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Encyclopedia > Bowdoin College

Bowdoin College

Motto Ut Aquila Versus Coelum ("As an eagle towards the sky")
Established June 24, 1794
Type Private
Endowment $673,000,000[1]
President Barry Mills
Staff 181
Undergraduates 1,710
Postgraduates Some postdoctoral students and visiting scholars
Location Brunswick, Maine, USA
Campus Suburban
Athletics 30 varsity teams, 6 club teams
Mascot Polar Bear
Website www.bowdoin.edu

U.S. University Rankings Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... President of Bowdoin College in Brunswick, ME since 2001 Barry Mills is the president of Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine, a position he has held since 2001. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Brunswick is a town located in Cumberland County, Maine. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... This article is about the animal. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... In higher education, college and university rankings are listings of universities and liberal arts colleges in an order determined by any combination of factors. ...

USNWR Liberal Arts College[24] 7


Bowdoin College, founded in 1794, is a private liberal arts college located in the coastal New England town of Brunswick, Maine. It enrolls approximately 1,700 students and has been coeducational since 1971. Bowdoin offers 33 majors and 4 additional minors; the academic year consists of two four-course semesters, and the student-faculty ratio is 10:1. Brunswick is located on the shores of Casco Bay and the Androscoggin River, 12 miles (19 km) north of Freeport, Maine, 28 miles north of Portland, Maine, and 131 miles (211 km) north of Boston, Massachusetts. In addition to its Brunswick campus, Bowdoin also operates a 118 acre (478,000 m²) coastal studies center on Orrs Island [2] in Harpswell, Maine and a 200 acre (809,000 m²) scientific field station on Kent Island [3] in the Bay of Fundy. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are primarily liberal arts colleges with an emphasis upon undergraduate study in the liberal arts. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Brunswick is a town located in Cumberland County, Maine. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Casco Bay is an inlet of the Gulf of Maine on the southern coast of Maine, USA. Its easternmost approach is Cape Small and its westernmost approach is Two Lights in Cape Elizabeth. ... The Androscoggin River is a river in the US states of Maine and New Hampshire, in northern New England. ... Freeport, Maine Freeport is a town located in Cumberland County, Maine. ... Nickname: Motto: Resurgam (Latin for I will rise again) Country United States State Maine County Cumberland Settled 1632 Incorporated 1786 Government  - Mayor Nicholas M. Mavodones, Jr Area  - City  52. ... “Boston” redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... A view of the ocean near Lookout Point in Harpswell. ... The Bay of Fundy (French: ) is a bay located on the Atlantic coast of North America, on the northeast end of the Gulf of Maine between the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, with a small portion touching the U.S. state of Maine. ...

Contents

History

The Bowdoin Crest

Bowdoin College was chartered in 1794 by Governor Samuel Adams of Massachusetts, of which Maine was then a district, and was named for former Massachusetts governor James Bowdoin, whose son James Bowdoin III was an early benefactor. At the time of its founding, it was the easternmost college in the United States. Image File history File links Bowdoin_Crest. ... For other uses, see Samuel Adams (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... James Bowdoin (August 7, 1726 – November 6, 1790) was an American political and intellectual leader from Boston, Massachusetts during the American Revolution. ... James Bowdoin III (September 22, 1752-October 11, 1811) was an American philanthropist and statesman from Boston, Massachusetts. ...


Bowdoin came into its own in the 1820s, a decade in which Maine became an independent state as a result of the Missouri Compromise and the College graduated a number of its most famous alumni, including future United States President Franklin Pierce, class of 1824, and writers Nathaniel Hawthorne and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, both of whom graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 1825. The United States in 1820. ... Birthplace of Franklin Pierce Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 — October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... Nathaniel Hawthorne (born Nathaniel Hathorne; July 4, 1804 – May 19, 1864) was a 19th century American novelist and short story writer. ... Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (February 27, 1807 – March 24, 1882) was an American poet whose works include Paul Reveres Ride, A Psalm of Life, The Song of Hiawatha and Evangeline. He also wrote the first American translation of Dante Alighieris Divine Comedy and was one of the five members... The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ...


Bowdoin's connections to the Civil War have prompted some to quip that the war "began and ended" in Brunswick. Harriet Beecher Stowe, "the little lady who started this big war," started writing her influential anti-slavery novel Uncle Tom's Cabin in Bowdoin's Appleton Hall while her husband was teaching at the College, and General Joshua Chamberlain, a Bowdoin alumnus and professor, was responsible for receiving the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox Court House in 1865. Chamberlain, a Medal of Honor winner who later served as governor of Maine and president of Bowdoin, distinguished himself at Gettysburg, where he led the 20th Maine in its valiant defense of Little Round Top. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Harriet Elizabeth Beecher Stowe (June 14, 1811 – July 1 , 1896) was an American abolitionist and novelist, whose Uncle Toms Cabin (1852) attacked the cruelty of slavery; it reached millions as a novel and play, and became influential, even in Britain. ... Uncle Toms Cabin, or Life Among the Lowly, is American author Harriet Beecher Stowes fictional anti-slavery novel. ... Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain (September 8, 1828 – February 24, 1914) was a college professor from Maine who volunteered to join the Union Army without the benefit of any formal military education, and became a highly respected and decorated Union officer during the American Civil War, reaching the rank of brigadier general... The Army of Northern Virginia was the primary military force of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War in the eastern theater. ... McLean house, April 1865. ... The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America Commanders George G. Meade Robert E. Lee Strength 93,921[1] 71,699[2] Casualties 23,055 (3,155 killed, 14,531 wounded, 5,369 captured/missing)[1] 23,231 (4,708 killed, 12,693 wounded, 5,830 captured/missing... (Redirected from 20th Maine) The 20th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment was an important combat unit of the United States Army during the American Civil War. ... Little Round Top, western slope, photographed by Timothy H. OSullivan, 1863. ...

