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Encyclopedia > Bram Stoker
Bram Stoker

Bram Stoker
Born November 8, 1847(1847-11-08)
Fairview, Ireland
Died April 20, 1912 (aged 64)
London, England
Occupation Novelist
Nationality Irish
Genres Horror, Romantic Fiction
Literary movement Victorian

Abraham "Bram" Stoker (8 November 184720 April 1912) was an Irish writer of novels and short stories, who is best known today for his 1897 horror novel Dracula. During his lifetime, he was better known for being the personal assistant of the actor Sir Henry Irving and the business manager of the Lyceum Theatre in London, which Irving owned. Image File history File links Bram_Stoker_bio_photo. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Fairview (Irish Fionn Radharc) is a district on the Northside of Dublin, Ireland. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about work. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... “Horror story” redirects here. ... A romance novel is a literary genre developed in Western culture, mainly in English-speaking countries. ... ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... “Horror story” redirects here. ... This article is about the novel. ... Sir Henry Irving, as Hamlet, in an 1893 illustration from The Idler magazine John Henry Brodribb (February 6, 1838 – October 13, 1905), knighted in 1895, as Sir Henry Irving, was one of the most famous stage actors of the Victorian era. ... The Lyceum Theatre is a 2,000-seat West End theatre located in the City of Westminster, on Wellington Street, just off the Strand. ...

Contents

Early life

He was born in 1847 at 15 Marino Crescent[1] – then as now called "The Crescent" – now in Fairview (but then Clontarf), Dublin, Ireland. His parents were Abraham Stoker[2] and the feminist Charlotte Mathilda Blake Thornely[3]. Stoker was the third of seven children.[4] Abraham and Charlotte were members of the Clontarf Church of Ireland parish and attended the parish church (St. John the Baptist located on Seafield Road West) with their children, who were both baptised there. Fairview (Irish Fionn Radharc) is a district on the Northside of Dublin, Ireland. ... Clontarf is a place name used in several English speaking countries. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... Feminists redirects here. ... The beautiful parish church of St John the Baptist, Seafield Road, Clontarf The Parish of St. ...


Stoker was bed-ridden until he started school at the age of seven — when he made a complete and astounding recovery. Of this time, Stoker wrote, "I was naturally thoughtful, and the leisure of long illness gave opportunity for many thoughts which were fruitful according to their kind in later years."


After his recovery, he became a normal young man, even excelling as an athlete (he was named University Athlete) at Trinity College, Dublin (1864 – 1870), from which he graduated with honours in mathematics. He was auditor of the College Historical Society and president of the University Philosophical Society, where his first paper was on "Sensationalism in Fiction and Society". For other institutions named Trinity College, see Trinity College. ... The College Historical Society (commonly known as The Hist within College) was founded in Trinity College in 1770 and traces its creation to the historical society founded by the philosopher Edmund Burke in Dublin in 1747. ... The University Philosophical Society (commonly known as The Phil or The Auto-Phil) is a student paper-reading and debating society in Trinity College, Dublin. ...


Early career

In 1876, while employed as a civil servant in Dublin, Stoker wrote a non-fiction book (The Duties of Clerks of Petty Sessions in Ireland, published 1879) and became the theatre critic for the newspaper Dublin Evening Mail. In December 1876, he gave a favourable review of the actor Henry Irving's performance as Hamlet at the Theatre Royal in Dublin. Irving read the review and invited Stoker for dinner at the Shelbourne Hotel, where he was staying. After that they became friends. He also wrote stories, and in 1872 "The Crystal Cup" was published by the London Society, followed by "The Chain of Destiny" in four parts in The Shamrock. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Dublin Evening Mail (renamed the Evening Mail in 1928) was between 1823 and 1962 one of Dublins evening newspapers. ... Sir Henry Irving, as Hamlet, in an 1893 illustration from The Idler magazine John Henry Brodribb (February 6, 1838 – October 13, 1905), knighted in 1895, as Sir Henry Irving, was one of the most famous stage actors of the Victorian era. ... For other uses, see Hamlet (disambiguation). ... At one stage in the history of the theatre in Britain and Ireland, the designation Theatre Royal or Royal Theatre was an indication that the theatre had a Royal Patent without which theatrical performances were illegal. ...

Bram Stoker's former home, Kildare Street, Dublin, Ireland.
Bram Stoker's former home, Kildare Street, Dublin, Ireland.

