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Encyclopedia > Boston Symphony Orchestra
Boston Symphony Orchestra

Background information
Also known as BSO
Origin Flag of the United States Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Genre(s) Classical
Occupation(s) Symphony orchestra
Years active 1881-present
Associated
acts
Boston Pops, BSO Chamber Players
Website www.bso.org
Members
Music Director
James Levine
Conductor Emeritus
Bernard Haitink
Music Director Laureate
Seiji Ozawa
Conductor, Boston Pops
Keith Lockhart
Laureate Conductor, Boston Pops
John Williams
Former members
Founder
Henry Lee Higginson

The Boston Symphony Orchestra is one of the world's premiere orchestras. Its home base is Symphony Hall in Boston, Massachusetts, usually considered to be one of the three finest concert halls in the world. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 497 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1731 × 2086 pixel, file size: 680 KB, MIME type: image/png) This is a logo of an organization, item, or event, and is protected by copyright and/or trademark. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Location in Massachusetts, USA Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Suffolk County Settled 1630 Incorporated (city) 1822 Government  - Mayor Thomas M. Menino (D) Area  - City  89. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Orchestra at City Hall (Edmonton). ... The Boston Pops Orchestra was founded in 1885 as a subsection of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. ... James Levine (born June 23, 1943 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is an American orchestral pianist and conductor and most well known as the music director of the Metropolitan Opera in New York. ... ... Seiji Ozawa , born September 1, 1935) is a Japanese conductor. ... Keith Lockhart (born November 1959, Poughkeepsie, New York, USA) is an orchestral conductor. ... This biographical article or section needs additional references for verification. ... Henry Lee Higginson (November 18, 1834 - November 14, 1919) was a remarkable Boston banker, amateur musician, Civil War soldier, and energetic philanthropist best known as the founder of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Symphony Hall in Boston, Massachusetts is widely considered to be one of the two or three finest concert halls in the world, alongside Amsterdams Concertgebouw and Viennas Grosser Musikvereinssaal. ... Nickname: Location in Massachusetts, USA Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Suffolk County Settled 1630 Incorporated (city) 1822 Government  - Mayor Thomas M. Menino (D) Area  - City  89. ... A Concert hall is a cultural building, which serves as performance venue, chiefly for classical instrumental music. ...

Contents

History

The orchestra was founded in 1881 by Henry Lee Higginson. It went on to have several notable conductors, including Arthur Nikisch from 1889 to 1893, and Pierre Monteux from 1919 to 1924 who gave the orchestra a reputation for a "French" sound which persists to some degree to this day. However, it was under the baton of Serge Koussevitzky that the orchestra became best known. Henry Lee Higginson (November 18, 1834 - November 14, 1919) was a remarkable Boston banker, amateur musician, Civil War soldier, and energetic philanthropist best known as the founder of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. ... A conductor conducting at a ceremony A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... Arthur Nikisch (or Nikitsch) (October 12, 1855 – January 23, 1922) was a Hungarian conductor who performed mainly in Germany. ... Pierre Monteux (April 4, 1875 – July 1, 1964) was an orchestra conductor. ... A modern wooden conducting baton Harvard University student Kenton Hetrick with the worlds largest baton A baton is a stick that is used by conductors primarily to indicate the musical beat of a piece through horizontal and vertical movements. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Under Koussevitzky, the orchestra gave regular radio broadcasts and established its summer home at Tanglewood, where Koussevitzky founded the Berkshire Music Center which is now the Tanglewood Music Center. Those network radio broadcasts ran from 1926 through 1951, and again from 1954 through 1956; the orchestra continues to make regular live radio broadcasts to the present day. The Boston Symphony was closely involved with the creation of WGBH Radio as an outlet for its concerts. Tanglewood Music Shed and lawn. ... The Tanglewood Music Center is an annual summer music academy in Lenox, Massachusetts in which emerging professional musicians participate in performances, master classes and workshops designed to provide an intense training and networking experience. ... The Tanglewood Music Center is an annual summer music academy in Lenox, Massachusetts in which emerging professional musicians participate in performances, master classes and workshops designed to provide an intense training and networking experience. ... A radio network is a network system which distributes programming to multiple stations simultaneously, or slightly delayed, for the purpose of extending total coverage beyond the limits of a single broadcast signal. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into articles entitled WGBH-TV and WGBH (FM), accessible from a disambiguation page. ...


