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Encyclopedia > Brescia
Comune di Brescia

Municipal coat of arms
Country Flag of Italy Italy
Region Lombardy
Province Brescia (BS)
Mayor Paolo Corsini (since June 10, 2003)
Elevation 150 m
Area 90 km²
Population
 - Total (as of December 31, 2004) 192,165
 - Density 2,087/km²
Time zone CET, UTC+1
Coordinates 45°32′N, 10°14′E
Gentilic Bresciani
Dialing code 030
Postal code 25100
Frazioni Fornaci, Sant'Eufemia, San Polo, Urago Mella, Sant'Anna, Mompiano
Patron Sts. Faustino and Giovita
 - Day February 15

Location of Brescia in Italy
Website: www.comune.brescia.it
The Capitoline Temple.
The Capitoline Temple.

Brescia (Lombard: Brèsa) is a city in the region of Lombardy in northern Italy. It is situated at the foot of the Alps, between the Mella and the Naviglio, with a population of around 190,000. It is the second largest city in Lombardy, after the capital, Milan. Image File history File links Brescia-stemma. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... For the village of the same name in Ontario, Canada, see Lombardy, Ontario. ... In Italy, a province (in Italian: provincia) is an administrative division of intermediate level between municipality (comune) and region (regione). ... Province of Brescia is a Province in Lombardy, Italy. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Here are a list of area codes in Italy. ... A frazione, in Italy, is the name given in administrative law to a type of territorial subdivision of a comune; for other subdivisions, see municipio, circoscrizione, quartiere. ... This article is about the saint. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Italy_Regions_220px_(including_Pelagie_Islands). ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 541 pixelsFull resolution (2327 × 1575 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 541 pixelsFull resolution (2327 × 1575 pixel, file size: 1. ... Eastern Lombard (sometimes also called Orobic) is a group of dialects spoken in the eastern side of Lombardy, mainly in the provinces of Bergamo, Brescia and Mantua and in the area around Crema. ... For the village of the same name in Ontario, Canada, see Lombardy, Ontario. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the village of the same name in Ontario, Canada, see Lombardy, Ontario. ... For other uses, see Milan (disambiguation). ...


The city is the administrative capital of the Province of Brescia, one of the largest in Italy, with about 1,200,000 inhabitants. The ancient city of Brixia, Brescia has been an important regional centre since pre-Roman times and a number of Roman and medieval monuments are preserved, among which is the prominent castle. Province of Brescia is a Province in Lombardy, Italy. ... Brixia is the Latin name of the modern city of Brescia in Northern Italy. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ...

Sight of Brescia from the city castle.
Sight of Brescia from the city castle.

The city is at the centre of the third-largest Italian industrial area, concentrating on mechanical and automotive engineering and machine tools. Its companies are typically small or medium- sized enterprises, often with family managements. The financial sector is also a major employer, and the tourist trade benefits from the proximity of Lake Garda, Lake Iseo and the Alps. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 167 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 167 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Engineering is the applied science of acquiring and applying knowledge to design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... Lake Garda (Italian Lago di Garda or Benaco) is the largest lake in Italy. ... aerial view of Lake Iseo Lake Iseo or Lago dIseo or Sebino is the fourth largest lake in Lombardy, Italy. ...


The plan of the city is rectangular, and the streets intersect at right angles, a peculiarity handed down from Roman times, though the area enclosed by the medieval walls is larger than that of the Roman town, which occupied the eastern portion of the present one. The Piazza del Museo marks the site of the forum, and the museum on its north side is ensconced in a Corinthian temple with three cellae, by some attributed to Hercules, but more probably the Capitolium of the city, erected by Vespasian in AD 73 (if the inscription really belongs to the building[1], which was excavated in 1823. The museum houses a famous bronze statue of Victory, found in 1826. Scanty remains of a building on the south side of the forum, called the curia, but which may have been a basilica, and of the theatre, east of the temple, still exist. Imperator Caesar Vespasianus Augustus (born November 17, 9, died June 23, 79), known originally as Titus Flavius Vespasianus and usually referred to in English as Vespasian, was emperor of Rome from 69 to 79. ...