Lyceum Theatre and later career

In 1878 Stoker married Florence Balcombe, a celebrated beauty whose former suitor was Oscar Wilde. The couple moved to London, where Stoker became business manager (at first as acting-manager) of Irving's Lyceum Theatre, a post he held for 27 years. On 31st December 1879, Bram and Florence's only child was born, a son that they christened Irving Noel Thornley Stoker. The collaboration with Irving was very important for Stoker and through him he became involved in London's high society, where he met, among other notables, James McNeil Whistler, and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. In the course of Irving's tours, Stoker got the chance to travel around the world. In the mid 1890s, Stoker became an member of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn,[5][6] a fraternal magical order that also included among its members author W.B.Yeats, occultist Aleister Crowley, author and co-creator of the Rider-Waite Tarot deck, Arthur Edward Waite, London stage actress and musician Florence Farr and others. Florence Balcombe (July 17, 1858 - May 25, 1937) was the wife of Bram Stoker whom she married in 1878. ... Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and author of short stories. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Upper class is a concept in sociology that refers to the group of people at the top of a social hierarchy. ... James Abbott McNeill Whistler (July 14, 1834 - July 17, 1903) was an American painter and etcher. ... Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, DL (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a Scottish author most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction, and for the adventures of Professor Challenger. ... This article is about the historical organization of the late 19th century. ... A 1907 engraving of Yeats. ... Aleister Crowley, born Edward Alexander Crowley, (12 October 1875 – 1 December 1947, pronounced ) was a British occultist, writer, mountaineer, philosopher, poet, and yogi. ... The Rider-Waite Tarot deck is probably the most popular Tarot deck today. ... Arthur Edward Waite in the early 1880s Arthur Edward Waite (October 2, 1857 - May 19, 1942) was an occultist and co-creator of the Rider-Waite Tarot deck. ... Florence Farr in 1890 Florence Farr (1860-1917) was a West End leading actress and one time mistress of George Bernard Shaw[1], acting head of a famed magical order, womens rights journalist, divorcee, educator, singer, musician, and author of the novel, She was a friend and collaborator with...

The first edition cover of Dracula
The first edition cover of Dracula

Stoker supplemented his income by writing a number of novels, his most famous being the vampire tale Dracula which was published in 1897. Before writing Dracula, Stoker spent eight years researching European folklore and stories of vampires. Dracula is an epistolary novel, written as collection of diary entries, telegrams, and letters from the characters, as well as fictional clippings from the Whitby and London newspapers. Stoker's inspirations for the story were a visit to Slains Castle and a visit to the crypts under the church St. John the Baptist where he was baptised. first edition cover to Bram Stokers novel Dracula from http://isd. ... first edition cover to Bram Stokers novel Dracula from http://isd. ... This article is about the novel. ... This article is about the novel. ... Titlepage of Aphra Behns Love-Letters (1684) An epistolary novel is a novel written as a series of documents. ... , For other uses, see Whitby (disambiguation). ...


Death

Bram Stoker died in 1912, and was cremated and his ashes placed in a display urn at Golders Green Crematorium. After Irving Noel Stoker's death in 1961, his ashes were added to that urn. The original plan had been to keep his parents' ashes together, but after Florence Stoker's death her ashes were scattered at the Gardens of Rest. The crematorium at Haycombe Cemetery, Bath, England. ... Golders Green Crematorium and Mausoleum is one of the oldest crematoria in Britain and opened in 1901 having been designed by the architect Sir Ernest George. ...


Posthumous

The short story collection Dracula's Guest and Other Weird Stories was published in 1914 by Stoker's widow Florence Stoker. The first film adaptation of Dracula was named Nosferatu. It was directed by Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau and starred Max Schreck as Count Orlock. Nosferatu was produced while Florence Stoker, Bram Stoker's widow and literary executrix, was still alive. Represented by the attorneys of the British Incorporated Society of Authors, she eventually sued the filmmakers. Her chief legal complaint was that she had been neither asked for permission for the adaptation nor paid any royalty. The case dragged on for some years, with Mrs. Stoker demanding the destruction of the negative and all prints of the film. The suit was finally resolved in the widow's favour in July 1925. Some copies of the film survived, however. This article is about the 1922 silent film. ... F. W. Murnau. ... Maximilian Max Schreck (September 6, 1879 – February 19, 1936) was a German actor. ...


