Robert Charlie Watts (born 2 June 1941) is the drummer of The Rolling Stones. ... Blues Incorporated was a British R&B band in the early 1960s, which was led by Alexis Korner and which featured at various times such musicians as Jack Bruce, Charlie Watts, Ginger Baker, Long John Baldry, Danny Thompson, Graham Bond, Cyril Davies, and Dick Heckstall-Smith. ...


Watts described Jones' role in these early days, "Brian was very instrumental in pushing the band at the beginning. Keith and I would look at him and say he was barmy. It was a crusade to him to get us on the stage in a club and be paid a half-crown and to be billed as an R&B band."[9]


The group played at local blues and jazz clubs, forming fans despite resistance from traditional jazz musicians who felt threatened by their popularity. While Jagger was lead singer, Jones, in the group's embryonic period, was leader - promoting the band, getting shows and negotiating with venues. Jones often acted more as an entertainer, playing guitar and harmonica. During performances, and especially at the Crawdaddy Club in Richmond, Jones was a more animated and engaging performer than even Jagger. Jagger initially stood still while singing - mainly by necessity, as there was hardly room to move.[9] A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ...


While business manager, Jones was paid £5 pounds sterling more than the other members, which did not sit well with the rest of the band and created resentment[9]. For details of notes and coins, see British coinage and British banknotes. ...


Fame and fortune

As the Stones' notoriety grew, they came to the attention of Andrew Loog Oldham, who met the band on April 28, 1963 at the suggestion of Record Mirror music writer Peter Jones (no relation) and became, with Eric Eastman, their co-manager.[11] Oldham, who had worked as the Beatles publicist, admired Anthony Burgess' novel A Clockwork Orange, as well as the film Expresso Bongo, cultivated an image for the band as unruly and slightly menacing, a blues-inflected, rough-edged answer to the more amiable Beatles, using the novel's protagonist and his gang as inspiration. It was Oldham who coined the phrase "Would you let your daughter marry a Rolling Stone?", although inadvertently because, according to his autobiography Stoned, the original question was "Would you let your daughter go out with a Rolling Stone?" He said he was delighted when he was misquoted because it sounded better. Andrew Loog Oldham (born 1944) is a British rock and roll producer, impresario and author. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... Record Mirror was a British weekly music newspaper. ... Anthony Burgess (February 25, 1917 – November 22, 1993) was a British novelist, critic and composer. ... Clockwork Orange redirects here. ... Expresso Bongo is a 1959 film directed by Val Guest and starring Laurence Harvey, Cliff Richard, and Yolande Dolan. ... The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ...


Piano player Ian Stewart was pushed into the background: Oldham felt that Stewart, a burly Scotsman, did not fit the image and because six members were too many for audiences to remember. Stewart was fired and became the Stones' road manager and occasional keyboard player until his death in 1985.[12] Ian AR Stewart (18 July 1938 – 12 December 1985) was a Scottish rock musician. ...


Until the group played blues covers or instrumentals credited to "Nanker Phelge", which showed a Jagger/Jones/Richards/Watts/Wyman composition. Through a publishing construction Oldham also benefitted from the Nanker/Phelge moniker. Nanker Phelge (aka Nanker/Phelge) was a pseudonym used for early Rolling Stones group compositions. ...


Oldham's arrival marked the beginning of Jones' slow estrangement, his prominent role diminished as Oldham shifted the Stones's centre from Jones to Jagger and Richards. Oldham recognised the advantages of writing their own songs, as exemplified by Lennon/McCartney, as well as that playing covers won't keep a band in the limelight for long. Further, Oldham wanted to make Jagger's charisma and flamboyance a focus of live performances. Jones saw his influence over the Stones's direction slide as their repertoire comprised fewer of the blues covers he preferred, and more Jagger-and-Richards originals, and as Oldham began asserting increasing managerial control, displacing Jones from another role. [13] The songwriting partnership of John Lennon and Paul McCartney, usually referred to as Lennon/McCartney (sometimes McCartney/Lennon), is one of the best-known and most successful musical collaborations of all time. ...


On 23 July 1964 Jones fathered another child out of wedlock, this time to girlfriend Linda Lawrence. Jones named this child Julian Brian Lawrence. Julian adopted the surname Leitch after Linda Lawrence married folk singer Donovan on 2 October 1970. Jones is said to have named both sons Julian in tribute to the jazz saxophonist Julian "Cannonball" Adderley. is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... For other uses, see Donovan (disambiguation). ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Julian Edwin Cannonball Adderley (September 15, 1928 - August 8, 1975), originally from Tampa, Florida was a jazz saxophonist of the small combo era of the 1950s and 1960s. ...

Jones playing his custom mando-guitar

Throughout his career, Jones showed exceptional musical aptitude, able to play many instruments on Stones' recordings. As soon as the Stones earned enough money to record in professional studios like Olympic Studio and the RCA and Sunset Sound Recorders in Los Angeles, and influenced by The Beach Boys 1966 album Pet Sounds and The Beatles experiment with Indian music (notably George Harrison's sitar and tamboura), Jones started experimenting with wind and stringed instruments. Image File history File links Brianguitar. ... Image File history File links Brianguitar. ... Olympic Studios is a commercial recording studio located at 117 Church Road, in the south-western suburb of Barnes in London, England. ... RCA, formerly an acronym for the Radio Corporation of America, is now a trademark owned by Thomson SA through RCA Trademark Management S.A., a company owned by Thomson. ... Sunset Sound Recorders is a legendary recording studio in Hollywood, California, located at 6650 Sunset Boulevard. ... The Beach Boys are an American rock and roll band. ... Pet Sounds is a 1966 album recorded by American pop group the Beach Boys. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ... Diagram of some sitar parts. ... The tambura is a musical instrument used in various places around the world. ...


Throughout his years with the band he played stringed instruments (guitar, sitar, tamboura, Appalachian dulcimer), keyboards (organ, mellotron), wind instruments (recorder, harmonica) and several other instruments like xylophone and marimba. In fact, sources say that Jones could pick any instrument and learn to play it in less than half an hour. [14] For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... Two Appalachian dulcimers The Appalachian dulcimer is a fretted string instrument of the zither family, typically with three or four strings, although contemporary versions of the instrument can have as many as twelve strings and six courses. ... Organ in Katharinenkirche, Frankfurt am Main, Germany The organ is a keyboard instrument played using one or more manuals and a pedalboard. ... The Mellotron is an electro-mechanical, polyphonic keyboard originally developed and built in Birmingham, England in the early 1960s. ... Various recorders The recorder is a woodwind musical instrument of the family known as fipple flutes or internal duct flutes — whistle-like instruments which include the tin whistle and ocarina. ... A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ... Kulintang a Kayo, a Philippine xylophone The xylophone (from the Greek meaning wooden sound) is a musical instrument in the percussion family which probably originated in Indonesia. ... The marimba ( ) is a musical instrument in the percussion family. ...


Jones' main guitar in the early years was a Gretsch Double Anniversary in two-tone green, but Jones is known for his signature teardrop-shaped prototype Vox Phantom Mark III. From late 1965 until his death, Jones used Gibson models (various Firebirds, ES-330, and a Les Paul model), as well as two Rickenbacker 12-String models. Gretsch is a U.S. musical instrument manufacturer currently being distributed by guitar company Fender and drum craft company Kaman. ... Vox is a musical equipment manufacturer formerly based in Britain, and now owned by Japanese electronics giants Korg, which is most famous for making the AC30 guitar amplifier and the Vox organ. ... The Gibson Guitar Corporation, of Nashville, Tennessee, USA, is a manufacturer of acoustic and electric guitars. ... Rickenbacker 330JG Rickenbacker International Corporation, also known as Rickenbacker (pronounced ) [1]), is an electric guitar manufacturer, notable for having invented the first electric guitar during the 1930s. ...


