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Encyclopedia > Brian De Palma
Brian De Palma

Birth name Brian Russell DePalma
Born September 11, 1940 (1940-09-11) (age 67)
Flag of the United States Newark, New Jersey, U.S.
Spouse(s) Nancy Allen (1979-1983)
Darnell Gregorio-De Palma (1995-1997)

Brian De Palma (born Brian Russell DePalma on September 11, 1940 in Newark, New Jersey) is a controversial American film director, best known for directing the Al Pacino classic Scarface, and the Academy Award-winning The Untouchables. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Map of Newark in Essex County County Founded/Incorporated 1666/1836 Government  - Mayor Cory Booker, term of office 2006–2010 Area [1]  - City 67. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Nancy Anne Allen (born June 24, 1950) is an American film actress. ... One of the A festivals in Europe. ... Greetings is a 1968 film directed by Brian De Palma. ... The Venice Film Festival ( ) is the oldest film festival in the world. ... Redacted is a feature film written and directed by Brian De Palma. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Map of Newark in Essex County County Founded/Incorporated 1666/1836 Government  - Mayor Cory Booker, term of office 2006–2010 Area [1]  - City 67. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... Alfredo James Pacino (born April 25, 1940) is an Academy, Golden Globe, Tony, BAFTA, Emmy, and SAG award winning American actor who is best known for playing the roles of Tony Montana in the 1983 film Scarface and Michael Corleone in The Godfather Trilogy . ... Scarface is a 1983 film directed by Brian De Palma, written by Oliver Stone and starring Al Pacino as Antonio Tony Montana. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Untouchables is a 1987 film, directed by Brian De Palma, based on the 1959 ABC television series, which, in turn, was based on Eliot Nesss autobiographical account of his efforts to bring Al Capone to justice. ...


De Palma is often cited as a leading member of the New Hollywood generation of film directors, a distinct pedigree who either emerged from film schools or are overtly cine-literate. His contemporaries include Martin Scorsese, Paul Schrader, John Milius, George Lucas, Francis Ford Coppola, and Steven Spielberg. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (born November 17, 1942) is an American film director, writer and producer and founder of the World Cinema Foundation. ... Paul Joseph Schrader (born July 22, 1946 in Grand Rapids, Michigan) is a screenwriter and film director, renowned for his characters that fall into desperation while their world crumbles around them. ... John Milius (born April 11, 1944 in St. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ... Francis Ford Coppola (born April 7, 1939) is a five-time Academy Award winning American film director, producer, and screenwriter. ... Steven Allan Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ...


De Palma's artistry in directing and use of cinematography and suspense in several of his films is often compared to the work of the late Alfred Hitchcock.[citation needed] Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 – April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ...


Throughout the 1970s and early 1980s, De Palma worked repeatedly with actors Jennifer Salt, Amy Irving, Nancy Allen (his wife from 1979 to 1983), William Finley, Charles Durning, Gerrit Graham, cinematographers Stephen H. Burum and Vilmos Zsigmond (see List of noted film director and cinematographer collaborations), set designer Jack Fisk, and composers Bernard Herrmann and Pino Donaggio. De Palma is credited with fostering the careers of or outright discovering Robert De Niro, Jill Clayburgh, John C. Reilly, John Leguizamo, and Margot Kidder. Jennifer Salt was a lead actress in the late 1960s early 70s. ... Amy Irving (born September 10, 1953 in Palo Alto, California) is an American actress. ... Nancy Anne Allen (born June 24, 1950) is an American film actress. ... William Finley is an American actor that has been in such movies as Phantom of the Paradise, Sisters, and The Wedding Party. ... Charles Durning Charles Durning (born February 28, 1923 in Highland Falls, New York) is an American actor of stage and screen, born to an impoverished Irish American Catholic family, which he left as soon as possible to ease the financial pressure on his mother. ... Gerrit Graham (born: 27 November 1949 in New York, New York) is an American actor and writer. ... Stephen H. Burum is an American cinematographer, and was born on 25 November 1939 in Visalia, California. ... Vilmos Zsigmond (born June 16, 1930) is a Hungarian-American cinematographer. ... The following cinematographers and film directors typically work together on projects. ... Jack Fisk (19 December 1945 Canton, IL) married actress Sissy Spacek on April 12, 1974. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Pino Donaggio is a composer from Burano, Italy. ... Robert De Niro in 1988 Robert De Niro (born August 17, 1943) is a two-time Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American film actor, director, and producer. ... Jill Clayburgh (born April 30, 1944) is an American actress of stage, motion pictures, and television. ... John Christopher Reilly (born May 24, 1965) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... John Leguizamo (born July 22, 1964) is an Emmy-winning and Golden Globe Award-nominated American comedian, actor and producer. ... Margot Kidder (born October 17, 1948) is a Canadian-American film and television actress who achieved fame playing Lois Lane in the Superman movies of the 1970s and 1980s. ...