Campus circa 1910

There are other Civil War connections as well: General Oliver Otis Howard, class of 1850, led the Freedmen's Bureau after the war and later founded Howard University; Massachusetts Governor John A. Andrew, class of 1837, was responsible for the formation of the famous 54th Massachusetts; and William P. Fessenden 1823 and Hugh McCulloch 1827 both served as Secretary of the Treasury during the Lincoln Administration. After the war, Bowdoin contended that a higher percentage of its alumni fought in the war than that of any other college in the North -- and not only for the Union. In fact, Confederate President Jefferson Davis held an honorary degree from Bowdoin, which he received while United States Secretary of War in 1858. This controversial degree was later used to ridicule Bowdoin by other New England institutions.[4]. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 230 pixel Image in higher resolution (2300 × 662 pixel, file size: 294 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Me. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 230 pixel Image in higher resolution (2300 × 662 pixel, file size: 294 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Me. ... Portrait of Oliver O. Howard by Mathew Brady, ca. ... The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands, popularly known as the Freedmens Bureau or (mistakenly) the Freedmans Bureau, was an agency of the government of the United States that was formed to aid distressed refugees of the United States Civil War, including former slaves and poor white... Howard University is a university located in Washington, D.C., USA. A historically black university, Howard was established in 1867 by congressional order and named for Oliver O. Howard. ... John Albion Andrew (1818 - 1867) was a U.S. political figure. ... The Storming of Fort Wagner, the most famous operation performed by the 54th Massachusetts Regiment The 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that participated in the American Civil War which was the first formal Army unit to be comprised of African-Americans. ... William Pitt Fessenden (October 16, 1806 – September 8, 1869) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... Hugh McCulloch Hugh McCulloch (December 7, 1808 – May 24, 1895) was an American statesman who served two non-consecutive terms as U.S. Treasury Secretary, serving under three presidents. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... Jefferson Finis Davis (June 3, 1808 – December 6, 1889) was an American politician who served as President of the Confederate States of America for its entire history from 1861 to 1865 during the American Civil War. ...


[[Image:HubbardHall.jpg|right|thumb|300px|Hubbard Hall, located on the main campus quad, houses the Government, History and Economics departments on campus. It is also home to the renowned Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum.


Although Bowdoin's Medical School of Maine closed its doors in 1920, the College is currently known for its particularly strong programs in the natural sciences. While Bowdoin's best-known alumnus in the sciences is the controversial entomologist-turned-sexologist Alfred Kinsey, class of 1916, the College's reputation in this area was cemented in large part by the Arctic explorations of Admiral Robert E. Peary, class of 1877, and Donald B. MacMillan, class of 1898. Peary led the first successful expedition to the North Pole in 1908, and MacMillan, a member of Peary's crew, became famous in his own right as he explored Greenland, Baffin Island and Labrador in the schooner Bowdoin between 1908 and 1954. Bowdoin's Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum [5] honors the two explorers, and the College's mascot, the Polar Bear, was chosen after in 1913 to honor MacMillan, who donated a particularly large specimen to his alma mater in 1917, Peary, and Thomas Hubbard class of 1857. Alfred Charles Kinsey (June 23, 1894 – August 25, 1956), was an American biologist and professor of entomology and zoology who in 1947 founded the Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction at Indiana University, now called the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction. ... Robert Edwin Peary (May 6, 1856 - February 20, 1920) was an American explorer who is usually credited as the first person, on April 6, 1909, to reach the Geographic North Pole. ... Donald Baxter MacMillan (November 10, 1874 - September 7, 1970) was an American explorer, sailor, researcher and lecturer who made over 30 expeditions to the Arctic during his 46-year career. ... For other uses, see North Pole (disambiguation). ... Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada. ... Labrador (also Coast of Labrador) is a region of Atlantic Canada. ... This article is about the animal. ...


