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Encyclopedia > Brecknockshire
Ancient county of Brecknockshire
Image:WalesBrecknockshireTrad.png
Geography
Area: (1891) 475,224 (1,923 km²)
Rank: Ranked 4th
Administration
County town: Brecon
Chapman code: BRE

Brecknockshire (Welsh: Sir Frycheiniog), also known as Breconshire, or the County of Brecon is one of thirteen historic counties of Wales, and a former administrative county. one of the traditional counties of England File links The following pages link to this file: Brecknockshire Categories: GFDL images ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... This is a list of the ancient counties of Wales as recorded by the 1891 census, ordered by their area. ... A county town is the capital of a county in the United Kingdom or Republic of Ireland. ... The Monmouthshire & Brecon Canal basin at Brecon, the starting point of the Taff Trail. ... Chapman codes are largely a superset of the ISO 3166-2:GB and BS 6879 codes identifying administrative divisions in the United Kingdom, Ireland and their surrounding islands, but covering historical divisions. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... Wales has thirteen traditional counties (or vice counties). ... This article is about the country. ...


The bulk of the historic county formed the borough of Brecknock in southern Powys from 1974 to 1996 under the Local Government Act 1972. The parishes of Penderyn and Vaynor went instead to the Cynon Valley and Merthyr Tydfil districts in Mid Glamorgan, whilst the urban district of Brynmawr and the parish of Llanelly from Crickhowell Rural District became part of Blaenau Gwent. Since 1996, Penderyn has formed part of the Rhondda Cynon Taff county borough and Llanelly has formed part of the Monmouthshire principal area. According to the 2001 census the shire had a population of 42,075. [1] The Borough of Brecknock (Welsh: ) was one of the three local government districts of Powys from 1974 to 1996. ... Powys is a local government principal area and a preserved county in Wales. ... The Local Government Act 1972 (1972 c. ... Siloam Chapel Penderyn is a village near Hirwaun, in Rhondda Cynon Taff, Wales. ... Vaynor (or Faenor) is a village and community in the Merthyr Tydfil county borough in Wales. ... Categories: UK geography stubs ... Merthyr Tydfil (Welsh: ) is a town and county borough in Wales, with a population of about 55,000. ... Mid Glamorgan is a ceremonial preserved county of Wales, one of the divisions of the traditional county of Glamorgan. ... See also Bryn Mawr (disambiguation) for other places with this name. ... Llanelly is the name of both a village and its respective parish in south-east Wales. ... Blaenau Gwent is a county borough and parliamentary constituency in South Wales. ... Rhondda Cynon Taff (Welsh: Rhondda Cynon T f) is a county borough in Glamorgan, South Wales. ... Monmouthshire (Welsh: ) is both a historic county and principal area in south-east Wales. ...


Geography

Brecknockshire is bounded to the north by Radnorshire, to the east by Herefordshire and Monmouthshire, to the south by Monmouthshire and Glamorgan, and west by Carmarthenshire and Cardiganshire. Area 475,224 acres (1,923 km²). The county is predominantly rural and mountainous. The Black Mountains occupy the southeast of the county, the Brecon Beacons the central region, Fforest Fawr the southwest and Mynydd Eppynt the north. Most of the Brecon Beacons National Park lies within the county. The highest point is Pen-y-Fan, 2907 ft (886 m). The River Wye traces nearly the whole of the northern boundary, and the Usk flows in an easterly direction through the central valley. Of the many waterfalls in the county, Henrhyd Falls are particularly spectacular. The main towns are Brecon, Brynmawr, Builth Wells, Crickhowell, Hay-on-Wye, Llanwrtyd Wells, Talgarth and Ystradgynlais. The most important industries are agriculture, forestry and tourism. The county corresponds roughly to the combined territories of the former Kingdom of Brycheiniog and the Kingdom of Builth which were brought together to form this traditional county following the defeat of the last independent Welsh prince and the signing of the Statute of Rhuddlan in 1284. Radnorshire (Welsh: ) is one of thirteen historic counties and former administrative counties of Wales. ... Herefordshire is a historic and ceremonial county and unitary district (known as County of Herefordshire) in the West Midlands region of England. ... Monmouthshire (Welsh: ) is both a historic county and principal area in south-east Wales. ... Monmouthshire is one of thirteen historic counties of Wales, covering south-east Wales. ... Glamorgan or Glamorganshire (Welsh: ) is one of thirteen historic counties and former administrative counties of Wales. ... Carmarthenshire (Welsh: ) is a one of thirteen historic counties and a principal area in Wales. ... Cardiganshire (Sir Aberteifi in Welsh) was a traditional county in Wales that existed between 1282 and 1974. ... The Black Mountains are a group of hills in south-eastern Wales, and a small part of Herefordshire, England. ... Part of the Brecon Beacons, looking from the highest point Pen y Fan, 886 m (2907 feet), to Cribyn, 795 m (2608 feet) The Brecon Beacons (Welsh: Bannau Brycheiniog) are a mountain range located in the south-east of Wales. ... Part of the Brecon Beacons National Park, looking from the highest point Pen Y Fan, 886 m (2907 feet), to Corn Du, 873 m (2864 feet) The Brecon Beacons National Park is one of three national parks in Wales. ... Pen y Fan is the highest mountain in South Wales, UK, situated in the Brecon Beacons national park. ... River Wye and Lancat and Ban y Gore Nature Reserve The Wye at Hay-on-Wye The Wye at Tintern This article is about the river that flows along the Anglo-Welsh border. ... The River Usk, Afon Wysg in Welsh, rises in the mountains of mid-Wales then flows south-east through Abergavenny and the eponymous town of Usk to the Roman legionary fortress of Caerleon and the Bristol Channel at Newport. ... With a drop of 90 feet (27. ... The Monmouthshire & Brecon Canal basin at Brecon, the starting point of the Taff Trail. ... See also Bryn Mawr (disambiguation) for other places with this name. ... Builth Wells (Welsh: ) is a town in Powys, traditional county of Brecknockshire, mid Wales, lying on the River Wye. ... Crickhowell (Welsh: Crughywel or Crucywel) is a town in Powys, traditional county of Brecknockshire, mid Wales. ... Second-hand bookshop at Hay-on-Wye Hay-on-Wye (Welsh: Y Gelli Gandryll or Y Gelli), often described as the town of books, is a market town in Brecknockshire, Wales, very close to the border with England, within the Brecon Beacons National Park. ... Llanwrtyd Wells (Welsh: Llanwrtyd) is a small town in Powys, in the traditional county of Brecknockshire, mid Wales, lying on the River Irfon. ... Talgarth is a small town in the traditional county of Brecknockshire, south Powys, mid Wales, with a population of around 1,800 people. ... Ystradgynlais is a town on the River Tawe in south west Powys, Wales. ... Builth Wells (Welsh: Llanfair ym Muallt) is a town in Powys, traditional county of Brecknockshire, mid Wales, lying on the River Wye. ... The Statute of Rhuddlan was enacted on 3 March 1284 after the conquest of Wales by the English king Edward I. The Statute of Rhuddlan was issued from Rhuddlan Castle in North Wales, which was built as one of the iron ring of fortresses by Edward I, in his late... // Events War and politics King Charles II of Naples is captured in a naval battle off Naples by Roger of Lauria, admiral to King Peter III of Aragon. ...


