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Encyclopedia > Bradley University

Bradley University

Established 1897
Type private, coeducational
Endowment $182 Million [1]
President Joanne K. Glasser, Esq.
Provost Dr. Peter Johnsen [1]
Faculty 389
Undergraduates 5,301
Postgraduates 800
Location Peoria, Illinois, USA
Campus urban, 85 acres (303,514 m²)
Colors Red & White
Nickname Braves
Website www.bradley.edu

Bradley University is a private, co-educational university located in Peoria, Illinois (40°51′53″N 89°37′0″W / 40.86472, -89.61667Coordinates: 40°51′53″N 89°37′0″W / 40.86472, -89.61667). It is a medium sized institution with an enrollment of approximately 6,100 undergraduate and postgraduate students. The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ... Dr. Peter Johnsen presently serves as the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs at Bradley University and has since July 2006. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... : See how it plays in Peoria United States Illinois Peoria 46. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... : See how it plays in Peoria United States Illinois Peoria 46. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Contents

History

Bradley Hall is one of the first buildings constructed for the university and bears the name of the university's founder.
Bradley Hall is one of the first buildings constructed for the university and bears the name of the university's founder.

The Bradley Polytechnic Institute was founded by philanthropist Lydia Moss Bradley in 1897 in memory of her husband Tobias and their six children, all of whom died early and suddenly, making Bradley a childless widow. In 1896, Bradley was introduced to the president of the University of Chicago, who convinced her to move ahead with her plans to establish the institute. Bradley provided seventeen and a half acres of land, $170,000 for buildings, equipment, and a library, and $30,000 per year for operating expenses. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 935 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 935 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ... Portrait of Lydia Moss Bradley Lydia Moss Bradley, (Born: July 31, 1816, Vevay, Indiana, died: January 16, 1908, Peoria, Illinois). ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ...


Originally, the institute was organized as a four-year academy as well as a two-year college. There was only one other high school in the city of Peoria at the time. By 1899 the institute had expanded to accommodate nearly 500 pupils, and study fields included biology, chemistry, food work, sewing, English, German, French, Latin, Greek, history, manual arts, drawing, mathematics, and physics. By 1920 the institute dropped the academy orientation and adopted a four-year collegial program. Enrollment continued to grow over the coming decades and the name Bradley University was adopted in 1946. [2] For other uses, see Academy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... : See how it plays in Peoria United States Illinois Peoria 46. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, knowledge), also referred to as the biological sciences, is the study of living organisms utilizing the scientific method. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Sewn redirects here. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... This article is about the study of time in human terms. ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Academics

Baker Hall, named after Murray M. Baker, is home to the Foster College of Business Administration
Baker Hall, named after Murray M. Baker, is home to the Foster College of Business Administration

Bradley University was recently ranked 6th among Midwestern comprehensive masters-degree-granting universities in the 2007 edition of America's Best Colleges published by U.S. News & World Report. In addition, Bradley's Department of Industrial Engineering was ranked second among colleges that do not grant PhDs. [3] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 1. ... Murray M. Baker (?-?) was a former President of Caterpillar Inc. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


Bradley University was named 24th on the list of "Top 25 Most Connected Campuses" and "Top 25 Most Entrepreneurial Campuses" in the nation by The Princeton Review and Forbes magazine. The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit American educational preparation company. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


The College of Education at Bradley University is NCATE-approved. [4] Additionally, of the nation’s 3623 colleges and universities, Bradley University's Foster College of Business Administration is one of only 160 schools whose business and accounting programs are both accredited by AACSB International. [5] The National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) was founded in 1954 to accredit teacher certification programmes at U.S. colleges and universities. ... The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) - is the USA based body which awards accreditation following a review of the quality of Scotts site can be found at Degree programmes delivered by Management Schools. ...


Bradley University is organized into the following colleges and schools:


Undergraduate School

  • College of Education and Health Sciences
  • College of Engineering and Technology
  • College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
  • Foster College of Business Administration
  • Slane College of Communications and Fine Arts
  • Academic Exploration Program (AEP), for students without a declared major.