Jones contributed to the 1960s sound of the Stones, playing slide guitar on "I Wanna Be Your Man", "Little Red Rooster" and "No Expectations", harmonica on "Come On", "Dear Doctor", "Prodigal Son", "2120 South Michigan Avenue", "I Just Want to Make Love to You", "Look What You've Done" and "Not Fade Away", tambura and sitar on "Street Fighting Man" and "Paint It, Black", organ on "Let's Spend The Night Together", "Complicated" and "2000 Man", marimba on "Under My Thumb" and "Yesterday's Papers", recorder on "Ruby Tuesday", saxophone on "Child of the Moon", dulcimer on "Lady Jane", accordion on "Backstreet Girl", harpsichord on "Sittin' on a Fence", harpsichord, saxophone and oboe on "Dandelion", harpsichord on Lady Jane, mellotron on "She's A Rainbow", "Stray Cat Blues", "We Love You" and on "2000 Light Years from Home", tambourine on "Can I Get a Witness" and "Tell Me (You're Coming Back), and autoharp on "You Got the Silver". I Wanna Be Your Man is a rock song written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, and recorded separately by The Beatles and The Rolling Stones. ... Little Red Rooster is a blues song originally written and recorded by Willie Dixon. ... No Expectations is a song by the british rock n roll band The Rolling Stones. ... Look up come on in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long or excessively detailed compared to the rest of the article. ... The Return of the Prodigal Son (1773) by Pompeo Batoni The Prodigal Son, also known as The Lost Son is one of the best known parables of Jesus. ... I Just Want to Make Love to You is a 1954 blues song written by Willie Dixon and first recorded by Muddy Waters. ... Not Fade Away is a 1957 song by Buddy Holly. ... Street Fighting Man, written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, is a song by The Rolling Stones recorded in 1968. ... This article is about The Rolling Stones song. ... Lets Spend the Night Together was a 1967 song by the Rolling Stones. ... The marimba ( ) is a musical instrument in the percussion family. ... Under My Thumb is a song written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards for The Rolling Stones. ... Yesterdays Papers is a song by The Rolling Stones from their 1967 album, Between the Buttons. ... Various recorders The recorder is a woodwind musical instrument of the family known as fipple flutes or internal duct flutes — whistle-like instruments which include the tin whistle and ocarina. ... For the restaurant named after the song, see Ruby Tuesday (restaurant). ... Dulcimer is the name given to two types of stringed musical instrument: The Appalachian dulcimer, a three-course, fretted, plucked instrument which is also referred to as a mountain dulcimer or just a dulcimer, and The Hammered dulcimer, which is a hammer-struck, trapezoid-shaped zither The instruments are quite... For the historical person, see Lady Jane Grey. ... For other uses, see Accordion (disambiguation). ... Back Street Girl is a song by the British rock band The Rolling Stones. ... Harpsichord in the Flemish style A harpsichord is a musical instrument played by means of a keyboard. ... Sittin on a Fence is a song by the British rock and roll band The Rolling Stones. ... For other uses, see Oboe (disambiguation). ... Template:Single Infobox Dandelion is a song by the british rock n roll band, The Rolling Stones. ... For the historical person, see Lady Jane Grey. ... Shes a Rainbow is a song by the English rock n roll band The Rolling Stones and was featured on their 1967 album Their Satanic Majesties Request. ... Stray Cat Blues is the eighth song on the Rolling Stones album Beggars Banquet. ... We Love You is a rock song written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, first released as Decca single F12654 in the UK by The Rolling Stones on August 18, 1967, with a B-side of Dandelion. ... 2000 Light Years From Home is a song by The Rolling Stones from their 1967 psychedelic rock album, Their Satanic Majesties Request. ... “Buben” redirects here. ... Can I Get a Witness was a 1963 hit song by Marvin Gaye. ... Tell Me (Youre Coming Back) is a song by English rock and roll band the Rolling Stones featured on their 1964 self-titled album, also known as Englands Newest Hit Makers. ... An Autoharp The Autoharp is a musical string instrument having a series of chord bars attached to dampers which, when depressed, mute all the strings other than those that form the desired chord. ... You Got The Silver is a song by English rock and roll band the Rolling Stones off of their 1969 album Let It Bleed. ...


In the early years, Jones was also a harmony singer, mainly from 1962–1965. Notable examples are "I Wanna Be Your Man", "Can I Get A Witness" and "Walking The Dog". Jones' raspy and gruff backing can also be heard on "Come On", "Bye Bye Johnny", the 12 X 5 recording of "Time Is On My Side", "You Better Move On", "Money", "Everybody Needs Somebody To Love", "Tell Me (You're Coming Back)" (alongside Jagger, Richards and Wyman), "Empty Heart" (alongside Jagger and Richards), and "It's All Over Now" with Richards. I Wanna Be Your Man is a rock song written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, and recorded separately by The Beatles and The Rolling Stones. ... Walking The Dog (or Walkin The Dog) is a Rufus Thomas song. ... 12 X 5 is the second US album by The Rolling Stones released in 1964 following the massive success of their debut The Rolling Stones in the UK and the promising sales of its American substitute Englands Newest Hit Makers . ... Time Is On My Side is a song recorded by Jazz singer Kai Winding and The Enchanters in 1963, and covered by both Soul singer Irma Thomas and Rock band The Rolling Stones in 1964. ... Music sample The Beatles Money (Thats What I Want) ( file info) Problems? See media help. ... Tell Me (Youre Coming Back) is a song by English rock and roll band the Rolling Stones featured on their 1964 self-titled album, also known as Englands Newest Hit Makers. ... Its All Over Now is a song by Bobby Womack and Shirley Womack. ...


Richards maintains that what he and Jones called "guitar weaving" grew out of this period, from listening to Jimmy Reed albums: In rock, metal, and other related genres, bands often have multiple electric guitar players to perform the different musical parts, such as melody lines, guitar solos, chords, and riffs. ... Jimmy Reed James Jimmy Mathis Reed (September 6, 1925 - August 29, 1976) was an important United States blues singer notable for bringing his distinctive style of blues to mainstream audiences. ...

We listened to the teamwork, trying to work out what was going on in those records; how you could play together with two guitars and make it sound like four or five.[9]

Jones' and Richards' guitar became a signature of the sound of the Rolling Stones. It involved both playing rhythm and lead at the same time, without differentiating between styles. This is also known as the Chicago style, heard on albums by Jimmy Reed, Muddy Waters and Howlin' Wolf, with Hubert Sumlin as the main exponent. Jimmy Reed James Jimmy Mathis Reed (September 6, 1925 - August 29, 1976) was an important United States blues singer notable for bringing his distinctive style of blues to mainstream audiences. ... McKinley Morganfield (April 4, 1915 – April 30, 1983), better known as Muddy Waters, was an American blues musician and is generally considered the Father of Chicago blues. He is also the actual father of blues musician Big Bill Morganfield. ... Chester Arthur Burnett (June 10, 1910 – January 10, 1976), better known as Howlin Wolf or sometimes, The Howlin Wolf, was an influential blues singer, guitarist and harmonica player. ... Hubert Sumlin (November 16, 1931) is a blues guitar player known as a both a solo artist and central element in Howlin Wolfs backup band. ...


