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Encyclopedia > Brandeis University

Brandeis University

Motto "אמת"
("Emet", Hebrew for "Truth")
Established 1948
Type Private
Academic term Semester
Endowment US $657 million
President Jehuda Reinharz
Staff 326 full-time, 139 part-time
Undergraduates 3,158
Postgraduates 1,872
Location Waltham, Massachusetts, USA
Campus Suburban, 235 acres (1.00 km²)
Mascot Ollie, the Owl (named for Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.)
Athletics NCAA Division III UAA
Website www.brandeis.edu

Brandeis University is a private university located in Waltham, Massachusetts, United States. It is located in the southwestern corner of Waltham, nine miles west of Boston. As of the 2006/07 term, the university had 3,304 undergraduates, 2,009 graduate students and 499 faculty members. Copyright Brandeis University. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... “Hebrew” redirects here. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... An academic term is a division of an academic year, the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... “USD” redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Jehuda Reinharz (born 1944) is the president of Brandeis University, and a Richard Koret Professor of Modern Jewish History at the same institution. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... One of the early centers of the Industrial Revolution in northern America, Waltham is a city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... “km” redirects here. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Brandeis University Mascot, Ollie the Owl Copyright Brandeis University. ... Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The University Athletic Association (UAA) is an athletic conference which competes in the National Collegiate Athletic Associations (NCAA) Division III. Member teams are located in Georgia, Illinois, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Ohio and New York. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... One of the early centers of the Industrial Revolution in northern America, Waltham is a city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. ... “Boston” redirects here. ...


Brandeis was founded in 1948 as a coeducational institution on the site of the former Middlesex University. The Heller School for Social Policy and Management, founded in 1959, is noteworthy for its graduate programs in social policy, social work, and international development[citation needed]. Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... Middlesex University, known primarily for its medical and veterinary schools, operated from 1914 until 1947, first in Cambridge, Massachusetts, later in Waltham, Massachusetts. ... The Heller School for Social Policy and Management is one of the graduate schools of Brandeis University. ... Social policy is the study of the welfare state, and the range of responses to social need. ... Professional social workers are concerned with social problems, their causes, their solutions and their human impacts. ... This article is about International Development. ...


The university is named for the first Jewish Justice of the United States Supreme Court, Louis Dembitz Brandeis (1856–1941). Louis D. Brandeis Louis Dembitz Brandeis (November 13, 1856 - October 3, 1941) was an important American litigator, Justice, advocate of privacy, and developer of the Brandeis Brief. ...


Brandeis is also sponsor of the Wien International Scholarship for non-American students. Wien International Scholarship is a highly prestigious scholarship instituted by Brandeis University (Waltham, MA) for international undergraduate students. ...

Contents

About Brandeis

Chapel's Pond

The schools of the University include: Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ...

The College of Arts and Sciences comprises 24 departments and 22 interdepartmental programs, which offer 41 majors and 46 minors. The Provost of the university, Marty Krauss, is an expert on disability policy and family-based caregiving.[citation needed] Brandeis is home to the Rose Art Museum, a museum of modern and contemporary art, widely renowned as the best modern art museum in New England.[citation needed] The Heller School for Social Policy and Management is one of the graduate schools of Brandeis University. ... // The Brandeis University Rabb School of Continuing Studies offers for-credit and non-credit courses, Masters Degrees and Certificates to the greater community with opportunities for professional development, personal enrichment and lifelong learning. ... // Introduction History The School has its origins in the Economics Department of Brandeis University, which first offered a Master of Arts in International Economics and Finance in 1987. ... The Rose Art Museum is part of Brandeis University, founded in 1961. ...


The Brandeis University Press, a member of the University Press of New England, publishes books in a variety of scholarly and general interest fields. The University Press of New England (or UPNE), founded in 1970, is a university press that is supported by Brandeis University, Dartmouth College (where it is located), the University of New Hampshire, Northeastern University, Tufts University and the University of Vermont. ...


The Goldfarb Library at Brandeis has more than 1.2 million books and 60,000 e-journals. It also has a section of monthly issues.


Presidents

The presidents of Brandeis University have been:

Abram Leon Sachar ( 1899 - 1993) was an American historian and university president. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Evelyn Erika Handler served from 1980 to 1983 as the University of New Hampshires 17th president, the first woman ever to hold that post. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Samuel O. Thier (born 1937) is professor of Medicine and Health Care Policy at Harvard University. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Jehuda Reinharz (born 1944) is the president of Brandeis University, and a Richard Koret Professor of Modern Jewish History at the same institution. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ...

Student life

Shapiro Campus Center

The university has an active student government, the Brandeis Student Union[1], as well as more than 270 student organizations. [2] Fraternities and sororities are officially prohibited by Brandeis University, as they are contrary to a central tenet of the university, namely, that student organizations be open to all students, with membership determined by competency or interest. "Exclusive or secret societies are inconsistent with the principles of openness to which the University is committed."[3]. The university is 9 miles west of Boston, and students are able to take a free shuttle into the city Thursday through Sunday. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ...


Brandeis has two administratively independent student newspapers, The Justice and The Hoot, and one satirical paper, The Blowfish. WBRS at 100.1 FM is the school's radio station. The Justice is the oldest and longest-running independent weekly student newspaper at Brandeis University, located in Waltham, Massachusetts. ... The Hoot is a weekly student publication written for and by the students of Brandeis University. ... The Blowfish is a independently-run humor newspaper distributed weekly at Brandeis University. ... WBRS is a student-run community and college radio station in Waltham, Massachusetts, west of Boston. ... The abbreviations FM, Fm, and fm may refer to: Electrical engineering Frequency modulation (FM) and its most common applications: FM broadcasting, used primarily to broadcast music and speech at VHF frequencies FM synthesis, a sound-generation technique popularized by early digital synthesizers Science Femtometre (fm), an SI measure of length... A radio station is an audio (sound) broadcasting service, traditionally broadcast through the air as radio waves (a form of electromagnetic radiation) from a transmitter to an antenna and a thus to a receiving device. ...


Emergency medical services are provided by the Brandeis Emergency Medical Corps (BEMCo). The official seal of the Brandeis Emergency Medical Corps. ...