De Palma has encouraged and fostered the filmmaking careers of directors such as Mark Romanek and Keith Gordon. Terrence Malick credits seeing De Palma's early films on college campus tours as a validation of independent film, and subsequently switched his attention from philosophy to filmmaking. Mark Romanek (born September 18, 1959) is an award-winning American music video director who has also moved into directing theatrical films. ... Keith Gordon (born February 3, 1961 in New York City) is an American actor and film director. ... Terrence Terry Malick (born November 30, 1943 in Waco, Texas) is an Assyrian American film director. ... An independent film, or indie film, is usually a low-budget film that is produced by a small movie studio. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Early life

De Palma, whose background is Italian Roman Catholic, was raised in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and New Jersey in various Protestant and Quaker schools. The fissure between the Catholic and Protestant ethic is exemplified in De Palma's cinema, where the grand guignol exists alongside the status quo, where the normal is made epic and the extraordinary deflated into the mainstream. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... “NJ” redirects here. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... “Quaker” redirects here. ... The Grand Guignol (Grahn Geen-YOL) was a theatre (Le Théâtre du Grand-Guignol) in the Pigalle area of Paris (at 20 bis, rue Chaptal), which, from its opening in 1897 to its closing in 1962, specialized in the most naturalistic grisly horror shows. ... This article is about the English rock band. ...


1960s - The American Godard

Enrolled at Columbia as a physics student, De Palma became enraptured with the filmmaking process after viewing Citizen Kane and Vertigo. De Palma subsequently enrolled at the newly coed Sarah Lawrence College as a graduate student in their theater department in the late 1960s, becoming one of the first male students among a female population. Once there, influences as various as drama teacher Wilford Leach, the Maysles brothers, Michelangelo Antonioni, Jean-Luc Godard, Andy Warhol and Alfred Hitchcock impressed upon De Palma the many styles and themes that would shape his own cinema in the coming decades. An early association with discovery Robert De Niro resulted in The Wedding Party, codirected with Leach and producer Cynthia Munroe. The film was shot in 1963 but remained unreleased until 1969, when De Palma's star had risen sufficiently within the Greenwich Village filmmaking scene, though De Niro's remained low enough for the credits to display his name as "Robert Denero". The film is noteworthy for its invocation of silent film techniques and an insistence on the jump-cut for effect. Various small films for the NAACP and The Treasury Department followed. Citizen Kane is a 1941 mystery/drama film released by RKO Pictures and directed by Orson Welles, his first feature film. ... For other uses of the word, see Vertigo. ... Sarah Lawrence College is a private liberal arts college located in metropolitan New York City, about a thirty-minute train ride north of Manhattan. ... Wilford Leach (August 26, 1929 - June 18, 1988) was a Tony Award-winning American theatre director, set designer, film director, screenwriter, and college professor. ... David and Albert Maysles Brothers Albert and David Maysles were a documentary filmmaking team whose films include Salesman, Gimme Shelter and Grey Gardens. ... Michelangelo Antonioni (September 29, 1912 - July 30, 2007) was an Italian modernist film director whose films are widely considered as some of the most influential in film aesthetics. ... Jean-Luc Godard (French IPA: ) (born 3 December 1930) is a French filmmaker and one of the most influential members of the Nouvelle Vague, or French New Wave. Born to Franco-Swiss parents in Paris, he was educated in Nyon, Switzerland, later studying at the Lycée Rohmer, and the... Andrew Warhola (August 6, 1928 — February 22, 1987), better known as Andy Warhol, was an American artist who became a central figure in the movement known as Pop art. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 – April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Robert De Niro in 1988 Robert De Niro (born August 17, 1943) is a two-time Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American film actor, director, and producer. ... The DVD cover promotes De Niro, although he actually is a lesser member of the ensemble cast The Wedding Party is a 1969 American farcial comedy film. ... The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (IPA pronunciation: ), also called simply the Village, is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City named after Greenwich, London. ... The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), is one of the oldest and most influential hate organizations in the United States. ... The United States Department of the Treasury is a Cabinet department, a treasury, of the United States government established by an Act of U.S. Congress in 1789 to manage the revenue of the United States government. ...