Jones and Richards perfected what they heard on 1950s Chicago Blues albums. The best examples can be heard on the first album The Rolling Stones and Out of Our Heads. Starting with the 1966 album Aftermath, the 1967 albums Between the Buttons and Their Satanic Majesties Request showcase Jones' multi-instrumental talents throughout. The 1968 album Beggars Banquet and the 1969 Let it Bleed album has Jones mostly missing, instead featuring guitar weaving by Richards alone or with session musicians such as Ry Cooder and Dave Mason. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alternate cover Englands Newest Hit Makers cover The Rolling Stones is the debut album by The Rolling Stones and was released in the United Kingdom in April 1964, following a month later in the United States as Englands Newest Hit Makers with a song substitution. ... Out of Our Heads is The Rolling Stones third UK album and their fourth in the US. It was released in 1965 through their original distributors (Decca Records in the UK and London Records in the US), but with significant differences in both territories. ... Alternate cover American cover Aftermath is the fourth UK and sixth US studio album by The Rolling Stones and was released in 1966. ... Between the Buttons is the fifth UK and seventh US studio album by The Rolling Stones and was released in 1967 as the follow-up to the ambitious Aftermath. ... Their Satanic Majesties Request is a psychedelic rock album by The Rolling Stones recorded and released in 1967. ... Alternate cover Initially rejected cover of Beggars Banquet Beggars Banquet is an LP released in 1968 by The Rolling Stones. ... This article is about the 1969 album by The Rolling Stones. ... Ryland Ry Peter Cooder (born 15 March 1947, in Los Angeles, California) is an American guitarist, singer and composer, known for his slide guitar work, his interest in the American roots music and, more recently, for his collaborations with traditional musicians from many countries. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In November 1968, Jones purchased Cotchford Farm in East Sussex, formerly owned by Winnie-the-Pooh author A. A. Milne. Winnie the Pooh Winnie-the-Pooh is a fictional bear created by A. A. Milne. ... Alan Alexander Milne (IPA pronunciation: ) (January 18, 1882 – January 31, 1956), also known as A. A. Milne, was an English author, best known for his books about the teddy bear Winnie-the-Pooh and for various childrens poems. ...


Estrangement from The Rolling Stones

The days on the road, the money and fame, and the feeling of being alienated from the group resulted in Jones' overindulgence in alcohol and other drugs. He frequently used LSD, pills and cannabis and was a heavy drinker. These excesses did no good for Jones' physical health. He suffered from asthma. On several occasions he was in hospital while the rest of the group was elsewhere, contributing to his paranoia and separating him from his bandmates. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Lysergic acid diethylamide, commonly called LSD, LSD-25, or acid. ... This article is about the plant genus Cannabis. ...


Jones was arrested for drug use on 10 May 1967, shortly after the Redlands incident at Richards' Sussex home. Authorities found marijuana, cocaine, and methamphetamine. He confessed to marijuana use but claimed he did not use hard drugs. Like the arrests of his bandmates, protesters appeared outside court demanding that Jones be freed, and he was not kept in jail for long. He was fined, given probation, and ordered to see a counsellor. is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Cannabis, also known as marijuana[1] or ganja (Hindi: गांजा),[2] is a psychoactive product of the plant Cannabis sativa. ... For other uses, see Cocaine (disambiguation). ... This article is about the psychostimulant, d-methamphetamine. ...


In June 1967, Jones attended the Monterey Pop Festival. He attended the festival with singer Nico, with whom he had a brief relationship. There he met Frank Zappa and Dennis Hopper, and went on stage to introduce the Jimi Hendrix Experience, then unknown in the U.S. One review referred to Jones as "the unofficial 'king' of the festival." Poster promoting the festival The Monterey International Pop Music Festival took place from June 16 to June 18, 1967. ... For other uses, see Nico (disambiguation). ... Frank Vincent Zappa[1] (December 21, 1940 – December 4, 1993) was an American composer, musician, and film director. ... Dennis Lee Hopper (born May 17, 1936) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and film-maker. ... Jimi Hendrix James Marshall Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 - September 18, 1970) was an American guitarist, singer, songwriter and producer who is widely considered to be the most important electric guitarist in the history of popular music. ...


Hostility grew between Jones and Jagger-Richards, alienating Jones from the group. Although by many accounts Jones was friendly and outgoing, Wyman commented that Jones could be cruel and difficult to get on with. By most accounts, Jones' attitude changed frequently, one minute caring and generous, the next making an effort to anger everyone.


As Wyman observed in Stone Alone:

There were two Brians…one was introverted, shy, sensitive, deep-thinking…the other was a preening peacock, gregarious, artistic, desperately needing assurance from his peers…he pushed every friendship to the limit and way beyond.

In an interview with Empire Magazine on the film Stoned, a film about Jones' final days, Richards cited him as "the nicest bunch of blokes you'd ever meet".[citation needed] To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Tensions grew between Jagger, Richards, and Jones, and his drug use and drinking did not help. His contributions became more sporadic. Richards began to play more guitar, while Jones, bored with the instrument, would find something exotic to play, though he was frequently absent from recordings. During the last years of his career, the most important of his little notable guitar parts was slide guitar on No Expectations in 1968. Jones' decline started around 1967 and continued until May 1968, when he recorded his last substantial contributions. Clips in the 1967 promotional film for "We Love You" show him slumped and barely able to keep his eyes open, most likely due to the effects of Mandrax (quaalude), a popular drug at the time. However, Jones maintained close relationships with many others outside of the Stones camp, including Bob Dylan, John Lennon, Jimi Hendrix, George Harrison, and Steve Marriott. No Expectations is a song by the british rock n roll band The Rolling Stones. ... The term Quaalude is defined by the Oxford English Dictionary as: A proprietary name for methaqualone; also, a tablet of this. More recently, however, the word has come to mean: a gently soothing interlude, possibly with mildly narcotic effects. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ... Steve Marriott (30 January 1947 in Upton, East London, – 20 April 1991 in Arkesden, Essex. ...


In March 1967, Jones' girlfriend Anita Pallenberg ran off with Richards while Jones was hospitalised, damaging Jones' and Richards' friendship. Pallenberg claimed Jones was hospitalised after a fight during which Jones hit her and broke his wrist; although as Richards remembers it, Jones simply "fell ill."[9] Richards later said: Anita Pallenberg (born January 25, 1944 in Rome, Italy) is a model, actress and fashion designer. ...

That was the final nail in the coffin with me and Brian. He'd never forgive me for that and I don't blame him, but, hell, shit happens.[9]


Jones' last substantial sessions with the Stones were in spring and summer of 1968, when the Stones produced "Jumpin' Jack Flash" and the Beggars Banquet album. Jones can be seen in the Jean-Luc Godard film One Plus One, playing acoustic guitar, chatting and sharing cigarettes with Richards, although Jones is neglected in the music-making. The film chronicles the making of "Sympathy for the Devil." While he played acoustic guitar for the backing track, it is not in the final released version, though occasionally audible in the film through the microphones of the film crew. Jumpin Jack Flash is a song by English rock and roll band The Rolling Stones, released as a single in 1968. ... Alternate cover Initially rejected cover of Beggars Banquet Beggars Banquet is an LP released in 1968 by The Rolling Stones. ... Jean-Luc Godard (French IPA: ) (born 3 December 1930) is a French filmmaker and one of the most influential members of the Nouvelle Vague, or French New Wave. Born to Franco-Swiss parents in Paris, he was educated in Nyon, Switzerland, later studying at the Lycée Rohmer, and the... The plus (+) and minus (−) signs are used universally to represent the operations of addition and subtraction, and have been extended to many other meanings, more or less analogous. ... This article is about the song. ...


