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Encyclopedia > Brahma
Brahma
Brahma carving at a temple in Halebidu
Brahma carving at a temple in Halebidu
creation
Devanagari ब्रह्मा
Affiliation Deva
Abode Brahmapura
Consort Saraswati
Mount Swan
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Brahma (Sanskrit masculine brahman-, nominative brahmā ब्रह्मा, personification of the neuter brahman-) is the Hindu god (deva) of creation and one of the Trimurti, the others being Vishnu and Shiva. He is not to be confused with the Supreme Cosmic Spirit in Hindu Vedanta philosophy known as Brahman. Also, in Sanskrit grammar, Brahma is nominative singular of generic word Brahman, as Aatma is nominative singular for Aatman. Brahaman and Aatman are same in Vedanta philosophy, the Param-Aatma (Supersoul) and Jeeva Aatma (Individual Soul) are Brahman. His consort is Saraswati, the goddess of learning. Brahmā is often identified with Prajapati, a Vedic deity. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... A Brahmā in Buddhism is the generic name for a type of exalted, passionless deity (deva), of which there are a very large number in Buddhist cosmology. ... The Sanskrit terms Brahman, Brahma, both from a root brh to grow, increase, are used in various meanings (depending on accent and grammatical gender): Brahman (, literally growth, also pious utterance, prayer, n. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (728x1304, 211 KB) Skildring Brahma carving from Halebid in Karnataka. ... Halebidu (Kannada ಹಳೆಬೀಡು) is located in Hassan District, Karnataka, India. ... For other uses, see Deva (disambiguation). ... In Hinduism, Brahmapura is the mythical and holy city of Brahma, one of the three primary deities. ... For the Vedic river, see Saraswati River. ... For other uses, see Swan (disambiguation). ... Sanskrit ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... Brahman (nominative ) is a concept of Hinduism. ... For other uses, see Deva (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Hindu gods. ... For other meanings, see Vishnu (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Shiva (disambiguation). ... Brahman (nominative ) is a concept of Hinduism. ... For the Vedic river, see Saraswati River. ... In Hinduism, Prajapati is Lord of Creatures, thought to be depicted on ancient Harappan seals, sitting in yogic posture, with an erection and what appear to be bison horns. ... The Vedas are part of the Hindu Shruti; these religious scriptures form part of the core of the Brahminical and Vedic traditions within Hinduism and are the inspirational, metaphysical and mythological foundation for later Vedanta, Yoga, Tantra and even Bhakti forms of Hinduism. ... This article is about the term Deity in the context of mysticism and theology. ...

Contents

Attributes

At the beginning of the process of creation, Brahmā created eleven Prajapatis (used in another sense), who are believed to be the fathers of the human race. The Manusmriti enumerates them as Marichi, Atri, Angirasa, Pulastya, Pulaha, Kratu, Vasishtha, Prachetas or Daksha, Bhrigu, and Narada[citation needed]. He is also said to have created the seven great sages or the Saptarishi to help him create the universe. However since all these sons of his were born out of his mind rather than body, they are called Manas Putras or mind-sons or spirits.


Within Vedic and Puranic scripture Brahmā is described as only occasionally interfering in the affairs of the other devas (gods), and even more rarely in mortal affairs. He did force Soma to give Tara back to her husband, Brihaspati. He is considered the father of Dharma and Atri. This article is about the Vedic plant and ritual. ... Taraka is the name of two characters from Hindu mythology. ... In Hinduism, Brihaspati is the god of magic and prayer. ... For other uses, see Dharma (disambiguation). ... In Hinduism, Atri (Sanskrit: अत्रि) is a legendary bard and scholar, and a son of Brahma. ...


