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Encyclopedia > Bozeman, Montana
Bozeman, Montana
Nickname: "The Bozone"
Location of Bozeman, Montana
Location of Bozeman, Montana
County Gallatin
 - City Manager Chris Kukulski
Area  
 - City 32.6 km²  (20.3 sq mi)
 - Land 32.6 km²  (20.3 sq mi)
 - Water 0 km²
Population (2000)
 - City 27,509
 - Density 843.8/km² (1,358/sq mi)
Time zone MST (UTC-7)
 - Summer (DST) MDT (UTC-6)
Website: http://www.bozeman.net/

Bozeman is a city in southwestern Montana, USA. It is the county seat of Gallatin County. With a 2000 population of 27,509, Bozeman is the fifth largest city in the state. The city is named after John M. Bozeman, founder of the Bozeman Trail. Located in the fastest-growing county in the state [1], Bozeman is an All-America City (awarded in 2001)[2]. Bozeman residents are known as Bozemanites. // A nickname is a short, clever, cute, derogatory, or otherwise substitute name for a person or things real name (for example, Bob, Rob, Robby, Robbie, Robi, Robin, Bobby, Rab, Rabbie, Bert, Bertie, Butch, Bobbers, Bobert, Beto, Bobadito, and Robban (in Sweden), are all nicknames for Robert). ... Adapted from Wikipedias MT county maps by Seth Ilys. ... A county is generally a sub-unit of regional self-government within a sovereign jurisdiction. ... Gallatin County is a county located in the U.S. state of Montana. ... The council-manager government is one of 2 main variations of representative municipal government (for contrast, also see Mayor-Council government). ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Population density by country, 2006 Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... MST is UTC-7 The Mountain Standard Time Zone (MST) is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting seven hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), resulting in UTC-7. ... Mountain Standard Time ...  Areas that observe daylight saving time  Areas that once observed daylight saving time  Areas that have never observed daylight saving time A 2001 public service announcement for the upcoming turning back of the clocks Daylight saving time (DST), also known as summer time in British English, is the convention of... MST is UTC-7 The Mountain Standard Time Zone (MST) is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting seven hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), resulting in UTC-7. ... Central Standard Time ... Official language(s) English Capital Helena Largest city Billings Area  Ranked 4th  - Total 147,165 sq mi (381,156 km²)  - Width 255 miles (410 km)  - Length 630 miles (1,015 km)  - % water 1  - Latitude 44°26N to 49°N  - Longitude 104°2W to 116°2W Population  Ranked... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Gallatin County is a county located in the U.S. state of Montana. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... John M. Bozeman (1835–1867) was born in Pickens County, Georgia. ... The Bozeman Trail was an overland route connecting the Oregon Trail to the gold rush territory of Montana. ... All-America City Program Logo The All-America City Award is given by the National Civic League annually to ten cities in the United States. ...


Bozeman is home to Montana State University - Bozeman. The local newspaper is the Bozeman Chronicle. Gallatin Field Airport serves the city. Montana State University - Bozeman (MSU) is a public university located in Bozeman, Montana. ... The Bozeman Daily Chronicle is a daily newspaper printed in Bozeman, Montana. ... Gallatin Field Airport (IATA: BZN, ICAO: KBZN), also known simply as Gallatin Field, is a regional airport located in Belgrade, Montana, about 8 miles (12. ...

Contents

History

Prehistory

For thousands of years, Native Americans tribes including the Shoshone, Nez Perce, Blackfeet, Flathead and Sioux made the area their home, though the Gallatin Valley was not permanently held by any particular tribe. Shoshone around their tipi, probably taken around 1890 Shoshone Indians at Ft. ... The Nez Perce or Nez Percé (pronounced , or as in French) are a tribe of Native Americans who inhabited the Pacific Northwest region of the United States at the time of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. ... Crowfoot, former Head Chief of the Blackfeet Nation The Piegan Blackfeet, (Pikuni in Blackfoot) are a tribe of Blackfoot Native Americans based in Montana. ... Flathead could refer to: Fishes in the family Platycephalidae. ... Wahktageli (Gallant Warrior), a Yankton Sioux chief (Karl Bodmer) Funeral scaffold of a Sioux chief (Karl Bodmer) Horse racing of the Sioux Indians (Karl Bodmer) The Sioux (IPA ) are a Native American people. ...