At this time, it was clear Jones was not long for the group. Whereas he would once have played multiple instruments on many tracks, he was now no longer an ubiquitous presence on the album. He played acoustic slide guitar on "No Expectations", harmonica on "Dear Doctor" and "Prodigal Son", sitar and tambura on "Street Fighting Man", and mellotron on "Stray Cat Blues".


Jones' last formal appearance was in the December 1968 The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus, a part concert, part circus-act film organized by the band. It went unreleased for 25 years because Jagger was unhappy with the band's performance compared to others in the film, such as Jethro Tull, The Who, and Taj Mahal. In the film Jones appeared uninterested and at times intoxicated. While introducing concert pianist Julius Katchen, his speech was slurred. During the Stones set he appeared distant and in the DVD of the film, his playing has been rendered inaudible except during a rendition of "No Expectations", in order to minimise royalty payments on behalf of the band to his estate. Extra material on the DVD of the film indicated that almost everyone at the concert knew that the end of Jones' time with the Stones was near, and Pete Townshend of The Who thought it would be Jones' last musical live performance. For the album of the same name, see The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus (album) The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus is a film released in 1996 of a December 11, 1968 event put together by The Rolling Stones. ... For the 18th-century agriculturist after whom the band was named, see Jethro Tull (agriculturist). ... The Who are a British rock band that first formed in 1964, and grew to be considered one of the greatest[1] and most influential[2] bands in the world. ... Henry Saint Clair Fredericks, better known by the stage name Taj Mahal (born May 17, 1942), is an American blues musician. ... Julius Katchen (August 15, 1926 - April 29, 1969) was an American concert pianist. ... Pete Townshend (born Peter Dennis Blandford Townshend on 19 May 1945 in Chiswick, London), is an award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter, composer, and writer. ... The Who are a British rock band that first formed in 1964, and grew to be considered one of the greatest[1] and most influential[2] bands in the world. ...


Other contributions

In 1966 Jones produced, played on and wrote the soundtrack for the film "Mord und Totschlag" (also called "A Degree Of Murder"), an avant-garde German film with Anita Pallenberg. He hired musicians to play on the soundtrack, among them guitarist Jimmy Page. Jones and Pallenberg attracted controversy during the making of the film when Jones posed in a Nazi uniform while standing on a naked doll for a photograph, along with Pallenberg. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1678x2164, 240 KB) Scan of 1971 album cover of Brian Jones Presents Pipes of Pan at Joujouka This image is of a cover of an audio recording, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1678x2164, 240 KB) Scan of 1971 album cover of Brian Jones Presents Pipes of Pan at Joujouka This image is of a cover of an audio recording, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of... This article or section needs sources or references that appear in credible, third-party publications. ... The Master Musicians of Joujouka are the Sufi trance musicians most famous for their connections with the Beat Generation and the Rolling Stones founder Brian Jones. ... Anita Pallenberg (born January 25, 1944 in Rome, Italy) is a model, actress and fashion designer. ... For the Scottish football (soccer) player, see Jimmy Page (footballer). ... National Socialism redirects here. ...


Jones played alto saxophone on a Beatles song, "You Know My Name (Look Up the Number)", not released until after his death. This article is about the voice-type. ... The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... You Know My Name (Look Up the Number) was issued as the B-side of The Beatles single Let It Be on 6 March 1970. ...


In summer 1968, Jones recorded the Morocco-based ensemble, the Master Musicians of Joujouka. In 1971, Brian Jones Presents The Pipes Of Pan At Joujouka, was released posthumously; it remains a World Music landmark. Jagger and Richards traveled to Jajouka in 1989 after recording "Continental Drift" for the Stones album Steel Wheels with the Master Musicians of Jajouka featuring Bachir Attar in Tangier. Bachir Attar, son of the leader of the Jajouka musicians that Jones had recorded had coincidentally written to the Rolling Stones at that time, and Jagger, Richards, Ron Wood, and Matt Clifford (who was working on the album with them) flew to meet him and the Jajouka musicians. This encounter is documented in a rarely seen BBC television film called "Rolling Stones in Morocco", later released on cassette. The homage to Jones, "Brian Jones Joujouka very Stoned" by Mohamed Hamri the painter who brought him to his home village to record appeared on Joujouka Black Eyes by Master Musicians of Joujouka in 1995. The Master Musicians of Joujouka are the Sufi trance musicians most famous for their connections with the Beat Generation and the Rolling Stones founder Brian Jones. ... This article or section needs sources or references that appear in credible, third-party publications. ... World music is, most generally, all the music in the world. ... This article or section needs sources or references that appear in reliable, third-party publications. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... This article is about the band led by Bachir Attar and previously by his father, Hadj Abdesalam Attar. ... Bachir Attar claims leadership of the Master Musicians of Jajouka Master Musicians of Joujouka, and since 1990 has released records as The Master Musicians of Jajouka featuring Bachir Attar. ... Mohamed Hamri (1932 - 2000) was a Moroccan painter and author and one of the few Moroccans to participate in the Tangier and Beat generation. ...


Death

Jones was arrested a second time, on 21 May 1968, for marijuana possession. Jones claimed the marijuana was left by previous owners of his home. He was facing a long jail sentence if found guilty, owing to his probation. Wyman commented, "The fact that the police had secured a warrant with no evidence showed the arrest was part of a carefully orchestrated plan. Brian and the Stones were being targeted in an effort to deter the public from taking drugs." The jury found him guilty, but the judge had sympathy for Jones; instead of fining and jailing him, he said, "For goodness sake, don't get into trouble again or it really will be serious." is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Jones' legal troubles, estrangement from his bandmates, substance abuse, sporadic contributions, and mood swings became too much. The Stones wanted to tour the United States in 1969 for the first time in three years, but Jones's second arrest exacerbated problems with US immigration. Jones was unable to acquire a work visa.


In addition, the Stones' music was heavily based on the two weaving guitars; Brian's penchant for exotic instrumentation worked to complement Richards' guitar work. Now, however, Brian was rarely coming to the studio; when he did, he rarely contributed anything musically, or his guitar would be switched off by his bandmates, leaving Richards playing nearly all the guitars. According to Gary Herman, he was "literally incapable of making music; when he tried to play harmonica, his mouth started bleeding".[15]


This behaviour began to wreak havoc during the Beggar's Banquet sessions but had fully flourished by the time the band commenced Let It Bleed. While the band was recording "You Can't Always Get What You Want", Jones meekly asked an agitated Jagger, "What can I play?" Jagger's terse response was "I don't know, Brian, what can you play?" From this point he made himself scarce, rarely attending sessions. By May, he had made two contributions to the work in progress: an autoharp on "You Got the Silver" and percussion on the epic "Midnight Rambler", which remains inaudible on the released version. Jones was informed by Jagger that he would be dismissed from the band if he did not appear at a photo shoot for the compilation album Through The Past Darkly. Looking frail, he showed. An Autoharp The Autoharp is a musical string instrument having a series of chord bars attached to dampers which, when depressed, mute all the strings other than those that form the desired chord. ... Through The Past, Darkly (Big Hits Vol. ...