Following in the footsteps of President Pierce and House Speaker Thomas Brackett Reed, class of 1860, several 20th century Bowdoin graduates have assumed prominent positions in national government while representing the Pine Tree State. Wallace H. White, Jr., class of 1899, served as Senate Minority Leader from 1944-1947 and Senate Majority Leader from 1947-1949; George J. Mitchell, class of 1954, served as Senate Majority Leader from 1989-1995 before assuming a prominent role in the Northern Ireland peace process; and William Cohen, class of 1962, spent twenty-five years in the House and Senate before being appointed Secretary of Defense in the Clinton Administration. Maine's First Congressional District, today held by Tom Allen, class of 1967, has been christened the "Bowdoin seat" due to its long occupation by graduates of the College. A total of eleven Bowdoin graduates have ascended to the Maine governorship, and three graduates of the College currently sit on the state's highest court. Birthplace of Franklin Pierce Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 — October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... Thomas Brackett Reed, (October 18, 1839 – December 7, 1902), occasionally ridiculed as Czar Reed, was a U.S. Representative from Maine, and Speaker of the House from 1889–1891 and from 1895–1899. ... Wallace Humphrey White, Jr. ... For other persons with a similar name, see George Mitchell George John Mitchell, GBE (born August 20, 1933) is a former Democratic Party politician and United States Senator from the state of Maine, and currently serves as Chairman of the global law firm DLA Piper US LLP and also as... William Sebastian Cohen (1940- ) is an author and American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Thomas H. (Tom) Allen (April 16, 1945- ) has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1997, representing Maines 1st congressional district (map). ...


Over the last several decades, Bowdoin College has modernized dramatically. In 1970, it became one of a very limited number of selective schools to make the SAT optional in the admissions process, and in 1971, after nearly 180 years as a small men's college, Bowdoin admitted its first class of women. Bowdoin also abolished fraternities in the late 1990s, replacing them with a system of college-owned social houses. Recent developments include the 2001 appointment of Barry Mills, class of 1972, as the fifth alumnus president of the College, and a 2002 decision by the faculty to change the grading system so that it incorporated plus and minus grades. For other uses, see SAT (disambiguation). ... While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for... President of Bowdoin College in Brunswick, ME since 2001 Barry Mills is the president of Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine, a position he has held since 2001. ...


Academics

Bowdoin has a strong academic reputation, and is consistently ranked among the top ten liberal arts colleges in the United States by U.S. News and World Report. In the 2007 edition of the rankings, Bowdoin was ranked seventh, behind Williams, Amherst, Swarthmore, Wellesley, Middlebury, and Carleton and tied with Pomona. In other years it has ranked as high as fourth. [6] In 2006, Newsweek described Bowdoin as a "New Ivy," one of a number of elite colleges and universities outside of the Ivy League. [citation needed] Bowdoin is also part of the SAT optional movement for undergraduate admission. Liberal arts colleges in the United States are primarily liberal arts colleges with an emphasis upon undergraduate study in the liberal arts. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Williams College is a private liberal arts college located in Williamstown, Massachusetts. ... Amherst College is a private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts. ... Swarthmore College is a private, independent, liberal arts college in the United States with an enrollment of about 1,450 students. ... For other uses, see Wellesley College (disambiguation). ... Middlebury College is a small, private liberal arts college located in the rural town of Middlebury, Vermont, United States. ... Skinner Memorial Chapel, Carleton College Carleton College is an independent, non-sectarian, coeducational liberal arts college in Northfield, Minnesota, USA. The school was founded on November 14, 1866, by the Minnesota Conference of Congregational Churches as Northfield College. ... The Reba Taylor Stover Memorial Fountain in the Smith Campus Center courtyard at Pomona College during the inauguration of College President David Oxtoby Pomona College is a private residential liberal arts college located 33 miles (53 km) east of downtown Los Angeles in Claremont, California. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are primarily liberal arts colleges with an emphasis upon undergraduate study in the liberal arts. ...


Bowdoin offers majors in African Studies, Anthropology, Art History, Asian Studies, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Classics, Computer science, Economics, English, Environmental Studies, French, Gender and Women's Studies, Geology, German, Government, History, Latin American Studies, Mathematics, Music, Neuroscience, Philosophy, Physics and Astronomy, Psychology, Religion, Russian, Sociology, Spanish, Visual Arts. In addition, the College offers minors in Theatre, Dance, Education, Film Studies, and Gay and Lesbian Studies.


The Government Department, whose prominent professors include Allen Springer, Paul Franco, Richard E. Morgan, Chris Potholm and Jean Yarbrough, was ranked the top small college political science program in the world by researchers at the London School of Economics in 2003. [7] Government was the most popular major for every graduating class between 2000 and 2004. Paul N. Franco is a professor of government at Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine and a leading authority on the British political philosopher Michael Oakeshott. ... Richard E. Dick Morgan is a conservative author, contributing editor of City Journal, and the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Government at Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine. ... Mascot Beaver Affiliations University of London Russell Group EUA ACU CEMS APSIA Golden Triangle G5 Group Website http://www. ...


A 2003 exposé in The Bowdoin Orient revealed that the departments with the most rampant grade inflation included theatre and dance, women's studies, and sociology; those with the least grade inflation included physics, economics, philosophy, mathematics and government. [8]


Student body

Bowdoin's acceptance rate has hovered around 25% from 2000-2005, but dropped to 18.5% for the class admitted in the fall of 2007, making it one of the most selective small colleges in the United States. Although Bowdoin does not require the SAT in admissions, all students must submit a score upon matriculation. The middle 50% SAT range for the verbal and math sections of the SAT is 640-730 and 650-710, respectively — numbers which include the scores of those students who did not submit during the admissions process. Bowdoin regularly accepts 30 to 40 percent of the matriculating class through its two early decision programs.[9] For other uses, see SAT (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see SAT (disambiguation). ...

