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Encyclopedia > Brachiosaurus
Wikipedia:How to read a taxobox
How to read a taxobox
Brachiosaurus
Fossil range: Late Jurassic - Early Cretaceous
Brachiosaurus (Giraffatitan) brancai
Brachiosaurus (Giraffatitan) brancai
Conservation status
Extinct (fossil)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Sauropsida
Superorder: Dinosauria
Order: Saurischia
Suborder: Sauropodomorpha
Infraorder: Sauropoda
Family: Brachiosauridae
Genus: Brachiosaurus
Riggs, 1903
Species

Brachiosaurus (IPA: /ˌbɹækiəˈsɔɹəs/) meaning "Arm Lizard", from the Greek brachion/βραχιων meaning 'arm' and sauros/σαυρος meaning 'lizard', was a genus of sauropod dinosaur which lived during the Late Jurassic Period. It was thus named because its forelimbs were longer than its hind limbs. One of the largest animals ever to walk the earth, it has become one of the most famous of all dinosaurs and is widely recognised worldwide. Upper Jurassic (also known as Malm) was an epoch of the Jurassic geologic period. ... The Early Cretaceous (timestratigraphic name) or the Lower Cretaceous (logstratigraphic name), is the earlier of the two major divisions of the Cretaceous period. ... Image File history File links Brachiosaurus-brancai_jconway. ... Giraffatitan (Giraffe Titan) was a sauropod of the family macronaria from Jurassic Africa. ... The conservation status of a species is an indicator of the likelihood of that species continuing to survive either in the present day or the future. ... Three small ammonite fossils, each approximately 1. ... Scientific classification or biological classification is a method by which biologists group and categorize species of organisms. ... Digimon, the only known animals. ... Typical Classes See below Chordates (phylum Chordata) are a group of animals that includes the vertebrates, together with several closely related invertebrates. ... Clades Subclass Anapsida Subclass Diapsida Infraclass Lepidosauromorpha Infraclass Archosauromorpha Sauropsids are a diverse group of mostly egg-laying vertebrate animals. ... Orders Saurischia    Sauropodomorpha    Theropoda Ornithischia Dinosaurs are giant reptiles that dominated the terrestrial ecosystem for most of their 165-million year existence. ... Groups Sauropodomorpha    Saturnalia    Prosauropoda    Sauropoda Theropoda    Eoraptor    Herrerasauridae    Ceratosauria    Tetanurae       Aves(extant) Saurischians (from the Greek Saurischia meaning lizard hip) are one of the two orders/branches of dinosaurs. ... Groups Saturnalia Prosauropoda Sauropoda The Sauropodomorpha were a group of long-necked, herbivorous dinosaurs that eventually dropped down on all fours and became the largest animals that ever the walked the earth. ... Families Brachiosauridae Camarasauridae Cetiosauridae Diplodocidae Dicraeosauridae Euhelopodidae Nemegtosauridae Omeisauridae Rebbachisauridae Titanosauridae/Saltosauridae Vulcanodontidae Sauropoda, the sauropods, are a suborder or infraorder of the saurischian (lizard-hipped) dinosaurs. ... Genera Brachiosaurus Cedarosaurus Giraffatitan Lusotitan Brachiosauridae is a family of dinosaurs, whose members are known as Brachiosaurids. ... Type specimens When a new species is discovered, more important than creating a new and unique name for the species is developing a reasonably detailed description. ... Giraffatitan (Giraffe Titan) was a sauropod of the family macronaria from Jurassic Africa. ... This chart shows concisely the most common way in which the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is applied to represent the English language. ... Families Brachiosauridae Camarasauridae Cetiosauridae Diplodocidae Euhelopodidae Nemegtosauridae Titanosauridae Vulcanodontidae Sauropoda, the sauropods, are a suborder or infraorder of the saurischian (lizard-hipped) dinosaurs. ... Orders & Suborders Saurischia Sauropodomorpha Theropoda Ornithischia Thyreophora Ornithopoda Marginocephalia Dinosaurs were vertebrate animals that dominated the terrestrial ecosystem for over 160 million years, first appearing approximately 230 million years ago. ... The Jurassic Period is a major unit of the geologic timescale that extends from about 199. ... A geologic period is a subdivision of geologic time that divides an era into smaller timeframes. ...