Brandeis has a large number of a cappella groups, one sketch comedy troupe Boris' Kitchen and four improv-comedy groups. Collegiate a cappella (or college a cappella) ensembles are formal, student-run and -directed singing groups that perform entirely without instruments. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Cholmondeley's coffeehouse, fondly and lovingly referred to as "Chums," resides at Brandeis' Usen Castle. Chums is a popular site for student performances and concerts. This cozy late-night haunt has played host to famous guests as varied as Tracy Chapman, The Mountain Goats, and Girl Talk. Chums itself has many claims to fame. This former pet morgue is also the noted inspiration for "Central Perk," the coffeehouse featured on the smash hit "Friends." Tracy Chapman (born March 30, 1964) is an American singer-songwriter, best known for her singles, Fast Car, Talkin Bout a Revolution, Baby Can I Hold You and Give Me One Reason. She is a multi-platinum and multi-Grammy Award-winning artist. ... The Mountain Goats is the name of prolific American singer-songwriter John Darnielles long-running musical project. ... Girl Talk is the stage name and recording alias of Gregg Gillis. ... Central Perk logo. ... For the use of the word in a general sense, see Friendship. ...


Greek Life

There are currently 4 fraternities and 2 sororities run by Brandeis students, but unaffiliated with the University. The fraternities are Zeta Beta Tau, Alpha Delta Phi, Alpha Epsilon Pi and Phi Kappa Psi. The sororities are Sigma Delta Tau and Delta Phi Epsilon. There are currently 300 students belonging to Greek organizations at Brandeis.


Athletics

The Brandeis University athletic teams ("The Judges") compete in the University Athletic Association (UAA) conference of the NCAA Division III. The school's colors are blue and white. The University Athletic Association (UAA) is an athletic conference which competes in the National Collegiate Athletic Associations (NCAA) Division III. Member teams are located in Georgia, Illinois, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Ohio and New York. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ...


Brandeis has 10 varsity teams for both men and women, and 1 coed varsity team. The varsity teams are in:

Brandeis also has more than 18 club sports, including rugby, ultimate, crew and martial arts. This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... The Minnesota State Highschool Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... Fencing advertisement for the 1900 Summer Olympic Games This article is about the sport, which is distinguished from stage fencing and academic fencing (mensur). ... This article is about the sport. ... A womens 400m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track. ... For either of the songs named Sailing, see Sailing (song). ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... Soft ball is also a sugar stage Softball is a team sport, in which a ball, eleven to twelve inches (or rarely, 16 inches) (28 to 30. ... “Swimmer” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Dive. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Ultimate (commonly called Ultimate Frisbee) is a non-contact competitive team sport played with a 175 gram flying disc. ... A coxless pair which is a sweep-oar boat. ... Hawaiian State Grappling Championships. ...


Brandeis has had an impressive list of coaches for its athletic teams, from Bud Collins and the men's tennis team in the late 1950s and early 1960s to K.C. Jones leading the men's basketball squad in the 1960s. Arthur Bud Collins (b. ... K.C. Jones (born May 25, 1932 in Taylor, Texas) is a former pro basketball player and coach. ...


Pete Varney, the former Major League Baseball player for the Chicago White Sox and Atlanta Braves is the current head coach of the baseball team. Pete Varney (full name Richard Fred Varney Jr. ... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 3, 4, 9, 11, 16, 19, 42, 72, Name Chicago White Sox (1904–present) Other nicknames The Sox, The South Siders, The ChiSox, The Pale Hose, The Good Guys, The Go-Go Sox, The... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 21, 35, 41, 42, 44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston...


Tim Morehouse Brandeis Alumni was the alternate for the US Olympic fencing team sent to Athens in 2004. The Brandeis Judges consistently send many fencers to the New England Regional NCAA championships often with multiple continuing on to the NCAA National Championships.


History of Brandeis

Founders

Names associated with the conception of Brandeis include Israel Goldstein, George Alpert, C. Ruggles Smith, Albert Einstein, and Abram L. Sachar. “Einstein” redirects here. ... Abram Leon Sachar ( 1899 - 1993) was an American historian and university president. ...

Usen Castle, the most recognized building on campus

C. Ruggles Smith was the son of Dr. John Hall Smith, founder of Middlesex University, who had died in 1944. In 1946, the university was on the brink of collapse. It was in grave financial peril. At the time, it was one of the few medical schools in the U. S. that did not impose a Jewish quota; but it had never been able to secure AMA accreditation—in part, its founder believed, due to institutional antisemitism in the AMA[1]—and, as a result, Massachusetts had all but shut it down. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Middlesex University, known primarily for its medical and veterinary schools, operated from 1914 until 1947, first in Cambridge, Massachusetts, later in Waltham, Massachusetts. ... Numerus Clausus (closed number in Latin) is one of many methods used to limit the number of students who may study at a university. ... The American Medical Association (AMA) is the largest association of medical doctors in the United States. ...


Israel Goldstein was a prominent rabbi in New York from 1918 until 1960 when he emigrated to Israel. He was an influential Zionist. Before 1946, he had headed the New York Board of Rabbis, the Jewish National Fund, and the Zionist Organization of America, and helped found the National Conference of Christians and Jews. On his eightieth birthday, in Israel, Yitzhak Rabin and other leaders of the government, the parliament, and the Zionist movement assembled at his house to pay him tribute.[2] But among all his accomplishments, the one chosen by the New York Times to headline his obituary was: "Rabbi Israel Goldstein, A Founder of Brandeis."[3]


C. Ruggles Smith, desperate for a way to save something of Middlesex University, learned of a New York committee headed by Goldstein that was seeking a campus to establish a Jewish-sponsored secular university, and approached Goldstein with a proposal to give the Middlesex campus and charter to Goldstein's committee, in the hope that his committee might "possess the apparent ability to reestablish the School of Medicine on an approved basis." Goldstein was concerned about being saddled with a failing medical school, but excited about the opportunity to secure "a 100-acre campus not far from New York, the premier Jewish community in the world, and only 10 miles from Boston, one of the important Jewish population centers."[1] Goldstein agreed to accept Smith's offer.


Goldstein then proceeded to recruit George Alpert, a Boston lawyer with fund-raising experience as national vice president of the United Jewish Appeal.


George Alpert (1898-September 11, 1988) was a Boston lawyer who had worked his way through Boston University School of Law. He cofounded the firm of Alpert and Alpert. His firm had a long association with the New York, New Haven and Hartford railroad, of which he was to become president from 1956 to 1961[4][5] (He is best known today as the father of Richard Alpert (Baba Ram Dass)[4]). He was influential in Boston's Jewish community. His Judaism "tended to be social rather than spiritual."[6] He was involved in assisting children displaced from Germany.[7]. Alpert was to be chairman of Brandeis from 1946 to 1954, and a director from 1946 until his death.[4] is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Boston University School of Law (BU Law) is the law school affiliated with Boston University. ... Ram Dass teaching, Hawaii Dr. Richard Alpert (born April 5, 1931), also known as Baba Ram Dass, is a contemporary spiritual teacher and noted bisexual. ...


