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Encyclopedia > Brentford
Brentford
OS grid reference TQ177778
London borough Hounslow
Ceremonial county Greater London
Region London
Constituent country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town BRENTFORD
Postcode district TW8
Dial code 020
Police Metropolitan
Fire London
Ambulance London
UK Parliament Brentford & Isleworth
London Assembly South West
European Parliament London
List of places: UKEnglandLondon

Coordinates: 51°29′10″N 0°18′36″W / 51.4861, -0.3101 Image File history File links Greater_london_outline_map_bw. ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... The London Borough of Hounslow is a London borough in West London, England. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping; thus the OECD has used the phrase in reference to the former Yugoslavia[1], the Soviet Union and European institutions such as the Council of... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The TW postcode area is a group of 20 postal districts in south west Greater London which are subdivisions of 13 post towns. ... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... 020 is the dial code for Greater London in the United Kingdom. ... The Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) is the name currently used by the territorial police force which is responsible for Greater London other than the City of London (the responsibility of the City of London Police). ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... The London Fire Brigade (LFB) is the statutory fire and rescue service for London, England. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The London Ambulance Service (LAS) is the largest ambulance service in the world that does not directly charge its patients for its services. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Brentford and Isleworth is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Greater London is divided into a number of constituencies for London Assembly elections. ... South West is a constituency represented in the London Assembly. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... London is a constituency of the European Parliament. ... List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in England Lists of places within counties List of places in Bedfordshire List of places in Berkshire List of places in Buckinghamshire List of places in Cambridgeshire List of places in Cheshire List of places in Cleveland List of places... This is a partial list of places in London, England. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Brentford is a suburb in the London Borough of Hounslow at the confluence of the River Thames and the River Brent in West London, situated approximately 8 miles (12.9 km) west south-west of Charing Cross. The London Borough of Hounslow is a London borough in West London, England. ... The Thames is a river flowing through southern England, and one of the major waterways in England. ... The Brent is a river in south-east England. ... Satellite image of the inner part of West London Ayad Dibis is the best in West London. ... The Victorian Eleanor Cross at Charing Cross The name Charing Cross, now given to a district of central London in the City of Westminster, comes from the original hamlet of Charing, where King Edward I placed a memorial to his wife, Eleanor of Castile. ...

Contents

Today

Brentford is a suburban development subsumed into the conurbation of Greater London, although just outside the London postal district.


History

Brentford, as the name suggests, was built on a fording point on the River Brent.


The town is named as Bregentforda at the time of the Council of Brentford 781 and as 'Bregentforda' and 'Brentforda' in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle of 1016. The root 'Bregent-', naming the river is thought to originate from the name of the Celtic goddess 'Brigantia', tutelary goddess of the Brigantes tribe (who didn't live in Brentford). Events Emperor Kammu succeeds Emperor Konin as emperor of Japan. ... The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle is a collection of annals narrating the history of the Anglo-Saxons and their settlement in Great Britain. ... In Gallo-Roman and Romano-British religion, Brigantia was a goddess who is attested several places in Britain and Europe. ... The Brigantes were a British Celtic tribe which lived between Tyne and Humber. ...

The Thames Lock on the Grand Union Canal at Brentford
The Thames Lock on the Grand Union Canal at Brentford

The settlement pre-dates the Roman occupation of Britain, and thus pre-dates the founding of London itself. Many pre-Roman artifacts have been excavated in and around the area in Brentford known as 'Old England'. Bronze Age pottery and burnt flints have been found in separate sites in Brentford. The quality and quantity of the artefacts suggests that Brentford was a meeting point for pre-Romanic tribes where part of tribal rituals included the ceremonial casting of weapons into the river. One well known Iron Age piece from about 100 BC - AD 50 is the Brentford horn-cap [1]- a ceremonial chariot fitting that formed part of local antiquarian Thomas Layton's collection [2], now held by the Museum of London. The Celtic knot pattern (the 'Brentford Knot') on this item has been copied for use on modern jewellery. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... The canal at Braunston The Grand Union Canal is a canal in England and part of the British canal system. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC - 100s BC - 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC Years: 105 BC 104 BC 103 BC 102 BC 101 BC - 100 BC - 99 BC 98 BC 97 BC 96 BC 95... This article is about the year 50. ... Interior showing the Mayors state coach The Museum of London documents the history of London from the Palaeolithic to the present day. ... Muiredacha Cross. ...


