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Encyclopedia > Breatharian
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A breatharian is someone who believes that food (and possibly water) are not necessary for human sustenance. Breatharians claim that the body can be sustained solely by prana, or according to some, by the energy in sunlight. There have been no verified cases of this occurring indefinitely to date. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Water (from the Old English word wæter; c. ... Prana is the vital air, or breath, of the human body, as visualized in Hinduism. ... Sunlight is also the trade name of the worlds first packaged, branded laundry soap producted by Lever Brothers. ...


Breatharian may also refer to someone who practices this philosophy as a lifestyle in place of the usual diet. While it is often seen as an esoteric practice performed by eastern ascetics, recently some groups such as the Breatharian Institute of America have promoted the practice as an option for anybody, once the proper techniques for accessing it are made known. They claim to be sustained by prana, the Hindu concept of an all-pervading universal force. Diet can refer to several things: The nutritional diet of an organism or group. ... Etymology Esoteric is an adjective originating during Hellenic Greece under the domain of the Roman Empire; it comes from the Greek esôterikos, from esôtero, the comparative form of esô: within. It is a word meaning anything that is inner and occult, a latinate word meaning hidden (from which... The word ascetic derives from the ancient Greek term askesis (practice, training or exercise). ... Prana is the vital air, or breath, of the human body, as visualized in Hinduism. ...


Both current scientific theories about nutrition and generally accepted common sense indicate that a person who followed this practice in the long term would die of starvation (if abstaining from food) or dehydration (if abstaining from food and water). As breatharians have seldom submitted themselves to medical testing, there is currently little evidence to support their claims. For the scientific journal named Science, see Science (journal). ... Nutrition is the study of the relationship between diet and states of health and disease. ... The term common sense (or as an adjective, commonsense) describes beliefs or propositions that seem, to most people, to be prudent and of sound judgment, without dependence upon esoteric knowledge. ... Starvation is a severe reduction in vitamin, nutrient, and energy intake, and is the most extreme form of malnutrition. ... Dehydration is the removal of water (hydor in ancient Greek) from an object. ...

Contents


Jasmuheen

Jasmuheen (born Ellen Greve) was probably the most famous advocate of breatharianism during the 1990s. [1] She claimed "I can go for months and months without having anything at all other than a cup of tea. My body runs on a different kind of nourishment."[2] Several interviewers found her house full of food, but she claimed the food was for her husband. In 1999, she volunteered to be monitored closely by Australia's 60 Minutes for one month without eating to demonstrate her methods. [3] [4] After Greve had fasted for four days, Dr. Berris Wink, president of the Queensland branch of the Australian Medical Association, urged her to stop the test. According to the doctor, Greve’s pupils were dilated, her speech was slow, she was dehydrated and her pulse had doubled. The doctor feared kidney damage if she continued with the fast. The test was stopped. She claimed it was due to stress and pollution from a nearby road. Greve claimed that she failed because on the first day of the test she had been confined in a hotel room near a busy road, which kept her from getting the nutrients she needs from the air. “I asked for fresh air. Seventy percent of my nutrients come from fresh air. I couldn’t even breathe,” she said. However, the last three days of the test took place at a mountainside retreat where she could get plenty of fresh air and where she claimed she could now live happily. She challenged the results of the program, saying, "Look, 6,000 people have done this around the world without any problem".[5] But there is no evidence that anyone has ever done better than her. It's unknown who these 6,000 people are, if they exist at all. One wonders if if 6,000 people can do it without any problem, why she had such problems in the conditions she requested. No self-proclaimed Breatharian has ever gone without food or drink for an extended period of time under the supervision of doctors. For her skeptics, Jasmuheen appears to be delusional, and a victim of what skeptics call True-believer syndrome. Jasmuheen (1957, born Ellen Greve) was born in 1957 in Australia to Norwegian immigrants. ... // Events and trends The 1990s are generally classified as having moved slightly away from the more conservative 1980s, but otherwise retaining the same mindset. ... The ticking TAG Heuer stopwatch from 60 Minutes. ... Stress (roughly the opposite of relaxation) is a medical term for a wide range of strong external stimuli, both physiological and psychological, which can cause a physiological response called the general adaptation syndrome, first described in 1936 by Hans Selye in the journal Nature. ... Pollution is the release of harmful environmental contaminants, or the substances so released. ... The true-believer syndrome is a term coined by the reformed psychic fraud M. Lamar Keene to refer to an irrational belief in the paranormal. ...