Goldstein also recruited Albert Einstein, whose involvement, while stormy and short-lived, was extremely important. It drew national attention to the nascent university. The founding organization was named "The Albert Einstein Foundation for Higher Learning, Inc." and early press accounts emphasized his involvement.


The Einstein incident

The origin of what was to become Brandeis was closely associated with the name of Albert Einstein from February 5, 1946,[8] when he agreed to the establishment of the Albert Einstein Foundation for Higher Learning, Inc., until June 22, 1947, when he withdrew his support.[9] “Einstein” redirects here. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The trustees offered to name the university after Einstein in the summer of 1946, but Einstein declined, and on July 16, 1946 the board decided the university would be named after Louis Brandeis.[10] Louis Dembitz Brandeis (November 13, 1856 – October 5, 1941) was an American litigator, Supreme Court Justice, advocate of privacy, and developer of the Brandeis Brief. ...


On August 19, the plans for the new university were announced by prominent rabbi and Zionist Israel Goldstein, president of the Albert Einstein Foundation. Goldstein said that the planned university was to be supported by contributions from Jewish organizations and individuals, and stressed the point that the institution was to be without quotas and open to all "regardless of race, color, or creed." The institution was to be "deeply conscious both of the Hebraic tradition of Torah looking upon culture as a birthright, and of the American ideal of an educated democracy."[11] In later stories the New York Times' capsule characterization of Brandeis was "a Jewish-supported non-quota university."[9]


Einstein and Goldstein clashed almost immediately. Einstein objected to what he thought was excessively expansive promotion, and to Goldstein's sounding out Abram L. Sachar as a possible president without consulting Einstein. Einstein took great offense at Goldstein's having invited Cardinal Spellman to participate in a fundraising event. Einstein resigned on September 2, 1946. Believing the venture could not succeed without Einstein, Goldstein quickly agreed to resign himself, and Einstein returned; his brief departure was publicly denied.[12][9] Abram Leon Sachar ( 1899 - 1993) was an American historian and university president. ... Francis Joseph Cardinal Spellman, (4 May 1889–2 December 1967) was an American prelate, the ninth bishop and sixth archbishop of the Roman Catholic diocese of New York. ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Foundation acquired the campus of the Middlesex University in Waltham, which was almost defunct except for the Middlesex Veterinary and Medical College. The charter of this small and marginal operation was transferred to the Foundation along with the campus. The Foundation had pledged to continue operating it, but began to feel that it would never be more than third-rate, while its operating costs were burdensome at a time when the Foundation was trying to raise funds. Disputes arose whether to try to improve it—as Einstein wished[13]—or to terminate it.[12] Einstein also became alarmed by press announcements that exaggerated the school's success at fundraising, and on June 22, 1947 he made a final break with the enterprise. The veterinary school was closed, despite "indignant and well-publicized protests and demonstrations by the disappointed students and their parents"[12]. George Alpert, a lawyer responsible for much of the organizational effort, gave another reason for the break: Einstein's desire to offer the presidency of the school to left-wing scholar Harold J. Laski. Alpert characterized Laski as "a man utterly alien to American principles of democracy, tarred with the Communist brush."[8] He said, "I can compromise on any subject but one: that one is Americanism."[12]. is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Harold Joseph Laski (June 30, 1893, Manchester, England - March 24, 1950, London, England) was an English political scientist, economist, author, and lecturer, and served as the 1945-1946 chairman of the Labour Party. ...


Six years later, Einstein would decline the offer of an honorary degree from Brandeis, writing to Brandeis president Abram L. Sachar that "what happened in the stage of preparation of Brandeis University was not at all caused by a misunderstanding and cannot be made good any more."[8] Abram Leon Sachar ( 1899 - 1993) was an American historian and university president. ...


Historians Slater and Slater commented that "plagued by infighting, Brandeis in early 1948 seemed a project in serious trouble. Nonetheless, the school opened in the fall with 107 students." They list the opening of Brandeis as one of their "Great Moments in Jewish History."[14]


In 1954 Brandeis inaugurated a graduate program and became fully accredited.[14]


Other notable events

The student takeover of Ford Hall

From January 8-18, 1969 about 70 students captured and held then-student-center, Ford Hall.[15] The student protesters renamed the school "Malcolm X University" for the duration of the siege (distributing buttons with the new name and logo) and issued a list of ten demands for better minority representation on campus.[16] Most of these demands were subsequently met. Ford hall was demolished in August 2000 to make way for a new student center, the Shapiro Center which had its groundbreaking October 25, 2000 and was opened and dedicated October 3, 2002.