Coles Tower, at 16 stories tall, stands in the center of the campus

While a significant portion of the student body hails from New England — including nearly 25% from Massachusetts and 10% from Maine — recent classes have drawn from an increasingly national pool. Although Bowdoin once had a reputation for homogeneity, a diversity campaign has increased the percentage of non-white students in recent classes to 23%. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 540 pixelsFull resolution (1818 × 1228 pixel, file size: 889 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 540 pixelsFull resolution (1818 × 1228 pixel, file size: 889 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... The multicultural national representation of the countries of origin at the student union of San Francisco City College. ...


In fact, admission of minorities goes back as least as far as John Brown Russwurm 1826, Bowdoin's first African-American college graduate, and the third African-American graduate of any American college.[10] Cumberland County, Maine, is among the 100 U.S. counties with the largest percentages of Jewish residents. 476 foreign students applied[11] for the graduating class of 2009. John Brown Russwurm (1799-1851) was an African American abolitionist from Jamaica, known for his newspaper, Freedoms Journal. ... A Jewish American (also commonly American Jew) is an American (a citizen of the United States) of Jewish descent who maintains a connection to the Jewish community, either through actively practicing Judaism or through cultural and historical affiliation. ...


Student life

Recalling his days at Bowdoin in a recent interview, Professor Richard E. Morgan '59 described student life at the then-all-male school as "monastic," and noted that "the only things to do were either work or drink." (This is corroborated by the Official Preppy Handbook, which in 1980 ranked Bowdoin the number two drinking school in the country, behind Dartmouth.) These days, Morgan observed, the College offers a far broader array of recreational opportunities: "If we could have looked forward in time to Bowdoin's standard of living today, we would have been astounded." [12] Richard E. Dick Morgan is a conservative author, contributing editor of City Journal, and the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Government at Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine. ... Cover of The Official Preppy Handbook The Official Preppy Handbook is a tongue-in-cheek reference guide edited by Lisa Birnbach; it describes an aspect of North American culture she styles as prepdom. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, in the United States. ...


Bowdoin is particularly well-known for its dining services, which the Princeton Review has ranked first in three of the last four years, including the 2006-2007 school year. [13] The College has two major dining halls, one of which was renovated in the late 1990s, and every academic year begins with a lobster bake outside Farley Fieldhouse. Bowdoin also does well in other lifestyle categories; in 2004 it ranked 10th in dorm quality and 14th for quality of life. [14] The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in...


Since abolishing Greek fraternities in the late 1990s, Bowdoin has switched to a system in which entering students are assigned a "college house" affiliation correlating with their first-year dormitory. While six houses were originally established, following the construction of two new dorms, two were added effective in the fall of 2007, bringing the total to eight: Ladd (affiliated with Osher Hall), Baxter (West), Quinby (Appleton), MacMillan (Coleman), Howell (Hyde), Helmreich (Maine), Reed (Moore), and Burnett (Winthrop). The college houses are physical buildings around campus which host parties and other events throughout the year. Those students who choose not to live in their affiliated house retain their affiliation and are considered members throughout their Bowdoin career. While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for...


Bowdoin's student newspaper, The Bowdoin Orient, is the oldest continuously published college weekly in the United States.[15] The largest student group on campus is the Outing Club, which leads canoing, kayaking, rafting, camping and backpacking trips throughout Maine [16]. The Meddiebempsters, Bowdoin's oldest a cappella group and the third oldest collegiate a cappella group in the nation, were well known after World War II for performing at numerous USO shows in Europe[17]. The Bowdoin Orient is the student newspaper of Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine. ... A cappella music is vocal music or singing without instrumental accompaniment, or a piece intended to be performed in this way. ...


Athletics

The Bowdoin Polar Bears compete in the NCAA Division III New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC), which also includes Amherst, Conn College, Hamilton, Middlebury, Trinity, Tufts, Wesleyan, Williams, and Maine rivals Bates and Colby in the Colby-Bates-Bowdoin Consortium (CBB). The College's official color is white, though black is traditionally employed as a complement. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... The New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) is an athletic conference consisting of eleven highly selective liberal arts colleges located in New England and New York. ... The New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) is an athletic conference consisting of highly selective liberal arts colleges located in New England and New York. ... Amherst College is a private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts. ... Connecticut College is a coeducational, highly selective private liberal arts college located in New London, Connecticut. ... Hamilton College is a private, independent, highly selective liberal arts college located in Clinton, New York. ... Middlebury College is a small, private liberal arts college located in the rural town of Middlebury, Vermont, United States. ... Trinity College is a private liberal arts college in Hartford, Connecticut. ... Tufts University is a private research university in Medford/Somerville, Massachusetts, suburbs of Boston. ... Wesleyan University is a private liberal arts college founded in 1831 and located in Middletown, Connecticut. ... Williams College is a private liberal arts college located in Williamstown, Massachusetts. ... Bates College is a private liberal arts college, founded in 1855 by abolitionists, located in Lewiston, Maine, in the United States. ... Colby College, founded in 1813, is one of the United States of Americas oldest independent liberal arts colleges. ... The Colby-Bates-Bowdoin (CBB) is an athletic conference containing three NCAA Division III schools, Colby College, Bates College, and Bowdoin College. ...


