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Encyclopedia > Boston accent

The Boston accent is found not only in the city of Boston, Massachusetts itself but also much of eastern Massachusetts. The Boston accent and closely related accents can be heard commonly in an area stretching throughout Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine. These regions are frequently grouped together with Rhode Island and eastern Connecticut by sociolinguists under the cover term Eastern New England accent. The best-known features of the Boston accent are non-rhoticity and broad A. It is most prominent in blue collar—and often traditionally Irish or Italian—Boston neighborhoods, such as South Boston, Dorchester, East Boston and Brighton, as well as in such nearby cities as Somerville. The accent is also quite prominent in working-class cities throughout the Greater Boston area, such as Lowell, Revere and Brockton or in the South Shore exurbs.[citation needed] “Boston” redirects here. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,350 sq mi (24,217 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 4. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Sociolinguistics is the study of the effect of any and all aspects of society, including cultural norms, expectations, and context on the way language is used. ... English pronunciation is divided into two main accent groups, the rhotic and non-rhotic, depending on when the phoneme (the letter r) is pronounced. ... The trap-bath split is a vowel split that occurs mainly in southern varieties of English English, in the Boston accent, and in the Southern Hemisphere accents (Australian English, New Zealand English, South African English), by which the Early Modern English phoneme was lengthened in certain environments and ultimately merged... A blue-collar worker is a working class employee who performs manual or technical labor, such as in a factory or in technical maintenance trades, in contrast to a white-collar worker, who does non-manual work generally at a desk. ... “South Boston” redirects here. ... 1888 German map of Boston Harbor showing Dorchester in the lower left hand corner. ... East Boston was annexed by the City of Boston in 1636 and is separated from the rest of the city by Boston Harbor and bordered by Winthrop, Revere, and the Chelsea Creek. ... Cemetary and apartment houses along Commonwealth Avenue, Brighton, near Chandlers Pond Brighton is a neighborhood of the City of Boston, Massachusetts. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1630 Incorporated 1842 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Joseph A. Curtatone Area  - City  4. ... Greater Boston is the area of the U.S. state of Massachusetts closely surrounding the city of Boston. ... Nickname: Motto: Art is the Handmaid of Human Good Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex County Settled 1653 Incorporated 1826 A city 1836 Government  - Type Manager-City council  - Mayor William F. Martin, Jr. ... Location in Suffolk County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Suffolk County Settled 1630 Incorporated 1846 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Thomas G. Ambrosino Area  - City  10. ... Nickname: Location in Plymouth County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Plymouth County Settled 1700 Incorporated 1821 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor James E. Harrington (D) Area  - City  21. ... The South Shore of Massachusetts is a geographic region stretching south and east from Boston along the shore of Massachusetts Bay toward Cape Cod. ... The expression exurb (for extra-urban) was coined in the 1950s, by Auguste Comte Spectorsky in his book The Exurbanites, to describe the ring of prosperous rural communities beyond the suburbs that, due to availability via the new high-speed limited-access highways, were becoming dormitory communities for an urban...


There is a variant of the Boston accent, often called the "Harvard accent," which has the non-rhoticity but lacks the extreme broad A found in working-class accents. This variant is also calld the "Kennedy accent," because it famously marked the speech of John F. Kennedy and Robert F. Kennedy and still marks the speech of Senator Ted Kennedy. It is also heard among Harvard graduates—in particular, those who were Harvard undergraduates. [citation needed] John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968), also called RFK, was one of two younger brothers of U.S. President John F. Kennedy and served as United States Attorney General from 1961 to 1964. ... Edward Kennedy Edward Moore Ted Kennedy, (born February 22, 1932, in Brookline, Massachusetts) is a Democratic U.S. senator from Massachusetts. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ...