Creation

According to the Puranas, Brahma is self-born (without mother) in the lotus flower which grew from the navel of Vishnu at the beginning of the universe. This explains his name Nabhija (born from the navel). Another legend says that Brahmā was born in water. In this he deposited a seed that later became the golden egg. From this golden egg, Brahma the creator was born, as Hiranyagarbha. The remaining materials of this golden egg expanded into the Brahm-anda or Universe. Being born in water, Brahmā is also called Kanja (born in water). Brahmā is said also to be the son of the Supreme Being, Brahman and the female energy known as Prakrti or Maya. The Puranas are part of Hindu Smriti; these religious scriptures discuss devotion and mythology. ... Binomial name Gaertn. ... For other uses, see Navel (disambiguation). ... For other meanings, see Vishnu (disambiguation). ... According to an account of the Hindu mythology, Hiranyagarbha, meaning the golden womb, is the source of the creation of the universe. ... Prakrti or Prakriti (from Sanskrit language) is, according to samkhya philosophy, the basic matter of which the universe consists. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Maya (illusion). ...

Vishnu with Lakshmi, on the serpent Ananta Shesha, as Brahma emerges from a lotus risen from Vishnu's navel
Vishnu with Lakshmi, on the serpent Ananta Shesha, as Brahma emerges from a lotus risen from Vishnu's navel

Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Lakshmi (disambiguation). ... Vishnu resting on Ananta-Shesha, with Lakshmi massaging his lotus feet. ...

Lack of Brahma worship in India

Although Brahma is one of the major gods in Hinduism, few Hindus actually worship him. India today has very few temples dedicated to Brahma alone as opposed to the thousands of temples dedicated to the other deities in the Trimurti: Shiva and Vishnu. However, among those that are, the most famous is in Pushkar in Rajasthan. Others include one in Brahma-Karmali village in Sattari Taluka in Goa, one in Khedbrahma in Gujarat and one in the village of Khokhan in the Kullu Valley, 4 km from Bhuntar. For other uses, see Shiva (disambiguation). ... For other meanings, see Vishnu (disambiguation). ... , Pushkar is a town in the state of Rajasthan in India. ... , Rājasthān (DevanāgarÄ«: राजस्थान, IPA: )   is the largest state of the Republic of India in terms of area. ... A taluka is an administrative division in India below a district; called tahsil/tehsil in northern India. ... For other uses, see Goa (disambiguation). ... Khedbrahma is a city and a municipality in Sabarkantha district in the Indian state of Gujarat. ... This article is for the Indian state. ... Kullu is the capital town of the Kullu district, in the state of Himachal Pradesh, India. ... Bhuntar is a town and a nagar panchayat in Kullu district in the state of Himachal Pradesh, India. ...


There are various stories in Hindu mythology that talk of the curse that has prevented Brahma from being worshipped on Earth.


At the beginning of time in Cosmos, Vishnu and Brahmā approached a huge Shiva linga and set out to find its beginning and end. Vishnu was appointed the end, and Brahma the beginning. Each took their journey, Vishnu took the form of a boar and began digging downwards into the earth while Brahma took on the shape of a swan began flying upwards. But neither could find their appointed destination. Vishnu, satisfied, came up to Shiva and bowed down to him as a swarupa of Brahman. Brahmā did not give up so easily. As he was going up, he saw a kaitha flower, dear to Shiva. His ego forced him to ask the flower to bear false witness of Brahmā's finding Shiva's beginning. When Brahmā told his tale, Shiva, the all-knowing, was angered by the former's ego. Shiva thus cursed him that no being in the three worlds will worship him. // an egg broke and out came the planets thanks to gods pet hen The Rig Veda describes the origin of the universe as: Then was not non-existence nor existence: there was no realm of air, no sky beyond it. ... Linga worship (Estate of Cynthia and Harlen Welsh) Lingam or Linga is the Sanskrit word for mark. ... Brahman (nominative ) is a concept of Hinduism. ... The ketaki or kaitha flower mentioned in the Brahmas story as Shivas favorite flower is Pandanus odoratissimus - Umbrella tree, Screw pine or Screw tree. ...