19th century

William Clark visited the area in July 1806 as he traveled east from Three Forks along the Gallatin River. The party camped 3 miles east of what is now Bozeman, at the mouth of Kelly Canyon. The journal entries from Clark's party briefly describes the future city's location in a place the local natives called the "Valley of the Flowers" [3]. Insert non-formatted text here For other persons named William Clark, see William Clark (disambiguation). ... Three Forks is a city in Gallatin County, Montana, United States. ...


In 1863, John Bozeman, along with a partner named John Jacobs, opened the Bozeman Trail, an offshoot from the Oregon Trail leading to the mining town of Virginia City through the Gallatin Valley and the future location of the city of Bozeman. 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar). ... John M. Bozeman (1835–1867) was born in Pickens County, Georgia. ... The Bozeman Trail was an overland route connecting the Oregon Trail to the gold rush territory of Montana. ... The Ox Team or the Old Oregon Trail 1852-1906 by Ezra Meeker. ... Virginia City, from the road agent cemetery on the hill. ...


John Bozeman, with Daniel Rouse and William Bealle platted the town in 1864 stating "standing right in the gate of the mountains ready to swallow up all tenderfeet that would reach the territory from the east, with their golden fleeces to be taken care of...". The Indian Wars closed the Bozeman Trail in 1868, but the town's fertile land attracted permanent settlers. A contemporary plat map showing the location of a property for sale. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Combatants Native Americans Various (see text) Indian Wars is the name used by historians in the United States to describe a series of conflicts between the United States and Native American peoples (Indians) of North America. ... 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...


In 1866 Nelson Story arrived with 3,000 head of longhorn cattle sneaking past angry Native Americans and the U.S. Army who tried to turn Story back for safety reasons. Those first cattle formed the first herd in Montana's cattle industry. 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...


Fort Ellis was established in 1868 by Captain R. S. LaMotte and two companies of the 2nd Cavalry, after the mysterious death of John Bozeman near Yellowstone and considerable political disturbance in the area led local settlers and miners to feel a need for added protection. The fort, named for Gettysburg casualty Colonel Augustus Van Horne Ellis, was decommissioned in 1886 and very few remains are left at the actual site, now occupied by the Fort Ellis Experimental Station of Montana State University [4]. In addition to Fort Ellis, a short-lived fort, Fort Elizabeth Meahger (also simply known as Fort Meagher), was established in 1867 by volunteer militiamen. This fort was located eight miles east of town on Rock Creek. 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America Commanders George G. Meade Robert E. Lee Strength 93,921 71,699 Casualties 23,055 (3,155 killed, 14,531 wounded, 5,369 captured/missing) 23,231 (4,708 killed, 12,693 wounded, 5,830 captured/missing) The Battle of...


Northern Pacific Railway tracks finally reached the small town in 1883. By 1900, Bozeman's population reached 3,500. A Northern Pacific train travels over Bozeman Pass, June 1939. ...


20th century

In 1906, a Chinese immigrant name Lu-Sing murdered another Chinese immigrant named Tom Sing (no relation). In a fascinating summary defense, witnesses indicate that Lu-Sing acted in self-defense but Lu-Sing was found guilty and hanged outside the Bozeman Jail [5].


The first Federal Building and Post Office was built in 1915 (many years later, while empty, it was used along with downtown Bozeman in filming A River Runs Through It (1992) by Robert Redford and starring Brad Pitt.) It is now used by HRDC, a community organization. A River Runs Through It and Other Stories is a semi-autobiographical novella by Norman Maclean (1902–1990). ... Robert Redford (born Charles Robert Redford, Jr. ... The Human Resource Development Council (HRDC) is a not-for-profit corporation based in Bozeman, Montana in the United States, providing volunteer and community development organization in three counties - Gallatin, Park and Meagher Counties - in the southwest part of the state. ...


Montana State University in recent years has graduated a number of pioneering scientists and engineers who have stayed in Bozeman and founded technology companies that compete on a national and global level. Local technology companies such as Zoot Enterprises and RightNow Technologies have in turn recruited many Montana State University Graduates to help build an innovative and dedicated workforce. The University's Museum of the Rockies was put on the map by famed paleontologist Jack Horner. RightNow Technologies NASDAQ: RNOW is a U.S. software company that develops customer relationship management (CRM) software small and mid-market businesses. ... The Museum of the Rockies is located in Bozeman, Montana, and is known for its paleontological collections. ... John Jack R. Horner (born June 15, 1946) is an American paleontologist who discovered and named the Maiasaura, providing the first clear evidence that dinosaurs cared for their young. ...