Notable faculty and staff

Robert J. Art is reputed to be a knowledgeable American Foreign Policy and International Relations writer. ... Leonard Bernstein in 1971 Leonard Bernstein (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, and pianist. ... Olga Broumas (born 1949), is the author of 7 books of poetry, collected in RAVE: 1975-1999, and 4 books of translations of the Greek Nobel Laureate poet Odysseas Elytis, collected in EROS, EROS, EROS, as well as a CD recording of parts of the above, called Olga Broumas: A... Mary Baine Campbell is an American poet, scholar, and professor. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Benjamin Friedman (Born March 18, 1905 in Cleveland, Ohio, Died November 24, 1982) is a former American Football quarterback who played for the Cleveland Bulldogs (1927), Detroit Wolverines (1928), New York Giants (1929-1931), and the Brooklyn Dodgers (football) 1932-1934). ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the hall of fame of the National Football League (NFL). ... Navy quarterback Aaron Polanco sets up to throw. ... Thomas Lauren Friedman, OBE (born July 20, 1953), is an American journalist. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... For other uses, see The World Is Flat (disambiguation). ... A KFC franchise in Kuwait. ... Arthur Green is a prominent scholar of Jewish spirituality and Jewish thought, as well as an innovative leader of rabbinic institutions. ... Allen Grossman was born in 1932 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation is a major private grant-making foundation based in Chicago that has awarded more than US$3 billion since its inception in 1978. ... Timothy J Hickey is a Professor of Computer Science and Chair of the Computer Science and Internet Studies Program (INET) at Brandeis University. ... For other persons with this name, see Anita Hill (disambiguation). ... Heisuke Hironaka (広中 平祐 Hironaka Heisuke, born April 9, 1931) is a Japanese mathematician. ... Leonhard Euler, considered one of the greatest mathematicians of all time A mathematician is a person whose primary area of study and research is the field of mathematics. ... The Fields Medal is a prize awarded to two, three, or four mathematicians not over 40 years of age at each International Congress of the International Mathematical Union, a meeting that takes place every four years. ... Irving Howe (1920 – 1993), was born Irving Horenstein in New York, the son of immigrants who ran a small grocery store that went out of business during the Great Depression. ... Dissent Magazine is a left-wing magazine that was started in 1954 by Irving Howe and Lewis Coser. ... Paul Jankowski is a professor at Brandeis University. ... William E. Kapelle (born in Baldwin City, Kansas) is a medieval historian at Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts. ... Walter Laqueur (born 1921) is an American historian and political commentator. ... Maxwell Max Alan Lerner (December 20, 1902—June 5, 1992) was an American journalist and educator known for his controversial syndicated column. ... Kanan Makiya is an Iraqi-American academic. ... Herbert Marcuse (July 19, 1898 – July 29, 1979) was a German-born philosopher, sociologist and a member of the Frankfurt School. ... Max Horkheimer (front left), Theodor Adorno (front right), and Jürgen Habermas in the background, right, in 1965 at Heidelberg The Frankfurt School is a school of neo-Marxist social theory (which is more akin to anarchism than communism), social research, and philosophy. ... Abraham (Harold) Maslow (April 1, 1908 – June 8, 1970) was an American psychologist. ... Reverend Dr. Anna Pauline (Pauli) Murray (November 20, 1910 – July 1, 1985) was an American civil rights advocate, feminist, lawyer, poet, teacher and ordained minister. ... Ulric Neisser (born 8 December 1928) is an American psychologist. ... Dr. Irene Pepperberg (born April 1, 1949, Brooklyn, New York) is a scientist noted for her studies in animal cognition, particularly in relation to parrots. ... James Pustejovsky is a professor of computer science at Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts. ... Generative Lexicon (GL) is a theory of linguistic semantics which focuses on the distributed nature of compositionality in natural language. ... Philip Rahv (March 10, 1908 – December 22, 1973) was an American literary critic and essayist. ... Partisan Review was an American political and literary quarterly published from 1934 to 2003. ... Robert Bernard Reich (born June 24, 1946) was the twenty-second United States Secretary of Labor, serving under President Bill Clinton from 1993 to 1997. ... Seal of the United States Department of Labor Secretary of Labor redirects here. ... Margret Elizabeth Rey (May 16, 1906 – December 21, 1996), born Margarete Elisabeth Waldstein, was (with her husband H.A. Rey), the co-author and illustrator of childrens books, best known for their Curious George Although she was born in Germany, she fled to Brazil early in her life to... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... An illustrator is a graphic artist who specializes in enhancing written text by providing a visual representation that corresponds to the content of the associated text. ... Anna Eleanor Roosevelt known as Eleanor (IPA: ; October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was an American political leader who used her influence as an active First Lady from 1933 to 1945 to promote the New Deal policies of her husband, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, as well as taking a prominent... This article is about the use of the term first lady internationally. ... For the author-illustrator, see Diana Ross (author). ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Jonathan D. Sarna is a professor of Judaic Studies at Brandeis University and one of the most prominent sociologists of the American Jewish community. ... Professor Morris Morrie Schwartz, BA, MA, Ph. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Tuesdays With Morrie is a bestselling non-fiction book by American writer Mitch Albom, published in 1997 (ISBN 0-385-48451-8). ... Thomas Sowell (born June 30, 1930), is an American economist, political writer, and commentator. ... Hoover Tower at the Hoover Institution The Hoover Institution on War, Revolution, and Peace is a public policy think tank and library founded by Herbert Hoover at Stanford University, his alma mater. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Fuld Hall The Institute for Advanced Study, located in Princeton, New Jersey, United States, is one of the world’s leading centers for theoretical research and intellectual inquiry. ... The Fulbright Program is program of educational grants (Fulbright Fellowships) sponsored by the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the United States Department of State. ... The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) is an independent federal agency of the United States established by the National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities Act of 1965 (Pub. ... Doctor Faustusis a film produced in 1967 that is based on Christopher Marlowes Doctor Faustus, written in 1604, http://www. ... The MacArthur Fellows Program or MacArthur Fellowship (sometimes nicknamed the genius grant) is an award given by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation each year to typically 20 to 40 citizens or residents of the U.S., of any age and working in any field, who show exceptional... Dr. Leslie A. Zebrowitz is a social psychologist who studies the effects of the way people look on others attitudes towards them. ...

Notable alumni

Government, law and politics

Jack Abramoff (born February 28, 1958) is an American political lobbyist, a Republican political activist and businessman who is a central figure in a series of high-profile political scandals. ... Red Scorpion is a 1989 film starring Dolph Lundgren. ... Sidney Blumenthal was born in Chicago in 1948 and educated at Brandeis University(BA in Sociology in 1969). ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Naomi Reice Buchwald (born 1944 in Kingston, New York) is a Federal District Judge in the Southern District of New York. ... Map of the boundaries of the United States Courts of Appeals and United States District Courts The United States district courts are the general trial courts of the United States federal court system. ... The United States District Court for the Southern District of New York (SDNY) is the Federal district court whose jurisdiction is comprised of the following counties: New York, Bronx, Westchester, Putnam, Rockland, Orange, Dutchess, and Sullivan. ... Winston Bernard Coard (born August 10, 1944) was a Grenadian politician who was part of the coup détat that overthrew Maurice Bishops government in 1983. ... A coup détat, or simply a coup, is the sudden overthrow of a government, usually done by a small group that just replaces the top power figures. ... Maurice Bishop Maurice Rupert Bishop (May 29, 1944 – October 19, 1983) was a Grenadian revolutionary leader. ... Jennifer Jean Casolo was an American citizen who was arrested on November 26, 1989 by El Salvadoran government troops during the November 1989 Final Offensive of the Farabundo Martí National Liberation Front (FMLN) in San Salvador. ... Angela Yvonne Davis (born January 26, 1944) is a African American radical activist, primarily working for racial and gender equality and for prison reform. ... “UCSC” redirects here. ... Geir Hilmar Haarde (born April 8, 1951) is an Icelandic politician. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of a cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... Wakako Hironaka (広中 和歌子) is a Japanese writer and politician. ... The National Diet of Japan ) is Japans legislature. ... Abbott Howard Abbie Hoffman (November 30, 1936 – April 12, 1989) was a self-identified communo-anarchist,[1] social and political activist in the United States, co-founder of the Youth International Party (Yippies), and later, a fugitive from the law, who lived under an alias following a conviction for dealing... Yippie flag, ca. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... This section may require cleanup to meet Wikipedias quality standards. ... Joette Katz, born Feb. ... The Connecticut Supreme Court, formerly known as the Connecticut Supreme Court of Errors, is the highest court in the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... Osman Faruk LoÄŸoÄŸlu (1941-) is a Turkish diplomat and the former Turkish ambassador to the United States of America, having served from 2001 to 2005. ... For other uses, see Ambassador (disambiguation). ... Katherine Ann Power was an American criminal, who was placed on the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) Most Wanted List in 1970, along with her accomplice Susan Edith Saxe, a fellow student at Brandeis University. ... Dimitrij Rupel (born April 7, 1946 in Ljubljana) is a liberal politician from Slovenia and current foreign minister of that country. ... George Saitoti (1945-) is a mathematician, politician, and former Vice President of Kenya. ... Michael Sandel (1943-) is a contemporary political philosopher. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... A controversial entity, created by George W. Bush, whose purpose is to regulate (or, at least, tell the president how he ought to regulate) biotechnology and biomedical research. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... Shen Tong is a Chinese dissident who was the leader in the democracy movement at Tiananmen Square in 1989. ... The Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, commonly referred to as the Tiananmen Square Massacre,[1] were a series of demonstrations led by students, intellectuals, and labor activists in the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) between April 15 and June 4, 1989. ... Gerald T. Zerkin (1950 - ) is a senior assistant federal public defender in Richmond, Va. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ...