Contents

Phonological characteristics

All phonetic transcriptions in the IPA; for example: Phonetic (pho-NET-ic) is a nationwide voicemail-to-text messaging service available for most digital mobile phones in which a subscriber is provided a custom voice mailbox for the purpose of receiving all incoming voice messages as actual transcribed text for reading via short messaging (also known as SMS... Transcription is the conversion into written, typewritten or printed form, of a spoken language source, such as the proceedings of a court hearing. ... The symbols of the International Phonetic Alphabet can be used to show pronounciation in English. ...

how are you? [hoˈwaːjə]

Non-rhoticity

The traditional Boston accent is non-rhotic; in other words, the phoneme [r] does not appear at the end of a syllable or immediately before a consonant, as in some types of British English. Thus, there is no [r] in words like park [paːk], car [kaː], and Harvard [haːvəd]. After high and mid-high vowels, the [r] is replaced by [ə] or another neutral central vowel like [ɨ]: weird [wiɨd], square [skweə]. Similarly, unstressed [ɝ] ("er") is replaced by [ə], [ɐ], or [ɨ], as in color [kʌlə]. In human language, a phoneme is the theoretical representation of a sound. ... British English (BrE, BE, en-GB) is the broad term used to distinguish the forms of the English language used in the United Kingdom from forms used elsewhere in the Anglophone world. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... In linguistics, stress is the emphasis given to some syllables (often no more than one in each word, but in many languages, long words have a secondary stress a few syllables away from the primary stress, as in the words cóunterfòil or còunterintélligence. ...


Although not all Boston-area speakers are non-rhotic, this remains the feature most widely associated with the region. As a result, it is frequently the butt of jokes about Boston, as in Jon Stewart's America, in which he states that the Massachusetts Legislature ratified everything in John Adams' 1780 Massachusetts Constitution "except the letter 'R'". Not to be confused with John Stewart ,Jon Alan Stewart or John Stuart. ... America (The Book): A Citizens Guide to Democracy Inaction is a 2004 bestseller that satirizes American politics and worldview. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about John Adams, an American president. ...


In the most traditional and old-fashioned Boston accents, what is in other dialects [ɔr] becomes a low back vowel [ɒ]: corn is [kɒːn], pronounced the same or almost the same as con or cawn.


For some old-fashioned speakers, stressed [ɝ] as in bird is replaced by [ʏ] ([bʏd]); for many present-day Boston-accent speakers, however, [ɝ] is retained. More speakers lose [r] after other vowels than lose [ɝ].


The Boston accent possesses both linking R and intrusive R: That is to say, a [r] will not be lost at the end of a word if the next word begins with a vowel, and indeed a [r] will be inserted after a word ending with a central or low vowel if the next word begins with a vowel: the tuner is and the tuna is are both [ðə tunərɪz] The linking R is a phonological phenomenon of most (but not all) non-rhotic dialects of English. ...


Some speakers who are natively non-rhotic or partially non-rhotic attempt to change their accent by restoring [r] to word-final position. For example, on the NPR program Car Talk, hosted by the Boston-native Magliozzi brothers, one host has castigated the other on air for saying [kaː] instead of [kɑɹ]. Occasionally such speakers may hypercorrect and "restore" [r] to a word that never originally had it. This usage is frequent when a word ending in a vowel is followed by a word starting with a vowel. Speakers will say "I have no idea," but add an r if they say "The idea-r is..." (which is a linking R). With the hypercorrection, "I have no idea-r" is used even at the end of an utterance. NPR redirects here. ... Car Talk is a radio talk show broadcast weekly on National Public Radio stations throughout the United States and elsewhere. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


There are also a number of Boston accent speakers with rhoticity, but they sometimes delete [r] only in unaccented syllables or words before a consonant.


Vowels

The Boston accent has a highly distinctive system of low vowels, even in speakers who do not drop [r] as described above. Eastern New England is the only region in North America where the distinction between the vowels in words like father and spa on the one hand and words like bother and hot on the other hand is securely maintained: the former contain [aː] ([faːðə], [spaː]), and the latter [ɒː] ([bɒːðə], [hɒːt]). This means that even though heart has no [r], it remains distinct from hot because its vowel quality is different: [haːt]. By contrast, the accent of New York uses the same or almost the same vowel in both of these classes: [ɑː]. The Received Pronunciation of England, like Boston English, distinguishes the classes, using [ɑː] in father and [ɒ] in bother. This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... // Father-bother merger The father-bother merger is a merger of the Early Modern English vowels and that occurs in almost all varieties of North American English (exceptions are accents in Eastern New England (such as the Boston accent) and New York-New Jersey English. ... The New York dialect of the English language is spoken by most European Americans who were raised in New York City and much of its metropolitan area including the lower Hudson Valley, western Long Island, and in northeastern New Jersey. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ...