For many decades, Brachiosaurus was the largest dinosaur known. It has since been discovered that a number of giant titanosaurians (Argentinosaurus, for example) surpassed Brachiosaurus in terms of sheer mass. More recently, another brachiosaurid, Sauroposeidon, has also been discovered; based on incomplete fossil evidence, it too is likely to have outweighed Brachiosaurus. The General Sherman, a Giant Sequoia, is generally considered to be the largest (by volume of its trunk) tree in the world The largest organism found on earth can be measured using a variety of methods. ... Genera and Families Andesaurus Family Titanosauridae Epachthosaurus Argentinosaurus Antarctosaurus Malawisaurus Argyrosaurus Gondwanatitan Aeolosaurus Baurutitan Trigonosaurus Alamosaurus Isisaurus Subfamily Nemegtosaurinae Subfamily Saltasaurinae For the Titanosaurus featured in the Godzilla film series, see Titanosaurus (Godzilla). ... Binomial name Argentinosaurus huinculensis Bonaparte & Coria, 1993 Argentinosaurus (meaning Argentina lizard) was a herbivorous sauropod dinosaur that was quite possibly the largest, heaviest land animal that ever lived. ... Genera Brachiosaurus Cedarosaurus Giraffatitan Lusotitan Brachiosauridae is a family of dinosaurs, whose members are known as Brachiosaurids. ... Species Sauroposeidon was a sauropod from the Early Cretaceous Period, related to the more famous Brachiosaurus. ... Three small ammonite fossils, each approximately 1. ...


Brachiosaurus is often considered to be the largest dinosaur known from a relatively complete fossilized skeleton. However, the most complete specimens, including the Brachiosaurus in the Humboldt Museum of Berlin (excavated in Africa, the tallest mounted skeleton in the world), are members of the species B. brancai which some scientists consider to be part of a separate genus, Giraffatitan. The holotype material of the type species, B. altithorax. includes a sequence of seven posterior dorsal vertebrae, sacrum, proximal caudal vertebra, coracoid, humerus, femur and ribs: enough from which to estimate size. Orders & Suborders Saurischia Sauropodomorpha Theropoda Ornithischia Thyreophora Ornithopoda Marginocephalia Dinosaurs were vertebrate animals that dominated the terrestrial ecosystem for over 160 million years, first appearing approximately 230 million years ago. ... The Museum für Naturkunde (in English, the Museum of Natural History), widely known as the Humboldt Museum of Berlin, is the first national museum in the world, with a massive collection of more than 25 million zoological, paleontological, and minerological specimens, including more than ten thousand type specimens. ... Berlin is the capital city and one of the sixteen states of the Federal Republic of Germany. ... For other uses of the word, please see Genus (disambiguation). ... Giraffatitan (Giraffe Titan) was a sauropod of the family macronaria from Jurassic Africa. ...

Size comparison between Brachiosaurus and a human
Size comparison between Brachiosaurus and a human

Based on a complete composite skeleton, Brachiosaurus attained 25 metres (82 feet) in length and was probably able to raise its head about 13 metres (42 ft) above ground level. Fragmentary material from larger specimens indicates that it could grow 15% longer than this. Such material includes an isolated fibula HMN XV2 1340 cm in length and the brachiosaurid scapulocoracoid referred to Ultrasauros. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The metre, or meter (U.S.), is a measure of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Brachiosaurus has been estimated to have weighed anywhere between 15 tonnes (Russell et al., 1980) and 78 tonnes[1]. These extreme estimates can be discarded as that of Russell et al. was based on limb-bone allometry rather than a body model, and that of Colbert on an outdated and overweight model. More recent estimates based on models reconstructed from osteology and inferred musculature are in the range 32 tonnes[2] to 37 tonnes (Christiansen 1997). The 15% longer specimens hinted at above would have massed 48 to 56 tonnes. A tonne or metric ton (symbol t), sometimes referred to as a metric tonne, is a measurement of mass equal to 1,000 kilograms. ... Dale A. Russell is a geologist/palaeontologist, currently Research Professor at The Department of Marine Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (MEAS) of North Carolina State University. ...

Contents

Discovery and species

The first Brachiosaurus was discovered in 1900 by Elmer S. Riggs, in the Grand River Canyon of western Colorado, in the United States.


Brachiosaurus species

The front leg bone of a Brachiosaurus.
The front leg bone of a Brachiosaurus.

Brachiosaurus includes three known species: ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1866x1292, 1720 KB) Brachiosaurus leg bone (from the upper part of the front leg) at the Smithsonian museum of Natural History File links The following pages link to this file: Brachiosaurus ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1866x1292, 1720 KB) Brachiosaurus leg bone (from the upper part of the front leg) at the Smithsonian museum of Natural History File links The following pages link to this file: Brachiosaurus ...