Bowdoin offers thirty varsity teams, including men's teams in baseball, basketball, cross country, football, ice hockey, lacrosse, Nordic skiing, soccer, squash, swimming, tennis, and track, and women's teams in field hockey, golf, ice hockey, lacrosse, Nordic skiing, soccer, softball, squash, swimming, tennis, track, volleyball, and rugby. Men's ice hockey is the most popular spectator sport, with hundreds of students turning out for games against arch-rival Colby. In 2004, Bowdoin became the second college in the United States to elevate the women's rugby team to varsity status. While technically still varsity, the women's rugby team competes in New England Rugby Football Union, rather than NESCAC. The sailing team is co-ed and was considered in 2006 to be one of the top 20 sailing teams in the nation by Sailing World magazine. There are also intercollegiate and club teams in men's and women's rowing, men's rugby, water polo, men's volleyball and men's and women's Ultimate. Recent NESCAC champions include men's cross country (2001, 2002), women's basketball (2001-2005), women's ice hockey (2002, 2004) and women's field hockey (2001,2005, 2006); recent NCAA tournament appearances include women's basketball (Elite Eight, 2002, 2003, 2005; Final Four, 2004), men's rugby (sweet 16, 2001), women's ice hockey (Final Four, 2002, 2003; Elite Eight, 2004, 2005), and women's field hockey (Final Four, 2005, 2006). Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Colby College, founded in 1813, is one of the United States of Americas oldest independent liberal arts colleges. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In addition to the outdoor athletic fields, the College has indoor and outdoor tracks, a swimming pool, squash courts, an ice hockey rink, a rowing boathouse, several basketball courts, indoor and outdoor tennis courts, an independent weight room with 5 treadmills for the entire student and faculty population, elliptical machines, and a new astroturf field.


Postgraduate placement

In 2003, the Wall Street Journal ranked Bowdoin College among the top twenty colleges and universities in the United States based on the percentage of alums who attend a "top five" graduate program in business, law or medicine — ahead of a number of highly ranked universities, including Rice, Northwestern, Johns Hopkins, Cornell, Caltech, Virginia, Notre Dame, William & Mary, Emory, UC Berkeley, Tufts and Washington University. [18] The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ... Lovett Hall William Marsh Rice University (commonly called Rice University and opened in 1912 as The William Marsh Rice Institute for the Advancement of Letters, Science and Art) is a private, comprehensive research university located in Houston, Texas, USA, near the Museum District and adjacent to the Texas Medical Center. ... For other uses, see Northwestern. ... The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ... “Cornell” redirects here. ... California Institute of Technology The California Institute of Technology (commonly known as Caltech) is a private, coeducational university located in Pasadena, California, in the United States. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Catholic[4] institution located in Notre Dame, an unincorporated section of St. ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... Emory University is a private university located in the metropolitan area of the city of Atlanta and in western unincorporated DeKalb County, Georgia, United States. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... Tufts University is a private research university in Medford/Somerville, Massachusetts, suburbs of Boston. ... “Washington University” redirects here. ...


In 2006, Bowdoin was named a "Top Producer of Fulbright Awards for American Students" by the Institute of International Education. [19] Established in 1946, the Fulbright Program aims to increase mutual understanding between the peoples of the United States and other countries, through the exchange of persons, knowledge and skills. ...


Alma Mater

Bowdoin's Alma Mater is "Raise Songs to Bowdoin." Originally penned by K.C.M. Sills, class of 1901, new lyrics have since been added by Anthony Antolini '63, who serves on the faculty of the College's Department of Music. Singers punch the air on the word 'friend' in both verses.

Raise songs to Bowdoin, praise her fame,
And sound abroad her glorious name;
To Bowdoin, Bowdoin lift your song,
And may the music echo long
O'er whispering pines and campus fair
With sturdy might filling the air.
Bowdoin, from birth, our nurturer and friend
To thee we pledge our love again, again.
 
While now amid thy halls we stay
And breathe thy spirit day by day,
Oh may we thus full worthy be
To march in that proud company
Of poets, leaders and each one
Who brings thee fame by deeds well done.
Bowdoin, from birth, our nurturer and friend
To thee we pledge our love again, again.

The original lyrics for the first verse were as follows. The changed phrases have been highlighted.

Rise sons of Bowdoin, praise her fame,
And sing aloud her glorious name;
To Bowdoin, Bowdoin lift your song,
And may the music echo long
O'er whispering pines and campus fair
With sturdy might filling the air.
Bowdoin, from birth, the nurturer of men,
To thee we pledge our love again, again.