The Stones decided that following the release of the Let it Bleed album (scheduled for a July 1969 release in the USA) they would start a North American tour in November 1969, the first in three years. However, the Stones management was informed that Jones would not receive a permit due to his drug convictions. At the suggestion of pianist and road manager Ian Stewart, the Stones decided to add a new guitarist, and on 8 June 1969, Jones was visited by Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Charlie Watts, and was told that the group he had formed would continue without him. Ian AR Stewart (18 July 1938 – 12 December 1985) was a Scottish rock musician. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ...


To the public, it appeared as if Jones had left voluntarily; the others told him that although he was being asked to leave, it was his choice how to break it to the public. Jones released a statement on 9 June 1969 announcing his departure. In the statement he said, among other things, that is the 160th day of the year (161st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ...

I no longer see eye-to-eye with the others over the discs we are cutting.

Ironically, this would come as the Stones were returning to their blues roots, which Jones had always emphasized. Jones was replaced by 21-year-old guitarist Mick Taylor (formerly of John Mayall's Bluesbreakers), who started sessions with the Stones at once. Michael Mick Kevin Taylor (born 17 January 1948 in Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire) is an English musician best known as a former guitarist for The Rolling Stones. ... John Mayall and the Bluesbreakers with Eric Clapton album cover John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers was a pioneering British blues band that included such luminaries as: Eric Clapton and Jack Bruce (both later in Cream), Peter Green, John McVie and Mick Fleetwood (later all in Fleetwood Mac), Mick Taylor (later in...


At this point Jones stayed at Cotchford Farm, with intentions to form another band. He did visit Olympic studios the next week to discuss the future with his former bandmates, Bill Wyman noting that he was "excited about his own plans".[1] He is known to have contacted Ian Stewart, Mitch Mitchell, Alexis Korner and Jimmy Miller. He toyed with joining Korner's New Church band, but Korner suggested Jones form his own band. Ian AR Stewart (18 July 1938 – 12 December 1985) was a Scottish rock musician. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Alexis Korner (born Alexis Andrew Nicholas Korner, 19 April 1928 in Paris, France - died on 1 January 1984 in Westminster, London, England) Korner is probably best remembered as the Founding Father of British Blues and a pioneering blues musician. ... Jimmy Miller (1944-1994) was a Brooklyn-born record producer who produced albums for The Spencer Davis Group (in fact, he co-wrote the song Gimme Some Lovin with Steve Winwood), Traffic , Blind Faith, Bobby Whitlock and The Rolling Stones (all albums from Beggars Banquet to Goats Head Soup), New...


There is uncertainty as to the mental and physical state Jones was in at this time. The last known photographs, taken by schoolgirl Helen Spittal on June 23, 1969, shortly after his departure from the Stones, are not flattering; Jones appears bloated, with deep-set eyes. People who visited (particularly Alexis Korner) were surprised, however, by Jones's state in late June. Korner noted that Jones was "happier than he had ever been"[1] at this time, and supposedly Jimmy Miller was surprised to find Jones in good spirits. is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ...


At around midnight on 3 July 1969, Jones was discovered motionless at the bottom of his swimming pool at his home in Hartfield, Sussex, England. His girlfriend, Anna Wohlin, is convinced he was alive when they took him out, insisting he still had a pulse. However, when the doctors arrived, it was too late and he was pronounced dead. The coroner's report stated "Death by misadventure", and noted his liver and heart were heavily enlarged by drug and alcohol abuse.[1]Some felt it was suicide, however, blaming Jagger and Richards for his state of mental depression. is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... For the 2003 film, see Swimming Pool (film). ... Hartfield Parish Church Hartfield Parish, situated in East Sussex, consists of several villages on the edge of Ashdown Forest. ... This article refers to the historic county in England. ... For the thrash metal band, see Coroner (band). ...


Wohlin claimed in 1999 that Jones had been murdered by a builder who had been renovating the house the couple shared. The builder, Frank Thorogood, allegedly confessed to the murder on his deathbed to the Rolling Stones' driver, Tom Keylock; however, there were no other witnesses. In ("The Murder Of Brian Jones") Wohlin alleges that Thorogood behaved suspiciously and showed little sympathy when Jones was discovered in the pool (he was the last to see Brian alive), but she admits she was not present at Jones's death. Witnesses who claim to have seen the 'murder' have been interviewed by journalists; however, these witnesses have almost always used pseudonyms, and none has been willing to go on record or report to the police. This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Many items, such as instruments and expensive furniture, were stolen from the home after Jones's death, most likely by Thorogood, driver Tom Keylock, and others who worked on the property. Rumours also exist that recordings by Jones for his future projects were stolen but nothing has surfaced to date. A watch given by Alexis Korner to Brian, with a personal inscription, surfaced at Christie's in New York. The Christies auction house in South Kensington, London Christies American branch in Rockefeller Center, New York Christies is a fine art auction house, the largest and by some accounts the oldest in the world. ...


Upon Jones' death, Pete Townshend wrote a poem titled "A Normal Day For Brian, A Man Who Died Every Day" (printed in The Times), Jimi Hendrix dedicated a song to him on U.S. television, and Jim Morrison of The Doors wrote a published poem entitled Ode To L.A. While Thinking Of Brian Jones, Deceased. Pete Townshend (born Peter Dennis Blandford Townshend on 19 May 1945 in Chiswick, London), is an award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter, composer, and writer. ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ... For other persons named James or Jim Morrison, see James Morrison. ... The Doors were an American rock band formed in 1965 in Los Angeles by vocalist Jim Morrison, keyboardist Ray Manzarek, drummer John Densmore, and guitarist Robby Krieger. ...


The Rolling Stones performed a free concert in Hyde Park on 5 July 1969, two days after his death. The concert had been scheduled weeks earlier as an opportunity to present the new guitarist. However, critics accused the band of being callous about their former bandmate. In response, the band dedicated the concert to Jones. Before the concert began, Jagger read excepts from "Adonais", a poem by Percy Shelley about the death of his friend John Keats. Their manager had come up with a plan to release thousands of white doves upon the sky of Hype Park to remember the memory of Jones. The Stones opened with a Johnny Winter song that was one of Brian's favourites, "I'm Yours And I'm Hers". is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Adonais is an epic poem written by Percy Bysshe Shelley as an elegy to John Keats in 1821. ... Percy Bysshe Shelley Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 - July 8, 1822) was one of the major English Romantic poets. ... Keats redirects here. ... John Dawson Johnny Winter III (born on 23 February 1944 in Beaumont, Texas, USA) is an American blues guitarist, singer, and producer. ...


Jones was reportedly buried 12 feet (3.7 m) deep in Cheltenham Cemetery (to prevent exhumation by trophy hunters) in a lavish casket sent for his funeral in Cheltenham by friend Bob Dylan. The Stones asked fans to stay away, and of the group only Watts and Wyman attended. Mick Jagger and Marianne Faithfull did not attend as they were travelling to Australia to begin a movie and claimed the producers prohibited their attendance upon threat of having their contract severed. Keith Richards did not attend due to studio commitments. This article is about the recording artist. ... Sir Michael Phillip Mick Jagger (born July 26, 1943) is a English rock musician, actor, songwriter, record and film producer and businessman. ... Marianne Faithfull (born 29 December 1946) is an English singer and actress whose career spans over four decades. ... Keith Richards (born 18 December 1943) is an English guitarist, songwriter, singer and a founding member of The Rolling Stones in 1962. ...


