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Encyclopedia > Brachialis muscle

Brachialis is a flexor muscle in the upper arm. It lies deep to biceps brachii, and is a more powerful flexor of the elbow.


Brachialis arises from the anterior surface of the humerus, particularly the distal half of this bone. It attaches distally at the coronoid process and the tuberosity of the ulna. The ulna does not rotate, so brachialis's only action is flexion. Pronation/supination of the forearm does not affect its action.


As in the biceps, nervous supply is from the musculocutaneous nerve, and blood is supplied by branches of the brachial artery.




  Results from FactBites:
 
Brachialis muscle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (420 words)
The brachialis (brachialis anticus) is a muscle in the upper arm that flexes the elbow joint.
The brachialis muscle is innervated by the musculocutaneous nerve, which runs on its superficial surface, between it and the biceps brachii.
The brachialis is the strongest flexor of the elbow.
Biceps brachii muscle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (770 words)
These are the coracobrachialis muscle, which like the biceps attaches to the coracoid process of the scapula, and the brachialis muscle which connects to the ulna and the humerus.
It has also been proven through several tests into muscle group stimulation, that supination of the forearm with an isometric grip allows for close and normal-grip bench press exercises to have a much more profound effect on the biceps brachii and the clavicular portion of the pectorialis major.
Originally, supination of the forearm was attributed as a function of the brachioradialis muscle.
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