Bowdoin alumni

Famous Bowdoin graduates include U.S. President Franklin Pierce (1824), poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1825), novelist Nathaniel Hawthorne (1825), Civil War heroes Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain (1852) and Oliver Otis Howard (1850), U.S. Speaker of the House Thomas Brackett Reed (1860), Arctic explorer Admiral Robert Peary (1877), sex researcher Alfred Kinsey (1916), U.S. Senator George Mitchell (1954), U.S. Senator and Secretary of Defense William Cohen (1962), American Express CEO Kenneth Chenault (1973), Olympic gold medalist Joan Benoit Samuelson (1979), Netflix founder and CEO Reed Hastings (1983), Musician and writer DJ Spooky (1992). Here follows a list of notable people associated with Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine. ... Birthplace of Franklin Pierce Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 — October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (February 27, 1807 – March 24, 1882) was an American poet whose works include Paul Reveres Ride, A Psalm of Life, The Song of Hiawatha and Evangeline. He also wrote the first American translation of Dante Alighieris Divine Comedy and was one of the five members... Nathaniel Hawthorne (born Nathaniel Hathorne; July 4, 1804 – May 19, 1864) was a 19th century American novelist and short story writer. ... Maj. ... Portrait of Oliver O. Howard by Mathew Brady, ca. ... Thomas Brackett Reed, (October 18, 1839 – December 7, 1902), occasionally ridiculed as Czar Reed, was a U.S. Representative from Maine, and Speaker of the House from 1889–1891 and from 1895–1899. ... Robert Edwin Peary (May 6, 1856 – February 20, 1920) was an American explorer who claimed to have been the first person, on April 6, 1909, to reach the geographic North Pole Peary was born in the Pittsburgh area town of Cresson, Pennsylvania. ... Alfred Charles Kinsey (June 23, 1894 – August 25, 1956), was an American biologist and professor of entomology and zoology who in 1947 founded the Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction at Indiana University, now called the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction. ... For musician see George Mitchell (musician), for billionaire see George P. Mitchell George John Mitchell (born August 20, 1933) was a United States Senator from Maine from 1980 to 1995. ... William Sebastian Cohen (1940- ) is an author and American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... Kenneth Irvine Chenault (born 2 June 1951) is a former president (1997-2001) and current Chief Executive Officer (2001-present) of American Express. ... Joan Benoit Samuelson (born May 16, 1957) was an American marathon runner who won gold at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. ... Reed Hastings at the Web 2. ... DJ Spooky, That Subliminal Kid (born Paul D. Miller, 1970), is a Washington DC-born electronic and experimental hip hop musician whose work is often called illbient or trip hop. He is a turntablist and producer. ...


Bowdoin in literature and film

  • Fanshawe (1828) — This Nathaniel Hawthorne novel, published only three years after his graduation from Bowdoin, is set at a small college which bears a striking resemblance to his alma mater.
  • "Morituri Salutamus" (1875) — Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote this poem for his 50th Bowdoin reunion, and recited it on that occasion. One famous passage recalls the College: "O ye familiar scenes,—ye groves of pine / That once were mine and are no longer mine, — / Thou river, widening through the meadows green / To the vast sea, so near and yet unseen, — / Ye halls, in whose seclusion and repose / Phantoms of fame, like exhalations, rose / And vanished,—we who are about to die / Salute you; earth and air and sea and sky / And the Imperial Sun that scatters down / His sovereign splendors upon grove and town." [20]
  • M*A*S*H (1968, 1970) — In both the book and film, the character Hawkeye Pierce is said to have played football at Androscoggin College, a fictional school based on the alma mater of author H. Richard Hornberger, Bowdoin class of 1945.
  • The Killer Angels (1975) — This historical novel by Michael Shaara, which won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, focuses in large part on the role played by Bowdoin graduate and professor Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain at the Battle of Gettysburg.
  • Glory (1989) — Massachusetts Governor John A. Andrew, class of 1837 is a character in this film about the 54th Massachusetts.
  • Gettysburg (1993) — In this movie based on The Killer Angels There is at least one reference to character Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain as having had an academic career at Bowdoin, which he put aside to lead the 20th Maine.
  • The Man Without a Face (1993) — Parts of this movie were filmed on campus.
  • The Cider House Rules (1994) — In this John Irving novel, a Bowdoin-educated doctor forges a Bowdoin diploma for a young protégé.
  • The Sopranos (1999) — In an episode entitled "College," Tony Soprano and his daughter Meadow visit Colby, where Tony kills a former associate, and Bowdoin, where he reads an inscription paraphrasing Hawthorne's warning that "no man, for any considerable period, can wear one face to himself, and another to the multitude, without finally getting bewildered as to which may be true." [21] Tony's daughter is ultimately waitlisted at Bowdoin and ends up attending Columbia. The episode was not filmed on Bowdoin's campus, but was filmed at Drew University in New Jersey.
  • Where the Heart Is (2000) — The main character in this movie falls in love with a Bowdoin man. The film, which has a scene "at Bowdoin," is based on a novel of the same name.
  • Gods and Generals (2003) — This film, based on a historical novel of the same name, is a prequel to Gettysburg.
  • Kinsey (2004) — Biopic about sex researcher Alfred Kinsey, class of 1916, includes a scene in which his father opposes his decision to transfer to Bowdoin.
  • The Aviator (2004) — 1909 Bowdoin grad and U.S. Senator Owen Brewster plays a major role in this Howard Hughes biopic.