During this decade, De Palma began making a living producing documentary films, notably The Responsive Eye (1966) about the The Responsive Eye op-art exhibit curated by William Seitz for MOMA in 1965. In an interview with Gelmis from 1969, De Palma described the film as "very good and very successful. It’s distributed by Pathe Contemporary and makes lots of money. I shot it in four hours, with synched sound. I had two other guys shooting people’s reactions to the paintings, and the paintings themselves."[1] Movement in Squares, by Bridget Riley, 1961. ...


Dionysus in '69 (1969) was De Palma's other major documentary from this period. The film records The Performance Group's performance of Euripdes’ “The Bacchae”, starring, amongst others, De Palma regular William Finely. The play is noted for breaking traditional barriers between performers and audience. The film's most striking quality is its extensive use of the split-screen. De Palma recalls that he was “floored” by this performance upon first sight, and in 1973 recounts how he "began to try and figure out a way to capture it on film. I came up with the idea of split-screen, to be able to show the actual audience involvement, to trace the life of the audience and that of the play as they merge in and out of each other."[2] The Performance Group was an experimental theater troupe started by Richard Schechner in 1967. ...


De Palma's most significant features from this decade are Greetings (1968) and Hi, Mom! (1969). Both films star Robert De Niro and espouse a Leftist revolutionary viewpoint common to their era. His other major film from this period is the slasher comedy Murder a la Mod. Each of these films contains experiments in narrative and intertextuality, reflecting De Palma's stated intention to become the "American Godard" while interrogating several of the themes which permeated Hitchcock's work. Greetings is a 1968 film directed by Brian De Palma. ... Hi, Mom! (1970) is a dark comedy by Brian De Palma, and is one of Robert De Niros first movies. ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... Revolutionary, when used as a noun, is a person who either advocates or actively engages in some kind of revolution. ... Murder a la Mod is a 1968 film directed by Brian De Palma. ... Intertextuality is the shaping of texts meanings by other texts. ...


"Greetings" is about three New Yorkers dealing with draft. The film is often considered the first to deal explicitly with the draft. The film is noteworthy for its use of various experimental techniques to convey its narrative in ultimately unconventional ways. Footage will be sped up, rapid cutting will distance the audience from the narrative, and it is difficult to discern with whom the audience must ultimately align. "Greetings" ultimately grossed over $1 million at the box office and cemented De Palma's position as a bankable filmmaker.


After the success of his 1968 breakthrough, De Palma and his producing partner (Charles Hirsch) were given the opportunity by Sigma 3 to make an unofficial sequel of sorts, initially entitled "Son of Greetings", and subsequently released as "Hi, Mom!." While "Greetings" accentuated its varied cast, "Hi, Mom" focuses on De Niro's character, Jon Rubin, an essential carry-over from the previous film. The film is ultimately significant insofar as it displays the first enunciation of De Palma’s style in all its major traits – voyeurism, guilt, and a hyper-consciousness of the medium are all on full display, not just as hallmarks, but built into this formal, material apparatus itself.


These traits come to the fore in "Hi, Mom!"'s "Be Black, Baby" sequence. This sequence parodies cinéma vérité, the dominant documentary tradition of the 1960s, while simultaneously providing the audience with a visceral and disturbingly emotional experience. De Palma describes the sequence as a constant invocation of Brechtian distanciation: “First of all, I am interested in the medium of film itself, and I am constantly standing outside and making people aware that they are always watching a film. At the same time I am evolving it. In 'Hi Mom!" for instance, there is a sequence where you are obviously watching a ridiculous documentary and you are told that and you are aware of it, but it still sucks you in. There is a kind of Brechtian alienation idea here: you are aware of what you are watching at the same time that you are emotionally involved with it.” Be Black, Baby is an extended bland-and-white sequence directed by Brian De Palma in his film Hi, Mom! ... This article is about filmmaking. ...


