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Encyclopedia > Bowsprit
Bowsprit of the Falls of Clyde, showing the dolphin striker, the use of chain for the bobstays, and three furled jibs. (The yellowish pole is the bowsprit of a different vessel.)
Bowsprit of the Falls of Clyde, showing the dolphin striker, the use of chain for the bobstays, and three furled jibs. (The yellowish pole is the bowsprit of a different vessel.)

The bowsprit, or boltsprit, of a sailing vessel is a pole extending forward from the vessel's prow. It provides an anchor point for the forestay(s), allowing the fore-mast to be stepped further forward on the hull. Photo of bowsprit of the Falls of Clyde, taken March 2002 by User:Stan Shebs File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Photo of bowsprit of the Falls of Clyde, taken March 2002 by User:Stan Shebs File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Falls of Clyde is the only surviving iron-hulled, four-masted full rigged ship, and the only surviving sail-driven oil tanker, in the world. ... A typical jib on a small yacht A jib is a triangular staysail set ahead of the foremost mast of a sailing boat. ... For either of the songs named Sailing, see Sailing (song). ... mizzen mast, mainmast and foremast Grand Turk The mast of a sailing ship is a tall vertical pole which supports the sails. ...


On large tall ships the bowsprit may be a considerable length and have several forestays attached. When not in use the foresails are stowed by being tied onto the bowsprit. The crew must then work out on the bowsprit to stow or prepare the sails. To minimise the risk of the bowsprit (and any crew working on it) being buried in large waves, the bowsprit is normally angled upwards from the horizontal. The USCGC Eagle. ... On a sailing vessel, a forestay is a piece of standing rigging which keeps a mast from falling backwards. ... A gaff-rigged cutter flying a mainsail, staysail and genoa jib For other uses, see Sail (disambiguation). ...

Bowsprit of the Dar Pomorza as seen from the deck, showing safety netting.

Early ocean-going vessels tended to tilt the bowsprit at a high angle, and hung one or two square spritsails from yards. In the 17th century and early 18th century a vertical sprit topmast was added near the end of the bowsprit and another square sail added to it; this was not a particularly successful design however, the mast tending to carry away in heavy weather. Fore-and-aft sails known as jibs hung from the stays proved more useful for speed and maneuvering, and the basic bowsprit was lengthened with a jibboom and then even further with a flying jibboom, resulting in bowsprits of tremendous length, up to 30 meters total. Download high resolution version (530x800, 90 KB)Dar Pomorza, Gdynia, May 2004 Originally from Wikipedia-PL (http://pl. ... Download high resolution version (530x800, 90 KB)Dar Pomorza, Gdynia, May 2004 Originally from Wikipedia-PL (http://pl. ... Dar Pomorza - on the right (on the left: Stad Amsterdam and Dar Mlodziezy). ... A form of sailing rig mainly employed on the Thames Sailing Barge, which uses two similarly sized spars to form the framework for the sail area. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... A typical jib on a small yacht A jib is a triangular staysail set ahead of the foremost mast of a sailing boat. ...


On smaller vessels, where the bowsprit is not used for stowing sails, it is often horizontal. Bowsprits are rare on modern yachts; the forestay merely runs down to the tip of the bow. On some modern racing yachts and dinghies, the bowsprit is retractable and primarily used to fly an asymmetrical spinnaker. This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... Dinghy of the schooner Adventuress A dinghy is a small utility boat attached to a larger boat. ... Symmetry is a characteristic of geometrical shapes, equations and other objects; we say that such an object is symmetric with respect to a given operation if this operation, when applied to the object, does not appear to change it. ... It has been suggested that gennaker be merged into this article or section. ...


The very end of the bowsprit is traditionally painted white on tall ships, unless the ship in question has ventured into either the Arctic or Antarctic circles, in which case it is painted blue. [citation needed] The USCGC Eagle. ...


External links

  • Glossary of Sailing and Nautical Terms

  Results from FactBites:
 
Bowsprit, sprit topmast, jib boom (430 words)
From the early 16th century until about 1650 (occasionally as late as 1670), the bowsprit was routed past the foremast on the starboard side.It did not lie parallel to the keel, but at an angle, so that the head of the bowsprit was on the centreline of the ship.
After this time the bowsprit's heel was stepped in line with the foremast, and supported by the stem -thus it was situated with all its length exactly on the centreline, like all the other masts and topmasts.
Two timbers, the bees, to right and left of the head of the bowsprit, served to attach the fore topmast stay, and the fore topmast preventer stay (see STAYS).The dolphin striker was fitted under the bowsprit cap, and the martingale stays (see BOWSPRIT RIGGING) passed under this.
Bowsprit - Definition, explanation (308 words)
The bowsprit of a sailing vessel is a pole extending forward from the vessel's prow.
In the 17th century and early 18th century a vertical sprit topmast was added near the end of the bowsprit and another square sail added to it; this is not a particular successful design however, the mast tending to carry away in heavy weather.
Bowsprits are rare on modern yachts; the forestay merely runs down to the tip of the bow.
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