Graduate School

Through its Graduate School, Bradley University offers Masters level graduate degrees in 5 of its departments; business, communication and fine arts, education and health sciences, engineering, and liberal arts and sciences. Each has its own hourly requirements and varies in completion time. The program of physical therapy provides a Doctor of Physical therapy degree.


Campus

Seen here from bottom left to bottom right are Wyckoff, Heitz, and Elmwood Halls, with Harper and Geisert (also from left to right) dominating the background.
Seen here from bottom left to bottom right are Wyckoff, Heitz, and Elmwood Halls, with Harper and Geisert (also from left to right) dominating the background.

Bradley's 85 acre campus is located on Peoria's west bluff and is minutes from the city's downtown. The campus of Bradley University is relatively compact. There are few places on campus which cannot be reached from any other part of campus in under ten minutes on foot. Bradley's student housing is concentrated on the campus's east side, and the dormitories include College (all women's), Geisert, Harper, Heitz, University, Williams, and Wyckoff Halls. There is also a complex of singles dormitories and two university-owned apartment complexes. [6] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 418 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1203 pixel, file size: 421 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 418 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1203 pixel, file size: 421 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ...


Also located on the south side of Bradley's campus is Dingeldine Music Center, which was acquired from the Second Church of Christ, Scientist in 1983. The Center serves as the main performance and practice facility for Bradley's instrumental and choral programs. The factual accuracy of this article is disputed. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ...

The Dingeldine Music Center
The Dingeldine Music Center

Bradley University is also the site of Peoria's National Public Radio affiliate, WCBU-FM, located on the second floor of Jobst Hall. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... NPR redirects here. ... WCBU is a listener-supported, non-commercial public radio station owned by Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois. ...


Groups and activities

Athletics

The athletic emblem of the Bradley University Braves.
The athletic emblem of the Bradley University Braves.

Bradley University is a member of the Missouri Valley Conference. Conference-approved sports at Bradley for men are baseball, basketball, cross country running, golf, soccer, and tennis. Women's' sports consist of basketball, cross country running, golf, indoor and outdoor track, softball, tennis, and volleyball. The men's basketball team has appeared eight times in the NCAA Tournament: 1950, 1954, 1955, 1980, 1986, 1988, 1996, and 2006. In 1950 and 1954 they were in the Final Four, and in 2006 the Braves made their first Sweet Sixteen appearance since 1955, defeating 4th seed Kansas and 5th seed Pittsburgh. However, Bradley's run came to an end in the Sweet Sixteen with a loss to the University of Memphis. Bradley also won the National Invitation Tournament in 1957, 1960, 1964, and 1982. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Former Missouri Valley Conference logo The Missouri Valley Conference (also called MVC or simply The Valley) is a college athletic conference whose members are located in the midwestern United States. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Final Four is a sports term that is commonly applied to the last four teams remaining in a playoff tournament. ... // Final four redirects here. ... Sweet Sixteen can mean: sweet sixteen (birthday), a party thrown in honor of a girls sixteenth birthday in USA Sweet Sixteen (album), an album by The Huntingtons Sweet Sixteen (Royal Trux album), a 1997 album by Royal Trux Sweet Sixteen (Billy Idol song) A song by Feeder, famed as... The University of Memphis is a public American research university located in Memphis, Tennessee, United States, and is the flagship public research university of the Tennessee Board of Regents system. ... The National Invitation Tournament (NIT) is a mens college basketball tournament operated by the National Collegiate Athletic Association. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ...


In 2006, the Bradley soccer team lost in the MVC Championship. The university does not have a football team, having disbanded its football program in 1970.


Controversy

In August of 2005, the National Collegiate Athletic Association, which conducts collegiate athletics, instituted a ban on schools that use "hostile and abusive" American Indian nicknames from hosting postseason games, beginning February 2006. Bradley, whose athletic teams are known as the "Braves," was placed on the list. In April 2006, the NCAA removed Bradley from the list but placed it on a 5-year watch list. [7]. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...


