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Encyclopedia > Bramley (apple)

The Bramley cooking apple (or Bramley`s seedling apple) is a type of apple which is almost invariably eaten cooked. Raw, most people find its intensly acidic flavour too strong. Once cooked, however, it is flavourful and pleasantly tart. A peculiarity of the variety is that when cooked it becomes golden and fluffy. Bramely apple trees are large and long-lived, and the apples are very large, two or three times the weight of a typical dessert apple like a granny smith. Binomial name Malus domestica Borkh. ... An acid (often represented by the generic formula AH) is typically a water-soluble, sour-tasting chemical compound. ...


The Bramley apple originated in Southwell, Nottinghamshire, UK. It is believed the first tree was planted in 1809, later included in the purchase of the house by Matthew Bramley in 1846. Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is an English county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. ...


Cooking

Bramley apples work well in pies, cooked fruit compotes and salads, crumbles, and other dessert dishes. They are also used in a variety of chutney recipes. Whole Bramley apples, cored and filled with dried fruit, baked, and then served with custard is an inexpensive and traditional British pudding. Cooked apple sauce is the traditional accompaniment to roast pork. Hot apple sauce goes very well with ice cream.


Regardless of the dish, Bramley apples are generally cooked in the same basic way. First the fruit is peeled and then sliced, and the pieces covered in lemon juice (or some other acidic juice) to prevent them from turning brown. Sugar is usually added as well. In pies and crumbles the fruit is simply covered with the topping and baked; the moisture in the apples is sufficient to soften them while cooking. To make apple sauce, the apples are sliced and then stewed with sugar and lemon juice in a saucepan.


External Link

  • Bramley Apple Information Service

  Results from FactBites:
 
Bramley (apple) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (298 words)
The Bramley cooking apple (Malus domestica 'Bramley's Seedling') is a cultivar of apple which is almost invariably eaten cooked.
Bramley apple trees are large and long-lived, and the apples are very large, two or three times the weight of a typical dessert apple like a Granny Smith.
Whole Bramley apples, cored and filled with dried fruit, baked, and then served with custard is an inexpensive and traditional British pudding.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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