  • B. alataiensis de Lapparent & Zbyszewski, 1957 has been referred to the new genus Lusotitan (Antunes and Mateus 2003). It is known from back bones (vertebrae), and parts of the hip and limbs, which were recovered in Estremadura, Portugal. It lived about 150 million years ago, during the Kimmeridgian age of the Late Jurassic period.
  • B. altithorax Riggs, 1903: The type species is known from two partial skeletons recovered in Colorado and Utah in the United States. It lived from 145 to 150 million years ago, during the Kimmeridgian to Tithonian ages.
  • ?B. nougaredi de Lapparent, 1960: While it may not be a distinct species (nomen dubium?) it is known from set of fused bones over the hip (sacrum) and parts of a forelimb, which were recovered in Wargla, Algeria in Africa. It lived 100 to 110 million years ago, during the Albian to Cenomanian ages of the middle Cretaceous period.

The best specimens of Brachiosaurus were from the species B. brancai, which was found in the Tendaguru Beds of Tanzania, in Africa in 1909 by Werner Janensch. In 1991, George Olshevsky placed them in a new genus, Giraffatitan, because they do not share the derived characteristics of Brachiosaurus. Giraffatitan has withers over its shoulder, and a rounded crest over its nostrils. Albert-Félix de Lapparent (1905 - 1975) was a French palaeontologist. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Binomial name Lusotitan atalaiensis Lusotitan is the name given to a genus of dinosaur from the Late Jurassic. ... A diagram of a thoracic vertebra. ... Bones of the Hip In anatomy, the hip is the bony projection of the femur, known as the greater trochanter, and the overlying muscle and fat. ... Estremadura Estremadura is a historical province of Portugal. ... Mega-annum, usually abbreviated as Ma, is a unit of time equal to one million years. ... The Kimmeridgian is a stage of the Late Jurassic Epoch. ... Faunal stages are a subdivision of geologic time used primarily by paleontologists who study fossils rather than by geologists who study rock formations. ... The Jurassic Period is a major unit of the geologic timescale that extends from about 199. ... In geology, a period or age is a time span of many millions of years that are assumed to have had similar characteristics. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Type specimens When a new species is discovered, more important than creating a new and unique name for the species is developing a reasonably detailed description. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English Capital Salt Lake City Largest city Salt Lake City Area  Ranked 13th  - Total 84,876 sq mi (219,887 km²)  - Width 270 miles (435 km)  - Length 350 miles (565 km)  - % water 3. ... The Tithonian (141-135 MYA) is the most recent faunal stage of the Jurassic era. ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... For the record label, see Sacrum Torch The sacrum is a large, triangular bone at the base of the spine and at the upper and back part of the pelvic cavity, where it is inserted like a wedge between the two hip bones. ... Ouargla is a city and wilaya in southern Algeria. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... The Cretaceous Period is one of the major divisions of the geologic timescale, reaching from the end of the Jurassic Period (i. ... George Olshevsky is a freelance editor, writer, publisher, paleontologist, and mathematician living in San Diego, California. ... It has been suggested that Clade be merged into this article or section. ... The withers is the highest point on an animals back, on the ridge between its shoulder blades. ...

  • Giraffatitan brancai Janensch, 1914 (formerly B. brancai): The new type species, it is known from five partial skeletons, including at least three skulls and some limb bones, which were recovered in Mtwara, Tanzania, in Africa. It lived from 145 to 150 million years ago, during the Kimmeridgian to Tithonian ages of the Late Jurassic period.

1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Type specimens When a new species is discovered, more important than creating a new and unique name for the species is developing a reasonably detailed description. ... It has been suggested that temporal fenestra be merged into this article or section. ... Mtwara is one of the Southern regions of Tanzania which have been underdeveloped for a long time for various justifiable reasons and constraints. ...