It has been suggested that Brentford was also a main fording point on the River Thames, and was the point where Julius Cæsar crossed the Thames during his invasion of Britain. It has been asserted, without strong evidence, that a documented battle fought at this time between Cæsar's forces and Cassivellaunus took place at Brentford. There are, however, two other historically accredited battles of Brentford in 1016 and 1642. Gaius Julius Caesar [1] (Latin pronunciation ; English pronunciation ; July 12 or July 13, 100 BC or 102 BC – March 15, 44 BC), was a Roman military and political leader and one of the most influential men in world history. ... Cassivellaunus was a historical British chieftain who led the defence against Julius Caesars second expedition to Britain in 54 BC. He also appears in British legend as Cassibelanus, one of Geoffrey of Monmouths kings of Britain, and in the Mabinogion and Welsh Triads as Caswallawn, son of Beli...


Timeline

  • 54 BC Brentford is a likely site of a battle recorded by Julius Cæsar between Julius Cæsar and local king, Cassivellaunus.
  • 781 Council of Brentford recording settlement of a dispute between Offa, king of Mercia, and the Bishop of Worcester
  • 1016 Battle of Brentford between the invading Canute and Edmund Ironside
  • 1431 Relocation of Syon Abbey to Brentford from Twickenham
  • 1539 Destruction of Syon Abbey by King Henry VIII
  • 1616 - 1617 Pocahontas, the Native American 'Princess', lived in Brentford
  • 1642 Battle of Brentford during the English Civil War
  • 1717 Brentford Turnpike Trust founded to maintain the road between Kensington and Hounslow
  • 1805 Start of operations of the Grand Junction Canal (later the Grand Union Canal)
  • 1815 - 1817 John Quincy Adams, sixth President of the USA, lived in Brentford
  • 1841 Brentford was flooded, several lives lost
  • 1849 Start of operations of the Hounslow Loop line, providing service to Kew Bridge, Brentford Central and Syon Lane stations in the Brentford area.
  • 1859 Start of operations of the Great Western & Brentford Railway company linking Brentford Dock to the Great Western Railway main line at Southall. Additional passenger station named 'Brentford Town' later constructed just north of Brentford High Street.
  • 1884 Start of operations of Boston Manor Underground station (then known as Boston Road).
  • 1889 Brentford Football Club founded by a rowing club seeking a winter sport.
  • 30 May 1925 - Great West Road officially opened by King George V. Later the Brentford section became known as the Golden Mile due to the large number of factories that relocated there to take advantage of the good communications. The factories provided high employment and stimulation to the local economy.
  • 1 January 1929 - Grand Junction Canal bought by the Regent's Canal and amalgamated with other canals to form the Grand Union Canal.
  • 1965 Opening of elevated section of M4 motorway

The main road to the South West of Britain passed through Brentford for many centuries, and even now, the M4 motorway passes approximately 1 mile (1.6 km) north of the original main road through Brentford. Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC - 50s BC - 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC Years: 59 BC 58 BC 57 BC 56 BC 55 BC 54 BC 53 BC 52 BC 51... Offa (or Alavivaz Olauus) (? - c. ... The Bishop of Worcester is the ordinary in the see of Worcester and has his seat in Worcester Cathedral. ... The Battle of Brentford (1016) was fought in 1016 some time between 9 May (the approximate date Canute landed at Greenwich) and 18 October (the date of the later Battle of Ashingdon) between the English led by Edmund Ironside and the Danes led by Canute. ... Canute (or Cnut) I, or Canute the Great (Old Norse: Knútr inn ríki, Danish: Knud den Store, Norwegian: Knut den mektige, Swedish: Knut den store) (ca. ... Edmund II or Eadmund II (c. ... Syon Abbey, (or Sion Abbey) was a major mediæval monastery of the Bridgettine Order in the late Gothic or Perpendicular style (with alterations to meet the needs of this very distinctive order), its major site bordering Brentford and Isleworth, Middlesex, England. ... Twickenham is a suburb in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, south west London. ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland, later King of Ireland, from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... A 1616 engraving of Pocahontas by Simon van de Passe. ... The Battle of Brentford was fought in 1642 between Royalist and Parliamentarian forces. ... The English Civil War consisted of a series of armed conflicts and political machinations that took place between Parliamentarians (known as Roundheads) and Royalists (known as Cavaliers) between 1642 and 1651. ... The Hyde Park Toll Gate, London. ... , A wealthy area in Kensington, that is just south of Kensington High Street. ... , Hounslow is the principal town of the London Borough of Hounslow in West London. ... The Grand Junction Canal was a canal in England from Braunston in Northamptonshire to the River Thames at Brentford, with a number of branches. ... The canal at Braunston The Grand Union Canal is a canal in England and part of the British canal system. ... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was a diplomat, politician, and President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 4, 1829). ... The Hounslow Loop Line is a railway line in southwest London, operated by South West Trains. ... The original Bristol Temple Meads station, first terminus of the GWR, is the building to the left of this picture The Great Western Railway (GWR) was a British railway company, linking South West England, the West Country and South Wales with London. ... It has been suggested that Southalls South Asian community be merged into this article or section. ... Boston Manor is a London Underground station in west London. ... Brentford Football Club are an English football club based in Brentford in the London Borough of Hounslow. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... The Gillette Factory on the Golden Mile The Golden Mile is the name given to a stretch of the Great West Road north of Brentford running west from the western boundary of Chiswick in London, United Kingdom. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Regents Canal is a canal across an area just to the north of central London. ... The M4 motorway is a motorway in Great Britain linking London with Wales. ...