After considering a new mascot to go with the Braves name, Bradley has decided not to create a mascot. Instead, the university is considering a revised logo.


Forensics

Westlake Hall is home to Bradley's College of Education and Health Sciences.
Westlake Hall is home to Bradley's College of Education and Health Sciences.

Bradley University boasts the nation's most prolific college forensics team, with their American Forensics Association Championship winning streak from 1980 through 2000 only broken in 1994 and 1995. [8][9] Originally established as an Oratorical Competition in 1897 by founder Lydia Moss Bradley, the Speech Team has become the most successful intercollegiate team in history. In 2005, Bradley won its 38th national championship title at the National Forensic Association tournament at the University of Akron. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 989 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 989 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Individual events is a type of speech competition characterized by individuals competing in a variety of different events. ... The National Forensic Association is a national intercollegiate organization designed to promote excellence in individual events and debate. ... The University of Akron is an institution of higher learning located in Akron, Ohio. ...


Since 1979, Bradley University has had one hundred and fifteen individual national champions. No other team has attained as many individual national champions. Since 1980, Bradley has won nationals thirty-three times. This record of success is unmatched by any other college forensics team in the United States.


Greek

Bradley chapters of the North-American Interfraternity Conference, National Panhellenic Conference, and National Pan-Hellenic Council are primarily located on the south side of campus. The North-American Interfraternity Conference (or NIC), (formerly known as the National Interfraternity Conference) is an association of collegiate mens fraternities that was formally organized in 1910, although it began on November 27, 1909. ... The National Panhellenic Conference (NPC), founded in 1902, is an umbrella organization for 26 inter/national womens sororities. ... The National Pan-Hellenic Council, Inc. ...


North-American Interfraternity Conference chapters

Alpha Epsilon Pi (ΑΕΠ or AEPi) is currently the only international Jewish college fraternity in North America, with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... Delta Tau Delta (ΔΤΔ, DTD, or Delts) is a U.S.-based international college fraternity. ... Delta Upsilon (ΔΥ) is one of the oldest international, all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities and is the first non-secret fraternity ever founded. ... Lambda Chi Alpha (ΛΧΑ), headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, is one of the largest mens general fraternities in North America with more than 250,000 initiated members and chapters at more than 300 universities. ... Theta Xi (ΘΞ) is a fraternity founded at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York on 29 April 1864. ... Theta Chi (ΘΧ) is an international college fraternity for men. ... Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity (ΠΚΑ) is an international, secret, social, Greek-letter, college fraternity. ... Pi Kappa Phi is a national social fraternity that was founded in the spirit of nu phi, meaning non-fraternity. ... Sigma Alpha Epsilon (ΣΑΕ) is a secret letter, social college fraternity. ... ΣΦΕ (Sigma Phi Epsilon), commonly nicknamed SigEp or S-P-E, is a social fraternity for male college students in the United States. ... ΣΝ (Sigma Nu) is an undergraduate college fraternity with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest and oldest all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities. ... Phi Gamma Delta (also known as FIJI) is a collegiate social fraternity with 116 chapters and 5 colonies across the United States and Canada. ... Phi Kappa Tau (ΦΚΤ) is a U.S. national college fraternity // Phi Kappa Tau Fraternity (commonly called Phi Tau) was founded in the Union Literary Society Hall of Miami Universitys Old Main Building in Oxford, Ohio on March 17, 1906. ...

National Panhellenic Conference sorority chapters

Alpha Chi Omega (ΑΧΩ, also known as A-Chi-O) is a womens fraternity founded on October 15, 1885. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Kappa Delta (ΚΔ) is a sorority founded at the State Female Normal School, now Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia. ... Pi Beta Phi (ΠΒΦ) is an international fraternity for women founded as I.C. Sorosis on April 28, 1867, at Monmouth College in Monmouth, Illinois. ... Sigma Delta Tau (ΣΔΤ), a national sorority and member of the National Panhellenic Conference, was founded March 25, 1917 at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Chi Omega (ΧΩ) is the largest womens fraternal organization in the National Panhellenic Conference. ...