Description and environment

Brachiosaurus was a sauropod, one of a group of four-legged, plant-eating dinosaurs with long necks and tails and relatively small brains. Unlike other families of sauropods, it had a giraffe-like build, with long forelimbs and a very long neck. Brachiosaurus had spatulate teeth (resembling chisels), well-suited to its herbivorous diet. Its skull featured a number of holes, probably aiding weight-reduction. The first toe on its front foot and the first three toes on its hind feet were clawed. Families Brachiosauridae Camarasauridae Cetiosauridae Diplodocidae Euhelopodidae Nemegtosauridae Titanosauridae Vulcanodontidae Sauropoda, the sauropods, are a suborder or infraorder of the saurischian (lizard-hipped) dinosaurs. ... The Zebra is an example of a quadruped. ... A deer and two fawns feeding on some foliage A herbivore is often defined as any organism that eats only plants[1]. By that definition, many fungi, some bacteria, many animals, about 1% of flowering plants and some protists can be considered herbivores. ... A human neck. ... A scorpion tail A tail is the section at the rear end of an animals body, the term particularly referring to such a section which forms a distinct, flexible appendage to the torso. ... In animals the brain, or encephalon (Greek for in the head), is the control center of the central nervous system. ... Scientific classification or biological classification refers to how biologists group and categorize extinct and living species of organisms. ... Binomial name Giraffa camelopardalis Linnaeus, 1758 Range map The giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) is an African even-toed ungulate mammal, the tallest of all land-living animal species. ... Types of teeth Molars are used for grinding up foods Carnassials are used for slicing food. ... Toes on foot. ... A claw is a curved pointed appendage, found at the end of a toe or finger or, in arthropods, of the tarsus. ...


Skull

Brachiosaurus has traditionally been characterised by its distinctive high-crested skull, but many scientists now assign the specimen which this depiction was based on to the genus Giraffatitan. Giraffatitan (Giraffe Titan) was a sauropod of the family macronaria from Jurassic Africa. ...


One complete Brachiosaurus skull is known. Marsh used it on his early reconstructions of Brontosaurus. Carpenter and Tidwell studied it in 1998 and found that it belonged to one of the North American Brachiosaurus species. The skull of Brachiosaurus is more camarasaur-like than the distinctive high-crested skull of Giraffatitan and it lends support to the opinion that Giraffatitan is a distinct genus. Othniel Charles Marsh (October 29, 1831 - March 18, 1899) was one of the pre-eminent paleontologists of the 19th century, who discovered and named many fossils found in the American West. ... Binomial name Apatosaurus excelsus (Marsh, 1879) vide Riggs, 1903 Synonyms Brontosaurus excelsus Marsh, 1879c Brontosaurus (pronounced ), meaning thunder lizard (from the Greek brontē/βροντη meaning thunder and sauros/σαυρος meaning lizard), is a deprecated genus of sauropod dinosaurs. ... Species (holotype) The Camarasaurus (pronounced KAM-a-rah-SORE-us) was a genera of quadrupedal, herbivorous dinosaurs. ...


Metabolism

Like other "long-necked" dinosaurs, Brachiosaurus may not have been able to pump sufficient oxygenated blood from its heart to its brain if it raised its head high above its shoulders, though this is disputed by some researchers.


If the Brachiosaurus was endothermic (warm-blooded), it would have taken an estimated ten years to reach full size. If it were instead poikilothermic (cold-blooded), then it would have required over 100 years to reach full size. As a warm-blooded animal, the daily energy demands of Brachiosaurus would have been enormous; it would probably have needed to eat more than 400 lb. (~200 kg) of food per day. If Brachiosaurus was fully cold-blooded or was a passive bulk endotherm, it would have needed far less food to meet its daily energy needs. Scientists now believe that like most large dinosaurs, it was a gigantotherm. In chemistry, an endothermic reaction is one that requires heat to break the bonds of the reactants. ... Cold-blooded is a common term used to describe organisms that maintain their body temperatures in ways different from mammals and birds. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


Environment and behaviour

Brachiosaurus at the Dino Jaws exhibition - Natural History Museum, London.
Brachiosaurus at the Dino Jaws exhibition - Natural History Museum, London.