Bibliography

Novels

Bram Stoker Commemorative Plaque, Whitby, England (2002)
Bram Stoker Commemorative Plaque, Whitby, England (2002)

Image File history File links Bram Stoker Commemorative Plaque, Whitby, England. ... Image File history File links Bram Stoker Commemorative Plaque, Whitby, England. ... , For other uses, see Whitby (disambiguation). ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Snakes Pass is a novel by Bram Stoker, first published in 1890. ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the novel. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Jewel of Seven Stars is a horror novel by Bram Stoker (more famous as the author of Dracula) about a mummys curse. ... Year 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the novel. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

Short story collections

  • Under the Sunset (1881), comprising eight fairy tales for children
  • Snowbound: The Record of a Theatrical Touring Party (1908)
  • Dracula's Guest and Other Weird Stories (1914), published posthumously by Florence Stoker

Under the Sunset is a collection of short stories by Bram Stoker, first published in 1881. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

Uncollected stories

  • "Bridal of Dead" (alternate ending to The Jewel of Seven Stars)
  • "Buried Treasures"
  • "The Chain of Destiny"
  • "The Crystal Cup"
  • "The Dualitists; or, The Death Doom of the Double Born"
  • "Lord Castleton Explains" (chapter 10 of The Fate of Fenella)
  • "The Gombeen Man" (chapter 3 of The Snake's Pass)
  • "In the Valley of the Shadow"
  • "The Man from Shorrox"
  • "Midnight Tales"
  • "The Red Stockade"
  • "The Seer" (chapters 1 and 2 of The Mystery of the Sea)

The Jewel of Seven Stars is a horror novel by Bram Stoker (more famous as the author of Dracula) about a mummys curse. ... The Fate of Fenella was an experiment in consecutive novel writing inspired by J. S. Wood. ... The Snakes Pass is a novel by Bram Stoker, first published in 1890. ...

Non-fiction

  • The Duties of Clerks of Petty Sessions in Ireland (1879)
  • A Glimpse of America (1886)
  • Personal Reminiscences of Henry Irving (1906)
  • Famous Impostors (1910)

Year 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

References and notes

  1. ^ Belford, Barbara (2002). Bram Stoker and the Man Who Was Dracula. Cambridge, Mass.: Da Capo Press, 17. ISBN 0-306-81098-0. 
  2. ^ Abraham Stoker was born in 1799; he married Stoker's mother in 1844, and died on 10 October 1876
  3. ^ Mathilda Blake Thornely was born in 1818; she died in 1901
  4. ^ His siblings were: Sir (William) Thornley Stoker, born in 1845; Mathilda, born 1846; Thomas, born 1850; Richard, born 1852; Margaret, born 1854; and George, born 1855
  5. ^ Ravenscroft, Trevor (1982). The occult power behind the spear which pierced the side of Christ. Red Wheel, p165. ISBN 0877285470. 
  6. ^ Picknett, Lynn (2004). The Templar Revelation: Secret Guardians of the True Identity of Christ. Simon and Schuster, p201. ISBN 0743273257. 

is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) // January 31 - United States orders all Indigenous peoples in the United States to move onto reservations February 2 - The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs of Major League Baseball is formed. ...

External links

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Bram Stoker
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Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... Find A Grave is an online database of seventeen million cemeteries and burial records. ...

Online texts

Wikisource has original text related to this article:
Bram Stoker
Persondata
NAME Stoker, Bram
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Stoker, Abraham
SHORT DESCRIPTION Irish novelist
DATE OF BIRTH November 8, 1847(1847-11-08)
PLACE OF BIRTH Clontarf, Dublin, Ireland
DATE OF DEATH April 20, 1912
PLACE OF DEATH London, England
Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... The Snakes Pass is a novel by Bram Stoker, first published in 1890. ... This article is about the novel. ... The Jewel of Seven Stars is a horror novel by Bram Stoker (more famous as the author of Dracula) about a mummys curse. ... This article is about the novel. ... Under the Sunset is a collection of short stories by Bram Stoker, first published in 1881. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Leinster County: Population (2006)  - Town:  - Environs:   -  n/a Clontarf (Irish: , meaning Bulls Meadow) is an affluent coastal suburb on the northside of Dublin, Ireland. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Bram Stoker,Oscar Wilde,Henry Irving (303 words)
Bram Stoker, born in Dublin in the year 1847, had a very troubled childhood, riddled with illness and suffering from a late development to speech.
Stoker remained there throughout his career and it was his careful management, providing a contrast to Henry Irving`s theatrical excesses, that was probably a major reason for the Lyceum`s success.
Bram Stoker wrote a number of short stories and novels, but surely is remembered for only one, that of his tale of vampires " Dracula ", published in 1897.
Bram Stoker - Biography and Works (1024 words)
Bram Stoker was born near Dublin on November 8, 1847, the third of seven children.
Had Bram Stoker continued in the same vein and style as he did in the beginning of "Dracula" the book would have given me shivers throughout the reading.
As Charlotte Stoker wrote to her son, shortly after Dracula was published in 1897: "No book since Mary Shelly's Frankenstein or indeed any other at all has come near yours in originality and terror..." Hoping for an answer.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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