National Pan-Hellenic Council fraternity chapters

Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ... Phi Beta Sigma (ΦΒΣ) Fraternity was founded at Howard University in Washington, D.C. on January 9, 1914, by three young African-American male students. ...

National Pan-Hellenic Council sorority chapters

Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΑΚΑ) Sorority, Incorporated, is the first Greek-letter organization established and incorporated by African-American college women. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Zeta Phi Beta (ΖΦΒ) Sorority Inc. ... Sigma Gamma Rho (ΣΓΡ) was founded on November 12, 1922, by seven educators in Indianapolis, Indiana. ...

Other social and professional organizations

Alpha Phi Omega (commonly known as APO, but also ΑΦΩ, A-Phi-O, and A-Phi-Q) is a co-ed service fraternity organized to provide community service, leadership development, [1] and social opportunities to college students. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... Community service refers to service that a person performs for the benefit of his or her local community. ... Gamma Iota Sigma (GIS) is a college academic fraternity, founded on April 16, 1966 at Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. ... Sigma Alpha Iota (ΣΑΙ) is a music fraternity for women. ... Sigma Theta Epsilon is an interdenominational Christian fraternal organization, tracing its history (through a series of name changes and mergers) to its founding in 1925 at Lincoln, Nebraska. ... Phi Mu Alpha (ΦΜΑ) Sinfonia is a collegiate social fraternity for men of musicianly character. ... Chi Alpha Campus Ministries (usually known as Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship on campus, but sometimes University Christian Fellowship or Schoolname Christian Fellowship) is a Pentecostal Christian ministry to college students. ...

The Scout

The student run and published weekly newspaper, The Scout covers student life and issues on campus, Bradley sports, local Peoria news that concerns students. Dates for local concerts, movie and music reviews can all be found written by students in The Scout’s Voice section. Student staff rotates and changes yearly. Articles can also be found on the Scout website, [10], along with the week’s comics and classifieds.


Notable alumni

Government, public service, and public policy

Raymond H. Ray LaHood (born December 6, 1945), American politician, has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 1995, representing downstate Illinoiss 18th congressional district (map). ... A Congressman or Congresswoman (generically, Congressperson) is a politician who is a member of a Congress. ... Robert H. Michel (March 2, 1923- ) was a Representive from Illinois. ... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Image:Nicholas Scoppetta2. ... The FDNY Commissioner is the head administrator for the Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY). ... John Malchase David Shalikashvili (born June 27, 1936) is a retired American general who served as Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff from 1993 to 1997. ... Joint Chiefs of Staff of the United States of America symbol The Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) is a group comprising the Chiefs of service of each major branch of the armed services in the United States armed forces. ... Supreme Allied Commander is the title given to the most senior commander of some multinational organisations. ... This article is about the military alliance. ...

Literature, arts, and media

Jack Brickhouse (January 24, 1916 - August 6, 1998) was an American sports broadcast announcer. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1871, 1874-1889) (a. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Philip José Farmer (born January 26, 1918) is an American author, principally known for his science fiction and fantasy novels and short stories. ... Neil Richard Flynn (born 13 November 1960) is an American actor who is perhaps best known for his role as Janitor in the show Scrubs. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... This article is about the US sitcom. ... Jerry Hadley (June 16, 1952 – July 18, 2007) was an American operatic tenor, who was a protegé of famous soprano Dame Joan Sutherland and her husband, conductor Richard Bonynge. ... The Metropolitan Opera is located at Lincoln Center in New York, New York. ... Francis Dayle Chick Hearn (November 27, 1916 - August 5, 2002) was an American sportscaster. ... The Los Angeles Lakers are a National Basketball Association (NBA) team based in Los Angeles, California. ... David Horowitz (born June 30, 1937) is a well-known American consumer advocate and reporter whose Emmy-winning TV program Fight Back! would warn viewers about defective products, test advertised claims to see if they were true, and confront corporations about customer complaints. ... ... Tami Lane is a native of Peoria, Illinois is an American make-up artist. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Ralph Lawler (born 1938 in Peoria, Illinois) is the television and radio voice of the National Basketball Associations Los Angeles Clippers. ... Clippers redirects here. ... Charley Steiner (born July 17, 1949) is an American sportscaster. ... ESPN/ESPN-DT, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an [[United States|Amer<nowiki>Insert non-formatted text here--68. ... This article is about the American ESPN show. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1913) Brooklyn Trolley Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899...