On the other hand, the Boston accent (unlike the Rhode Island accent) merges the two classes exemplified by caught and cot: both become [kɒːt]. So caught, cot, law, water, rock, talk, doll, and wall all have exactly the same vowel, [ɒː]. For some speakers, as mentioned above, words like corn and horse also have this vowel. By contrast, New York accents have [kɔːt] for caught and [kɑːt] for cot; Received Pronunciation has [kɔːt] and [kɒt], respectively. This article is about the U.S. State. ... // Father-bother merger The father-bother merger is a merger of the Early Modern English vowels and that occurs in almost all varieties of North American English (exceptions are accents in Eastern New England (such as the Boston accent) and New York-New Jersey English. ...


Some older Boston speakers — the ones who have a low vowel in words like corn [kɒːn] — do not undergo the so-called horse-hoarse merger, i.e., they maintain a distinction between horse and for on the one hand and hoarse and four on the other. The former are in the same class as corn, as [hɒːs] and [fɒː], and the latter are ['howəs] and ['fowə]. This distinction is rapidly fading out of currency, as it is in almost all regions of North America that still make it. The English language has undergone a number of phonological changes before the historic phoneme . ...


Boston English has a so-called "nasal short-a system". This means that the "short a" vowel [æ] as in cat and rat becomes a mid-high front diphthong [eə] when it precedes a nasal consonant: thus man is [meən] and planet is [pleənət]. Boston shares this system with the accents of the southern part of the Midwest. By contrast, Received Pronunciation uses [æ] regardless of whether the next consonant is nasal or not, and New York uses [eə] before a nasal at the end of a syllable ([meən]) but not before a nasal between two vowels ([plænət]). // Trap-bath split The trap-bath split is a vowel split that occurs mainly in southern varieties of English English (including Received Pronunciation), in the Boston accent, and in the Southern Hemisphere accents (Australian English, New Zealand English, South African English), by which the Early Modern English phoneme was lengthened... A nasal consonant is produced when the velum—that fleshy part of the palate near the back—is lowered, allowing air to escape freely through the nose. ... The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ...


A feature that some Boston English speakers share with Received Pronunciation is the so-called Broad A: In some words that in other accents have [æ], such as half and bath, that vowel is replaced with [aː]: [haːf], [baːθ]. (In Received Pronunciation, the Broad A vowel is almost identical to [ɑː].) Fewer words have the Broad A in Boston English than in Received Pronunciation, and fewer and fewer Boston speakers maintain the Broad A system as time goes on, but it is still noticeable. The word aunt, however, remains almost universally broad. The trap-bath split is a vowel split that occurs mainly in southern varieties of English English, in the Boston accent, and in the Southern Hemisphere accents (Australian English, New Zealand English, South African English), by which the Early Modern English phoneme was lengthened in certain environments and ultimately merged...


Boston accents make a greater variety of distinctions between short and long vowels before medial [r] than many other modern American accents do: Boston accents maintain the distinctions between the vowels in marry [mæri], merry [mɛri], and Mary [meəri], hurry [hʌri] and furry [fɝri], mirror [mɪrə] and nearer [niərə], though some of these distinctions are somewhat endangered as people under 40 in neighboring New Hampshire and Maine blend the vowel sound. Boston shares these distinctions with both New York and Received Pronunciation, but the Midwest, for instance, has lost them entirely. The English language has undergone a number of phonological changes before the historic phoneme . ... Phonemic differentiation is the phenomenon of a phoneme in a language splitting into two phonemes over time, a process known as a phonemic split. ...


The nuclei of the diphthongs /aɪ/ and /aʊ/ may be raised to something like /ɐ/ before voiceless consonants: thus write has a higher vowel than ride. This effect is known usually as Canadian raising, though it is less extreme in New England than in most of Canada. Furthermore, some Boston dialects have a tendency (similar to the Upper Midwest) to raise the /au/ diphthong in both voiced and voiceless environments. In phonetics, a voiceless consonant is a consonant that does not have voicing. ... Canadian raising is a phonetic phenomenon that occurs in varieties of the English language, especially Canadian English, in which diphthongs are raised before voiceless consonants (e. ...