Contents

History

Ancient history

Different mythological versions of the foundation of Brescia exist: one assigns it to Hercules, while another attributes it to Altilia ("the other Ilium") by a fugitive from the siege of Troy. According to a further one, the founder was the king of the Ligures Cidnus, who had invaded the Padan Plain in the late Bronze Age. Other scholars attribute the foundation to the Etruscans. Hercules and the Nemean Lion (detail), silver plate, 6th century BC (Cabinet des Médailles, Paris). ... For other uses of Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... The Ligures (Ligurians) were an ancient people who gave their name to Liguria, which once stretched from Northern Italy into southern Gaul. ... The Po (Latin: Padus, Italian: Po) is a river that flows 652 kilometers (405 miles) eastward across northern Italy, from Monviso (in the Cottian Alps) to the Adriatic Sea near Venice. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Extent of Etruscan civilization and the twelve Etruscan League cities. ...


Invaded by the Gauls Cenomani, allied of the Insubri, in the 4th century BCE, it became their capital; the city bcame Roman in 225 B.C., when the Cenomani submitted to Virginia. During the Carthaginian Wars Brixia was usually allied of the Romans: in 202 BCE it was part of a Celt confederation against them, but, after a secret agreement, changed side and attacked by surprise the Insubri, destroying them. Subsequently the city and the tribe entered peacefully in the Roman world as a faithful allied, maintaining a certain administrative freedom. In 89 BCE it was recognized as civitas ("city") and in 41 BCE received the Roman citizenship. Augustus founded a civil (not a military) colony here in 27 B.C., and he and Tiberius constructed an aqueduct to supply it. The Roman Brixia had at least three temples, an aqueduct, an amphitheater, a forum with a further temple built under Vespasianus, and some baths. Gallia (in English Gaul) is the Latin name for the region of western Europe occupied by present-day France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... The Cenomani (Greek: , Strabo, Ptol. ... The Insubres or Insubri were a Celtic population who settled in Insubria, in what is now Lombardy. ... The 4th century BC started the first day of 400 BC and ended the last day of 301 BC. It is considered part of the Classical era, epoch, or historical period. ... The Punic Wars were a series of three wars fought between Rome and Carthage. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 3rd century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC - 200s BC - 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC Years: 207 BC 206 BC 205 BC 204 BC 203 BC - 202 BC - 201 BC 200 BC 199 BC 198 BC 197 BC Events October... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC - 80s BC - 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC Years: 94 BC 93 BC 92 BC 91 BC 90 BC - 89 BC - 88 BC 87 BC 86... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC - 40s BC - 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC 0s Years: 46 BC 45 BC 44 BC 43 BC 42 BC 41 BC 40 BC 39 BC 38 BC... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... The name amphitheatre (alternatively amphitheater) is given to a public building of the Classical period (being particularly associated with ancient Rome) which was used for spectator sports, games and displays. ... Imperator Caesar Vespasianus Augustus (November 17, 9 – June 23, 79), known originally as Titus Flavius Vespasianus and usually referred to in English as Vespasian, was emperor of Rome from 69 to 79. ...


When Constantine advanced against Maxentius in 312, an engagement took place at Brescia in which the enemy was forced to retreat as far as Verona. In 402 the city was ravaged by the Visigoths of Alaric I. During the invasion of the Huns under Attila, the city was again besieged and sacked (452) while, some forty years later, it was one of the first conquests of the Goth general Theoderic the Great in his war against Odovacer. For other uses, see Constantine I (disambiguation). ... Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius ( 278-28 October 312) was Western Roman Emperor from 306 to 312. ... October 28 — Battle of Milvian Bridge: Constantine I defeats Maxentius and becomes the only Roman Emperor in the West. ... Verona is a city and provincial capital in Veneto, Northern Italy. ... Events Stilicho recalls troops from the frontiers of the Roman Empire to defend Italy against the Visigoths. ... Migrations The Visigoths (Western Goths) were one of two main branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe (the Ostrogoths being the other). ... An 1894 photogravure of Alaric I taken from a painting by Ludwig Thiersch. ... The Huns were an early confederation of Central Asian equestrian nomads or semi-nomads. ... For other uses, see Attila (disambiguation). ... Events Attila, king of the Huns, invades Italy Northern Wei Tai Wu Di is succeeded by Northern Wei Nan An Wang, then by Northern Wei Wen Cheng Di as ruler of the Northern Wei Dynasty in China. ... Tomb of Theodoric in Ravenna Theodoric the Great (454 - August 30, 526), known to the Romans as Flavius Theodoricus, was king of the East Goths, the Ostrogoths (488-526), ruler of Italy (493-526), and regent of the Visigoths (511-526). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Medieval history