Business and science

Major Robert H. Lawrence, Jr. ... Timothy L. Mounts has made significant contributions to the advancement of agriculture technology. ... George T. Shaheen, born July 11, 1944, an American businessman, was chief executive at management consulting firm Andersen Consulting 1989 to 1999, before moving on to now-defunct online grocer Webvan. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... Siebel is a brand name of Oracle Corporation. ... Accenture (NYSE: ACN) is a global management consulting, technology services and outsourcing company. ... Webvan was an online credit and delivery grocery business that went bankrupt in 2001. ... Logo on a 2003 Harley Davidson The Harley-Davidson Motor Company (NYSE: HDI) is a manufacturer of motorcycles based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ...

Athletics

Hersey R. Hawkins, Jr. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Seattle SuperSonics (or simply Sonics) are an American professional basketball team based in Seattle, Washington. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Final results for the Basketball competition at the 1988 Summer Olympics held in Seoul, South Korea: Results Categories: 1988 Summer Olympics | Basketball at the Olympics ... Johnson winning the 100 m final The 1988 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIV Olympiad, were held in 1988 in Seoul, South Korea. ... James (Jim) Allen Les (born August 18, 1963 in Niles, Illinois) is a retired American National Basketball Association player. ... The Utah Jazz is a professional basketball team based in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Clippers redirects here. ... The Sacramento Kings are a professional basketball team based in Sacramento, California. ... The Atlanta Hawks are an American professional basketball team based in Atlanta, Georgia. ... WNBA may also refer to WNBA-AM, a radio station in Illinois. ... The Sacramento Monarchs is a Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA) team based in Sacramento, California. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... City Indianapolis, Indiana Other nicknames The Horseshoes Team colors Speed Blue and White Head Coach Tony Dungy Owner Jim Irsay General manager Bill Polian Mascot Blue League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1953–present) Western Conference (1953-1969) Coastal Division (1967-1969) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC East (1970... This article is about the sport. ... For the animated television series, see Harlem Globetrotters (TV series). ... Matthew Savoie (born September 12, 1980, in Peoria, Illinois), is an American figure skater. ... Figure skating is an ice skating sporting event where individuals, mixed couples, or groups perform spins, jumps, and other moves on the ice, often to music. ... Neve and Gliz, the 2006 Olympics mascots, on display in Turin The 2006 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XX Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Turin, Italy from February 10, 2006, through February 26, 2006. ... David Thirdkill (born April 12, 1960 in St. ... This article is about the sport. ... The 1985-86 NBA Season was the 40th season of the National Basketball Association. ... The Boston Celtics are a professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Detroit Pistons are a team in the National Basketball Association based in the Detroit metropolitan area. ... The Phoenix Suns are a professional basketball team, based in Phoenix, Arizona. ... Image:Http://www. ... The Philadelphia 76ers are a National Basketball Association team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Patrick OBryant is an NCAA basketball player who is projected to be a lottery pick in the 2006 NBA Draft. ... The 2006 NBA Draft was held on June 28 at the Theatre at Madison Square Garden in New York City. ... The Golden State Warriors are a professional basketball team based in Oakland, California. ... Kirby Puckett (March 14, 1960 [1] – March 6, 2006) was a center fielder in Major League Baseball who played his entire career with the Minnesota Twins from 1984 to 1995. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 6, 14, 29, 34, 42 Name Minnesota Twins (1961–present) Washington Nationals/Senators (1901-1960) Other nicknames The Twinkies Ballpark Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome 1982-present Metropolitan Stadium (1961-1981) Griffith Stadium (1911-1960... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... Anthony Michael Parker (born June 19, 1975 in Des Moines, Iowa) is an American professional basketball player currently with the National Basketball Associations (NBA) Toronto Raptors. ... The Toronto Raptors are a professional basketball team based in Toronto, Ontario. ... The Orlando Magic is a professional basketball team based in Orlando, Florida. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Gavin Glinton (born March 1, 1979 in Grand Turk, Turks & Caicos Islands) is a Turks & Caicos Islands soccer striker who currently plays for the Los Angeles Galaxy of Major League Soccer. ... Year founded 1995 League Major League Soccer Nickname Galaxy, The Gs, Los Galacticos de Los Angeles, The Goatbusters, The Gals Stadium The Home Depot Center (HDC) Carson, CA Coach Frank Yallop Owner Philip Anschutz (AEG) First Game Los Angeles Galaxy 2–1 MetroStars (Rose Bowl; April 13, 1996) Largest... First international Bahamas 3 - 0 Turks and Caicos Islands (Nassau, Bahamas; February 24, 1999) Biggest win Cayman Islands 0 - 2 Turks and Caicos Islands (Havana, Cuba; September 4, 2006) Biggest defeat SK&N 8 - 0 Turks and Caicos Islands (Basseterre, SK&N; March 18, 2000) The Turks and Caicos Islands... Brian Douglas Shouse (Born September 26, 1968 in Effingham, Illinois is a left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball for the Milwaukee Brewers. ... Major league affiliations National League (1998–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 4, 19, 34, 42, 44 Name Milwaukee Brewers (1970–present) Seattle Pilots (1969) Other nicknames True Blue Brew Crew, The Brew Crew, The Crew, Beermakers Ballpark Miller Park (2001–present) County Stadium (1970–2000) Sick... For the league that began in 1999, see American Basketball Association (2000-). The American Basketball Association (ABA) was a professional basketball league founded in 1967, and eventually merged, in part, with the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Gene Squeaky Melchiorre (born August 10, 1927 in Highland Park, Illinois) is a former NBA basketball player and was the first overall pick in the 1951 NBA Draft. ... Bryan Namoff (born May 28, 1979 in Carson City, Nevada) is an American soccer defender, who currently plays for D.C. United of Major League Soccer. ... William Bill Stone (born 23 September 1900 in Ledstone, Devon) is one of the few surviving British veterans of the First World War. ...

