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Encyclopedia > Brake

A brake is a device for slowing or stopping the motion of a machine or vehicle, or alternatively a device to restrain it from starting to move again. The kinetic energy lost by the moving part is usually translated to heat by friction. Alternatively, in regenerative braking, much of the energy is recovered and stored in a flywheel, capacitor or turned into alternating current by an alternator, then rectified and stored in a battery for later use. Look up brake in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1632x1232, 738 KB) Description: A picture taken of a Bicycle, disk brake. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1632x1232, 738 KB) Description: A picture taken of a Bicycle, disk brake. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Vehicle brake. ... For other uses, see Motorcycle (disambiguation). ... This article is about devices that perform tasks. ... The Trikke is a Human Powered Vehicle (HPV) Automobiles are among the most commonly used engine powered vehicles. ... The cars of a roller coaster reach their maximum kinetic energy when at the bottom of their path. ... For other uses, see Heat (disambiguation) In physics, heat, symbolized by Q, is energy transferred from one body or system to another due to a difference in temperature. ... For other uses, see Friction (disambiguation). ... Regenerative braking is any technology which allows a vehicle to recapture and store part of the kinetic energy that would otherwise be lost to heat when braking. ... Spoked flywheel Flywheel from stationary engine. ... See Capacitor (component) for a discussion of specific types. ... City lights viewed in a motion blurred exposure. ... Early 20th century Alternator made in Budapest, Hungary, in the power generating hall of a hydroelectric station. ... A rectifier is one or more diodes arranged for converting alternating current (AC) to direct current (DC). ... A battery is of one or more electrochemical cells, which store chemical energy and make it available in an electrical form. ...


Note that kinetic energy increases with the square of the velocity (E = mยทv2 relationship). This means that if the speed of a vehicle doubles, it has four times as much energy. The brakes must therefore dissipate four times as much energy to stop it and consequently the braking distance is four times as long. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Braking distance refers to the distance a vehicle will travel from the point where its brakes are fully applied to when it comes to a complete stop. ...


Brakes of some description are fitted to most wheeled vehicles, including automobiles of all kinds, trucks, trains, motorcycles, and bicycles. Baggage carts and shopping carts may have them for use on a moving ramp. For other uses, see Wheel (disambiguation). ... The Trikke is a Human Powered Vehicle (HPV) Automobiles are among the most commonly used engine powered vehicles. ... “Car” and “Cars” redirect here. ... For other uses, see Truck (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Train (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Motorcycle (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Bicycle (disambiguation). ... Small Baggage cart Cart mule Baggage carts or Trolleys are small vehicles pushed by travellers (human-powered) to carry individual luggage, mostly suitcases. ... A row of parked (and very colorful) shopping carts equipped with a coin-operated mechanism. ... An inclined moving sidewalk at Beaudry metro station in Montreal A moving sidewalk, moving walkway, travelator, travellator or trav-o-lator is a slow speed conveyor belt to transport people; they can walk along it or stand; it is like a horizontal escalator. ...


Some aeroplanes are fitted with wheel brakes on the undercarriage. Some aircraft also feature air brakes designed to slow them down in flight. Notable examples include gliders and some WWII-era fighter aircraft. These allow the aircraft to maintain a safe speed in a steep descent. The Saab B 17 dive bomber used the deployed undercarriage as an air brake. Airplane and Aeroplane redirect here. ... Luftwaffe Junkers Ju 87s, with fixed conventional landing gear. ... In aeronautics air brakes are a type of flight control used on aircraft to reduce speed during landing. ... For other uses, see Glider (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... An A-10 Thunderbolt II, F-86 Sabre, P-38 Lightning and P-51 Mustang fly in formation during an air show at Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. ... The Saab 17 was a Swedish bomber-reconnaisance aircraft. ... A dive bomber is a bomber aircraft that dives directly at its targets in order to provide greater accuracy. ...


Deceleration and avoiding acceleration when going downhill can also be achieved by using a low gear; see engine braking. Acceleration is the time rate of change of velocity, and at any point on a v-t graph, it is given by the gradient of the tangent to that point In physics, acceleration (symbol: a) is defined as the rate of change (or time derivative) of velocity. ... Acceleration is the time rate of change of velocity and/or direction, and at any point on a velocity-time graph, it is given by the slope of the tangent to the curve at that point. ... For other uses, see Gear (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Exhaust brake be merged into this article or section. ...


Friction brakes on cars store the heat in the rotating part (drum brake or disc brake) during the brake application and release it to the air gradually. It has been suggested that Drum brake and Disc brake be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Vehicle brake. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Vehicle brake. ...

Contents

Effects on noise pollution

Main article: Roadway noise

The action of braking for motor vehicles produces recognizable sound level emissions, varying with the specific tire types and with the roadway surface type produces considerable effect upon sound levels or noise pollution emanating from moving vehicles.[1] There is a considerable range in acoustical intensities produced depending upon the specific tire tread design and the rapidity of deceleration required to slow the vehicle. Roadway noise is the most prevalent form of environmental noise. ... Noise pollution (or environmental noise in technical venues) is displeasing human or machine created sound that disrupts the environment. ...


See also

Air brakes are used in trucks, buses, trailers and semi-trailers. ... Piping diagram from 1920 of a Westinghouse E-T Air Brake system. ... In aeronautics air brakes are a type of flight control used on aircraft to reduce speed during landing. ... Brakes are used on railway trains to bring the train to a standstill. ... Drive-by-wire technology in automotive industry replaces the traditional mechanical and hydraulic control systems with electronic control systems using electromechanical actuators and human-machine interfaces such as pedal and steering feel emulators. ... Linear-pull brake on rear wheel of a mountain bike Bicycle brake systems are used to slow down, or brake a bicycle. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Vehicle brake. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Vehicle brake. ... Electromagnetic brakes, also called eddy current brakes, seek to retard motion or cause deceleration in a moving system. ... It has been suggested that Exhaust brake be merged into this article or section. ... In cars, the hand brake (also known as the emergency brake, e-brake, park brake, or parking brake) is a supplementary system that can be used if the vehicles primary brake system (usually hydraulic brakes) has a failure. ... The hydraulic brake is an arrangement of braking mechanism which uses hydraulic fluid, typically some type of light-viscosity petroleum oil, to transfer pressure from the controlling unit, which is usually near the operator of the vehicle, to the actual brake mechanism, which is usually at or near the wheel... The Jake Brake is a particular brand of engine brake manufactured and sold by Jacobs Vehicle Systems, Inc. ... Threshold braking or limit braking is a technique describing the maximal force that can be applied to a brake rotor before it takes the tire out of the static friction range and places it into the kinetic friction range. ... Trail braking is an advanced riding technique of motorcycle riders which requires professional training, and it is also used in car racing, meaning to continue to break into a turn. ... Regenerative braking is any technology which allows a vehicle to recapture and store part of the kinetic energy that would otherwise be lost to heat when braking. ... It has been suggested that Drum brake and Disc brake be merged into this article or section. ...

References

  1. ^ C.Michael Hogan, Analysis of highway noise, Journal of Water, Air, & Soil Pollution, Volume 2, Number 3, Biomedical and Life Sciences and Earth and Environmental Science Issue, Pages 387-392, September, 1973, Springer Verlag, Netherlands ISSN 0049-6979

External links

Look up Brake in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
  • How Stuff Works - Brakes
  • Brakes News Blog
  • How to know when to replace your brakes
  • Resource on Stanfords solar car brakes
Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ...

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