"Be Black, Baby" was filmed in black and white stock on 16mm, in low-light conditions that stress the crudity of the direct cinema aesthetic. It is precisely from this crudity that the film itself gains a credibility of “realism.” In an interview with Michael Bliss, De Palma notes “[Be Black, Baby] was rehearsed for almost three weeks… In fact, it’s all scripted. But once the thing starts, they just go with the way it’s going. I specifically got a very good documentary camera filmmaker (Robert Elfstrom) to just shoot it like a documentary to follow the action.” Furthermore, “I wanted to show in Hi Mom how you can really involve an audience. You take an absurd premise – “Be Black, Baby” – and totally involve them and really frighten them at the same time. It’s very Brechtian. You suck ‘em in and annihilate ‘em. Then you say, “It’s just a movie, right? It’s not real.” It’s just like television. You’re sucked in all the time, and you’re being lied to in a very documentary-like setting. The “Be Black, Baby” section of HI Mom is probably the most important piece of film I’ve ever done.”


The Transition to Hollywood

In 1976, after several small, studio and independent released films that included stand-out's Sisters and Obsession, a small film based on a novel called Carrie was released directed by Brian De Palma. The psychic thriller Carrie is seen by some as De Palma's bid for a blockbuster. In fact, the project was small, underfunded by United Artists, and well under the cultural radar during the early months of production, as Stephen King's source novel had yet to climb the bestseller list. De Palma gravitated toward the project and changed crucial plot elements based upon his own predilections, not the saleability of the novel. The cast was young and relatively new, though stars Sissy Spacek and John Travolta had gained considerable attention for previous work in, respectively, film and episodic sitcoms. Carrie became a hit, the first genuine box-office success for De Palma. Preproduction for the film had coincided with the casting process for George Lucas's Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, and many of the actors cast in De Palma's film had been earmarked as contenders for Lucas's, and vice-versa. The "shock ending" finale is effective even while it upholds horror-film convention, its suspense sequences are buttressed by teen comedy tropes, and its use of split-screen, split-diopter and slow motion shots tell the story visually rather than through dialogue. Psychic (sīkĭk); from the Greek psychikos - of the soul, mental - and referring in part to the human mind or psyche (ex. ... Carrie is a 1976 American horror film directed by Brian De Palma based on the novel by Stephen King, with a screenplay written by Lawrence D. Cohen. ... This article is about the film studio. ... Stephen Edwin King (born September 21, 1947) is an American author of over 200 stories including over 50 bestselling horror novels. ... Mary Elizabeth Sissy Spacek (born December 25, 1949) is an Academy Award-winning American actress and singer. ... John Joseph Travolta (born February 18, 1954) is a two-time Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe Award-winning American actor, dancer, and singer. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ... This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological... Depending on context, the term split screen may mean one of the following: a motion picture technique; see split screen (film) a computer graphics and video game technique; see split screen (computer graphics) This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Slow motion is an effect resulting from running film through a movie camera at faster-than-normal speed. ...