Academia

“MIT” redirects here. ... David Bernstein is a professor at the George Mason University School of Law. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... Dr. Jean Bethke Elshtain is a prolific feminist political philosopher with the University of Chicago Divinity School and a contributing editor for The New Republic. ... The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ... John H. Hopps ( - May 14, 2004) was an African-American physicist and politician. ... Alma Mater Columbia University in the City of New York is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... Lipstadts book: Denying The Holocaust Deborah Esther Lipstadt (born March 18, 1947, New York City) is an American historian and author of the book Denying the Holocaust. ... A historian is an individual who studies history and who writes on history. ... Fatema Mernissi (Arabic:فاطمة مرنيسي) is a Moroccan feminist writer and sociologist. ... Elisa New is a Professor of English at Harvard University. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... Lawrence Henry Larry Summers (born November 30, 1954) is an American economist and academic. ... Alicia Ostriker is an American poet and scholar born in 1937, and is considered a prominent voice in Jewish feminist poetry. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... “Rutgers” redirects here. ... Philip Rubin (born May 22, 1949, in Newark, New Jersey) is an American cognitive scientist who since 2003 has been the Chief Executive Officer and a Senior Scientist at Haskins Laboratories in New Haven, Connecticut. ... Haskins Laboratories [1] is an independent, international, multidisciplinary community of researchers conducting basic research on spoken and written language. ... Paul Sally is a professor of mathematics at the University of Chicago, where he is the director of undergraduate mathematics instruction. ... The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... The Ateneo de Davao University (AdDU) is a private Catholic university founded administered by the by Jesuit priests in the island of Mindanao in the Philippines in 1948 . ... Judith R. Shapiro (born January 24, 1942) is the current President of Barnard College, a liberal arts college for women affiliated with Columbia University; as President of Barnard, she is also an academic dean within the university. ... Barnard College, founded in 1889, is one of the four undergraduate divisions of Columbia University. ... Robert F X Sillerman (born New York in 1949) is a billionaire businessman, making his fortune through building and selling companies in the media industry. ... “Elvis” redirects here. ... AMERICAN IDOL HAS BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO DEATH OF SIMON ... Long Island University (LIU) is a private university located on Long Island in the U.S. state of New York. ... The Southampton College of Long Island University is a small liberal arts college located in Southampton, New York, founded in 1963. ... Image:Mwalzer large. ... Fuld Hall The Institute for Advanced Study, located in Princeton, New Jersey, United States, is one of the world’s leading centers for theoretical research and intellectual inquiry. ... Nassau Street, Princetons main street. ... “NJ” redirects here. ... Robert J. Zimmer is an American mathematician and academic administrator. ... The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ...

