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Encyclopedia > Brady Bill

The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, also known as the Brady Bill, was passed by Congress and signed into law by President Bill Clinton on November 30, 1993.

James Brady

The act was named after James Brady, who was shot by John Hinckley, Jr. during an attempted assassination of President Ronald Reagan on March 30, 1981.



Contents

Provisions

The law initially required a five-day waiting period for customers purchasing handguns, and mandated a national criminal background check on purchasers buying handguns from ATF-licensed dealers. Private party sales, or sales by dealers who are not federally approved, were not affected. The provision which mandated that local law enforcement officials carry out the background checks was struck down by the Supreme Court in 1997. The waiting period provision was set to sunset in 1998. In the interval the so-called "instant-check" system, still used today (2004), was developed by the FBI.


Sarah Brady and the Brady Law

Sarah Brady

The Brady Bill was championed for over a decade by Brady's wife, Sarah Brady, who after her husband's shooting became an anti_gun advocate. In 1989 she became chairman of the legislative lobby, Handgun Control, Inc. (HCI). In 1991 she became chairman of HCI's "education, research, and legal advocacy" arm, The Center to Prevent Handgun Violence. In 1993 she was a guest of honor at the signing ceremony for the bill, whose signing represented a milestone for her organizations.


The Brady Law Today

Under the Brady Law, prior to the sale of a handgun, federally-licensed firearms dealers must verify the identity of a customer and receive authorization from the background checking system's database.


External links

Wikisource has original text related to this article:
Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act


US Firearms Legal Topics:
Assault weapons ban
Brady Handgun Act
BATFE (law enforcement)
Gun Control Act of 1968
Gun politics in the US
National Firearms Act
2nd Amendment
Straw purchase
Sullivan Act (New York)
Violent Crime Control Act



  Results from FactBites:
 
Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (859 words)
The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, also known as the Brady Bill, was passed by the United States Congress, signed into law by President Bill Clinton on November 30, 1993, and went into effect on February 28, 1994.
The Brady Bill was championed for over a decade by Brady's wife, Sarah Brady, who became an gun control advocate after her husband's shooting.
In 1997, one provision of interim Brady Law was ruled unconstitutional by the Supreme Court in Printz v.
Brady Bill - definition of Brady Bill in Encyclopedia (300 words)
The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, also known as the Brady Bill, was passed by Congress and signed into law by President Bill Clinton on November 30, 1993.
The Brady Bill was championed for over a decade by Brady's wife, Sarah Brady, who after her husband's shooting became an anti-gun advocate.
In 1993 she was a guest of honor at the signing ceremony for the bill, whose signing represented a milestone for her organizations.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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