Infamous

  • Matthew F. Hale - white supremacist and founder of the Creativity Movement, currently in jail for soliciting an undercover FBI officer to kill a federal judge
  • Ali Saleh Kahlah al-Marri - arrested in December 2001. Classified as an unlawful combatant in 2003[citation needed].

Matthew F. Hale (center) at the Peoria Public Library. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Ali Saleh Kahlah al-Marri is a citizen of Qatar who was arrested while studying in the United States, because the U.S. government classified him as an unlawful combatant. ...

See also

: See how it plays in Peoria United States Illinois Peoria 46. ... Portrait of Lydia Moss Bradley Lydia Moss Bradley, (Born: July 31, 1816, Vevay, Indiana, died: January 16, 1908, Peoria, Illinois). ... Carver Arena is a 11,433-seat multi-purpose arena in Peoria, Illinois. ...

External links

References

  1. 1 endowment  America's Best Colleges 2006. U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved on February 7, 2006.

  Results from FactBites:
 
:: Bradley University :: (207 words)
The Bradley University web site may contain links to other web sites which are sites independently run outside of the bradley.edu domain.
The University is not responsible for the privacy practices, activities, or content of such independent sites.
They should not be construed as an endorsement by the University of the content or views of the linked materials.
Bradley University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1490 words)
The Bradley Polytechnic Institute was founded by philanthropist Lydia Moss Bradley in 1897 in memory of her husband Tobias and their six children, all of whom died early and suddenly, making Bradley a childless widow.
In 1896, Bradley was introduced to the president of the University of Chicago, who convinced her to move ahead with her plans to establish the institute.
Bradley University was named 24th on the list of "Top 25 Most Connected Campuses" and "Top 25 Most Entrepreneurial Campuses" in the nation by The Princeton Review and Forbes magazine.
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