The financial and critical success of Carrie allowed De Palma to pursue more personal material. The Demolished Man was a novel that had fascinated De Palma since the late 1950s and appealed to his background in mathematics and avant-garde storytelling. Its unconventional unfolding of plot (exemplified in its mathematical layout of dialogue) and its stress on perception have analogs in De Palma's filmmaking. He sought to adapt it on numerous occasions, though the project would carry a substantial price tag, and has yet to appear onscreen (Steven Spielberg's adaptation of Philip K. Dick's Minority Report bears striking similarities to De Palma's visual style and some of the themes of The Demolished Man). The result of his experience with adapting The Demolished Man was The Fury, a sci-fi psychic thriller that starred Kirk Douglas, Carrie Snodgress, John Cassavetes and Amy Irving. The film was admired by Jean-Luc Godard, who featured a clip in his mammoth Histoire(s) du cinéma and Pauline Kael, who championed both The Fury and De Palma. The film boasted a larger budget than Carrie, though the consensus view at the time was that De Palma was repeating himself, with diminishing returns. As a film it retains De Palma's considerable visual flair, but points more toward his work in mainstream entertainments such as The Untouchables and Mission: Impossible, the thematic complex thrillers for which he is better known. For many film-goers, De Palma's gangster films, most notably Scarface and Carlito's Way, pushed the envelope of violence and depravity, and yet greatly vary from each other in both style and content and also illustrate De Palma's evolution as a film-maker. In essence, Scarface's excesses contrast with the more emotional tragedy of Carlito's Way. Both films feature Al Pacino in what has become a fruitful working relationship. The Demolished Man is a 1951 science fiction novel by Alfred Bester, and was the first Hugo Award winner in 1953. ... A work similar to Marcel Duchamps Fountain Avant garde (written avant-garde) is a French phrase, one of many French phrases used by English speakers. ... Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American writer, mostly known for his works of science fiction. ... The Minority Report (The) Minority Report is a science fiction short story by Philip K. Dick first published in 1956. ... The Fury is a 1978 sci-fi/horror/thriller film directed by Brian de Palma. ... Sci-fi is an abbreviation for science fiction. ... Kirk Douglas (born Issur Danielovitch Demsky December 9, 1916) is an iconic American actor and film producer known for his gravelly voice and his recurring roles as the kinds of characters Douglas himself once described as sons of bitches. He is also father to Hollywood actor and producer Michael Douglas. ... Carrie Snodgress (October 27, 1946 - April 1, 2004, Los Angeles, California) was an American actress. ... John Nicholas Cassavetes (December 9, 1929–February 3, 1989) was a Greek American actor, screenwriter, and director. ... Amy Irving (born September 10, 1953 in Palo Alto, California) is an American actress. ... Jean-Luc Godard (French IPA: ) (born 3 December 1930) is a French filmmaker and one of the most influential members of the Nouvelle Vague, or French New Wave. Born to Franco-Swiss parents in Paris, he was educated in Nyon, Switzerland, later studying at the Lycée Rohmer, and the... Pauline Kael (June 19, 1919 – September 3, 2001) was an American film critic who wrote for The New Yorker magazine. ... Carrie is a 1976 American horror film directed by Brian De Palma based on the novel by Stephen King, with a screenplay written by Lawrence D. Cohen. ... The Untouchables is a 1987 film, directed by Brian De Palma, based on the 1959 ABC television series, which, in turn, was based on Eliot Nesss autobiographical account of his efforts to bring Al Capone to justice. ... Mission: Impossible (1996) is a film directed by Brian De Palma and featuring Tom Cruise, based on the television series Mission: Impossible. ... Scarface is a 1983 film directed by Brian De Palma, written by Oliver Stone and starring Al Pacino as Antonio Tony Montana. ... Carlitos Way is a 1993 gangster film based on the novels Carlitos Way and After Hours by Judge Edwin Torres. ...


Themes and critical opinion

His works explore themes of suspense and obsession, along with gender identity. He is famous for his extensive use of split screen, split-diopter and process shots, and long tracking shots. His films also frequently feature characters changing their hair colour from blonde to brunette and vice versa. Look up Suspense in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Fixation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... In film, split screen is the combination of two actions filmed separately by copying them onto the same negative-- the usual way, for example, of having an actor talk to himself in a dual role. ...