A depiction of Khambhavati Ragini, A lady worshiping Brahma
A depiction of Khambhavati Ragini, A lady worshiping Brahma


According to another legend, Brahmā is not being worshiped due to a curse by the great sage Brahmarishi Bhrigu. Once a great fire-sacrifice (yajna) was being organised on Earth with Bhrigu being the high priest. It was decided that the greatest among all Gods would be made the presiding deity. Bhrigu then set off to find the greatest among the Trinity. When he went to Brahmā, he was so immersed in the music played by Saraswati that he could hardly hear Bhrigu's calls. The enraged Bhrigu then cursed Brahmā that no person on Earth would ever invoke him or worship him again. Brahmarishi is the highest of the Rishis. ... Bhrigu, a sage in indian mythology, was said to have stepped on Brahma, Shiva and Vishnu to test who of the three gods was the greatest. ... In Hinduism, Yajna (Devanagari यज्ञ IAST ; also anglicized as Yagna or Yagya) is a ritual of sacrifice (Monier-Williams gives the meanings worship, prayer, praise; offering, oblation, sacrifice) more commonly practised during Vedic times. ... For the Vedic river, see Saraswati River. ...



According to Brahma Purana and Hindu cosmology, Brahmā is the creator but not necessarily regarded as God in Hinduism.He is mostly regarded as a creation of God / Brahman. The lifespan of Brahmā is 100 Brahmā years or 311 trillion,40 billion human years. At the end of his lifespan, there is a gap of 100 Brahmā years after which another Brahmā or creator begins anew and the process is repeated forever. For this reason, Brahmā might be considered only as a creator who is the executor of the order from the Supreme being - The Brahman. Brahma Purana, one of the major eighteen Puranas, is a Hindu religious text. ... Brahman (nominative ) is a concept of Hinduism. ...


Appearance

A handcoloured engraving of Brahma
A handcoloured engraving of Brahma

Brahma is traditionally depicted with four heads and four faces and four arms. With each head he continually recites one of the four Vedas. He is often depicted with a white beard (especially in North India), indicating the near eternal nature of his existence. He is shown as having four arms, with none holding a weapon, unlike most other Hindu Gods. One of his hands is shown holding a septer in the form of a spoon, which is associated with the pouring of holy ghee or oil into a sacrificial pyre - indicating the fact that Brahma is the lord of sacrifices. Another of his hands holds a water-pot (sometimes depicted as a coconut shell containing water). The significance of the water is that it is the initial, all-encompassing ether in which the first element of creation evolved. Brahma also holds a string of prayer beads that he uses to keep track of the Universe's time. He also is shown holding the Vedas, and sometimes, a lotus flower. Image File history File links Brahma_1820. ... Image File history File links Brahma_1820. ... Veda redirects here. ... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ...


Another story in connection with Brahma's four heads is that when Brahmā was creating the universe, he made a female deity known as Shatarupā (one with a hundred beautiful forms). Brahmā became immediately infatuated. Shatarupā moved in various directions to avoid the gaze of Brahmā. But wherever she went, Brahmā developed a head. Thus, Brahmā developed five heads, one on each side and one above the others. In order to control Brahmā, Shiva cut off the top head. Also, Shiva felt that Shatarupā was Brahmā's daughter/son, being created by him. Therefore, Shiva determined, it was wrong for Brahmā to become obsessed with her. He directed that there be no proper worship on earth for the "unholy" Brahmā. Thus, only Vishnu and Shiva continue to be worshipped, while Brahmā is almost totally ignored. Ever since the incident, Brahmā has been reciting the four Vedas in his attempt at repentance. In Hindu mythology, when Brahma was creating the universe, he made a female deity known as Shatarupa (one with a hundred beautiful forms). ...


Symbols

The Four Hands - The four arms represent the four directions north, east, west and south. they describe the mind (back right hand), intellect (back left hand), ego (front right hand), and the self confidence (front left hand).


The Rosary - Symbolizes the substances used in the progress of creation.


The Book - Symbolizing the knowledge


The Gold - symbolizes activity in the universe and the golden face of Brahma indicates that the Lord is active when involved in the process of creation.


The Swan - The Swan symbolizes the power of discrimination. Brahma uses the swan as a vehicle.


The Crown - The crown on the head implies that the Brahma has supreme authority.


The Lotus - Lotus symbolizes the nature and living essence of all things and beings in the universe.


The Beard - The black or white beard describes the wisdom and the longer the beard conveys describes eternal process.


Vehicle

See also Vimana.