Arts and media

Kathy Acker (18 April 1947 in Manhattan—30 November 1997 in Tijuana, Mexico) was an experimental novelist, prose stylist, playwright, essayist, poète maudit and sex-positive feminist writer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Along with The Detroit News, the Detroit Free Press is one of the two major metro Detroit newspapers. ... Tuesdays With Morrie is a bestselling non-fiction book by American writer Mitch Albom, published in 1997 (ISBN 0-385-48451-8). ... The Five People You Meet in Heaven is a novel by Mitch Albom, published in 2003. ... Paula Schwartz Apsell (July 4, 1947 - present) (Brandeis Alumni Soc. ... Nova is a popular science television series produced by the Public Broadcasting Service. ... An Emmy Award. ... Morton Brilliant was the initial campaign manager for Democrat Cathy Coxs 2006 gubernatorial campaign in Georgia. ... Peter Childs is an American composer. ... Joe Conason is a United States-based journalist and author and is a noted commentator for liberal positions. ... The New York Observer is a weekly newspaper first published in New York City on September 22, 1987 by Arthur L. Carter, a very successful former investment banker with publishing interests. ... David Crane (born August 10, 1957) is a successful American writer and producer. ... For the use of the word in a general sense, see Friendship. ... Tyne Daly (born Ellen Tyne Daly on February 21, 1946 in Madison, Wisconsin) is an Emmy Award and Tony Award-winning American stage and screen actress. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... Stuart Damon (born Stuart Michael Zonis on February 5, 1937) is an American actor. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Loretta Devine Loretta Devine (born August 21, 1949 in Houston, Texas) is an American actress. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... Boston Public was an American television series created by David E. Kelley and broadcast on FOX from October 23, 2000 through to January 30, 2004. ... This article is about the television series. ... Thomas L. Friedman (born July 20, 1953) is an American journalist, columnist, and author, currently working as an Op-Ed columnist for the New York Times. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The National Book Awards is one of the most preeminent literary prizes in the United States. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Anthony Howard Goldwyn (born May 20, 1960 in Los Angeles, California) is an American actor. ... Marshall Herskovitz (-) is an American film director. ... Dangerous Beauty (1998) is a biographical drama film directed by Marshall Herskovitz. ... Promotional poster The Last Samurai is a film released in the United States on December 5, 2003. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Chuck Israels is a composer/arranger/bassist who has worked with Billie Holiday, Benny Goodman, Coleman Hawkins, Stan Getz, Herbie Hancock, J.J. Johnson, John Coltrane, and many others. ... Margo Jefferson is a cultural critic for The New York Times. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Criticism has been presented since 1970 to a newspaper writer who has demonstrated distinguished criticism. Recipients of the award are chosen by an independent board and officially administered by Columbia University. ... Jīn Xuěfēi (Simplified Chinese: 金雪飞; Traditional Chinese: 金雪飛; born February 21, 1956) is a contemporary Chinese-American writer using the pen name Ha Jin (哈金). Ha Jin was born in Liaoning, China in 1956. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... Michael M. Kaiser, is the President of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts (which is also known as the Kennedy Center) in Washington, DC. Kaiser received his B.A. in Economics from Bradeis University and his M.B.A. from the MIT Sloan School of Management. ... The Kennedy Center as seen from the Potomac River. ... Marta Kauffman created the TV series Friends with David Crane and is the executive producer of that show along with David Crane and Kevin S. Bright. ... An Emmy Award. ... For the use of the word in a general sense, see Friendship. ... Family Album is the name of a Danielle Steel romance novel and of a TV movie based on it. ... Dream On S1 is out on uk DVD 30TH JULY Dream On is a cult American adult situation comedy about Martin Tupper, a dreamer whose life is full of colourful characters. ... The Powers That Be was a United States television show created by David Crane and Marta Kauffman. ... -1... Peter Lieberson (born 25 October 1946 New York City) is an American composer. ... Steven Mackey (b. ... Mark Leyner (born 1956) is an American postmodernist author. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... Cheryl Gates McFadden (born March 2, 1949 in Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio), usually credited as Gates McFadden, is an American actress and choreographer. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... Doctor Beverly Crusher, played by actress Gates McFadden, was a character on the Star Trek: The Next Generation TV show and subsequent films. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... Michael McDowell (born 1950) is an American novelist and screenwriter, whom Stephen King has called the finest writer of paperback originals in America today. His screen credits include collaboration on Thinner (1996), and on Tim Burtons Beetlejuice (1987) and The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993). ... Debra Lynn Messing (born August 15, 1968) is an Emmy Award-winning American actress, known for portraying Grace Adler in Will & Grace and for appearing in a series of film roles. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... Will & Grace is a popular Emmy Award winning and Golden Globe nominated American television sitcom that was originally broadcast from 1998 to 2006. ... Walter Mossberg is a highly respected technology journalist for the Wall Street Journal. ... The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ... Josh Mostel (December 21, 1946, New York, New York) is an American actor who is most known for his roles in Jesus Christ Superstar and two Adam Sandler films. ... National Lampoons Animal House is a 1978 comedy film in which a misfit group of fraternity boys take on the system at their college. ... Delta House was a short-lived follow-up to the smash 1978 film National Lampoons Animal House. ... Barry Newman (born November 7, 1938) is an American actor best known for the character Anthony Petrocelli on the TV crime-drama Petrocelli, for which he was nominated for a Golden Globe. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Anand Patwardhan (b. ... Martin H. Peretz, also known as Marty Peretz, (born December 6, 1938), is an American publisher and former Harvard University lecturer. ... For other uses, see New Republic. ... Letty Cottin Pogrebin is an American writer and journalist. ... magazine Ms. ... Tom Rapp (born 1947) is an American composer and folk singer. ... For other uses of the phrase Pearls Before Swine, see Pearls Before Swine (disambiguation). ... Theresa Rebeck (born 1958?) is a writer for the stage, screen, television, and radio. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Film editing. ... Toy Story 2 is a CGI animation film and the sequel to Toy Story, and the third Disney / Pixar feature film, which featured the adventures of a group of toys that come to life when humans are not around to see them. ... Finding Nemo is an Academy Award-winning computer-animated film produced by Pixar Animation Studios and released to theaters by Walt Disney Pictures and Buena Vista Distribution. ... Bill Schneider is a news reporter and political analyst at CNN. Categories: | | ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Bob Simon is a CBS News correspondent. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... It has been suggested that Equity feminism be merged into this article or section. ... The American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research is a think tank founded in 1943 whose stated mission is to support the foundations of freedom - limited government, private enterprise, vital cultural and political institutions, and a strong foreign policy and national defense. ... Karen Sosnoski (born November 30, 1964) is an American author, radio contributor and documentary filmmaker. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For the film, see Calamity Jane (1953 film) Calamity Jane at age 33. ... For other uses, see HBO (disambiguation). ... Deadwood is an American television drama series that premiered in March 2004 on HBO. The series is a Western set in the 1870s in Deadwood, Dakota Territory. ... Penelope Trunk (born 1966) is an American writer who examines the increasingly blurred lines between work and life. ...

Business

Leonard Asper (born May 31, 1964, in Winnipeg, Manitoba), is a Canadian businessman. ... CanWest Global Communications Corp. ... Mitch Caplan is the CEO and Director of E*TRADE Financial Corporation. ... e-trade ... Kraft Foods Inc. ... A patriotic advertisement for Tootsie Rolls during World War I For information about the hip-hop song Tootsee Roll, see 69 Boyz. ... Christie Hefner (born November 8, 1952 in Chicago, Illinois) is the chairman and chief executive officer for Playboy Enterprises Inc. ... For other uses, see Playboy (disambiguation). ... Hugh Marston Hefner (born April 9, 1926 in Chicago, Illinois), also referred to colloquially as Hef, is the founder and editor-in-chief of Playboy magazine. ... Bob Kraft is the owner of the NFLs New England Patriots. ... City Foxborough, Massachusetts Other nicknames The Pats Team colors Nautical Blue, New Century Silver, Red, and White Head Coach Bill Belichick Owner Robert Kraft General manager Bill Belichick (de facto) Mascot Pat Patriot League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–69) Eastern Division (1960–69) National Football League (1970–present... SsangYong can refer to: SsangYong Motor Company SsangYong Group This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Jeffrey Lurie (b. ... City Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Team colors Midnight Green, Black, White, and Silver Head Coach Andy Reid Owner Jeffrey Lurie General manager Tom Heckert (official) Andy Reid (de facto) Fight song Fly, Eagles Fly Mascot Swoop League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1933–present) Eastern Division (1933-1949) American Conference (1950-1952... Ólafur Jóhann Ólafsson (born September 26, 1962) is an Icelandic writer and businessman. ... Time Warner Inc. ... Sony Corporation ) is a Japanese multinational corporation and one of the worlds largest media conglomerates with revenue of $66. ... The Sony PlayStation ) is a video game console of the 32/64-bit era, first produced by Sony Computer Entertainment in the mid-1990s. ... Robert F X Sillerman (born New York in 1949) is a billionaire businessman, making his fortune through building and selling companies in the media industry. ... SFX is a three letter acronym for any of the following: Special effects or Sound effects SFX, a sci-fi magazine Spread Firefox, a campaign to encourage the use of Mozilla Firefox SFX, a concert venue in Dublin Self-extracting archive, a compressed file with an embedded executable to decompress...