In 568 or 569 Brescia was occupied by the Lombards, who made it the capital of one of their semi-independent duchies. First duke was one Alachis, who died in 573. Later dukes included the future king Rotharis and Rodoald, and Alachis II, a fervent anti-Catholic who was killed in the batte of Cornate d'Adda (688). The last king of the Lombard, Desiderius, had been also duke of Brescia. In 774 Charlemagne captured the city and ended the existence of the Lombard kingdom in northern Italy. Events April 1 - King Alboin leads the Lombards into Italy; refugees fleeing from them go on to found Venice. ... Events The Nubian kingdom of Alodia is converted to Christianity, according to John of Ephesus. ... The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, whence comes the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Northern Europe that entered the late Roman Empire. ... Events Pope Gregory I is ordained monk. ... Rothari of the house of Arodus was king of the Lombards from 636 to 652; previously he had been duke of Brescia. ... Rodoald (or Rodwald) was a Lombard king of Italy, who succeeded his father Rothari on the throne in 652. ... Country Italy Region Lombardy Province Province of Milan (MI) Mayor Elevation m Area 13. ... Events Emperor Justinian II of the Bulgarians. ... Desiderius, the last king of the Lombards, is chiefly known through his connection with Charlemagne. ... Events Charlemagne conquers the kingdom of the Lombards, and takes title King of the Lombards. ... Charlemagne (left) and Pippin the Hunchback. ...


Notingus was the first (prince-)bishop (in 844) who bore the title of Count (see Bishopric of Brescia). Later the power of the bishop as imperial representative was gradually defied by the local citizens and nobles, Brescia becoming a free commune around the early 12th century. Subsequently it expanded in the nearby countryside, first at the expenses of the local landholders, and later against the neighbouring communes, notably Bergamo and Cremona. Brescia defeated the latter two times at Pontoglio, and then at the Grumore (mid-12th century) and in the battle of the Malamorte (1192). Events Succession of Pope Sergius II (844 - 847). ... A count is a nobleman in most European countries, equivalent in rank to a British earl, whose wife is also still a countess (for lack of an Anglo-Saxon term). ... The Roman Catholic Bishopric of Brescia takes its name from its episcopal see, the city of Brescia. ... Small street (via della Noca) leading to città alta. ... Cremona is a city in northern Italy, situated in Lombardy, on the left shore of the Po river in the middle of the Pianura padana (Po valley). ... Pontoglio is a commune in the province of Brescia, in Lombardy. ... // Events The Third Crusade ends in disaster. ...