The well-publicized deaths of 49-year-old Australian-born Scotland resident Verity Linn, 31-year-old Munich kindergarten teacher Timo Degen, and 53-year-old Melbourne resident Lani Marcia Roslyn Morris while attempting to enter the breatharian "diet" have drawn further criticism of the idea.[6] [7] Jim Vadim Pesnak, 63, and his wife Eugenia, 60, went to jail for three years on charges of manslaughter for their involvement in the death of Morris.


Verity Lynn, the Scottish woman who inadvertently killed herself by choosing the Breatharian "diet" was a nominee for the 1999 Darwin Awards. She took to the highlands, the article says, "with only a tent and her grit and determination." She died of hypothermia and dehydration, aggravated by lack of food. Jasmuheen claimed that her death was brought on by a psycho-spiritual problem, rather than a physiological one. A Darwin Award is an honor given to people who supposedly help to improve the human gene pool by removing themselves from it in a spectacularly stupid manner. The prizes are named in honor of the evolutionary theorist Charles Darwin, and are awarded over the World Wide Web and frequently...


Jasmuheen has denied any involvement with the three deaths and claims she cannot be held responsible for the actions of her followers.


Jasmuheen was awarded the Bent Spoon award by Australian Skeptics in 2000 ("presented to the perpetrator of the most preposterous piece of paranormal or pseudoscientific piffle").[8]


Other explanations

Other than a simple confidence trick, skeptics can also point to somnambulism as an alternative explanation for this purported phenomenon. The most common sleep activity is sleepwalking, but activities such as eating, dressing or even driving cars have also been recorded as taking place while the subjects are technically asleep. A confidence trick, confidence game, or con for short (also known as a scam) is an attempt to intentionally mislead a person or persons (known as the mark) usually with the goal of financial or other gain. ... Occams razor non sunt multiplicanda entia praeter necessitatem or plurality should not be posited without necessity is a central tenet of skeptical thought. ... Sleepwalking (also called noctambulism or somnambulism) is a sleep disorder where the sufferer engages in activities that are normally associated with wakefulness while asleep or in a sleeplike state. ... Sleepwalking (also called noctambulism or somnambulism) is a sleep disorder where the sufferer engages in activities that are normally associated with wakefulness while asleep or in a sleeplike state. ... A meal is an instance of eating, specifically one that takes place at a specific time and includes specific, prepared foodstuffs. ... A small variety of cars, the most popular kind of automobile. ...


See also

The true-believer syndrome is a term coined by the reformed psychic fraud M. Lamar Keene to refer to an irrational belief in the paranormal. ... A delusion is commonly defined as a false belief, and is used in everyday language to describe a belief that is either false, fanciful or derived from deception. ... Fasting is the act of willingly (and generally briefly) abstaining from all food and in some cases drink, sexual intercourse, or any sexual desire (including masturbation), or in other cases from certain types or groups of food (e. ... Esotericism refers to knowledge suitable only for the advanced, privileged, or initiated, as opposed to exoteric knowledge, which is public. ... Mysticism, from the Greek (mueo, to conceal), is the pursuit of achieving communion with, or conscious awareness of ultimate reality, the divine, spiritual truth, or God through direct, personal experience (intuition or insight) rather than rational thought; the belief in the existence of realities beyond perceptual or intellectual apprehension that... New Age describes a broad movement characterized by alternative approaches to traditional Western culture. ... See Qi (disambiguation) for other meanings of Qi. Qi, also commonly spelled chi, chi or ki, is a fundamental concept of everyday Chinese culture, most often defined as air or breath (for example, the colloquial Mandarin Chinese term for weather is tiān qi, or the breath of heaven... Spirituality is, in a broad sense, a concern with matters of the spirit, but it is also a wide term with many available readings. ... Anorexia (deriving from the Greek όρεξη (orexe) = appetite) is the decreased sensation of appetite. ...

External links

Case Studies

Criticism


  Results from FactBites:
 
Inedia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1017 words)
Breatharians claim that the body can be sustained solely by prana (the vital life force in Hinduism), or according to some, by the energy in sunlight.
Breatharianism or inedia may also refer to this philosophy practiced as a lifestyle in place of the usual diet.
While it is often seen as an esoteric practice performed by eastern ascetics, recently some groups such as the Breatharian Institute of America have promoted the practice as an option for anybody, once the proper techniques for accessing it are made known.
Breatharian - Wikipedia (271 words)
Een Breatharian is iemand die een dieet volgt waarin geen voedsel (en mogelijk ook geen water) wordt geconsumeerd.
Breatharians claimen dat ze leven van 'lichtenergie' (of prana), en dat dit 'dieet' een mogelijkheid is voor iedereen, zodra de juiste technieken bekend zijn.
De beweging meent dat het "niet eten" geen "alles of niets" kwestie is; velen eten een tijd niets en dan weer een tijdje wel (meestal heel licht en vegetarisch).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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