The novel Fanshawe was the first published work by Nathaniel Hawthorne, and published anonymously in 1828. ... Nathaniel Hawthorne (born Nathaniel Hathorne; July 4, 1804 – May 19, 1864) was a 19th century American novelist and short story writer. ... Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (February 27, 1807 – March 24, 1882) was an American poet whose works include Paul Reveres Ride, A Psalm of Life, The Song of Hiawatha and Evangeline. He also wrote the first American translation of Dante Alighieris Divine Comedy and was one of the five members... M*A*S*H title screen from the television series M*A*S*H was a media franchise active, in various forms, from 1968 to 1986. ... MASH is a 1970 satirical American dark comedy film directed by Robert Altman and based on the novel MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors by Richard Hooker. ... Captain Benjamin Franklin Hawkeye Pierce is the lead fictional character in the M*A*S*H novels, film, and television series. ... H. Richard Hornberger (February 1, 1924 – November 4, 1997) was an American writer and surgeon, born in Trenton, New Jersey, who wrote under the pseudonym Richard Hooker. ... The Killer Angels front cover The Killer Angels (1974) is a historical novel by Michael Shaara that was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1975. ... Michael Shaara Michael Shaara (June 23, 1928 - May 5, 1988) was a writer of science fiction, sports fiction, and historical fiction. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Maj. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America Commanders George G. Meade Robert E. Lee Strength 93,921[1] 71,699[2] Casualties 23,055 (3,155 killed, 14,531 wounded, 5,369 captured/missing)[1] 23,231 (4,708 killed, 12,693 wounded, 5,830 captured/missing... Glory is a 1989 film which follows the history of the 54th Massachusetts Regiment during the American Civil War. ... John Albion Andrew (1818 - 1867) was a U.S. political figure. ... The Storming of Fort Wagner, the most famous operation performed by the 54th Massachusetts Regiment The 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that participated in the American Civil War which was the first formal Army unit to be comprised of African-Americans. ... Gettysburg is a 1993 movie which depicts the decisive American Civil War battle in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. ... The Killer Angels front cover The Killer Angels (1974) is a historical novel by Michael Shaara that was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1975. ... Maj. ... (Redirected from 20th Maine) The 20th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment was an important combat unit of the United States Army during the American Civil War. ... The Man Without a Face is a 1993 drama starring and directed by Mel Gibson. ... This article is about the novel. ... John Winslow Irving (born March 2, 1942 as John Wallace Blunt, Jr. ... The Sopranos was an American television drama series created by David Chase and originally broadcast on the HBO network. ... Information Aliases Ron Spears, Kevin Finnerty, Mr. ... Meadow Mariangela Soprano, played by Jamie-Lynn Sigler, is a fictional character on the HBO TV series The Sopranos. ... Colby College, founded in 1813, is one of the United States of Americas oldest independent liberal arts colleges. ... Drew University is a small, private university located in Madison, New Jersey. ... Where the Heart Is is a 2000 comedy film directed by Matt Williams, starring Natalie Portman and Ashley Judd. ... For other uses, see Gods and Generals (disambiguation). ... Gettysburg is a 1993 movie which depicts the decisive American Civil War battle in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. ... Categories: Movie stubs | 2004 films | Drama films ... Alfred Charles Kinsey (June 23, 1894 – August 25, 1956), was an American biologist and professor of entomology and zoology who in 1947 founded the Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction at Indiana University, now called the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction. ... For other uses, see Aviator (disambiguation) The Aviator is an Academy Award-winning 2004 biographical drama film, directed by Martin Scorsese, and based largely on the book Hughes by Richard Hack. ... Senator Owen Brewster defeated after battles with Howard Hughes Ralph Owen Brewster (February 22, 1888–December 25, 1961) was an American politician from Maine. ... For the Welsh murderer, see Howard Hughes (murderer). ...