Notable present and former residents

Dates are dates of residence in Brentford, where known

A 1616 engraving of Pocahontas by Simon van de Passe. ... Joseph Mallord William Turner (April 23, 1775 (exact date disputed) – December 19, 1851) was an English Romantic landscape painter, watercolourist and printmaker, whose style can be said to have laid the foundation for Impressionism. ... For the American politican, read the article Thomas W. Hardwick. ... -1... Anna Ford (born 2 October 1943 in Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire) is a retired British television presenter, best known as a newsreader. ... Kate Adie (born September 19, 1945) is a British journalist. ... Bob Friend (born 1938) was the original news anchor for the flagship Sky News programme, Sky News Live At Five, which he presented from the channels first day in 1989 until late 2003. ... Scabies at the time of the release of The Damned single New Rose, October 1976 Christopher Miller (born 30 July 1957), better known by the stage name Rat Scabies, is a musician best known for his tenure as the drummer for The Damned. ... The Damned are a punk rock and later gothic rock band formed in London, England in 1976. ... Bowi EP sleeve (1977). ... Jake Riviera (born Andrew Jakeman) founded Stiff Records in 1976, a label best known for its punk and new wave acts, including Elvis Costello, Madness, Ian Dury, and the Damned. ... Stiff Records is a record label created in London in 1976 by entrepreneurs Dave Robinson and Andrew Jakeman (aka Jake Riviera), and active until 1985. ... Stanley Bowles (born 24 December 1948 in Manchester, England) was a leading English footballer who gained a reputation as one of the games greatest mavericks. ... Annie Vernon (born September 1, 1982 in Truro, Cornwall) is a British rower. ... Christopher Dawes is a British journalist and book author. ... Rat Scabies And The Holy Grail is a book written by Christopher Dawes and published in 2005 by Thunder’s Mouth Press in the US (ISBN 1560256788) and by Sceptre Books in the UK (ISBN 0340832118). ... Ian Ridpath, Born 1947 May 1, Ilford, Essex is a journalist made famous for his breaking article on the Rendlesham Forest Incident of January 5, 1985. ... Robert Rankin Robert Fleming Rankin (born July 27, 1949) is a prolific British humorous novelist. ... Spoiler warning: The Brentford Trilogy is a series of five novels by writer Robert Rankin. ... This article is about the lawyer; for the writer, see Simon Moore (writer). ... Janey Godley is a stand-up comedian, writer and raconteur, born in 1961 and brought up in Shettleston, Glasgow, Scotland. ... A comedian, or comic, is an entertainer who amuses an audience by making them laugh. ... Abuser redirects here. ... Victim was the title of a British film made in 1961, directed by Basil Deardon and starring Dirk Bogarde and Sylvia Simms. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... For other persons known as Princess Amelia, see Princess Amelia The Princess Amelia Sophie (10 July 1711 – 31 October 1786), was a member of the British Royal Family, the second daughter of King George II. // Early Life Princess Amelia was born in Schloss Herrenhausen, Hanover, Germany. ... George II may refer to: George II of Württemberg-Mömpelgard (1626–1699). ... Gunnersbury Park is in Ealing, in west London. ...