Critics of De Palma such as Andrea Dworkin accuse him of being misogynistic and of emphasizing technical aspects of storytelling at the expense of human stories. These views, along with the charge of 'ripping off' various filmmakers, is slowly fading from mainstream critical analysis of De Palma's work, as the complexities of his montage and mise en scène come into focus. Emerging views (as expressed on scholarly sites like Senses of Cinema) of De Palma compare him less and less with modernist filmmakers like Alfred Hitchcock and more with transgressionists such as Luis Buñuel and Jean-Luc Godard and to traditions ranging from Surrealism, Postmodernism to the theater of the Absurd. Andrea Dworkin speaking to a federal commission on pornography in New York in January 1986 Andrea Rita Dworkin (September 26, 1946 – April 9, 2005) was an American radical feminist and writer best known for her criticism of pornography, which she linked with rape and other forms of violence against women. ... This box:      Misogyny (IPA: ) is hatred or strong prejudice against women; an antonym of philogyny. ... Film editing is the connecting of one or more shots to form a sequence, and the subsequent connecting of sequences to form an entire movie. ... Mise en scène [mizɑ̃sÉ›n] has been called film criticisms grand undefined term, but that is not because of a lack of definitions. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 – April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Max Ernst. ... Postmodernism is a term applied to a wide-ranging set of developments in critical theory, philosophy, architecture, art, literature, and culture, which are generally characterized as either emerging from, in reaction to, or superseding, modernism. ... The Theatre of the Absurd, or Theater of the Absurd (French: Le Théâtre de lAbsurde) is a designation for particular plays written by a number of primarily European playwrights in the late 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s, as well as to the style of theatre which has evolved from...


Political positions

De Palma is a staunch opponent of the US-led war in Iraq. In 2007 he directed the film Redacted with the intention of influencing the US public to end the war.[3] The film is based on the actual March 2006 rape and murder of a 14-year-old Iraqi schoolgirl by US soldiers who also murdered her family. The US military prosecuted the soldiers responsible for this crime, sentencing them to prison terms of between 5 and 110 years. The film, with its intentionally brutal and shocking images, was popular at the Venice film festival where De Palma won the Silver Lion award for Best Director.[4] "The pictures are what will stop the war," De Palma told a news conference after the showing of the movie, adding "One only hopes that these images will get the public incensed enough to get their congressmen to vote against the war"[5]


Director trademarks

  • Split screen
  • Many Alfred Hitchcock homages, using similar locations and camera techniques, and using a "long take" which is usually complimented by a series of elaborate tracking shots or dolly movements. The latter is an homage to Hitchcock's Rope (1948) and Under Capricorn (1949).
  • Has commissioned Hitchcockian compositions for his films, and worked with composer Bernard Herrmann, who worked with Alfred Hitchcock until a falling out during the production of Torn Curtain (1966).
  • Often shoots "tense" moments without any widening lens or zoom. When coupled with his trademark extended shot, it creates a feeling the viewer is in the scene.

Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 – April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Rope (1948) is an Alfred Hitchcock classic film notable for its single location covered in what appeared to be just a few continuous shots. ... The year 1948 in film involved some significant events. ... Under Capricorn is a 1949 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock based on a novel by Helen Simpson. ... See also: 1948 in film 1949 1950 in film 1940s in film 1950s in film years in film film Events Top grossing films North America Adams Rib Jolson Sings Again Pinky I Was a Male War Bride, The Snake Pit, Joan of Arc Academy Awards Best Picture: All the... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Torn Curtain DVD cover Torn Curtain is a 1966 thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, featuring his trademark characters and camera techniques. ... // Events Top grossing films North America Thunderball Dr. Zhivago Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf? That Darn Cat! The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming Academy Awards Best Picture: A Man for All Seasons - Highland, Columbia Best Actor: Paul Scofield - A Man for All Seasons Best Actress: Elizabeth Taylor...