Bowdoin trivia

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... The New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) is an athletic conference consisting of eleven highly selective liberal arts colleges located in New England and New York. ... Amherst College is a private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts. ... Tufts University is a private research university in Medford/Somerville, Massachusetts, suburbs of Boston. ... The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... Nathaniel Hawthorne (born Nathaniel Hathorne; July 4, 1804 – May 19, 1864) was a 19th century American novelist and short story writer. ... Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (February 27, 1807 – March 24, 1882) was an American poet whose works include Paul Reveres Ride, A Psalm of Life, The Song of Hiawatha and Evangeline. He also wrote the first American translation of Dante Alighieris Divine Comedy and was one of the five members... Robert Edwin Peary (May 6, 1856 - February 20, 1920) was an American explorer who is usually credited as the first person, on April 6, 1909, to reach the Geographic North Pole. ... Owen Brewster Ralph Owen Brewster (February 22, 1888–December 25, 1961) was an American politician from Maine. ... Harold Hitz Burton (June 22, 1888 - October 28, 1964) was an American Senator and Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... This article is about the economist and senator; Paul Douglas. ... Alfred Charles Kinsey (June 23, 1894 – August 25, 1956), was an American biologist and professor of entomology and zoology who in 1947 founded the Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction at Indiana University, now called the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction. ... Thomas Reeve Tom Pickering (born November 5, 1931), is a retired United States Ambassador. ... Lawrence B. Lindsey was Director of the National Economic Council (2001-2002), and the Assistant to the President on Economic Policy for the U.S. President George W. Bush. ... Birthplace of Franklin Pierce Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 — October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Melville Weston Fuller (February 11, 1833–July 4, 1910) was the Chief Justice of the United States between 1888 and 1910. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch... Thomas Brackett Reed, (October 18, 1839 – December 7, 1902), occasionally ridiculed as Czar Reed, was a U.S. Representative from Maine, and Speaker of the House from 1889–1891 and from 1895–1899. ... The term Speaker is usually the title given to the presiding officer of a countrys lower house of parliament or congress (ie: the House of Commons or House of Representatives). ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... Wallace Humphrey White, Jr. ... For other persons with a similar name, see George Mitchell George John Mitchell, GBE (born August 20, 1933) is a former Democratic Party politician and United States Senator from the state of Maine, and currently serves as Chairman of the global law firm DLA Piper US LLP and also as... A Senate Majority Leader is a politician within a Senate who leads the majority party, or majority coalition, of sitting senators. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Harvard Yard Harvard College is the undergraduate section and oldest school of Harvard University, founded in 1636. ... Labrador (also Coast of Labrador) is a region of Atlantic Canada. ...

External links

References

  1. ^ http://orient.bowdoin.edu/orient/article.php?date=2007-02-02&section=1&id=5 Report gives college 'B-' on environmental practices
  2. ^ The Bowdoin Coastal Studies Center
  3. ^ A description of Kent Island.
  4. ^ Timothy Larson, Bates Thesis:Faith by Their Works, "Class at Bates College"
  5. ^ Website of the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum
  6. ^ US News and World Report rankings for liberal arts colleges.
  7. ^ Official website for the Bowdoin London School of Economics
  8. ^ Bowdoin Orient exposé on grade inflation.
  9. ^ Bowdoin admissions
  10. ^ Charles C. Calhoun, A Small College in Maine: 200 Years of Bowdoin. pullihed by the College in 1993, ISBN 091-6606-25-2
  11. ^ Bowdoin Orient article on foreign student applications
  12. ^ Orient article interviewing Professor Morgan
  13. ^ Princeton Review dining rankings
  14. ^ Princeton Review dorm rankings
  15. ^ Maine League of Historical Societies and Museums (1970). in Doris A. Isaacson: Maine: A Guide 'Down East'. Rockland, Me: Courier-Gazette, Inc., 177. 
  16. ^ Bowdoin Outing Club website.
  17. ^ Race, Peter (1987). Meddiebempsters History: "And may the music echo long..." 1937-1987, 17-30. ML200.8.B73 M44 1987. 
  18. ^ Wall Street Journal rankings of undergraduate institutions' success at sending students to top-five graduate programs.
  19. ^ Bowdoin Orient article on Bowdoin producing Fulbright Scholars.
  20. ^ Longfellow poem written for his 50th Bowdoin reunion.
  21. ^ Synopsis of the Sopranos episode in which Tony Soprano and his daughter visit Bowdoin.
  22. ^ Symbols (About Bowdoin). Bowdoin College (September 23, 2006).
  • "House Linked to 'Uncle Tom's Cabin'". (June 16, 1968), NY Times.
  • "Bowdoin Seeks End of R.O.T.C. Credits". (Feb 16, 1969), NY Times.
  • "Bowdoin Drops College Boards" (Jan 19, 1970), NY Times.
  • "Bowdoin to Become Coed" (Sept 29, 1970), NY Times.
  • Moran, Malcolm (Aug 6, 1984). "First Women's Olympic Marathon to Benoit". NY Times.
  • "Favorite Elective at Bowdoin: Food". (Feb 21, 1988), NY Times.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Bowdoin College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2209 words)
Bowdoin College was chartered in 1794 by Governor Samuel Adams of Massachusetts, of which Maine was then a district, and was named for former Massachusetts governor James Bowdoin, whose son James Bowdoin III was an early benefactor.
While Bowdoin's best-known alumnus in the sciences is the controversial entomologist-turned-sexologist Alfred Kinsey, class of 1916, the College's reputation in this area was cemented in large part by the Arctic explorations of Admiral Robert E. Peary, class of 1877, and Donald B. MacMillan, class of 1898.
Bowdoin's Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum * honors the two explorers, and the College's mascot, the Polar Bear, was chosen after MacMillan donated a particularly large specimen to his alma mater in 1917.
QB Partners - Bowdoin College (149 words)
The college could be said to be notably strong in the sciences followed closely by the art history and English departments.
Bowdoin’s classes are characterized by strong academics without the competition, the focus is on learning.
Although Bowdoin is smaller than other schools of equivalent caliber, there is less overt competition without a reduction in the quality of the resources, the student body, and the education.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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