The Hardwicks

A notable family from Brentford was the 18th/19th century architectural father and son partnership, the Hardwicks. Thomas Hardwick Senior (1725-1798) and Thomas Hardwick Junior (1752-1829) were both from Brentford and are buried in the old church of St Laurence. Hardwick Senior was the master mason for the Adam Brothers during the construction of Syon House. Hardwick Junior assisted in the building of Somerset House and was known for his designs of churches in the capital. He was also a tutor of J.M.W Turner whom he helped start Turner's illustrious career in art. Both father and son did a great deal of remodelling and rebuilding on the church of St Laurence. For the American politican, read the article Thomas W. Hardwick. ... Adam Brothers may refer to: Scottish architects, four sons of William Adam: John Adam (1721–1792) Robert Adam (1728–1792) James Adam (1732–1794) William Adam, Jr. ... Syon House before the alterations of the 1760s Robert Adams plan for the reconstruction of Syon House. ...


Places of interest

Syon House, the London residence of the Duke of Northumberland. Syon House before the alterations of the 1760s Robert Adams plan for the reconstruction of Syon House. ... The title Duke of Northumberland was created in 1551 for John Dudley. ...


Syon Abbey, now rased to the ground, was the largest abbey church in England. Syon Abbey, (or Sion Abbey) was a major mediæval monastery of the Bridgettine Order in the late Gothic or Perpendicular style (with alterations to meet the needs of this very distinctive order), its major site bordering Brentford and Isleworth, Middlesex, England. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total...


Syon House is built upon part of the site of Syon Abbey. The exact location of Syon Abbey was unknown until archeological investigations in the grounds of Syon House (Syon Park) in 2003 (by Time Team) and 2004 revealed the foundations of the abbey church. It was larger than Westminster Abbey is now, but no above-ground structure remains. For more details on the abbey and the reasons for its destruction, see its own entry - Syon Abbey. Time Team is a popular British television series explaining the process of archaeology for the layman in the UK. Broadcast by Channel 4, the programme was first shown in 1994, and is presented by Tony Robinson. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... Syon Abbey, (or Sion Abbey) was a major mediæval monastery of the Bridgettine Order in the late Gothic or Perpendicular style (with alterations to meet the needs of this very distinctive order), its major site bordering Brentford and Isleworth, Middlesex, England. ...


The London Butterfly House in Syon Park is like a large aviary containing butterflies. Visitors can see butterflies and moths flying about, feeding, and emerging from Chrysalises. There is also a colony of large ants (kept with the butterflies), a small tropical bird aviary, and a small gallery of reptiles, amphibians, insects and spiders. The lease on the current site is due to expire in Oct 07 and the company are seeking a new location. Syon House and its 200 acre (800,000 m²) park is in southwest London, in England. ...

Front of Boston manor House
Front of Boston manor House

Boston Manor House, built in 1622, is a Jacobean manor house, noted for its fine plasterwork ceilings. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 559 pixelsFull resolution (1906 × 1332 pixel, file size: 264 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 559 pixelsFull resolution (1906 × 1332 pixel, file size: 264 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Jacobean - an early phase of English Renaissance architecture and decoration. ...


Gunnersbury Park Museum is the local museum for the Boroughs of Ealing and Hounslow and situated in Gunnersbury House. It contains many archaeological finds including hundreds of flints, plus Roman and Viking weapons found in Brentford. It also has displays of costumes and changing displays on other subjects of local interest. The house was formerly occupied by the Rothschild family and although they did not leave any contemporary furniture or fittings, some of the decorative schemes have been well preserved. Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire at its greatest extent. ... The term king commonly denotes the ship-borne warriors, pirates and traders of Norsemen (literally, men from the north) who originated in Scandinavia and raided the coasts of britain and ireland as far east as the Volga River in Russia from the late 8–18th century. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ...


The Weir, public house, formerly 'The White Horse' was where the artist J. M. W. Turner lived for one year at the age of ten. He is regarded as having started his interest in painting while living there. Later on in life, he lived nearby in Isleworth and Twickenham Isleworth is an affluent suburb located in the London Borough of Hounslow alongside the River Thames in west London. ...

The Pool of Brentford Lock with new developments and GSK building in background
The Pool of Brentford Lock with new developments and GSK building in background

Syon Park House (demolished in 1953), not to be confused with Syon House, housed the 'Syon Park Academy' where the poet Shelley was educated between the ages of 10 and 12 before moving on to Eton. A Royal Mail depot stands on the site now. This may also be the site of the dwelling where Pocahontas lived in Brentford End between 1616 and 1617. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... GlaxoSmithKline plc (LSE: GSK NYSE: GSK) is a British based pharmaceutical, biologicals, and healthcare company. ... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (privately funded and independent) for boys, founded in 1440 by King Henry VI. It is located in Eton, Berkshire, near Windsor in England, situated north of Windsor... A 1616 engraving of Pocahontas by Simon van de Passe. ...