Writing credits

In contrast to Jagger and Richards, Jones was not known to write songs for the Rolling Stones. Jones was unsure and insecure as a composer, and although reports differ as to how many released compositions he co-wrote or proposed, Jones was no prolific songwriter.


Allegedly, when the Stones first met him, Andrew Oldham tried to set up a songwriting partnership between Jones and Gene Pitney. Wyman has stated in interviews that although Jagger and Richards were protective of their role as writers, they would be open to ideas, and he names his "In Another Land" and "Downtown Suzie" as examples. Wyman commented that Jones was "an incredibly gifted musician, but not a song writer". Ronnie Wood also commented in interviews that he is proud that he was able to get about two dozen songs recorded and released, and Wood also mentioned the protective nature of the Jagger/Richards partnership. Jagger/Richards originals laid the foundation of the success of The Stones. Gene Francis Alan Pitney (February 17, 1940 – April 5, 2006) was an American singer and songwriter. ... Ron Wood (born June 1, 1947 in London) is a British rock guitarist and best known as a member of The Rolling Stones and The Faces. ...


Only one officially released song is credited to Jones, the 30-second "Rice Krispies" jingle for Kellogg's, co-written with J. W. Thompson in 1963 and which the group performed incognito. The fact that Jones took sole credit did not sit well with the rest of the Stones, who felt it was a group effort and all should benefit equally. Fourteen Stones songs were credited to "Nanker Phelge", a pseudonym indicating that all members of the group (including Jones) authored the song. They dropped the pseudonym after 1965. A 'Nanker' was a strange face Jones and Richards would often make, and Phelge came from their former roommate James Phelge. J.W. Thompson worked for an advertising agency who was hired for the Kelloggs Cornflakes campaign in 1963 and 1964. ... Nanker Phelge (aka Nanker/Phelge) was a pseudonym used for early Rolling Stones group compositions. ... For other uses, see Alias. ...


A second song, "Sure I Do", reportedly written, recorded, and sung completely by Jones in 1963, remains unreleased. A vinyl disc with a label containing the title remains in Wyman's "Sticky Fingers" restaurant; it is unclear whether the song exists.


An example of the dispute is "Ruby Tuesday". Jones' recorder is a key ingredient, as is Jack Nitzsche's piano and Richards' and Wyman's combined double-bass effort. Wyman and Glyn Johns state that Richards wrote the song, and Richards has stated in various interviews (as well as his own website) that he wrote the song in a hotel room in Los Angeles in early 1966. He also explained the title as the name of a hotel he visited in the US, and the song's story being about a groupie. Jagger stated of 'Ruby Tuesday', when discussing songs he wrote with Richards in Rolling Stone: "Beautiful lyrics and music, neither of which I wrote". One source claims Jones wrote the song; Marianne Faithfull stated in her book that Jones composed the song's melody as a mix between medieval music and Skip James's blues numbers. Ruby Tuesday is a song recorded by The Rolling Stones in 1966, written by Brian Jones with some bits by Keith Richards concerning lyrics and texture, but credited to Jagger and Richards instead. ... Various recorders The recorder is a woodwind musical instrument of the family known as fipple flutes or internal duct flutes — whistle-like instruments which include the tin whistle and ocarina. ... Bernard Alfred (Jack) Nitzsche (Chicago, April 22, 1937 – Hollywood, August 25, 2000) was an integral presence in the history of popular music in the 20th century. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Marianne Faithfull (born 29 December 1946) is an English singer and actress whose career spans over four decades. ... Nehemiah Curtis Skip James (June 21, 1902 – October 3, 1969) was an American blues singer, guitarist, pianist and songwriter. ...


When asked in 1965 if he had written songs, Jones replied: "Always tried. I've written quite a few, but mostly in blues style." Richards said: "No, no. Absolutely not. That was the one thing he would never do. Brian wouldn't show them to anybody within the Stones. Brian as far as I know never wrote a single finished song in his life; he wrote bits and pieces but he never presented them to us. No doubt he spent hours, weeks, working on things, but his paranoia was so great that he could never bring himself to present them to us." However, he did compose the soundtrack to a German film, A Degree Of Murder, in which his name is mentioned during the movie's opening credits. The soundtrack is the only thing the public has heard of a Jones solo recording.


Public image and legend

Brian Jones enjoyed high status as a fashion icon, exemplified by his rebellious, outlandish style. As the most photogenic member of the early Rolling Stones, his style of dress and manner did much to influence the fashion scene of swinging 1960s London.


He was 1.68 metres tall with blue-grey eyes and blond hair, yet he was a pioneer "surly rock star". He was known to walk deliberately in crowded streets until girls would start chasing him, at which point he would run as fast as he could.


Jones, like Jagger, was politically inclined, and stated in an interview that abortion and recreational drugs should be legal, and expressed his support for gay rights. He gave interviews frequently, the most eloquent of the group. His intellect, combined with outspoken dislike of socially imposed constraints, made him one of the earliest stars of the British Invasion. For other uses, see British Invasion (disambiguation). ...


His death at 27 was the first of the Sixties rock movement, and when Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, and Jim Morrison found their own drug-related deaths at the same age within two years (the last, Morrison, dying exactly two years after Jones), Jones was immortalised in the 27 Club (Kurt Cobain joining in 1994). Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ... Janis Lyn Joplin (19 January 1943 – 4 October 1970) was an American singer, songwriter, and music arranger, from Port Arthur, Texas. ... For other persons named James or Jim Morrison, see James Morrison. ... The 27 Club, also occasionally known as the Forever 27 Club, is a popular culture name for a group of influential rock and blues musicians who all died at the age of 27, sometimes under mysterious circumstances. ... Kurt Donald Cobain (February 20, 1967 – c. ...


The Psychic TV song "Godstar" is about Jones' death, as is Robyn Hitchcock's "Trash." The Doors' song "Tightrope Ride" was originally written for Jones by Morrison, but after Morrison's death fellow Doors member Ray Manzarek rewrote some of the lyrics to apply them to both musicians. The 2005 film Stoned is a fictional account of Jones and his role in the Rolling Stones. The Brian Jonestown Massacre was named partially after him. In 2001, Jones was mentioned in the lyrics of De Phazz's "Death By Chocolate" album in the song "Something Special". This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Robyn Rowan Hitchcock (born March 3, 1953) is a singer-songwriter, psych folk artist, and occasional actor. ... Stoned is a film released in the UK in 2005. ... The Brian Jonestown Massacre is a psychedelic rock band founded in San Francisco, California in the early 1990s, led by Anton Newcombe. ... De-Phazz is a jazz band integrating modern turntablism, led by Pit Baumgartner, a German producer who changes his crew for every new album. ...


