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Encyclopedia > Brentwood College School
Brentwood College School
De Manu in Manum
From Hand to Hand
Address
2735 Mount Baker Road
Mill Bay, British Columbia, V0R 2P1, Canada
Information
Head of School Andrea M. Pennells
Vice principal John Allpress
Staff 60
School type Private Day and Boarding
Grades 8-12
Language English
Team name Brentwood 1st XV (men's rugby)
Colours Red and Black
Founded 1923
Enrollment 430
Homepage www.brentwood.bc.ca

Brentwood College School is an independent school in Mill Bay, British Columbia, Canada. It has over 429 students, the large majority of whom board. Brentwood's oceanfront campus comprises 75 acres (304,000 m²), bounded by water on two sides, and the village of Mill Bay on the remaining two. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 127 × 164 pixelsFull resolution (127 × 164 pixel, file size: 10 KB, MIME type: image/gif) created by Brentwood College, http://www. ... Mill Bay is a quiet village of about 3,200 people located on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada about 20 miles north of Victoria, British Columbia, the capital. ... Motto: Splendor Sine Occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor Iona Campagnolo - Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 36 - Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area Ranked 4th - Total 944,735 km... A Canadian postal code is a string of six characters that forms part of a postal address in Canada. ... Education in Canada is provided, funded, and overseen by federal, provincial, and local governments. ... Mill Bay is a quiet village of about 3,200 people located on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada about 20 miles north of Victoria, British Columbia, the capital. ... Mill Bay is a small village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, on Islandmagee. ...


Brentwood's motto, dating from the school's founding, is De Manu in Manum (Latin for "From hand to hand"). To this end, the school crest depicts a hand holding a torch, the symbol of learning and civilization.

Contents

Mission

To develop team players and creative individuals; to support our students as they discover their unique strengths and find joy in contributing to the good of the community; to inspire the leaders of the future: this is the mission of Brentwood College School.


History overview

Brentwood College is a Western Canadian private school. Brentwood was first founded in 1923 as a boys school. The original location was in Brentwood Bay near Saanich on Vancouver Island, from where its name was derived. The original school was destroyed by a fire in 1947, leaving only the chapel intact. The new and current school is located westward directly across the bay from the original site, in Mill Bay. The new version of the school was resurrected through the efforts of David D MacKenzie and opened in September 1961. In 1972, Brentwood College opted to become the first all boys' boarding school in Canada to gradually integrate girls, starting with 20 grade 12 students, becoming officially co-ed for the fall session. The Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin (WCSB) is a vast sedimentary basin underlying 1. ... 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Brentwood Bay, British Columbia is a small village just north of Victoria and south of Sidney on the southern tip of Vancouver Island. ... The Saanich are a Native American/First Nations group from the north coast of the Olympic Peninsula in Washington and the southereasternmost part of Vancouver Island in British Columbia. ... Vancouver Island is separated from mainland British Columbia by the Strait of Georgia and the Queen Charlotte Strait, and from Washington by the Juan De Fuca Strait. ... Mill Bay is a quiet village of about 3,200 people located on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada about 20 miles north of Victoria, British Columbia, the capital. ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ...


Old school 1923 - 1947

Brentwood College was founded in 1923 at Brentwood Bay, B.C., by a group of distinguished Victoria business and professional men, led by P.F. Curtis. From the initial enrollment of fifty boys and a faculty of four, the school operated for many years on the shores of Brentwood Bay and gained an enviable reputation through outstanding academic and athletic results. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 281 × 201 pixelsFull resolution (281 × 201 pixel, file size: 17 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) created by Brentwood College, http://www. ...


While many significant milestones chart our historical journey, Brentonians remember with pride the achievements of our founders and pioneers, including Brentwood's first Olympian, Ned Pratt (Class of 1930), LCdr. John H Stubbs (Class of 1930) a WWII hero and commander of HMCS Athabaskan, Alastair Gillespie (Class of 1941) a senior member of Pierre Trudeau's cabinet and Philip (Pip) D P Holmes (Class of 1941) WWII hero. HMCS Athabaskan (G 07) was the first of three destroyers of the Canadian Navy to bear this name. ... The Honourable Alastair William Gillespie, PC , OC , M.Com (born May 1, 1922) is a former Canadian politician. ... For other uses, see Pierre Elliott Trudeau (disambiguation). ...


In 1947, fire consumed the Brentwood Bay campus. Only the Brentwood Memorial Chapel, where our annual Service of Remembrance is still held, survived. Although the original school was forced to close, Old Brentonians remained loyal to the spirit of their alma mater and dreamed of rebuilding their school.


New school 1961 - 1971

In 1960, some of the old school alumni met David D. MacKenzie, the re-founding headmaster, and were tremendously encouraged by his enthusiasm. As a result of their collective financial commitment, and in particular David Mackenzie's enduring dedication, the new Brentwood College campus reopened in September 1961 on the shores of Mill Bay, directly westward across the bay from its original location in Brentwood Bay. The new campus featured a central complex with the dining area for over 200 in the basement, offices and meeting rooms on the main floor and dormitories on the upper floors. An adjoining building housed classrooms with a gymnasium attached at the far right end. Several separate buildings served as accommodation for the 180 or so boarders. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 346 × 211 pixelsFull resolution (346 × 211 pixel, file size: 26 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) created by Brentwood College, http://www. ...