Brentford Dock, a freight terminus of the Great Western Railway, built at the confluence of the River Thames and River Brent, designed by Brunel, and built between 1855 and 1859. A spur line from the GWR at Southall was constructed to the dock to facilitate easy transferral of freight from lighters and barges on the Thames to GWR served destinations in the west of the United Kingdom. The dock was redeveloped as residential accommodation in the early 1970s, and little industrial archeology remains. Brunel before the launching of the Great Eastern. ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... GWR is a TLA that can mean: Great Western Railway of Canada (AAR reporting mark GWR) Great Western Railway of the United Kingdom Gloucestershire Warwickshire Railway — a heritage railway that has taken the initials of the GWR. GWR Group, who until early 2005 own several radio stations, including GWR FM... Lighter riding the current under Tower Bridge, London, circa 1928 A lighter is a type of flat-bottomed barge used to transfer goods to and from moored ships. ... Self propelled barge carrying bulk crushed stone A barge is a flat-bottomed boat, built mainly for river and canal transport of heavy goods. ... Industrial archaeology, like other branches of archaeology, is the study of material culture from the past, but with a focus on industry. ...


The Brentford Dock flats were built alongside formerly important transport infrastructure as Brentford is the terminus of the Grand Union Canal, originally the Grand Junction Canal. This waterway is still in use for leisure traffic. The canal at Braunston The Grand Union Canal is a canal in England and part of the British canal system. ...

Brentford Public Library
Brentford Public Library

Brentford Public Library is a Carnegie library. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 2438 KB) Brentford Carnegie Library, UK photo by myself Date and Time 2005:01:13 11:54 Exposure Time 1/250 sec. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 2438 KB) Brentford Carnegie Library, UK photo by myself Date and Time 2005:01:13 11:54 Exposure Time 1/250 sec. ... A Carnegie library, opened in 1913 in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, designed in Spanish Colonial style Carnegie libraries for both public use and academic institutions were built with money donated by Scottish-American businessman Andrew Carnegie, earning him the nickname, the Patron Saint of Libraries. ...


Brentford Public Baths (1896) are a Grade II listed example of late Victorian architecture.


Kew Bridge Steam Museum houses the world's largest working beam engine.


The Musical Museum houses a large collection of mechanical musical instruments, such as player pianos. The player piano is a type of piano that plays music without the need for a human pianist to depress the normal keys or pedals. ...


Griffin Park is home to Brentford Football Club and Chelsea Football Club Reserves (from 2002 until 23 September 2005 it was the home of the London Broncos rugby league club - subsequently they were renamed Harlequins Rugby League and transferred to The Stoop). Griffin Park is a football ground situated on Braemar Road in Brentford in the London Borough of Hounslow, south west London. ... The London Broncos, known from 26 September 2005 as Harlequins Rugby League, is a rugby league club representing the greater London area. ... Rugby league football (usually shortened to rugby league, football, league or rugby) is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... Harlequins Rugby League is a rugby league club representing the greater London area. ... The Stoop is the popular name for the home stadium of the London rugby union club Harlequins, which plays in the second level of English rugby union, National Division One. ...

Houseboats on the Thames at Brentford, from Kew Bridge

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 799 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2101 × 1576 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 799 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2101 × 1576 pixel, file size: 1. ...

Interests of inhabitants

The launching of Google Trends in 2006 drew world attention to Brentford because of Brentford's unexpected prominence as a source of internet searches for terms relating to pornography and many sexual fetishes. This unexpected prominence probably reflected the presence of an ISP routing centre near Brentford rather than the interests of the inhabitants of Brentford themselves. [3] Google Trends is a tool from Google Labs that shows the most popularly searched terms from the beginning of 2004 to now. ... Porn redirects here. ... Sexual fetishism, first described as such by Sigmund Freud though the concept and certainly the activity is quite ancient, is a form of paraphilia where the object of affection is a specific inanimate object or part of a persons body. ... “ISP” redirects here. ... It has been suggested that Routing protocol be merged into this article or section. ...