Notes

  1. ^ a b c d Wyman, Bill. Rolling With The Stones. DK Publishing, 2002. p. 10.
  2. ^ Wyman, Bill. Rolling With The Stones. DK Publishing, 2002. p. 10 & 16.
  3. ^ a b Wyman, Bill. Rolling With The Stones. DK Publishing, 2002. p. 23.
  4. ^ a b Wyman, Bill. Rolling With The Stones. DK Publishing, 2002. p. 19.
  5. ^ a b c Wyman, Bill. Rolling With The Stones. DK Publishing, 2002. p. 28.
  6. ^ a b Wyman, Bill. Rolling With The Stones. DK Publishing, 2002. p. 31.
  7. ^ Wyman, Bill. Rolling With The Stones. DK Publishing, 2002. p. 32.
  8. ^ Wyman, Bill. Rolling With The Stones. DK Publishing, 2002. p. 35.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h Jagger, Mick et al. According To The Rolling Stones. Chronicle Books, 2003.
  10. ^ Wyman, Bill. Rolling With The Stones. DK Publishing, 2002. p. 37.
  11. ^ Wyman, Bill. Rolling With The Stones. DK Publishing, 2002. p. 56.
  12. ^ Wyman, Bill. Rolling With The Stones. DK Publishing, 2002. p. 57.
  13. ^ Wyman, Bill. Rolling With The Stones. DK Publishing, 2002. p. 76.
  14. ^ Tony Sanchez, Up and Down with The Rolling Stones (New York: Quill Books, William Morrow And Company, Inc., 1979, ISBN 0-688-08515-6), pg. 7
  15. ^ Gary Herman, Rock 'N' Roll Babylon (Norfolk: Fakenham Press, 1982), p. 44."

References

  • Gary Herman, Rock 'N' Roll Babylon (Norfolk: Fakenham Press, 1982), ISBN 0-85965-041-3
  • Geoffrey Giuliano, Paint It Black: The Murder Of Brian Jones.
  • Gered Mankowitz, Brian Jones: Like a Rollin' Stone
  • Robert Weingartner, A tribute to Brian Jones
  • Terry Rawlings (1994), Who Killed Christopher Robin?: The Life and Death of Brian Jones, ISBN 0-7522-0989-2
  • Laura Jackson (1992), Golden Stone: The Untold Life and Tragic Death of Brian Jones, ISBN 0-312-09820-0
  • R. Chapman, "The bittersweet symphony", Mojo, 68 (July 1999), pg.62-84
  • Bill Wyman and Ray Coleman, Stone Alone, ISBN 0-670-82894-7
  • Alan Clayson, Brian Jones, ISBN 1-86074-544-X
  • Bill Wyman, Rolling With The Stones, ISBN 0-7894-8967-8
  • Andrew Loog Oldham, Stoned : A Memoir of London in the 1960s ISBN 978-0312270940