Residents and visitors enjoy easy access to skiing at the Big Sky Ski Resort. Plentiful recreational activities and the free marketing the area received from A River Runs Through It and The Horse Whisperer have combined to bring a steady influx of new residents and visitors. A River Runs Through It and Other Stories is a semi-autobiographical novella by Norman Maclean (1902–1990). ... The Horse Whisperer (1998) is a Robert Redford movie based on the 1995 novel by Nicholas Evans about a talented horse trainer (Robert Redford) hired to help an injured teenager (played by Scarlett Johansson) and her horse recuperate. ...


In the 1930s, for instance, local ordinances prohibited dancing anywhere in town after midnight, and in beer halls at any time. It was illegal to drink beer standing up, so all the bars had plenty of stools.


References in popular culture

In two episodes of Star Trek: Enterprise, "Carbon Creek" and "Desert Crossing," the city was named as the fictional location of First Contact (as shown in the movie Star Trek: First Contact) between Vulcans and humans, an obvious nod from Bozeman native and Star Trek producer Brannon Braga. The starship USS Bozeman appears in the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "Cause and Effect", another reference to Braga's hometown. The starship Enterprise (NX-01) Star Trek: Enterprise is a science fiction television series set in the Star Trek universe. ... First contact may refer to: In science: First contact (anthropology), a first meeting of two previously unknown cultures First contact (astronomy), the moment in astronomy during a transit or eclipse when the apparent positions of the two bodies first touch In Star Trek: First Contact (TNG episode), a fourth season... Star Trek: First Contact (Paramount Pictures, 1996; see also 1996 in film), is the eighth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... This article or section may need to be cleaned up and rewritten because it describes a work of fiction in a primarily in-universe style. ... Human beings are defined variously in biological, spiritual, and cultural terms, or in combinations thereof. ... Brannon Braga at a 2006 lecture Brannon Braga (born August 14, 1965 in Bozeman, Montana) is an American television producer and screenwriter who is mostly known for his significant contributions to the Star Trek series since 1990. ... The USS Bozeman, NCC-1941, was commissioned sometime during the mid- to late-23rd Century, and by the 2280s, was under the command of Capt. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... Cause and Effect is considered by many fans to be one of the best episodes of the series Star Trek: The Next Generation. ...


In the popular television show CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, Las Vegas Crime Scene Investigator Level 3 Catherine Willows is originally from Bozeman. In the spinoff show CSI: NY, Detective Lindsay Monroe is also a Bozeman native and had been a CSI there for 3 years before her transfer to New York at the request of Mac Taylor. Because of her roots in Bozeman, Lindsay is given the nickname "Montana" by co-worker Detective Danny Messer. In a 2007 episode, Lindsay returns to Bozeman to testify as a witness for the prosecution in a quadruple homicide case in which she is the lone survivor. CSI: Crime Scene Investigation is a popular Alliance Atlantis/CBS police procedural television series, running since October 2000, about a team of forensic scientists. ... Catherine (Mugs) Willows (Born March 26, 1963) is a character on the CBS television series CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. ... CSI: NY (working title CSI: New York) is an American police procedural television series which premiered on September 22, 2004. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... This article should belong in one or more categories. ...


Bozeman was also featured in the movie Supervolcano, where it is destroyed by an eruption at Yellowstone. A supervolcano refers to a volcano that produces the largest and most voluminous kinds of eruption on Earth. ...