In the successive struggles between the Lombard cities and the emperors, Brescia was implicated in some of the leagues and in all of the uprisings against them. In the Battle of Legnano the contingent from Brescia was the second in size after that of Milan. The Peace of Constance (1183) that ended the war with Frederick Barbarossa confirmed officially the free status of the commune. Memorable is also the siege laid to Brescia by the emperor Frederick II in 1238 on account of the part taken by this city in the battle of Cortenova (27 November 1237). Brescia came through this assault victorious. After the fall of the Hohenstaufen, republican institutions declined at Brescia as in the other free cities and the leadership was contested between powerful families, chief among them the Maggi and the Brusati, the latter of the (pro-imperial, anti-papal) Ghibelline party. In 1258 it fell into the hands of Eccelino of Verona. Combatants Holy Roman Empire and Ghibellines Lombard League(Guelphs) Commanders Frederick I Barbarossa Alberto da Giussano Strength 2500 (all cavalry) 2500 (2000 cavalry, 500 foot) The Carroccio of Legnano on the way to the battlefield. ... For other uses, see Milan (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Events Three-year old Emperor Go-Toba ascends to the throne of Japan after the forced abdication of his brother Antoku during the Genpei War William of Tyre excommunicated by the newly appointed Heraclius of Jerusalem, firmly ending their struggle for power Andronicus I Comnenus becomes the Byzantine emperor Births... Frederick in a 13th century Chronicle Frederick I (German: Friedrich I. von Hohenstaufen)(1122 – June 10, 1190), also known as Friedrich Barbarossa (Frederick Redbeard) was elected king of Germany on March 4, 1152 and crowned Holy Roman Emperor on June 18, 1155. ... The Siege of Brescia occurred in 1238. ... Frederick II (December 26, 1194 – December 13, 1250), of the Hohenstaufen dynasty, was a pretender to the title of King of the Romans from 1212 and unopposed holder of that monarchy from 1215. ... Events In the Iberian peninsula, James I of Aragon captures the city of Valencia September 28 from the Moors; the Moors retreat to Granada. ... Combatants Holy Roman Empire Lombard League Commanders Frederick II The Battle of Cortenuova was fought on 27 November 1237, when Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II defeated the Lombard League. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events Thomas II of Savoy becomes count of Flanders. ... Arms of the Hohenstaufen Dynasty The Hohenstaufen (or the Staufer(s)) were a dynasty of Kings of Germany, many of whom were also crowned Holy Roman Emperor and Dukes of Swabia. ... The Guelphs and Ghibellines were factions supporting, respectively, the Papacy and the Holy Roman Empire in Italy during the 12th century and 13th century. ...


In 1311 Emperor Henry VII laid siege to Brescia for six months, losing three-fourths of his army. Later the Scaliger of Verona, aided by the exiled Ghibellines, sought to place Brescia under subjection. The citizens of Brescia then recoursed to John of Luxemburg, but Mastino II della Scala expelled the governor appointed by him. His mastery was soon contested by the Visconti of Milan, but not even their rule was undisputed, as Pandolfo Malatesta in 1406 took possession of the city, but in 1416 bartered it to Filippo Maria Visconti, who in 1426 sold it to the Venetians. The Milanese nobles forced Filippo to resume hostilities against the Venetians, and thus to attempt the recovery of this city, but he was defeated in the battle of Maclodio (1427), near Brescia. In 1439 Brescia was once more besieged by Francesco Sforza, captain of the Venetians, who defeated Niccolò Piccinino, Filippo's condottiero. Thenceforward Brescia acknowledged the authority of Venice, with the exception of the years between 1512 and 1520, when it was occupied by the French armies under Gaston de Foix. Early in the 16th century it was one of the wealthiest cities of Lombardy, but has never recovered from its sack by the French. It subsequently shared the fortunes of the Venetian republic until 1796, when it came under Austrian dominion. Events Bolingbroke Castle passes to the House of Lancaster. ... Henry VII, (ca. ... The persons most commonly meant by the single name are Julius Caesar Scaliger and Joseph Justus Scaliger, qq. ... John I, Count of Luxemburg John the Blind (Luxembourgish: Jang de Blannen; German: Johann der Blinde von Luxemburg; Czech: Jan Lucemburský) (10 August 1296 – 26 August 1346) was the Count of Luxembourg from 1309, King of Bohemia, and titular King of Poland from 1310. ... Mastino II della Scala (1308 - June 3, 1351) was lord of Verona. ... Pandolfo Malatesta is the name of four members of the Italian House of Malatesta: Pandolfo I Malatesta (c. ... Events Construction of Forbidden City begins in Beijing. ... May 30 - The Catholic Church burns Jerome of Prague as a heretic. ... Filippo Maria Visconti Filippo Maria Visconti, (1392–1447), who became nominal ruler of Pavia in 1402, succeeded his assassinated brother Gian Maria Visconti as Duke of Milan. ... Events March 6 - Battle of St. ... Combatants Venice Milan Commanders Francesco Bussone da Carmagnola Carlo Malatesta Casualties Unknown 8,000 Milanese taken prisoner including Malatesta The Battle of Maclodio was fought on 11 October 1427, resulting in a victory for the Venetians under Carmagnola over the Milanese under Carlo I Malatesta. ... Events Lincoln College, a constituent college of the University of Oxford, is founded. ... Events Battle of Grotnik, which ended the hussite movement in Poland Eric of Pomerania, King of Sweden, Denmark and Norway is declared deposed in Sweden. ... Portrait of Francesco Sforza, ca 1460, by Bonifazio Bembo: Sforza insisted on being shown in his worn dirty old campaigning hat. ... Portrait Niccolò Piccinino (1386 - 1444), Italian condottiere, born at Perugia, was the son of a butcher. ... Condottieri (singular condottiero) were mercenary leaders employed by Italian city-states from the late Middle Ages until the mid-sixteenth century. ... Year 1512 (MDXII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1520 (MDXX) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Gaston de Foix, Duc de Nemours (1489-1512) was a nephew of Louis XII of France. ... Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Map of Brescia in the early 18th century.
Map of Brescia in the early 18th century.
Piazza della Loggia.
Piazza della Loggia.
Duomo Nuovo and Duomo Vecchio.
Duomo Nuovo and Duomo Vecchio.