External links

The Master Musicians of Joujouka are the Sufi trance musicians most famous for their connections with the Beat Generation and the Rolling Stones founder Brian Jones. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... Sir Michael Phillip Mick Jagger (born July 26, 1943) is a English rock musician, actor, songwriter, record and film producer and businessman. ... Keith Richards (born 18 December 1943) is an English guitarist, songwriter, singer and a founding member of The Rolling Stones in 1962. ... Charles Robert Charlie Watts (born 2 June 1941) is the drummer of The Rolling Stones. ... Ron Wood (born June 1, 1947 in London) is a British rock guitarist and best known as a member of The Rolling Stones and The Faces. ... Michael Mick Kevin Taylor (born 17 January 1948 in Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire) is an English musician best known as a former guitarist for The Rolling Stones. ... Ian AR Stewart (18 July 1938 – 12 December 1985) was a Scottish rock musician. ... Bill Wyman (born William George Perks on 24 October 1936) was the bassist for the English rock and roll band The Rolling Stones from its founding in 1962 until 1993. ... Dick Taylor performing with The Pretty Things in 1999. ... Chuck Leavell (born Charles Alfred Leavell, April 28, 1952) is an American pianist and keyboardist, who was a member of The Allman Brothers Band during the height of their popularity, a founding member of the jazz-rock combo Sea Level, a frequently-employed session musician, and later, the keyboardist for... Darryl Jones (born December 11, 1961), also known as The Munch, is an American bassist, highly regarded in both jazz and rock music. ... Nicholas Nicky Hopkins (February 24, 1944 in Ealing, West London – September 6, 1994 in Nashville, Tennessee, USA) was an English musician who featured on scores of the most important British and American popular music recordings of the 1960s and 1970s, playing piano and organ. ... Bobby Keys is a saxophone player. ... James Jimmy Miller (23 March 1942 - 22 October 1994) was a Brooklyn-born record producer who produced albums for the Spencer Davis Group (and co-wrote the song Im A Man with Steve Winwood), Traffic, Blind Faith, Bobby Whitlock, Kracker and the Rolling Stones (all albums from Beggars Banquet... Jim Price was, together with Bobby Keys and Jim Horn one of the most in demand horn session players of the 1970s. ... William Everett Preston (September 2, 1946 – June 6, 2006) was an American soul musician from Houston, Texas, raised mostly in Los Angeles, California. ... Don Was (born Don Fagenson on September 13, 1952 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American musician and a music and record producer. ... Alternate cover Englands Newest Hit Makers cover The Rolling Stones is the debut album by The Rolling Stones and was released in the United Kingdom in April 1964, following a month later in the United States as Englands Newest Hit Makers with a song substitution. ... The Rolling Stones No. ... Out of Our Heads is The Rolling Stones third UK album and their fourth in the US. It was released in 1965 through their original distributors (Decca Records in the UK and London Records in the US), but with significant differences in both territories. ... Alternate cover American cover Aftermath is the fourth UK and sixth US studio album by The Rolling Stones and was released in 1966. ... Between the Buttons is the fifth UK and seventh US studio album by The Rolling Stones and was released in 1967 as the follow-up to the ambitious Aftermath. ... Alternate cover Englands Newest Hit Makers cover The Rolling Stones is the debut album by The Rolling Stones and was released in the United Kingdom in April 1964, following a month later in the United States as Englands Newest Hit Makers with a song substitution. ... 12 X 5 is the second US album by The Rolling Stones released in 1964 following the massive success of their debut The Rolling Stones in the UK and the promising sales of its American substitute Englands Newest Hit Makers . ... The Rolling Stones, Now! is the third US album by The Rolling Stones and was released in the 1965 by their initial American distributor, London Records. ... Out of Our Heads is The Rolling Stones third UK album and their fourth in the US. It was released in 1965 through their original distributors (Decca Records in the UK and London Records in the US), but with significant differences in both territories. ... Decembers Children (And Everybodys) is the fifth US album by The Rolling Stones, released in late 1965. ... Alternate cover American cover Aftermath is the fourth UK and sixth US studio album by The Rolling Stones and was released in 1966. ... Between the Buttons is the fifth UK and seventh US studio album by The Rolling Stones and was released in 1967 as the follow-up to the ambitious Aftermath. ... Their Satanic Majesties Request is a psychedelic rock album by The Rolling Stones recorded and released in 1967. ... Alternate cover Initially rejected cover of Beggars Banquet Beggars Banquet is an LP released in 1968 by The Rolling Stones. ... This article is about the 1969 album by The Rolling Stones. ... Alternate cover Cover of Spanish edition Sticky Fingers is an album by The Rolling Stones and was released in 1971. ... Exile on Main St. ... Goats Head Soup is an album by The Rolling Stones released in 1973. ... For the Waylon Jennings album, see Its Only Rock and Roll For the Only Fools and Horses episode, see Its Only Rock and Roll (Only Fools and Horses) Its Only Rock n Roll is an album by The Rolling Stones, released in 1974. ... Black And Blue is an album by The Rolling Stones and was released in 1976. ... For other uses, see Some Girls (disambiguation). ... Emotional Rescue is an album by The Rolling Stones and was released in 1980. ... Tattoo You is an album by The Rolling Stones, released in 1981. ... For the 2005 Ozzy Osbourne album, see Under Cover (Ozzy Osbourne album) Undercover is also the title of a 2003 album by the German band the Puhdys Undercover is an album by The Rolling Stones and was released in 1983. ... Dirty Work is an album by The Rolling Stones, released in 1986. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Voodoo Lounge is an album by The Rolling Stones and was released in 1994. ... Bridges to Babylon is an album by The Rolling Stones and was released in 1997. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Rolling Stones is the debut EP released by The Rolling Stones in 1964. ... For other uses, see Five by five (disambiguation). ... Get Yer Ya-Yas Out! The Rolling Stones in Concert is a live album by The Rolling Stones released in 1970. ... Love You Live is a double live album by The Rolling Stones, released in 1977. ... Still Life (American Concert 1981) is a live album by The Rolling Stones and was released in 1982. ... Flashpoint is a live album by The Rolling Stones and was released in 1991. ... Stripped is a live album by The Rolling Stones and was released in 1995 while on the Voodoo Lounge Tour. ... No Security is a live album by The Rolling Stones and was released in 1998. ... Live Licks is a double live album by The Rolling Stones and was released in 2004. ... Big Hits (High Tide and Green Grass) is the first official compilation album by The Rolling Stones, released in late 1966 on Decca Records in the U.K. and in the U.S. on London Records, the bands American distributor at the time. ... Flowers is the eighth U.S. studio album by The Rolling Stones, released in 1967. ... Through The Past, Darkly (Big Hits Vol. ... Compilation of the finest years of the Stones - The Mick Taylor years. ... Sucking in the Seventies is the fourth official compilation album by The Rolling Stones and was released in 1981. ... Rewind (1971-1984) is a compilation album by The Rolling Stones and was released in 1984. ... Forty Licks is a double compilation album by The Rolling Stones. ... Rarities 1971-2003 is a compilation album by The Rolling Stones that was released in 2005 worldwide by Virgin Records - as well as by the coffee-chain Starbucks in North America - and features a selection of supposedly rare and obscure material recorded between 1971 and 2003. ... ABKCO Music & Records, Inc. ... Hot Rocks 1964-1971 is the first compilation album of Rolling Stones music released by former manager Allen Kleins ABKCO Records (who usurped control of the bands Decca/London material in 1970) after the bands departure from Decca and Klein. ... More Hot Rocks (Big Hits & Fazed Cookies) is the second compilation album of Rolling Stones music released by former manager Allen Kleins ABKCO Records (who usurped control of the bands Decca/London material in 1970) after the bands departure from Decca and Klein. ... Metamorphosis is the third compilation album of Rolling Stones music released by former manager Allen Kleins ABKCO Records (who usurped control of the bands Decca/London material in 1970) after the bands departure from Decca and Klein. ... The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus is the fifth release of Rolling Stones music by former manager Allen Kleins ABKCO Records (who usurped control of the bands Decca/London material in 1970) after the bands departure from Decca and Klein. ... Singles 1963-1965 is a box set compilation of the singles and EPs by The Rolling Stones during the years 1963 and 1965. ... Singles 1965-1967 is a box set compilation of the singles released by The Rolling Stones during the years 1965 and 1967. ... Singles 1968-1971 is a box set compilation of the singles released by The Rolling Stones during the years 1968 and 1971. ... It has been suggested that Decca Music Group be merged into this article or section. ... Jamming with Edward is a Rolling Stones album, recorded in Keith Richards private studio in France during the Let It Bleed sessions of 1969, and released on Virgin Records in 1972. ... Brussels Affair is an unofficial live album by the Rolling Stones. ... The Rolling Stones 1969 American Tour (which seems to have had no official name) was a much publicised, written about, recorded, and filmed concert tour of the United States that took place during November 1969. ... The Rolling Stones 1970 European Tour was a concert tour of Continental Europe that took place during the late summer and early fall of 1970. ... The Rolling Stones 1971 UK Tour was a brief concert tour of England and Scotland that took place over two weeks in March 1971. ... The Rolling Stones American Tour 1972, often referred the S.T.P. Tour (for Stones Touring Party), was a much-publicized and much-written-about concert tour of The United States and Canada in June and July 1972 by The Rolling Stones. ... The Rolling Stones Pacific Tour 1973 was a concert tour of countries bordering the Pacific Ocean in January and February 1973 by The Rolling Stones. ... The Rolling Stones 1973 European Tour was a concert tour of Great Britain and Continental Europe in September and October 1973 by The Rolling Stones. ... The Rolling Stones Tour of the Americas 75 was a concert tour, intended for North and South America, that took place during 1975. ... The Rolling Stones Tour of Europe 76 was a concert tour of Continental Europe and Great Britain that took place in Spring 1976. ... The Rolling Stones US Tour 1978 was a concert tour of the United States that took place during June and July 1978, immediately following the release of their album Some Girls. ... The Rolling Stones American Tour 1981 was a concert tour of stadiums in the United States to promote the album Tattoo You. ... Its the European Tour to promote, the album Tattoo You 26th May: Aberdeen, Scotland, Capitol Theatre 27th May: Glasgow, Scotland, Apollo Theatre 28th May: Edinburgh, Scotland, Green’s Playhouse 2nd June: Rotterdam, Netherlands, Feyenoord Stadion 4th June: Rotterdam, Netherlands, Feyenoord Stadion 5th June: Rotterdam, Netherlands, Feyenoord Stadion 6th June... The Rolling Stones Steel Wheels Tour was a North American concert tour that took place starting in late August 1989, concurrent with the release of their album Steel Wheels. ... The world tour for promote Voodoo Lounge 1st August: Washington, D.C., Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium 3rd August: Washington, D.C., Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium 6th August: Birmingham, Alabama, Legion Field 12th August: East Rutherford, New Jersey, Giants Stadium 14th August: East Rutherford, New Jersey, Giants Stadium 15th... The Bridges to Babylon Tour was a 1997-1998 concert tour by The Rolling Stones, in support of their album Bridges to Babylon. ... The No Security Tour was a tour by The Rolling Stones which played to 25 cities in Canada and North America in 1999. ... The Licks Tour was a lengthy, truly worldwide concert tour held during 2002 and 2003 by The Rolling Stones. ... The Rolling Stones A Bigger Bang Tour was a worldwide concert tour which took place between August 2005 and August 2007, in support of their album A Bigger Bang. ... Andrew Loog Oldham (born 1944) is a British rock and roll producer, impresario and author. ... Allen Klein (born December 18, 1931) is an American businessman and record label executive. ... This is an annotated listing of the recordings of The Rolling Stones. ... Glimmer Twins first appears in 1974. ... Jagger/Richards is a songwriting team that consists of Mick Jagger and Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones. ... Nanker Phelge (aka Nanker/Phelge) was a pseudonym used for early Rolling Stones group compositions. ... Rolling Stones Records is the record label formed by The Rolling Stones in 1970, after their recording contract with Decca Records expired. ... For other uses, see Altamont. ... The Rolling Stones Mobile Studio is a mobile recording studio owned by the musical group the Rolling Stones. ... This is an annotated listing of the recordings of The Rolling Stones. ...

 
 

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