Geography

Bozeman is located at 45°40′40″N, 111°2′50″W (45.677890, -111.047274)GR1, in the Gallatin Valley with the Bridger Mountains to the northeast, the Tobacco Root Mountains to the west, the Big Belt Mountains to the north, the Hyalites to the south and the Spanish Peaks and Gallatin Range to the southwest. Interstate 90 passes through the city, with the city lying 60 miles east of Butte, Montana (87 by road), 125 miles west of Billings, Montana (143 by road), and 93 miles north of Yellowstone National Park. The Gallatin River The Gallatin River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 120 mi (193 km long), in the U.S. states of Wyoming and Montana. ... View of the Bridger Range looking south from the summit of Sacajawea Peak. ... The Big Belt Mountains are a section of the Rocky Mountains in the U.S. state of Montana. ... Interstate 90 (abbreviated I-90) is the longest interstate highway in the United States at nearly 3,100 miles (5,000 kilometers). ... Uptown Butte 1942 view of the city Butte is a city in Silver Bow County, Montana and is the county seat. ... Nickname: The Magic City, Star of the Big Sky Country, City Beneath the Rims, The Paradigm City The Yellowstone City Motto: Billings Pride: City~Wide Location in Montana Coordinates: County Yellowstone County Founded 1877 Incorporated 1882 Mayor Ronald Tussing Area    - City 106 km²  (41 sq mi)  - Water 0. ... Yellowstone National Park is a U.S. National Park located in the western states of Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho. ...


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 32.6 km² (12.6 mi²), all land. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


Demographics

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 27,509 people, 10,877 households, and 5,014 families residing in the city. The population density was 843.0/km² (2,183.8/mi²). There were 11,577 housing units at an average density of 354.8/km² (919.0/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 94.73% White, 0.33% African American, 1.24% Native American, 1.62% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 0.54% from other races, and 1.47% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.59% of the population. 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... Race, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 10,877 households out of which 22.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.0% were married couples living together, 7.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 53.9% were non-families. 30.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.26 and the average family size was 2.85. Matrimony redirects here. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 16.0% under the age of 18, 33.0% from 18 to 24, 28.6% from 25 to 44, 14.4% from 45 to 64, and 8.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 25 years. For every 100 females there were 111.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 112.6 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $32,156, and the median income for a family was $41,723. Males had a median income of $28,794 versus $20,743 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,104. About 9.2% of families and 20.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.8% of those under age 18 and 4.4% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


As of 2006, Bozeman has sustained a consistent 5% to 7% growth rate since the last US Census edging the municipal population towards 40,000 households. To address the impacts of rapid growth, local government officials have had the difficult job of researching controversial measures such as county wide zoning, inclusionary zoning, transfer of development rights, and other land use regulation. See economic growth Growth rate (group theory) Population growth rate This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Inclusionary zoning, also know as inclusionary housing, refers to city planning ordinances that require a given share of new construction be affordable to people with low to moderate incomes. ... Air rights are a type of development right in real estate. ...