Koussevitzky also commissioned many new pieces from prominent composers, including the Symphony No. 4 of Sergei Prokofiev and the Symphony of Psalms by Igor Stravinsky. They also gave the premiere of Béla Bartók's Concerto for Orchestra, which had been commissioned by the Koussevitzky Foundation at the instigation of Fritz Reiner and Joseph Szigeti. A composer is a person who writes music. ... // Sergei Prokofievs Symphony No. ... Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev (Russian: , Sergej Sergejevič Prokofijev; April 27 (April 151 O.S.), 1891–March 5, 1953) was a Russian and Soviet composer who mastered numerous musical genres and came to be admired as one of the greatest composers of the 20th century. ... The Symphony of Psalms by Igor Stravinsky was written in 1930 and was commissioned by Serge Koussevitzky to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. ... Igor Stravinsky. ... Béla Bartók in 1927 Béla Viktor János Bartók (March 25, 1881 – September 26, 1945) was a Hungarian composer, pianist and collector of Eastern European and Middle Eastern folk music. ... The Concerto for Orchestra Sz. ... This article contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... Joseph Szigeti (September 5, 1892 – February 19, 1973) was a Hungarian violinist. ...


Koussevitzky started a tradition that was to be continued by the orchestra with commissions by Henri Dutilleux for its 75th anniversary, Roger Sessions, and Andrzej Panufnik, for the 100th, and lately for the 125th works by Leon Kirchner, Elliott Carter, and Peter Lieberson. On other occasions, they have commissioned works from various other composers, such as John Corigliano's Symphony No. 2 for the 100th anniversary of Symphony Hall. Henri Dutilleux (born January 22, 1916 in Angers, France) is one of the most important French composers of the second half of the 20th century, producing work in the tradition of Maurice Ravel, Claude Debussy, and Albert Roussel, but in a style distinctly his own. ... Roger Huntington Sessions (28 December 1896 – 16 March 1985) was an American composer, critic and teacher of music. ... Sir Andrzej Panufnik (September 24, 1914 - October 27, 1991) was a Polish composer, pianist, and a conductor of classical music. ... Leon Kirchner (born January 24, 1919 in Brooklyn, NY) is an American composer of classical music. ... Elliott Cook Carter, Jr. ... Peter Lieberson (born 25 October 1946 New York City) is an American composer. ... John Corigliano (b. ...


In 1949, Charles Münch succeeded Koussevitzky who toured with the orchestra overseas for the first time, and also produced their first stereo recording in February 1954 for RCA Victor. Münch was succeeded in 1962 by Erich Leinsdorf, who served as music director for seven years until 1969. William Steinberg was then music director from 1969 to 1973. In 1973, Seiji Ozawa took over the orchestra and remained the Music Director until 2002, the longest tenure of any Boston Symphony conductor. In 2004, James Levine became the first American-born music director ever to lead the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Levine has received critical praise for revitalising the quality and repertoire since the beginning of his tenure.[1] Charles Münch (September 26, 1891 – November 6, 1968) was a French conductor and violinist. ... RCA Red Seal Records is a prestigious classical music label and is now part of Sony BMG Masterworks. ... Erich Leinsdorf (February 4, 1912 - September 11, 1993) was a conductor. ... William Steinberg (originally Hans Wilhelm Steinberg) (August 1, 1899 – May 16, 1978) was a German Jewish conductor. ... Seiji Ozawa , born September 1, 1935) is a Japanese conductor. ... James Levine (born June 23, 1943 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is an American orchestral pianist and conductor and most well known as the music director of the Metropolitan Opera in New York. ...


The BSO also benefits from its close association with the New England Conservatory, located just one block from Symphony Hall with several graduates now occupying BSO musician seats. The Greater Boston Youth Symphony Orchestra performing in Jordan Hall, New England Conservatory of Music. ...


An offshoot of the Boston Symphony Orchestra is the Boston Pops Orchestra, founded in 1885, which plays lighter, more popular classics, and show tunes. Arthur Fiedler was the conductor who did the most to increase the fame of the Boston Pops, over his tenure from 1930 to 1979. Film composer John Williams succeeded Fiedler as the conductor of the Pops from 1980 to 1993. Since 1995, the conductor of the Boston Pops is Keith Lockhart. The Boston Pops Orchestra was founded in 1885 as a subsection of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. ... The Fantasticks is the longest-running musical in history Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ... Arthur Fiedler (December 17, 1894 – July 10, 1979) was the long-time conductor of the Boston Pops Orchestra, a symphony orchestra that specialized in popular music. ... This biographical article or section needs additional references for verification. ... Keith Lockhart (born November 1959, Poughkeepsie, New York, USA) is an orchestral conductor. ...


Performing with the BSO and Boston Pops for major choral works is the Tanglewood Festival Chorus. Organized in 1970 by its founding director, John Oliver, the Chorus comprises 250 volunteer singers. Before the creation of the Tanglewood Chorus, and for some time after, the BSO frequently employed the New England Conservatory Chorus conducted by Lorna Cooke DeVaron, Chorus Pro Musica, Harvard Glee Club and Radcliffe Choral Society. The Tanglewood Festival Chorus is a choir which performs with the Boston Symphony Orchestra and Boston Pops in major choral works. ... The Harvard Glee Club is a 60-voice, all-male choral ensemble at Harvard University. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ...