Brachiosaurus was one of the largest dinosaurs of the Jurassic era; it lived on prairies filled with ferns, bennettites and horsetails, and it moved through vast conifer forests and groves of cycads, seed ferns and ginkgos. Some of its contemporary genera included Stegosaurus, Dryosaurus, Apatosaurus and Diplodocus. While it is speculated that groups of Brachiosaurus moved in herds, fully grown individuals had little to fear from even the largest predators of the time, Allosaurus and Torvosaurus, on account of their sheer size. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2188x1576, 2476 KB) Other versions Originally from en. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2188x1576, 2476 KB) Other versions Originally from en. ... For other similarly-named museums see Museum of Natural History. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Jurassic Period is a major unit of the geologic timescale that extends from about 199. ... Classes Psilotopsida Equisetopsida Marattiopsida Pteridopsida (Polypodiopsida) A fern is any one of a group of about 20,000 species of plants classified in the phylum or division Pteridophyta, also known as Filicophyta. ... Bennettites refers to an extinct genus of the order Bennettitales. ... Species The horsetails are vascular plants, comprising 15 species of plants in the genus Equisetum. ... Orders & Families Cordaitales † Pinales   Pinaceae - Pine family   Araucariaceae - Araucaria family   Podocarpaceae - Yellow-wood family   Sciadopityaceae - Umbrella-pine family   Cupressaceae - Cypress family   Cephalotaxaceae - Plum-yew family   Taxaceae - Yew family Vojnovskyales † Voltziales † The conifers, division Pinophyta, are one of 13 or 14 division level taxa within the Kingdom Plantae. ... Families Cycadaceae cycas family Stangeriaceae stangeria family Zamiaceae zamia family Leaves and male cone of Cycas revoluta Cycads are an ancient group of seed plants characterized by a large crown of compound leaves and a stout trunk. ... Pteridospermatophyta, also called seed ferns, is an extinct gymnosperm division of the Plantae kingdom. ... Binomial name Ginkgo biloba L. The Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba), frequently misspelled as Gingko, and sometimes known as the Maidenhair Tree, is a unique tree with no close living relatives. ... Species Marsh, 1877 (type) Marsh, 1887 Gilmore, 1914 Stegosaurus (IPA pronunciation ) is a genus of stegosaurid armoured dinosaur from the Late Jurassic period (Kimmeridgian to Early Tithonian) of what is now western North America. ... Species Dryosaurus (DRY-oh-sawr-us) meaning oak lizard, due to the vague oak shape of its cheek teeth (Greek dryo = oak + sauros = lizard) was a ornithopod dinosaur living in the Late Jurassic Period. ... Species Apatosaurus ajax Apatosaurus excelsus Apatosaurus louisae Apatosaurus (pronounced ) meaning deceptive lizard, because its chevron bones were like those of Mosasaurus (Greek apatelos or apatelios = deceptive + sauros = lizard), often mistakenly referred to as Brontosaurus, is a genus of sauropod dinosaurs that lived about 140 million years ago, during the Jurassic... Species (Hatcher, 1901) (Holland, 1924) (Marsh, 1878; holotype) Diplodocus (dih-PLOH-doc-us) meaning double beam in reference to its double-beamed chevron bones (Greek diplos = double + dokos = beam) is a type of dinosaur of subgroup Sauropoda. ... Species type (Marsh, 1878) Paul, 1987 Mateus , 2006 jimmadseni Chure, 2000 vide Glut, 2003 Synonyms Creosaurus Marsh, 1878 Labrosaurus Marsh, 1879 Camptonotus Marsh, 1879  ?Epanterias Cope, 1878 Allosaurus (IPA: ) was a large (up to 11. ... Binomial name Torvosaurus tanneri Galton & Jensen, 1979 Torvosaurus (TORE-vo-SORE-us) was a giant carnivorous dinosaur, similar in appearance to the Tyrannosaurus though it had larger arms, and a bulky body. ...


Brachiosaurus nostrils, like the huge corresponding nasal openings in its skull, were long thought to be located on the top of the head. In past decades, scientists theorised that the animal used its nostrils like a snorkel, spending most of its time submerged in water in order to support its great mass. The current consensus view, however, is that Brachiosaurus was a fully terrestrial animal. Studies have demonstrated that water pressure would have prevented the animal from breathing effectively while submerged and that its feet were too narrow for efficient aquatic use. Furthermore, new studies by Larry Witmer (2001) show that, while the nasal openings in the skull were placed high above the eyes, the nostrils would still have been close to the tip of the snout (a study which also lends support to the idea that the tall "crests" of brachiosaurs supported some sort of fleshy resonating chamber). A nostril is one of the two channels of the nose, from the point where they bifurcate to the external opening. ... Snorkel A snorkel (also spelled schnorkel or schnorchel) is a tube that allows a person, vehicle, or vessel to draw air while submerged under water. ... Animal environments are classified as either aquatic (water), terrestrial (land), or amphibious (water and land). ... Water pressure is the pressure in any system for supplying water, usually a domestic water system, although the term is used in other contexts as well, such as a municipal water system. ...