Notable People Involved With Bozeman

Loren Wilber Acton (born March 7, 1936) is a physicist and was a Payload Specialist astronaut. ... For other uses, see Astronaut (disambiguation). ... STS-51-F (Spacelab 2) was the nineteenth flight of a Space Shuttle and the eighth flight of Challenger. ... John M. Bozeman (1835–1867) was born in Pickens County, Georgia. ... The Bozeman Trail was an overland route connecting the Oregon Trail to the gold rush territory of Montana. ... Brannon Braga at a 2006 lecture Brannon Braga (born August 14, 1965 in Bozeman, Montana) is an American television producer and screenwriter who is mostly known for his significant contributions to the Star Trek series since 1990. ... The current Star Trek franchise logo Star Trek is an epic American science fiction franchise. ... Deborah Kay Butterfield (May 7, 1949 - ) is an American artist currently living in Bozeman, Montana. ... The Smithsonian American Art Museum is a museum in Washington, D.C. with an extensive collection of American art. ... Gary Cooper (born Frank James Cooper May 7, 1901 – May 13, 1961) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film actor of English heritage. ... Zales Nelson Ecton (April 1, 1898 March 3, 1961) was an American politician. ... Peter Fonda Peter Henry Fonda, born February 23, 1940 in New York, New York, is an American actor. ... Jack Horner may refer to: Jack Horner (paleontologist) John Henry (Jack) Horner, former member of the Canadian House of Commons. ... A paleontologist carefully chips rock from a column of dinosaur vertebrae. ... Jurassic Park is a novel written by Michael Crichton that was published in 1990. ... Stuart Alexander Alex Lowe (1958-1999), was widely considered his generations finest all-around mountaineer prior to his October 5, 1999 death in a massive slab avalanche on Shishapangma in Tibet[]. The event also claimed the life of talented high-altitude cameraman David Bridges, 29, and injured climber — and... Ben Mikaelsen was born in La Paz, Bolivia, and started writing full time in 1984. ... Robert Maynard Pirsig (born September 6, 1928, Minneapolis, Minnesota) is an American philosopher, mainly known as the author of the book Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values (1974), which has sold millions of copies around the world. ... The Montana State University System was created on July 1, 1994, when the Montana Board of Regents of Higher Education restructured the states colleges and universities into two umbrella universities, Montana State University System and the University of Montana. ... Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values is the first of Robert M. Pirsigs texts in which he explores a Metaphysics of quality. ... Elizabeth Clare Prophet Elizabeth Clare Prophet (born April 8, 1939) is an American who became the leader of the New Age new religious movement The Summit Lighthouse, an organization encompassing the branches of Church Universal and Triumphant, Summit University, Summit University Press, and Montessori International, after her husband, Mark L... The Church Universal and Triumphant is a New Age new religious movement and organization founded by Mark L. Prophet and Elizabeth Clare Prophet. ... David Quammen is an award-winning science, nature and travel writer whose writing has appeared in publications such as National Geographic, Outside, Harpers, Rolling Stone, and The New York Times Book Review. ... Red Cloud Red Cloud Red Cloud (Lakota: Makhpyia-luta), (1822 – December 10, 1909) was a war leader of the Oglala Lakota (Sioux). ... Alternative meaning: Lakota, Côte dIvoire is a département of Côte dIvoire. ... The Bozeman Trail was an overland route connecting the Oregon Trail to the gold rush territory of Montana. ... Julia Stimson Thorne (September 16, 1944 – April 27, 2006) was a writer and the ex-wife of U.S. Senator John Kerry. ... Al Gore (born December 11, 1943) is a Vietnam Veteran and the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Peter Voulkos (January 29, 1924 - 2002) popular name of Panagiotis Voulkos, was an American artist known for his Abstract Expressionist ceramic sculptures, which bounded the traditional divide between ceramic crafts and fine art. ... Robert Edward Turner III (born November 19, 1938 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is an American media mogul and philanthropist. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Turner Broadcasting System logo The Turner Broadcasting System (often abbreviated to Turner or TBS) is the company managing the collection of cable networks and properties started by Ted Turner from the mid-1970s to the late-1990s. ... Sarah Vowell Sarah Vowell (born December 27, 1969) is an American author, journalist, and regular contributor to the radio program This American Life on Public Radio International. ... This American Life (TAL) is a weekly hour-long radio program produced by Chicago Public Radio. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Kathy Tyers was born on July 21, 1952 in Long Beach, California. ... This article is about the series. ...

Points of interest

This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Museum of the Rockies is located in Bozeman, Montana, and is known for its paleontological collections. ... Bridger Bowl is a local ski hill for the residents of Bozeman, Montana and students at Montana State University-Bozeman. ... Yellowstone National Park is a U.S. National Park located in the western states of Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho. ... Montana State University - Bozeman (MSU) is a public university located in Bozeman, Montana. ... The American Computer Museum is a museum of the history of computing founded in May 1990 by Barbara and George Keremedjiev as a non-profit organization and originally intended to be located in Princeton, New Jersey; the museums location was changed to Bozeman, Montana when the museums founders... Big Sky Resort is a ski resort located in the Rocky Mountains in Big Sky, Montana, owned by Boyne USA Resorts. ... Moonlight Basin is a ski resort in southwestern Montana located in the Spanish Peaks mountain range of the Rocky Mountains near the small village of Big Sky, MT. It shares a common mountain, Lone Peak, with nearby Big Sky Resort. ...

External links

  • Maps and aerial photos Coordinates: 45.67789° -111.047274°
    • Street map from Google Maps, or Yahoo! Maps, or Windows Live Local
    • Satellite image from Google Maps, Windows Live Local, WikiMapia
    • Topographic map from TopoZone
    • Aerial image or topographic map from TerraServer-USA

  Results from FactBites:
 
Bozeman, Montana (391 words)
Bozeman is nestled in the midst of the pristine jewel of the Rockies, the Gallatin Valley.
Bozeman was named after John Bozeman, who blazed a trail across Wyoming and in 1864 guided the first train of immigrants into the Gallatin Valley.
Bozeman is an exceptional town offering many opportunities for recreational experiences, while retaining its flavor as a thriving arts and culture community.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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