Companies in Brentford

  SE[1], (ISIN: DE0008404005; IPA pronunciation: [alliˈanʦ], and formerly AG) is a large financial service provider headquartered in Munich, Germany. ... {{Infobox Company | company_slogan = Vorsprung durch Technik (Advancement Through Technique) | Never Follow | company_name = Audi AG | company_logo = | company_type = Public (Xetra: NSU) | | foundation = 1909 | location_city = Ingolstadt | location_country = Germany | key_people = August Horch, Founder Rupert Stadler, Chairman | industry = Automotive | products = Luxury Automobiles, Engines | revenue = € 28. ... Brompton bicycle The Brompton is a British folding bicycle. ... The Netherlands Carillon in Arlington, Virginia, USA A carillon is a keyboard percussion instrument composed of a range of bells controlled by a keyboard. ... Datapoint Corporation, originally known as Computer Terminal Corporation (CTC), was a computer company based in San Antonio, Texas. ... GlaxoSmithKline plc (LSE: GSK NYSE: GSK) is a British based pharmaceutical, biologicals, and healthcare company. ... Altria, formerly Philip Morris Companies, is the worlds largest tobacco company, and also owns some of the major brands in the alcohol and food markets, being the second largest food company (the first one being Nestlé) in the world. ... Sega Corporation ) is a multinational Japanese video game software and hardware development company, and a former home computer and console manufacturer. ... Tie Rack is a British-based necktie retailer which has recently diversified into selling scarves. ... Gower Street branch Waterstones Piccadilly branch, Europes largest bookshop Waterstones is a United Kingdom based chain of bookshops. ... His Masters Voice, often abbreviated to HMV, is a famous trademark in the music business, and for many years was the name of a large record company. ...

Town twinning

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Academy in Branford. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Largest metro area Hartford Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[2] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ...

Transport and locale

Nearest places

Kew is a place in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames in South West London. ... Gunnersbury is a place in the London Borough of Hounslow, west London. ... Chiswick (IPA pronunciation: ) is a district of West London, covering the eastern part of the London Borough of Hounslow. ... Ealing is a town in the London Borough of Ealing. ... Isleworth is an affluent suburb located in the London Borough of Hounslow alongside the River Thames in west London. ... Osterley is a place in the London Borough of Hounslow in South West London. ...

Nearest tube stations

Northfields tube station is a station on the Piccadilly Line, Heathrow branch in Zone 3, between Boston Manor tube station and South Ealing tube station. ... Boston Manor is a London Underground station in west London. ... South Ealing is a London Underground station in west London. ... Gunnersbury station is a London Underground and National Rail station in Gunnersbury in west London. ...

Nearest railway stations

Brentford railway station (formerly Brentford Central) is in the London Borough of Hounslow, in west London, and is in Travelcard Zone 4. ... Kew Bridge railway station is in the London Borough of Hounslow, in west London, and is in Travelcard Zone 3. ... Syon Lane railway station is in the London Borough of Hounslow, in west London, and is in Travelcard Zone 4. ...

References and sources

  • The Archive Photographs Series, Brentford; Tempus Publishing Ltd., 1998, ISBN 0-7524-0627-2
  • Brentford as it was; Hendon Publishing Co. Ltd., Second impression May 1993, ISBN 0-86067-082-1
  • Brentford Past; Historical Publications Ltd., ISBN 0-948667-79-6
  • Old Ordnance Survey Maps, Brentford 1894, The Godfrey Edition; Alan Godfrey Maps, ISBN 0-85054-509-9

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Brentford - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1483 words)
Brentford is a suburb in the London Borough of Hounslow at the confluence of the River Thames and the River Brent in South West London, situated approximately 8 miles (12.9 km) west south-west of Charing Cross.
1431 Relocation of Syon Abbey to Brentford from Twickenham
Brentford Dock was built alongside previous important transport infrastructure as Brentford is the terminus of the Grand Union Canal, originally the Grand Junction Canal.
Brentford F.C. - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (870 words)
Brentford Football Club (nicknamed the Bees or The red and white army) are an English association football club from the town of Brentford, west London and are currently playing in Football League One.
The survival of Brentford FC was threatened by a projected takeover by Queens Park Rangers in the late 1960's - a bid that was only narrowly averted with an emergency loan of £104,000 - while the club continued to yo-yo between the third and fourth divisions during the next three decades.
Brentford finished 3rd in the league and lost to Swansea in the play-off semi-final.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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