The nuclei of /oʊ/ and /uː/ are significantly less fronted than in many American accents.


Non-rhoticity elsewhere in New England

Non-rhoticity outside of the Boston area decreased greatly after World War II. Traditional maps have marked most of the territory east of the Connecticut river as non-rhotic, but this is highly inaccurate of contemporary speakers. The Atlas of North American English, for example, shows none of the six interviewed speakers in New Hampshire (a historically non-rhotic area) as having more than 10% non-rhoticity.


Well-known speakers of/with the Boston accent

Norm Abram (born 1950) is an American carpenter known from the PBS television programs This Old House and The New Yankee Workshop. ... This Old House is a magazine and television program which is aired on the American public broadcast network PBS that follows remodeling projects of houses over a number of weeks. ... Dicky Barrett (born June 22, 1964 as Richard Michael Barrett) was the frontman of skacore band The Mighty Mighty Bosstones. ... The Mighty Mighty Bosstones were a ska-core band from Boston, Massachusetts. ... Jimmy Kimmel Live is a late-night talk show in the United States created and hosted by Jimmy Kimmel, broadcast from the El Capitan Theatre in Hollywood, California. ... Michael Rubens Bloomberg (born 14 February 1942) is an American businessman, philanthropist, and the founder of Bloomberg L.P., currently serving as the Mayor of New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... William J. Bratton is the chief of the Los Angeles Police Department. ... Andy Brickley (born August 9, 1961) is a former hockey player, who spent 25 seasons playing in the National Hockey League, American Hockey League, and the International Hockey League. ... The Boston Bruins are a professional ice hockey team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Andrew Hill Andy Card Jr. ... Lenny Clarke as Frank Harrigan in The Job Lenny Clarke is a comedian from Cambridge, Massachusetts, famous for his thick Boston accent. ... Armando Anthony Chick Corea (born June 12, 1941) is a multiple Grammy Award winning American jazz pianist/keyboardist and composer. ... Matthew Paige Matt Damon (born October 8, 1970) is an American screenwriter and actor. ... William D. (Bill) Delahunt (born July 18, 1941), has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1997, representing the 10th District of Massachusetts. ... The 10th District includes the South Shore of Massachusetts, running from Quincy to Weymouth and Abington and includes all of Cape Cod, Nantucket and Marthas Vineyard. ... Nick DiPaolo (born January 31, 1962 in Danvers, Massachusetts) is an Italian-American stand-up comedian, writer and former radio host on the old 92. ... Sully Erna (born Salvatore Paul Erna February 7, 1968 in Lawrence, Massachusetts), is both the vocalist and primary songwriter for the hard rock/heavy metal band, Godsmack. ... For the Alice in Chains song, see God Smack (song). ... Carlton Ernest Fisk (born December 26, 1947 in Bellows Falls, Vermont) is a former Major League Baseball catcher who played for 24 years with the Boston Red Sox and Chicago White Sox. ... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... Loyd Daniel Gilman Grossman, OBE, FSA (born September 16, 1950) is an English-American television presenter and chef who mainly works in the United Kingdom. ... Henry Joseph Nasiff Jr. ... This article is a biography of Howard Stern as an individual; for information regarding his radio show see The Howard Stern Show. ... The Wack Pack is the name given to a wide assortment of regular guests of the Howard Stern Show. ... Edward Moore Ted Kennedy (born February 22, 1932) is the senior United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the Democratic Party. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968), also called RFK, was one of two younger brothers of U.S. President John F. Kennedy and served as United States Attorney General from 1961 to 1964. ... Don Kent (meteorologist) Don Kent was a meteorologist for several decades in Boston. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... Christopher Lydon born in Boston, Massachusetts in 1940 is an American media personality and author whose work in radio includes creating The Connection for WBUR. He is a former journalist with the New York Times, former WGBH Boston evening news anchor and was a candidate for mayor of Boston in... Tom Magliozzi during a session of Car Talk Doctor Tom Louis Magliozzi is the older brother (to Ray) of Click and Clack, The Tappet Brothers (Tom is Click), the hosts of National Public Radios Car Talk. ... Raymond F. Magliozzi (born ca. ... NPR redirects here. ... Car Talk is a radio talk show broadcast weekly on National Public Radio stations throughout the United States and elsewhere. ... Rob Mariano (born Robert Carlo Mariano on December 25, 1975 in Canton, Massachusetts, better known as Boston Rob) is an American reality TV star best known for appearing in several reality TV shows, partly as a contestant on The Amazing Race and Survivor: All Stars along with his wife, Amber... Edward John Ed Markey (born July 11, 1946) has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1976, representing the 7th District of Massachusetts. ... Massachusetts Congressional District 7 is a congressional district in eastern Massachusetts. ... Joseph Mulrey McIntyre (aka Joe McIntyre, Joey McIntyre), born December 31, 1972 in Needham, Massachusetts, is a singer-songwriter and actor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Thomas Michael Menino (born December 27, 1942) is the current mayor of Boston, Massachusetts, United States and the citys first Italian-American mayor. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... Christy P. Mihos (born 1950 in Brockton, Massachusetts) is an American politician and businessman from the U.S. state of Massachusetts. ... For other persons with a similar name, see George Mitchell George John Mitchell, GBE (born August 20, 1933) is a former Democratic Party politician and United States Senator from the state of Maine, and currently serves as Chairman of the global law firm DLA Piper US LLP and also as... James Patrick Jim Moran Jr. ... Thomas Phillip ONeill, Jr. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Anthony Joseph Joe Perry (Born September 10, 1950 in Lawrence, Massachusetts), is the lead guitarist and a contributing songwriter for the rock band Aerosmith. ... This article is about the band Aerosmith. ... Gerald Peter Remy (b. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... A color commentator (colour commentator in Canada), sometimes known as a color analyst, is a member of the broadcasting team for a sporting event who assists the play-by-play announcer by filling in any time when play is not in progress. ... The Fox Broadcasting Company, usually referred to as just Fox (the company itself prefers the capitalized version FOX), is a television network in the United States. ... The New England Sports Network, or NESN [NESS-en], is a regional cable television network that covers the six New England states. ... Frederic Charles Smerlas (born April 8, 1957 in Waltham, Massachusetts) was a 5-time NFL Pro Bowl selection during 14-year career as a nose tackle with the Buffalo Bills, San Francisco 49ers and New England Patriots. ... Donald Edmond Wahlberg, Jr. ... For the actor and television game show host, see Mark L. Walberg. ... The Departed is a 2006 crime film directed by Martin Scorsese and starring Leonardo DiCaprio (in his third movie with Scorsese), Matt Damon, Jack Nicholson and Mark Wahlberg. ... Jermaine Wiggins (born January 18, 1975 in East Boston, Massachusetts) is an American football tight end for the Minnesota Vikings of the NFL. He was originally signed by the New York Jets as an undrafted free agent out of the University of Georgia. ... f u ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...