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 735 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1402 × 1143 pixel, file size: 1,008 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Pierre Mortier (1661-1711), Mappa di Brescia a fine Seicento o a inizio Settecento. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 735 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1402 × 1143 pixel, file size: 1,008 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Pierre Mortier (1661-1711), Mappa di Brescia a fine Seicento o a inizio Settecento. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... Download high resolution version (1280x960, 100 KB)New and old Cathedral - Brescia - Picture taken by myself File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (1280x960, 100 KB)New and old Cathedral - Brescia - Picture taken by myself File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Modern history

After the end of the Napoleonic era, Brescia was annexed to the Austrian puppet state called Kingdom of Lombardy-Venetia. Brescia revolted in 1848. It distinguished again for the revolt called the Ten Days of Brescia (march 1849), for which the poet Giosuè Carducci called it "Leonessa d'Italia" ("Italian Lionesse"), being the only Lombard town to rally to Charles Albert in the latter year; but was taken after ten days' obstinate street fighting by the Austrians under Haynau. For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... The Kingdom of Lombardy-Venetia (Italian: ; German: ) (1815 - 1866) was established after the defeat of Napoleon, according to the decisions of the Congress of Vienna (9 June 1815). ... The Ten Days of Brescia were a revolt broken out in the city of northern Italy with that name, and which laster from March 23 to April 1, 1849. ... Giosuè Carducci. ...


In 1769 the city was devastated when the Church of San Nazaro was struck by lightning. The resulting fire ignited 200,000 lb (90,000 kg) of gunpowder being stored there, causing a massive explosion which destroyed one sixth of the city and killed 3,000 people. For information on lightning precautions, see Lightning safety. ... Smokeless powder Gunpowder is a pyrotechnic composition, an explosive mixture that burns rapidly, producing volumes of hot gas which can be used as a propellant in firearms and fireworks. ...


Brescia was annexed to Italy in 1859.


The city was awarded a Gold Medal for its resistance against Fascism, in the late World War II. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


On May 28, 1974, it was the seat of the bloody Piazza della Loggia bombing. May 28 is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