Science

A fractal antenna is an antenna that uses a fractal design to maximize the length of material that can receive or transmit electromagnetic signals within a given total surface area. ... Judith Rich Harris (February 10, 1938 - ) is a psychologist and the author of The Nurture Assumption, a book criticizing the belief that parents are the most important factor in child development. ... Leslie Lamport Dr. Leslie Lamport (born 1941) is an American computer scientist. ... This article is about the typesetting system. ... Roderick MacKinnon (born 19 February 1956 in Burlington, Massachusetts) is a professor of Molecular Neurobiology and Biophysics at Rockefeller University who in 2003 was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work on the structure and operation of ion channels. ... Founders Hall Rockefeller University is a private university focusing primarily on graduate and postgraduate education research in the biomedical fields, located between 63rd and 68th Streets along York Avenue, on the Upper East Side of Manhattan island in New York City, New York. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ), as designated in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, are awarded for physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, and peace. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Janet Akyüz Mattei Janet Akyüz Mattei (January 2, 1943 – March 22, 2004) was a Turkish-American astronomer and longtime director of the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO). ... Since its founding in 1911, the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) has coordinated, collected, evaluated, analyzed, published, and archived variable star observations made largely by amateur astronomers and makes the records available to professional astronomers, researchers, and educators. ... Patrick Tufts is a computer scientist and inventor. ... Karen K. Uhlenbeck (24 August 1942, Cleveland, Ohio – ) is a professor and Sid W. Richardson Regents Chairholder in the Department of Mathematics at The University of Texas in Austin. ... Edward Witten (born August 26, 1951) is an American theoretical physicist and professor at the Institute for Advanced Study. ... The Fields Medal is a prize awarded to two, three, or four mathematicians not over 40 years of age at each International Congress of the International Mathematical Union, a meeting that takes place every four years. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ...

Sports

Nelson Figueroa (born May 18, 1974) is an American professional baseball player from Brooklyn, New York. ... Major league affiliations National League (1998–present) West Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Arizona Diamondbacks (1998–present) Other nicknames The D-backs, The Snakes Ballpark Chase Field (1998–present) a. ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 14, 20, 32, 36, 42 Name Fightin Philadelphia Phillies (1884–present) Philadelphia Quakers (1883-1889) (Also referred to as Blue Jays 1943-1945 despite formal name remaining Phillies) Other nicknames The Phils, The Phightin... Major league affiliations National League (1998–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 4, 19, 34, 42, 44 Name Milwaukee Brewers (1970–present) Seattle Pilots (1969) Other nicknames True Blue Brew Crew, The Brew Crew, The Crew, Beermakers Ballpark Miller Park (2001–present) County Stadium (1970–2000) Sick... Major league affiliations National League (1887–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 11, 20, 21, 33, 40, 42 Name Pittsburgh Pirates (1891–present) Pittsburgh Innocents (1890) Pittsburg Alleghenies (1882–1889) (Also referred to as Infants in 1890) Other nicknames The Bucs, The Buccos... Curtis Montague (Curt) Schilling (born November 14, 1966 in Anchorage, Alaska) is an American Major League Baseball right-handed starting pitcher for the Boston Red Sox. ...

Publications

  • The Justice, which was founded in 1949 (one year after the university's inception) is an administratively independent weekly newspaper distributed every Tuesday during term.
  • The Brandeis Hoot, founded in 2005, is an independent weekly newspaper published on Fridays.
  • The Blowfish, a satirical newspaper which was founded in February 2006 is published every other Thursday. The first issue appeared inside The Hoot and every issue since then has been published independently.
  • The Louis Lunatic, founded in the winter of 2005, is a student-run sports magazine released each semester, discussing Brandeis and national sports.
  • Archon, the yearbook
  • Gravity, a humor magazine founded in 1990.
  • Laurel Moon, a literary magazine
  • Where the Children Play, a literature and arts magazine
  • Louis Magazine, a defunct journal of intellectual discourse, 1999–2002.
  • The Barrister News Ltd, a politically neutral broadside weekly newspaper with nationally syndicated features. 1985–1991.[dubious ]
  • Under the Robe, an arts and entertainment social tabloid published by The Barrister 1985-1988

In popular culture

Where did April come up with that stuff about Adolph Loos and terms like "organic form"?
Well, naturally. She went to Brandeis.
Music and Lyrics is a romantic comedy film released by Warner Bros. ... Drew Blyth Barrymore (born February 22, 1975) is an American actress and film producer, the youngest member of the Barrymore family of American actors. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Today I Am a Clown is the sixth episode of The Simpsons fifteenth season. ... Hannah and Her Sisters is a 1986 romantic comedy film which tells the intertwined stories of an extended family, told mostly during a year that begins and ends with a family Thanksgiving dinner. ... Dianne Wiest (born March 28, 1948) is two-time Academy Award-winning, Golden Globe Award-winning, Emmy Award-winning and Bafta Award-nominated American actress in stage, television, and film, and has received several awards in her career. ... Adolf Loos (December 10, 1870 in Brno, Moravia – August 8, 1933 in Austria) was an early-twentieth_century Viennese modernist architect (associated with the International Style). ...

  • In the 1977 Woody Allen movie Annie Hall, Allen accuses Carol Kane of being like "New York, Jewish, left-wing, liberal, intellectual, Central Park West, Brandeis University."
  • In Angel, Wesley gets excited when he thinks he's meeting an archaeologist from Brandeis.
  • In Gilmore Girls, Paris suggests to Rory that she should go to Brandeis instead of Harvard.
  • In the 1998 movie Free Enterprise, one of the minor characters (who is played by writer Mark Altman) wears a Brandeis sweatshirt. Altman also attended Brandeis.