Vocabulary

Some words used in the Boston area but not in many other American English dialects (or with different meanings) are:

  • bubbler or water bubbler — 'drinking fountain'
  • Bummer - (sounds like bumma) a downer or bad thing. A derivation of bumbed out. Now in lesser use.
  • bang a Uey — To take a U-turn
  • cleansers — 'cleaners (mostly on signage)'
  • digger - (sounds like digga) an extreme trip, usually involves falling flat on one's face; "He took a digga on the sidewalk."
  • dooryard - the front yard or driveway area
  • down cellar — 'in the basement'
  • frappe — 'a blend of ice cream, milk, and syrup'[2] (milkshake refers to a concoction not made with ice cream)
  • hopper (sounds like hoppa) - toilet or toilet seat; "He can't talk now, he's onna hoppa."
  • into town — 'into Boston' (similar to New Yorkers' use of "the City")
  • jimmies - chocolate 'sprinkles'
  • johnny — a medical gown worn by patients for examinations
  • milk shake - 'drink composed of milk and flavored syrup, without ice cream[3]'
  • packie — 'liquor store', short for "package store"
  • parlor - 'living room', 'family room'
  • pisser (sounds like pissah) - Good, great. Also an affectionate term for someone who does something mischievous (i.e. "Aaron is such a pissah, he invited us to a party and then charged us to get in!") Also, the cliche term "wicked pissah" is selectively used in Boston, though is becoming archaic.
  • puffer — hand-held asthma inhaler
  • regular coffee — 'coffee with milk (or cream) and usually two spoonfuls of sugar'
  • rotary — 'traffic circle or roundabout'
  • spa — 'convenience store' (originally, it meant a store with a soda fountain). A "Town Spa" is often a pizza restaurant.
  • time — 'a party', e.g., "My buddy's having a time over at his place."
  • tonic — 'soft drink' (tonic is retreating in favor of soda among younger speakers)
  • town club or sports club - When Boston surburbia was woods and farms, men would gather here for deer hunting expeditions. When the land was subdivided into Levitt houses and McMansions, these "clubs" became places where the aging ex-hunters would gather to escape their wives and get drunk.
  • The Pike - A term commonly used by Bostonians when referring to the Massachusetts Turnpike
  • The T - Public transportation in the Metro Boston area. Refers to the subway, the streetcar, the ferry, and the bus.
  • triple decker — or more commonly three decker a three-story, three-family home with one unit built on top of the other'
  • wicked — 'very'; alternatively, 'wicked' may also indicate approval or become a universal descriptor, e.g., "That chowdah was wicked good."