Popular culture

Brachiosaurus has appeared in many films and television programmes, including Jurassic Park, Jurassic Park 3 and Walking With Dinosaurs. It also appeared briefly at the end of Walking With Monsters. Jurassic Park is a techno-thriller novel written by Michael Crichton that was published in 1990. ... Jurassic Park III is a 2001 motion picture, and a sequel of The Lost World: Jurassic Park and the highly successful original Jurassic Park. ... The factual accuracy of part of this article is disputed. ... Walking with Monsters (also distributed as Walking With Monsters: Life Before Dinosaurs and Before the Dinosaurs) is a three-part British documentary film series about life in the Paleozoic, bringing to life extinct arthropods, fish, amphibians, synapsids, and reptiles. ...


Berlin's G. brancai and Chicago's high flyer

A Brachiosaurus skeleton is mounted in the B Concourse of United Airlines' Terminal One in O'Hare International Airport in Chicago, courtesy of the Field Museum of Natural History of Chicago. It is a model, not a collection of fossils. United Airlines, also known as United Air Lines, Inc. ... ORD redirects here. ... Nickname: The Windy City, The Second City, Chi Town, City of the Big Shoulders, The 312, The City that Works, Second City (reference to when Chicago was second in population and prestige to New York). ... Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago The Field Museum of Natural History, in Chicago, Illinois, USA, sits on Lake Shore Drive next to Lake Michigan, part of a scenic complex known as Museum Campus Chicago. ...


A famous specimen of Giraffatitan brancai mounted in Berlin, sometimes considered a species or sub-genus of Brachiosaurus, is one of the largest mounted skeletons in the world. Giraffatitan (Giraffe Titan) was a sauropod of the family macronaria from Jurassic Africa. ...


Beginning in 1909, Werner Janensch found many additional brachiosaur specimens in Tanzania, Africa, including some nearly complete skeletons, which were widely used in Brachiosaurus reconstructions. These are now considered to be Giraffatitan fossils. Giraffatitan (Giraffe Titan) was a sauropod of the family macronaria from Jurassic Africa. ...


See also

Jurassic Park is a 1993 science fiction film directed by Steven Spielberg, based upon the novel of the same name written by Michael Crichton. ... Jurassic Park III is a 2001 motion picture, and a sequel of The Lost World: Jurassic Park and the highly successful original Jurassic Park. ... Binomial name Apatosaurus excelsus (Marsh, 1879) vide Riggs, 1903 Synonyms Brontosaurus excelsus Marsh, 1879c Brontosaurus (pronounced ), meaning thunder lizard (from the Greek brontē/βροντη meaning thunder and sauros/σαυρος meaning lizard), is a deprecated genus of sauropod dinosaurs. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Colbert, 1962, p. 10.
  2. ^ Paul, 1988

Edwin Harris Colbert (1905 – 2001) was a distinguished vertebrate paleontologist and prolific researcher and author. ... Gregory S. Paul (born 1954) is a freelance paleontologist, author and illustrator. ...

References

  • Colbert, E. H. (1962). "The Weights of Dinosaurs". American Museum Novitiates (2076): p. 1–16. 
  • Paul, G. S. (1988). "The brachiosaur giants of the Morrison and Tendaguru with a description of a new subgenus, Giraffatitan, and a comparison of the world's largest dinosaurs". Hunteria 2 (3): 1–14. 
  • See entry on Brachiosaurus at DinoData (registration required, free)
  • dB Brachiosaurus (Natural History Museum)

External links

  • Expect awe-struck travelers, from the Field Museum. (O'Hare airport mount)
  • Dinosaurier-Web, Description and printable fact-sheet with picture (in german and english)
Dinosaurs Portal

  Results from FactBites:
 
Brachiosaurus - Dinosaur Art (442 words)
Brachiosaurus is one of the better known sauropods, belonging to the family Brachiosaurid.
Brachiosaurus probably had no predators, because of its enormous size; its defense was its size.
Brachiosaurus was a herbivore, a treetop eater, that ate the most elevated plant material (like conifers leaves and fruit).
Brachiosaurus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1453 words)
Brachiosaurus /bræ.kiː.əʊ'sʊə.rʊs/, meaning "Arm Lizard", from the Greek brachion/βραχιων meaning 'arm' and sauros/σαυρος meaning 'lizard', was a genus of sauropod dinosaur which lived during the Late Jurassic Period.
Brachiosaurus was a sauropod, one of a group of four-legged, plant-eating dinosaurs with long necks and tails and relatively small brains.
Brachiosaurus was one of the largest dinosaurs of the Jurassic era; it lived on prairies filled with ferns, bennettites, horsetails and it moved through vast conifer forests, groves of cycads, Seed ferns, and Ginkgos.
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