History

For the Kingdom of Brycheiniog, see Brycheiniog.

The kingdom of Brycheiniog was established in the 5th century and survived until the 10th century when it was subjugated by the Anglo-Saxons. During the Norman period, the area was classified as a Lordship. The Lord of Brycheiniog was subject to the Mortimer family who ruled most of south and east Wales in an area called the Welsh Marches. During the reign of Llywelyn ap Gruffydd of Gwynedd the homage of the Lord of Brycheiniog was transferred to him from the King of England (Henry III) by the Treaty of Montgomery in 1267. However, it was an attack on Brycheiniog by the Marcher Lords Humphrey de Bohun and Roger Mortimer in 1276 which led to the final breakdown of the peace between England and Wales after which Llywelyn's domain was reduced to just his lands in Gwynedd. Brycheiniog was thereafter subject to the King of England and became a county under the same Shire model as seen in England under the Laws in Wales Acts 1535-1542. Brecknockshire, also known as Breconshire or, in Welsh, as Sir Frycheiniog is an inland traditional county of Wales, bounded to the north by Radnorshire, to the east by Herefordshire and Monmouthshire, to the south by Monmouthshire and Glamorganshire, and west by Carmarthenshire and Cardiganshire. ... Europe in 450 The 5th century is the period from 401 to 500 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Welsh Marches is an area along the border of England and Wales in the island of Great Britain. ... Arms used by Llywelyn ap Gruffydd Llywelyn ap Gruffudd or Gruffydd (c. ... Medieval kingdoms of Wales. ... This is a list of British monarchs, that is, the monarchs on the thrones of some of the various kingdoms that have existed on, or incorporated, the island of Great Britain, namely: England (united with Wales from 1536) up to 1707; Scotland up to 1707; The Kingdom of Great Britain... Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was the son and successor of John Lackland as King of England, reigning for fifty-six years from 1216 to his death. ... By means of the Treaty of Montgomery (1267), Llywelyn ap Gruffydd was able to get his new title Prince of Wales acknowledged by the English king Henry III. Llywelyn ap Gruffydd finished the work his grandfather, Llywelyn the Great, had started: by force and diplomacy all the other Welsh dynasties... Humphrey de Bohun was the name of a number of men in medieval England, all members of a prominent noble family. ... Roger Mortimer (or Roger de Mortimer) was the name of several Marcher lords, members of a powerful Norman family living on the borders of England and Wales in the 13th and 14th centuries. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... The Laws in Wales Acts 1535–1542 were a series of parliamentary measures by which the legal system of Wales was annexed to England and the norms of English administration introduced in order to create a single state and a single legal jurisdiction, which is frequently referred to as England...


Places of interest


  Results from FactBites:
 
Old Brecknockshire (Breconshire) (1720 words)
The old county of Brecknockshire, or Breconshire, now forms the southern portion of the new the administrative county of Powys
“ but no one dares continue that libellous and scurrilous rhyme in Brecknockshire, one of the most Welsh of counties, well endowed with good samples of all the scenic beauties for which the principality is famous, and yet remote and inaccessible enough to leave Nature victorious in her eternal struggle with civilisation.
The “Wye Valley,” to the average tourist, means the well-known stretch of the river from Ross to the Severn, but the initiated know that its upper reaches form the most fascinating and delightful boundary between Brecknockshire on the one side and Radnorshire and Herefordshire on the other.
Brecknockshire Agricultural Society gives pointers to the future (257 words)
The Brecknockshire Agricultural Society is marking its 250th anniversary by commissioning a ground breaking report into the Future of Upland Farming in Wales.
It's the oldest agricultural society in the UK and is continuing a tradition of support and inspired leadership begun in 1755.
He has warned that there may be a need for a more wide-ranging debate and that will begin at the launch with a discussion by a panel chaired by Glyn Mathias and including Lord Dafydd Elis-Thomas, Presiding Officer National Assembly for Wales and a cross section of other interested stakeholders.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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