Woody Allen (born Allen Stewart Königsberg on December 1, 1935) is a three-time Academy Award-winning American film director, writer, actor, jazz musician, comedian, and playwright. ... Annie Hall is a 1977 romantic comedy film directed by Woody Allen from a script he co-wrote with Marshall Brickman. ... Carolyn Laurie Kane (born June 18, 1952, Cleveland, Ohio, USA) is an American actress. ... For the South Korean TV series of the same name, see Angel (2007 TV series). ... Gilmore Girls is an American television drama/comedy created by Amy Sherman-Palladino and starring Lauren Graham and Alexis Bledel. ... Paris Eustace Geller is a fictional character on the television series Gilmore Girls, played by Liza Weil. ... Information Nickname(s) Rory, Mary (from Tristan DuGrey), Ace (from Logan Huntzberger) Age 22 Date of birth October 8, 1984 Occupation journalist Family Lorelai Gilmore (mother) Christopher Hayden (father) Georgia GiGi Tinsdale (half-sister) Spouse(s) Logan Huntzberger (Ex-boyfriend) Dean Forester (Ex-boyfriend) Jess Mariano (Ex-boyfriend) Relatives Emily... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... Free Enterprise is a 1998 comedy/romance movie featuring William Shatner, directed by Robert Meyer Burnett and written by Mark A. Altman and Robert Meyer Burnett. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Reis, Arthur H., Jr. The Founding. Brandeis Review, 50th Anniversary Edition. Retrieved on 2006-05-17., pp. 42-3: founder's son C. Ruggles Smith quoted: "From its inception, Middlesex was ruthlessly attacked by the American Medical Association, which at that time was dedicated to restricting the production of physicians, and to maintaining an inflexible policy of discrimination in the admission of medical students. Middlesex, alone among medical schools, selected its students on the basis of merit, and refused to establish any racial quotas"
  2. ^ "Israeli Officials Honor Longtime Zionist Leader," The New York Times, June 28, 1976, p. 14
  3. ^ "Rabbi Israel Goldstein, A Founder of Brandeis", The New York Times, April 13, 1986, p. 40"
  4. ^ a b George Alpert, 90; was a Founder and First Chairman of Brandeis; The Boston Globe, September 13, 1988, p. 82
  5. ^ Lyall, Sarah (1988): "George Alpert, 90, Ex-President Of New Haven Line and a Lawyer," The New York Times, September 13, 1988, pp. D26
  6. ^ Stevens, Jay (1988). Storming Heaven: LSD and the American Dream. Grove Press. ISBN 0-8021-3587-0. p. 152
  7. ^ Lattin, Don (2004). Following Our Bliss: How the Spiritual Ideals of the Sixties Shape Our Lives Today. HarperCollins. ISBN 0-06-073063-3.  p. 161
  8. ^ a b c Reis, Arthur H. Jr, The Albert Einstein Involvement. Brandeis Publications 50th review (PDF). Retrieved on 2006-05-04., pp. 60-61: Source for Einstein agreeing to establishment of the foundation Feb. 5th, 1946, foundation incorporated Feb. 25; for Alpert quotation, "a man utterly alien to American principles of democracy, tarred with the Communist brush;" for Einstein's refusal to accept an honorary degree in 1953.
  9. ^ a b c "Goldstein Quits Einstein Agency; Rabbi Resigns Presidency of Foundation that Plans to Build a University." The New York Times, September 26, 1946, p. 27. "Goldstein issued a statement to correct an erroneous item in a Jewish weekly newspaper printed on Boston. This said Dr. Einstein was withdrawing from the foundation." Goldstein cited "differences on matters of public relations and faculty selection." A foundation director is quoted as saying "Professor Einstein's devotion to and enthusiasm for our purposes are now and always have been strong and unswerving." A board member who "withheld use of his name" is reported as saying Goldstein and Einstein differed "over plans for a major fund-raising meeting for the new university to be held here in November. He indicated that differences over Zionism were also a factor." NYT characterized the university as "a Jewish-supported non-quota university."
  10. ^ Reis, Arthur H., Jr. Naming the University. Brandeis Review, 50th Anniversary Edition. Retrieved on 2006-05-03., pp. 66-7
  11. ^ "New Jewish Unit Plans University," The New York Times, August 20, 1946, p. 10.
  12. ^ a b c d Sachar, Abram L. (1995). Brandeis University: A Host at Last. Brandeis University Press, distributed by University Press of New England. ISBN 0-87451-585-8.  pp. 18-22: Einstein-Goldstein clashes, Einstein's objections to Cardinal Spellman; conflict over veterinary school; conflict over Harold Laski; Alpert quotation, "I can compromise on any subject but one: that one is Americanism."
  13. ^ "Dr. Einstein Quits University Plan; Withdraws Support of Brandeis and Bars Use of His Name By Einstein Foundation." The New York Times, June 22, 1947: "These disputes centered mainly on the operation of the veterinarian school of Middlesex University... S. Ralph Lazrus... withdrew as president of the foundation. Dr. Lazrus said he and his associates had been critical of both the manner in which the present limited facilities of the school have been operated and of the policies contemplated for the future."
  14. ^ a b Slater, Elinor; Robert Slater (1999). Great Moments in Jewish History. Jonathan David Company, Inc.. ISBN 0-8246-0408-3.  pp. 121-3, "Brandeis University Founded"
  15. ^ The Student Occupation of Ford Hall, January 1969. Brandeis University Archives, Remembering Ford & Sydeman Halls. Retrieved on 2007-03-22.
  16. ^ The Ten Demands. Brandeis University Archives, Remembering Ford & Sydeman Halls. Retrieved on 2007-03-22.
  17. ^ Iceland Ministry for Foreign Affairs. Minister for Foreign Affairs, H.E. Mr. Geir H. Haarde. Retrieved on 2006-06-07.
  18. ^ David E. Nathan (2006-05-25). Two to receive Brandeis Alumni Achievement Awards. Brandeis University. Retrieved on 2006-06-07.
  19. ^ Hook, Sidney (1995). Letters of Sidney Hook: Democracy, Communism, and the Cold War. M. E. Sharpe. ISBN 1-56324-487-X.  p. 297: "In 1970, Katherine Anne Power, then a senior at Brandeis University, took part in a robbery in Boston of the State Street Bank and Trust..."; "Q & A with Katherine Power's Parents," The Boston Globe, October 28, 1981: "Among the radical '60s activists still underground is Katherine Ann Power who, while a 22-year-old student at Brandeis University, allegedly participated in the robbery of a Boston bank during which a police officer was killed."
  20. ^ Mitch Albom bio.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ...

External links

Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

See also


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