From 1961-1968 the dining room was in the basement of the central complex, and was often packed to capacity with 180 or so boys plus instructors and house masters. The dining area had in the order of 17 standard four foot by eight foot tables with wooden benches along each side and two chairs at the ends. The kitchen held an array of stainless steel, quasi-industrial, cook ware on a fairly large scale, complete with gas fired cooking surfaces, automatic dish washing equipment, and mass production toasters. About 5 employees, usually local women, were hired to do the cooking. The most memorable, and perhaps oft repeated, dishes were curried chicken with rice, fish sticks, Salisbury steak, liver and onions, macaroni with cheese, bacon or sausages and eggs with toast and potatoes. More rarely roast beef or t-bone steak was served with an assortment of vegetables. Usually milk, juice, tea and water were the standard fair for drinks. Deserts ranged from various types of pudding to canned fruit with fresh fruit on occasion. The morning break offered cake with the usual assortment of drinks. In retrospect the meals were likely the best one could expect under the circumstances in regard to budget and the mass preparation technology of the day. Overall it is amazing everything was so well organized from 1961-68 and a tribute to many long unseen and for the most part unappreciated hours of effort, on the part of the school staff as a whole. The new, much improved, dining room, located at the north end of campus, was ready for the 1968-1969 session and still serves that role today.


Classes were efficiently organized and taught by domain experts, usually of 55 minute duration, with the first class at 8:00. A mid-morning break was at 10:00, followed by two more classes, then lunch at 12:30. The afternoons were dedicated to sports activities, mainly rugby, starting at 13:30. The bulk of students were inculcated into the gentlemanly, rough and ready, sport of rugby, starting with rules of the game and preliminary exercises. These included ball handling skills, strategy and tackling practice combined with endurance training. The most memorable (and often joyfully derided) exercises were conducted by Nick Prowse, which he called “Heine Muellers”. Needless to say at the end of the sports sessions one might be considered lucky to have escaped with only a few bruises, cuts, complete exhaustion, and possibly an enhanced understanding of the universe. Dinner was served at 18:00 in the dining area, then a prefect enforced study session ensued in ones respective dormitory or study area until 21:30. Prefects were appointed by housemasters from the grade 12 group, as limited proxies, for house master authority.


Co-ed transition 1972 - 1980

In 1972, Brentwood College opted to become the first all boys' boarding school in Canada to gradually integrate girls, starting with 20 grade 12 students, becoming officially co-ed for the fall session. 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ...


Current campus

Campus layout

The campus is functionally arranged and spread out over the waterfront, with a pier and ramp enabling access for sailing, rowing and docking for float planes and motor boats. The campus has ample room for expansion, sagaciously provided for by the more than doubling of available land area purchased incrementally since 1976. This has put the school in position to challenge some of its larger Eastern Canada rivals over coming decades. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 535 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 669 pixel, file size: 627 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) created by Brentwood College, http://www. ... Eastern Canada, defined politically. ...


On a clear day it is easy to see the other side of the bay, a few kilometres away. As can be seen in the campus photograph, tennis courts and rugby fields adjoin the residences, main school classroom block and specialized buildings. Some recent additions include a world class fine arts theatre, complete with facilities for a wide range of arts training, including acting, dance and singing. Numerous exceptional quality productions are put on and hosted by the students, during the school year, with very high demand for tickets.


Specialized buildings

With the purchase of adjoining land in 1976 the Woodward Sportsplex, Maintenance Facility and a residence for the Head of School were constructed to the north of campus. More residences were added to accommodate a doubling of the school population, as a result of more than 200 boarding girls in attendance. With the increased diversification of programs into more Arts education, a new performing arts centre was added to the south of campus.

  • Academic Annex
  • Maintenance Building
  • Residence of the Head of School
  • Ross Academic Centre
  • Woodward Sportsplex
  • T Gil Bunch Centre for the Performing Arts

Houses

The new school has expanded considerably in the intervening period from 1961, with the construction of first class dormitories in several independent houses spaced out across the park like campus. The residence houses each with their own house master and prefects (appointed from the grade 12 class). 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... The House System is a traditional feature of British schools, similar to the collegiate system of a university. ... A prefect (from the Latin praefectus, perfect participle of praeficere: make in front, i. ...

  • Alex House
  • Allard House
  • Ellis House
  • Mackenzie House
  • Privett House
  • Rogers House
  • Whittall House

Leadership

One of the greatest strengths of Brentwood is its exemplary leadership. All of the volunteers on the Board of Governors are unpaid, and serve from a sense of personal responsibility, to make the school one of the best of its class globally. Emphasis is placed on developing life long skills, in relation to the students future role as a valuable contributor, in a social context. A board of governors is usually the governing board of a public entity. ...