Violin virtuoso Willy Hess was concertmaster from 1904 to 1910. The current concertmaster is Malcolm Lowe. Willy Hess (July 14, 1859 – 1939) was a famous violin virtuoso and violin teacher. ... Concert-master. ...


Recordings

The Boston Symphony made its first acoustical recordings in 1917 in Camden, New Jersey for the Victor Talking Machine Company with Karl Muck. Among the first discs recorded was the finale to Tchaikovsky's fourth symphony. Typical of acoustical recordings, the musicians had to crowd around a large horn that transferred the sounds to a recording machine. The City of Camden is the county seat of Camden County, New Jersey in the United States. ... Victor logo with the famous Nipper dog. ... Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (Russian Пётр Ильи́ч Чайко́вский, sometimes transliterated as Piotr, Anglicised as Peter Ilich), (May 7, 1840 – November 6, 1893 (N.S.); April 25, 1840 – October...


It was under Serge Koussevitsky that the orchestra made its first electrical recordings, also for Victor, in the late 1920s. Using a single microphone for a process Victor called "Orthophonic," the first recordings included Ravel's Bolero. Recording sessions took place in Symphony Hall. Koussevitsky's final recording with the Boston Symphony was a high fidelity version of Sibelius' second symphony, recorded in 1949 and released on LP. Joseph-Maurice Ravel (March 7, 1875 – December 28, 1937) was a French composer and pianist, best known for his orchestral work, Boléro, and his famous 1922 orchestral arrangement of Modest Mussorgskys Pictures at an Exhibition. ... The bolero is a type of dance and musical form. ... Contrary to what Rachel Lewis believes. ...


In February 1954, RCA Victor began recording the orchestra in stereo, under the direction of Charles Munch. RCA continued to record Munch and the orchestra through 1962, his final year as music director in Boston.


Erich Leinsdorf, who had already made numerous recordings for RCA, continued his association with the company during his seven years in Boston. These included a critically-acclaimed performance of Brahms' German Requiem. Then, the orchestra switched to Deutsche Grammophon under William Steinberg and Seiji Ozawa. Michael Tilson Thomas, who was an assistant conductor under Steinberg, also made several recordings for DGG; some of these have been reissued on CD. Johannes Brahms Johannes Brahms (May 7, 1833 – April 3, 1897) was a German composer of classical music. ... Logo Deutsche Grammophon is a German record label. ... Michael Tilson Thomas (born December 21, 1944), nicknamed MTT, is an American conductor, pianist and composer. ...


Music Directors

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... George Henschel (Ismoa Georg] (1850 - 1934), English musician (naturalized 1890), of German family, was born at Breslau, and educated as a pianist, making his first public appearance in Berlin in 1862. ... Wilhelm Gericke (born 18 May, 1845, Schwanberg, died 27 October 1925) was an Austrian conductor. ... Arthur Nikisch (or Nikitsch) (October 12, 1855 – January 23, 1922) was a Hungarian conductor who performed mainly in Germany. ... Emil Paur (born 1855 in Czernowitz, Austria, now Ukraine, died 1932 in Mistek, Czechoslovakia, now the Czech Republic) was an Austrian conductor. ... Wilhelm Gericke (born 18 May, 1845, Schwanberg, died 27 October 1925) was an Austrian conductor. ... Karl Muck (1859 - 1940) was a German conductor. ... Max Fiedler (born 21 December 1859, Zittau, Germany, died 1 December 1939, Stockholm) was a German conductor and composer. ... Karl Muck (1859 - 1940) was a German conductor. ... Henri Rabaud Life Henri Rabaud (1873 - 1949), the son of a violincello professor and a singer, was a pupil of Gédalge and Massenet at the Paris Conservatoire, where he succeeded Fauré as director in 1920. ... Pierre Monteux (April 4, 1875 – July 1, 1964) was an orchestra conductor. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Charles Münch (September 26, 1891 – November 6, 1968) was a French conductor and violinist. ... Erich Leinsdorf (February 4, 1912 - September 11, 1993) was a conductor. ... William Steinberg (originally Hans Wilhelm Steinberg) (August 1, 1899 – May 16, 1978) was a German Jewish conductor. ... Seiji Ozawa , born September 1, 1935) is a Japanese conductor. ... James Levine (born June 23, 1943 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is an American orchestral pianist and conductor and most well known as the music director of the Metropolitan Opera in New York. ...

References

  1. ^ Lloyd Schwartz. "Stretching exercises: The BSO challenges the audience and itself", Boston Phoenix, Mar 2005. Retrieved on 2007-04-02. 
  • Dunning, John (1998). On the Air: The Encyclopedia of Old-Time Radio. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-507678-8. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


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