Main sights

  • Piazza della Loggia, a noteworthy example of Renaissance piazza, with the omonymous loggia (the current Town Hall) built in 1492 by the architect Filippino de' Grassi. On May 28, 1974 the square was the location of a terrorist bombing.
  • Duomo Vecchio ("Old Cathedral"), also known as La Rotonda. It is an exteriorly rusticated Romanesque church, striking for its circular shape. The main structure was built in the 11th century on the ruins of an earlier basilica. Near the entrance is the pink Veronese marble sarcophagus of Berardo Maggi, while in the presbitery is the entrance to the crypt of San Filastrio. The structure houses paintings of the Assumption, the Evangelists Luke and Mark, and Feast of the Paschal Lamb , and Eli and the Angel by Alessandro Bonvicino (known as il Moretto); two canvasses by Girolamo Romanino, and other paintings by Palma il Giovane, Francesco Maffei, Bonvicino, and others[2].
  • Duomo Nuovo ("New Cathedral"): Construction on the new cathedral began in 1604 and continued till 1825. While initially a contract was awarded to Palladio, economic shortfalls awarded the project, still completed in a Palladian style, to the young Brescian architect Giovanni Battista Lantana, with decorative projects were directed mainly by Pietro Maria Bagnadore. The facade is mainly owed to the designs Giovanni Battista and Antonio Marchetti, while the cupola was designed by Luigi Cagnola. Interior frescoes including the Marriage, Visitation, and Birth of the Virgin, as well as the Sacrifice of Isaac, were frescoed by Bonvicino. The main attractions is the Arch of Sts. Apollonius and Filastrius (1510)[3].
  • The Broletto, formerly the Town Hall. It is a massive building of the 12th and 13th centuries with a lofty tower.
  • In Piazza del Foro is the most important array of Roman remains in Lombardy. These include the Capitoline Temple, built by Vespasianus in 73 AD.
  • The monastery of San Salvatore (os Santa Giulia), dating from the Lombard age but later renovated several times. It is one of the best example of High Middle Ages architecture in northern Italy.
  • Santa Maria dei Miracoli (1488-1523), with a fine façade by Giovanni Antonio Amadeo, decorated with bas-reliefs and a Renaissance peristilium.
  • The Romanesque-Gothic church of St. Francis, with a Gothic façade and cloisters.
  • The castle, at the north-east angle of the town, commands a fine view.
  • Church of San Nazario e Celso, with the Averoldi Polyptych by Titian.
  • Church of San Clemente, with numerous painting by Alessandro Bonvicino (generally known as Moretto).
  • Church of San Giovanni, with a refectory partly painted by the Moretto and partly by Girolamo Romanino.
  • The Pinacoteca Tosio Martinengo, the local art gallery hosts works of the painters of the classical Brescian school, Romanino, Bonvicino, and Bonvicino's pupil, Giovanni Battista Moroni.
  • Biblioteca Queriniana, containing rare early manuscripts, including a 14th-century manuscript of Dante, and some rare incunabula.


The city has no less than seventy-two public fountains. The stone quarries of Mazzano, 20 km east of Brescia, supplied marble for the Monument to Vittorio Emanuele II in Rome. The Renaissance (French for rebirth, or Rinascimento in Italian), was a cultural movement in Italy (and in Europe in general) that began in the late Middle Ages, and spanned roughly the 14th through the 17th century. ... Villa Godi by Palladio. ... May 28 is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... South transept of Tournai Cathedral, Belgium, 12th century. ... Girolamo Romani (Romanino) (c. ... Giaele uccide Sisara Palma il Giovane, Italian for Palma the Younger, is the common nickname of the Italian painter Jacopo Palma il Giovane (1544-1628), used to distinguished him from his more reputed uncle Palma il Vecchio. ... Francesco Maffei was an Italian painter (1605 - 1660), active in the Baroque style. ... Andrea Palladio (November 30, 1508 – August 19, 1580), was an Italian architect, widely considered the most influential person in the history of Western architecture. ... Piermaria Bagnadore {c. ... Luigi Cagnola. ... Alessandro Bonvicino (1498 - December 22, 1554), known as Il Moretto, was a celebrated painter of Brescia, Venetian school. ... St. ... The twin churches of Santa Maria in Montesanto (left) and Santa Maria dei Miracoli (right), seen from Piazza del Popolo. ... Giovanni Antonio Amadeo (ca. ... Tiziano Vecelli or Tiziano Vecellio (c. ... Alessandro Bonvicino (1498 - December 22, 1554), known as Il Moretto, was a celebrated painter of Brescia, Venetian school. ... Girolamo Romani (Romanino) (c. ... The Pinacoteca Tosio Martinengo is a public art collection in Brescia exhibiting mainly paintings by local artists from the 13th through 18th centuries. ... Girolamo Romani (Romanino) (c. ... Alessandro Bonvicino (1498 - December 22, 1554), known as Il Moretto, was a celebrated painter of Brescia, Venetian school. ... Giovanni Battista Moroni (1520-1578) was an Italian mannerist painter, son of an architect, Andrea Moroni, born in Albino near Bergamo. ... DANTE is also a digital audio network. ... A page from a rare Blackletter Bible (1497) printed in Strassburg by J.R.Grueninger. ... Mazzano is a commune in the province of Brescia, in Lombardy. ... The monument of Victor Emmanuel II The Monumento Nazionale a Vittorio Emanuele II (National Monument of Victor Emmanuel II) or Altare della Patria (Altar of the Fatherland) or Il Vittoriano is a monument to honour Victor Emmanuel, the first king of a unified Italy. ...