Curriculum

Brentwood offers an amazing combination of preparatory activities designed to take advantage of the school's waterfront locale and allow the individual student to select their own personal development program appropriately.

Advanced Placement Courses

Athletic Programs This article is about the academic discipline of art history. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Calculus (from Latin, counting stone) is a major area in mathematics. ... Calculus (from Latin, counting stone) is a major area in mathematics. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, including literature composed in English by writers not necessarily from England; Joseph Conrad was Polish, Robert Burns was Scottish, James Joyce was Irish, Dylan Thomas was Welsh, Edgar Allan Poe was American, Salman Rushdie is Indian, V.S... French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Microeconomics is a branch of economics that studies how individuals, households, and firms make decisions to allocate limited resources,[1] typically in markets where goods or services are being bought and sold. ... Physics (Greek: (phúsis), nature and (phusiké), knowledge of nature) is the science concerned with the fundamental laws of the universe. ... Physics (Greek: (phúsis), nature and (phusiké), knowledge of nature) is the science concerned with the fundamental laws of the universe. ... This article is about the international language known as Spanish. ...

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Extracurricular activities

Brentwood values highly its Tri-Partite program consisting of academics, sports, and the arts. Brentwood has a long tradition as the leading high-school rowing power in Western Canada. It hosts an annual regatta which it claims as the largest high-school rowing event in western North America. The school is also known for its rugby( 1st XV came in 3rd in B.C. in 2005 and 2006) and performing arts traditions. The school is noted for its outstanding Outdoor Pursuits program, involving sea kayaking, whitewater kayaking, hiking, rock climbing, biking, and survival skills. A coxless pair which is a sweep-oar boat. ... Western Canada is a geographic region of Canada, also known as simply the West, generally considered to be west of the province of Ontario. ... A regatta is a boat race or series of boat races. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... A rugby union scrum. ... Motto: Splendor Sine Occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor Iona Campagnolo - Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 36 - Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area Ranked 4th - Total 944,735 km... The performing arts are those forms of art which differ from the plastic arts insofar as the former uses the artists own body, face and presence as a medium, and the latter uses materials such as clay, metal or paint which can be molded or transformed to create some... This article is in need of attention. ... Whitewater kayaking is the sport of paddling a kayak on a moving body of water, typically a river. ... Two hikers in the Mount Hood National Forest Eagle Creek hiking Hiking is a form of walking, undertaken with the specific purpose of exploring and enjoying the scenery. ... Climbers on Valkyrie at the Roaches. ... ... Survival skills are skills that may help one to survive dangerous situations (such as storms or earthquakes), or in dangerous places (such as the desert, the mountains, and the jungle). ...

Arts & Music Programs

Recreational Athletic Programs A choir or chorus is a musical ensemble of singers. ... This article is about choirs, musical ensembles containing singers. ... jus like my ass For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... Jazz is a style of music which originated in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States at around the start of the 20th century. ... Interior of the 1928 B. F. Keith Memorial Theatre, Boston, Massachusetts. ... Harry Belafonte singing, photograph by C. van Vechten Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, which is often contrasted with speech. ... In music, a band is a company of musicians, or musical ensemble, usually popular or folk, playing parts of or improvising a musical arrangement on different musical instruments. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle &#8212... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Acting is the work of an actor or actress, which is a person in theatre, television, film, or any other storytelling medium who tells the story by portraying a character and, usually, speaking or singing the written text or play. ...

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School events

  • Brentwood Regatta is held in the spring and is one of the largest regattas on the west coast.
  • Brentwood Receptions are held in every major Western Canadian city and also Seattle.
  • Brentwood Founders' Day is held every fall, usually in early November.

The Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin (WCSB) is a vast sedimentary basin underlying 1. ... City nickname Emerald City City bird Great Blue Heron City flower Dahlia City mottos The City of Flowers The City of Goodwill City song Seattle, the Peerless City Mayor Greg Nickels County King County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water   - % water 369. ...

School publications

  • Brentonian Magazine - Brentwood's bi-annual magazine with editing and production by Lara McDonald. The magazine is usually about 60 pages, or so, and covers many areas of interest to current students and alumni, alike.

Notable alumni

Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... HMCS Athabaskan (G 07) was the first of three destroyers of the Canadian Navy to bear this name. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... The Honourable Alastair William Gillespie, PC , OC , M.Com (born May 1, 1922) is a former Canadian politician. ... For other uses, see Pierre Elliott Trudeau (disambiguation). ... The Cabinet of Canada (French: Cabinet du Canada or Conseil des ministres) plays an important role in the Government of Canada in accordance with the Westminster System. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... An air force is a military organization that primarily operates in air-based war. ... Bomber Command is an organizational military unit, generally subordinate to the air force of a country. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... An ethnobotanist is an ethnologist who studies relationships between people from various cultures and their plants. ... Cosette Dwyer is an amazing author. ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action to bring about social or political change. ... Blair Horn (born July 17, 1961 in Kelowna, British Columbia) is a former Canadian rower, who was a member of the Canadian mens eights team that won the gold medal at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, California. ...

External links

  • Brentwood College School website

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