Filmography

Feature Films

The DVD cover promotes De Niro, although he actually is a lesser member of the ensemble cast The Wedding Party is a 1969 American farcial comedy film. ... Murder a la Mod is a 1968 film directed by Brian De Palma. ... Greetings is a 1968 film directed by Brian De Palma. ... Hi, Mom! (1970) is a dark comedy by Brian De Palma, and is one of Robert De Niros first movies. ... Get to Know Your Rabbit is a 1972 American comedy film. ... Sisters is a 1973 film directed by Brian de Palma. ... Phantom of the Paradise is a 1974 muscial, horror-thriller film written and directed by Brian De Palma. ... Obsession is a 1976 psychological thriller/mystery directed by Brian De Palma, starring Cliff Robertson, Geneviève Bujold, and John Lithgow. ... Carrie is a 1976 American horror film directed by Brian De Palma based on the novel by Stephen King, with a screenplay written by Lawrence D. Cohen. ... The Fury is a 1978 sci-fi/horror/thriller film directed by Brian de Palma. ... Home Movies is a 1980 film directed by Brian De Palma. ... Dressed to Kill is a 1980 horror film written and directed by Brian de Palma. ... Blow Out is a 1981 film by Brian DePalma starring John Travolta as Jack Terry, a movie sound effect technician from Philadelphia who, while recording sounds for a low-budget horror film, accidentally captures audio evidence of the possible assassination of the Pennsylvania governor who was planning to run for... Scarface is a 1983 film directed by Brian De Palma, written by Oliver Stone and starring Al Pacino as Antonio Tony Montana. ... Body Double is a 1984 film by Brian De Palma. ... Wise Guys is a 1986 feature film directed by Brian De Palma. ... The Untouchables is a 1987 film, directed by Brian De Palma, based on the 1959 ABC television series, which, in turn, was based on Eliot Nesss autobiographical account of his efforts to bring Al Capone to justice. ... director = Brian De Palma producer = Art Linson=hiddenStructure Casualties of War is a 1989 war movie about the Vietnam War, starring Michael J. Fox and Sean Penn. ... Movie In 1990, a film adaptation directed by Brian De Palma was released and starred Tom Hanks as Sherman McCoy, Bruce Willis as Peter Fallow, an uncredited F. Murray Abraham as Abe Weiss, Melanie Griffith as Maria Ruskin, and Kim Cattrall as Judy McCoy, Shermans wife. ... Raising Cain is a 1992 film starring John Lithgow. ... Carlitos Way is a 1993 gangster film based on the novels Carlitos Way and After Hours by Judge Edwin Torres. ... Snake Eyes is a crime thriller film directed by Brian De Palma, and featuring his trademark use of long tracking shots and split screens. ... Mission to Mars is a 2000 science fiction movie directed by Brian de Palma about a rescue mission to Mars following a disaster during the first manned voyage to the planet. ... Femme Fatale is a 2002 film directed by Brian De Palma. ... The Black Dahlia is an Academy Award-nominated 2006 film directed by Brian De Palma. ... Redacted is a feature film written and directed by Brian De Palma. ... The Untouchables: Capone Rising is a prequel to director Brian De Palmas earlier film The Untouchables. ...

Short Films

  • Icarus (1960)
  • 660124: The Story of an IBM Card (1961)
  • Woton's Wake (1962)
  • Jennifer (1964)
  • Bridge That Gap (1965)
  • Show Me a Strong Town and I'll Show You a Strong Bank (1966)

Documentary Films

  • The Responsive Eye (1966)
  • Dionysus in '69 (1969)

References

  1. ^ Gelmis, Joseph (1970). The Film Director as Superstar. Garden City: Doubleday & Company, Inc., 24. 
  2. ^ Knapp, Lawrence (2003). Brian De Palma Interviews. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 26. 
  3. ^ He is a total anti american left wing zealot who has attempted to disparage the United States Military with his one sided movie aimed at fueling anti American bias throughout the world. ""Redacted" stuns Venice", Reuters, 2007-08-31. 
  4. ^ "Venice ends on sour note with shock film choices", Reuters, 2007-09-09. 
  5. ^ "Brian De Palma wins Best Director award at Venice with 'Redacted'", AFP, 2007-09-08. 

Bibliography

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Brian De Palma - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1747 words)
De Palma is often cited as a leading member of the Movie Brat generation of film directors, a distinct pedigree who either emerged from film schools or are overtly cine-literate.
De Palma's chief entrance into the mainstream has been his public image (fostered by De Palma in the early 1980s and later rejected as counterproductive) as a combative and controversial director of sex and violence.
De Palma, a veteran of the New York underground scene, had yet to produce a certifiable commercial hit by 1975, while his friends Steven Spielberg and Martin Scorsese benefitted from a comparatively larger financial and critical windfall.
Palma - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (224 words)
Palma is Spanish for palm tree, and is found in several geographic names.
Palma, Mozambique, a city and a district (pop: 42,182 in 1997) in the province of Cabo Delgado, Mozambique
Palma di Montechiaro (pop: 21,500), in the province of Agrigento in the island of Sicily in Italy
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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