Sports

Brescia is the start and the arrival of the historical car race Mille Miglia that takes place every year in May and also the now defunct Coppa Florio, one of the first ever sport motor races. It is also the home of Brescia Calcio football club and Rugby Leonessa 1928. The Mille Miglia (Thousand Miles - pronounced [mi:lle mi:lja]) was an open-road endurance race which took place in Italy twenty-four times from 1927 to 1957 (thirteen before the war, eleven from 1947). ... Coppa Florio was an Italian car race started in 1900, and renamed in 1905 when Vincenzo Florio offered the initial 50 000 Lira and a cup designed by Polak of Paris. ... Brescia Calcio is a football club based in Brescia, Lombardy. ... Rugby Leonessa 1928 is a Italian rugby union club currently competing in Super 10. ...


Famous citizens

Rothari of the house of Arodus was king of the Lombards from 636 to 652; previously he had been duke of Brescia. ... The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, whence comes the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Northern Europe that entered the late Roman Empire. ... Desiderius, the last king of the Lombards, is chiefly known through his connection with Charlemagne. ... The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, whence comes the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Northern Europe that entered the late Roman Empire. ... Louis the German (also known as Louis II or Louis the Bavarian or German Ludwig der Deutsche) (804 – August 28, 876), the third son of the emperor Louis the Pious and his first wife, Ermengarde of Hesbaye, was the king of Bavaria from 817, when his father partitioned the empire... Arnold of Brescia, (c. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... Albertanus of Brescia (Latin: Albertano da Brescia, ca. ... Saint Angela Merici (1474? - 1540) was an Italian religious leader and saint born in Desenzano del Garda, Brescia, Lombardy. ... The Ursulines is a religious order founded at Brescia, Italy by St. ... Events January 18 - Lima, Peru founded by Francisco Pizarro April - Jacques Cartier discovers the Iroquois city of Stadacona, Canada (now Quebec) and in May, the even greater Huron city of Hochelaga June 24 - The Anabaptist state of Münster (see Münster Rebellion) is conquered and disbanded. ... Niccolo Fontana Tartaglia. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Giulio Alenio (often spelled Giulio Aleni; 1582 - 1649), Italian Jesuit missionary, was born at Brescia. ... Nanping (Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) is a prefecture-level city in northwestern Fujian province, Peoples Republic of China. ... Confucius (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kung-fu-tzu), lit. ... Benedetto Castelli, born Antonio Castelli (Brescia, 1578 – Rome, 1643), took the name Benedetto upon entering the Benedictine Order in 1595. ... Table of Hydraulics and Hydrostatics, from the 1728 Cyclopaedia. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli (January 5, 1920–June 12, 1995) was an Italian classical pianist. ... Emanuele Severino (January 26, 1929 in Brescia, Italy) is one of the most important contemporary Italian philosophers. ... This article cites very few or no references or sources. ... Gasparo da Salò is the name given to Gasparo di Bertolotti, one of the earliest violin-makers of which we have a historical record. ... The violin is a bowed string instrument with four strings tuned in perfect fifths. ...

Gallery

See also

Wikisource has an original article from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica about:

The Roman Catholic Bishopric of Brescia takes its name from its episcopal see, the city of Brescia. ... The University of Brescia (Italian: Università degli Studi di Brescia) is a university located in Brescia, Italy. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ...

Sources

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. This article incorporates text from the public-domain Catholic Encyclopedia of 1913. [1] Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


External links

  • University of Brescia official site
  • Catholic University of Brescia

References

  1. ^ cf. Th. Mommsen in Corp. Inscrip. Lat. v. No. 4312, Berlin, 1872
  2. ^ Duomo Vecchio
  3. ^ Duomo Nuovo.

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