Brahma's vehicle is a divine Swan. This divine bird is bestowed with a virtue called Neera-Ksheera Viveka or the ability to separate milk and water from a mixture of the two. The significance of this is that justice should be dispensed to all creatures, however entwined it might be in a situation. Also, this virtue indicates that one should learn to separate the good from the evil and then accept that which is valuable and discard that which is worthless or evil. This page deals with the flying chariots of Hindu mythology. ... For other uses, see Swan (disambiguation). ...


Temples

The four-faced Brahma (Phra Phrom) statue
The four-faced Brahma (Phra Phrom) statue

Although Brahmā is prayed to in almost all Hindu religious rites, there are very few temples dedicated to him in India, the more prominent of which is at Pushkar, close to Ajmer. Once a year, on the full moon night of the Hindu lunar month of Kartika (October - November), a religious festival is held in Brahmā's honour. Thousands of pilgrims come to bathe in the holy lake adjacent to the temple. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (736x907, 252 KB) Summary Four-faces Brahma statue Pra Prom in the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (736x907, 252 KB) Summary Four-faces Brahma statue Pra Prom in the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand. ... Phra Phrom is the Thai representation of the Hindu god Brahma. ... , Pushkar is a town in the state of Rajasthan in India. ... , Ajmer   (Hindi: अजमेर ) is a city in Ajmer District in Indias Rajasthan state. ...


There are also temples in Goa, (in the small, remote village of Carambolim in the Sattari taluka in the northeast region of the state); in the temple town of Kumbakonam, (Thanjavur District) in Tamil Nadu; and in Thirunavaya in Kerala. Regular pujas are held for Brahma and during Navrathris, this temple comes to life with colourful festivities. There is also a shrine for Brahma within the Bramhapureeshwarar temple in Thirupattur, near Trichy and a famous murti of Brahmā at Mangalwedha, 52 km from Solapur district in Maharashtra, the largest of which is in Angkor Wat in Cambodia. In Khedbrhama, Gujarat, there is a statue of Brahma.A six feet tall statue was also discovered at Sopara near Mumbai. , Kerala ( ; Malayalam: കേരളം; ) is a state on the Malabar Coast of southwestern India. ... A puja as performed in Ujjain during the Monsoon on the banks of the overflowing river Shipra. ... This December 2006 does not cite its references or sources. ... A large clay Ganesha murti at Ganesh Chaturthi festival in Mumbai, 2004 In Hinduism, a murti (Devanagari: मूर्ति) typically refers to an image in which the Divine Spirit is murta, or expressed. ... , Solapur (Marathi: ))(Kannada: )), is a city and a municipal corporation in south eastern Maharashtra, India near the Karnataka border and is the administrative headquarters of Solapur District. ... , Maharashtra (Marathi: महाराष्ट्र , IPA  , translation: Great Nation) is Indias third largest state in area and second largest in population after Uttar Pradesh. ... The main entrance to the temple proper, seen from the eastern end of the Naga causeway Angkor Wat (or Angkor Vat) (Khmer: អង្គរវត្ត), is a temple at Angkor, Cambodia, built for King Suryavarman II in the early 12th century as his state temple and capital city. ... This article is for the Indian state. ... Sopara was an ancient port town near the present day Bombay exurb of Nala Sopara. ... , Bombay redirects here. ...


See also

A Brahmā in Buddhism is the generic name for a type of exalted, passionless deity (deva), of which there are a very large number in Buddhist cosmology. ... Phra Phrom is the Thai representation of the Hindu god Brahma. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Brahmastra is an arrow created by Brahma. ... Demiurge (from the Greek , Latinized , meaning artisan or craftsman, literally worker in the service of the people, from of the people + work) is a term for a creator deity, responsible for the creation of the physical universe. ... Narada (Sanskrit: नारद, nārada) is the Hindu divine sage, who is an enduring chanter of the names Hari and Narayana which other names for Vishnu, considered to be the supreme God by Vaishnavites and many other Hindus. ...