A typical Bubbler Bubbler is a trademarked name that refers to a drinking fountain. ... Bummer may refer to: Bummer Vacation, a SpongeBob SquarePants episode Double Bummer, a double-LP by Bongwater Major Bummer, a comic book published by DC Comics Category: ... Dry cleaning is any cleaning process for clothing and textiles using an organic solvent other than water — generally known as dry cleaning fluid, and typically this is tetrachloroethylene. ... A strawberry milkshake topped with whipped cream and strawberry syrup A milkshake is a sweet, cold beverage which is made from milk, ice cream, and sweet flavourings such as fruit syrup or chocolate sauce (in Canada and most regions of the United States, and the United Kingdom. ... Chocolate sprinkles In the Netherlands chocolate sprinkles – hagelslag – are commonly used as a sandwich topping Birthday cupcakes with colored sprinkles Sprinkles are very small pieces of confectionary used as a decoration or to add texture to desserts – typically cakes or cupcakes, cookies, doughnuts, ice cream, and some puddings. ... For the several U.S. counties named Coffee, see Coffee County. ... Columbus Circle, New York City, NY; site of the first traffic circle in the United States completed in 1905 DeSoto Fountain sits in the center of a traffic circle in the city of Coral Gables, Florida. ... A roundabout is a type of road junction at which traffic enters a one-way stream around a central island. ... A soft drink is a drink that contains no alcohol. ... View of the Turnpike from an overpass by Boston University, facing east (towards central Boston). ... The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) is a quasi-governmental organization formed in 1964 that controls the subway, bus, commuter rail, and ferry systems in the Boston, Massachusetts area. ... Triple-decker apartment building in Cambridge, Massachusetts built in 1916 A row of triple-deckers in Cambridge, Massachusetts A three-decker (occassionally referred to as a triple-decker) is a three-story apartment building, usually of light-frame construction, where each floor consists of one apartment. ...

Recordings of the Boston accent

References

  1. ^ About Beat Charlie Moore ESPN Outdoors
  2. ^ Frappe Definition at Boston-Online.com
  3. ^ Milkshake Definition at Boston-Online.com

See also

It has been suggested that Vermont English be merged into this article or section. ... The Boston Brahmin accent is a New England accent associated with the Boston Brahmin upper social class. ...

External links

  • The Boston Slang Dictionary

  Results from FactBites:
 
Shelley Murphy pronounces the Boston accent - Boston.com (253 words)
Shelley Murphy pronounces the Boston accent - Boston.com
Boston Globe reporter, and Boston native, Shelley Murphy pronounces the Boston accent.
Shelley Murphy is a reporter for The Boston Globe and covers organized crime, homeland security, and federal court.
Boston accent Information (1448 words)
The Boston accent is the dialect of English not only of the city of Boston, Massachusetts itself, but more generally of all of eastern Massachusetts; it shares much in common with the accents of Rhode Island, New Hampshire, southern Maine, and northeastern Connecticut.
This accent is separate and distinct from the Boston Brahmin accent associated with the Boston Brahmin aristocracy.
The traditional Boston accent is non-rhotic; in other words, the phoneme [r] does not appear at the end of a syllable or immediately before a consonant.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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