External links

  • The Brahma-Samhita - Prayers of Lord Brahma at the start of creation (Brahmasamhita.com)
  • Brahma's Prayers for Creative Energy from the Bhagavata Purana (vedabase.net)
  • Brahma at the Open Directory Project
  • Brahma: The God with Only Three Temples (boloji.com)
  • Indian Gods and Goddesses - Brahma (indiayogi.com)
The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ... Hinduism is a religious tradition[1] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... Within Hinduism a large number of personalities, or forms, are worshipped as murtis. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Within Hinduism a large number of personalities, or forms, are worshipped as murtis. ... It has been suggested that Shri Vidya be merged into this article or section. ... For the Vedic river, see Saraswati River. ... For other uses, see Lakshmi (disambiguation). ... In the Hindu religion, SatÄ« (Devanagari: सती, the feminine of sat true) or Dākshāyani is the Goddess of marital felicity and longevity; she is worshipped particularly by ladies to seek the long life of their husbands. ... For the Harry Potter character, see Parvati Patil. ... In Hinduism, Durga (Sanskrit: ) is a form of Devi, the supreme goddess. ... Lakshmi is a common aspect of Shakti Shakti meaning force, power or energy is the Hindu concept or personification of Gods female aspect, sometimes referred to as The Divine Mother. Shakti represents the active, dynamic principles of feminine power. ... Kali (Sanskrit ) is a goddess with a long and complex history in Hinduism. ... Lord Rama (center) with wife Sita, brother Lakshmana and devotee Hanuman. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Mahavidyas (Great Wisdoms) are aspects of Devi in Hinduism. ... Navadurga, which literally means nine Durgas, constitute, according to Hindu mythology, the manifestation of Durga in nine different forms. ... Matrikas, that is, the mothers, are a band of divinities, which always appear in a group. ... Image File history File links HinduSwastika. ... Within Hinduism a large number of personalities, or forms, are worshipped as murtis. ... For other uses, see Deva (disambiguation). ... For other meanings, see Vishnu (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Shiva (disambiguation). ... Rama ( in IAST, in DevanāgarÄ«) or Ramachandra is a legendary or historical king of ancient India. ... This article is about the Hindu deity. ... For other uses, see Ganesha (disambiguation). ... Murugan (also Murugan) (Tamil: ) is a popular Hindu deity amongst Tamil Hindus. ... This article is about a divine entity in Hinduism. ... For other uses, see Indra (disambiguation). ... For the intercontinental ballistic missile, see Surya (missile). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Veda redirects here. ... The Upanishads (उपनिषद्, Upanişad) are part of the Hindu Shruti scriptures which primarily discuss meditation and philosophy and are seen as religious instructions by most schools of Hinduism. ... Purana (Sanskrit: ), meaning belonging to ancient or olden times, is the name of an ancient Indian genre (or a group of related genres) of Hindu or Jain literature (as distinct from oral tradition). ... For the television series by Ramanand Sagar, see Ramayan (TV series). ... For the film by Peter Brook, see The Mahabharata (1989 film). ... Bhagavad Gīta भगवद्गीता, composed ca the fifth - second centuries BC, is part of the epic poem Mahabharata, located in the Bhisma-Parva chapters 23–40. ... Hinduism is a religious tradition[1] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... Hindu mythology is a term used by modern scholarship for a large body of Indian literature that details the lives and times of legendary personalities, deities and divine incarnations on earth interspersed with often large sections of philosophical and ethical discourse. ... The ancient Sanskrit epics, the Ramayana and Mahabharata, laid the cornerstone for much of Hindu religion. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Brahma - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1094 words)
Brahma (written Brahmā in IAST) (Devanagari ब्रह्मा, pronounced as /brəhmɑː/) is the Hindu creator god, and one of the Trimurti, the others being Vishnu and Shiva.
From this golden egg, Brahma the creator was born, as Hiranyagarbha.
Regular pujas are held for Brahma and during Navrathris, this temple comes to life with colourful festivities.
Brahma (1653 words)
Brahma, eternal and perpetually undecaying, sprang from the ether; from him was descended Marichi; the son of Marichi was Kasyapa.
Brahma was the father of Daksha, who is said to have sprung from his thumb, and he was present at the sacrifice of that patriarch, which was rudely disturbed by Rudra.
The heaven of Brahma, on the summit of Mount Meru, and enclosed by the river Ganga.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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