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Encyclopedia > Boston Latin School
Boston Latin School
Motto Sumus Primi
Established April 23, 1635
Type Public Exam School
Gender Coeducational
Affiliation Boston Public Schools
Head Master Lynne Mooney-Teta
Faculty 139
Students 2383
Grades 7–12
Location 78 Avenue Louis Pasteur,
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Accreditation NEASC
Campus Urban
Colors Purple and White            
Nickname Wolfpack
Mascot Wolfie[1]
Rival Boston English
Yearbook Liber Actorum
Newspaper The Argo
Head Master Emeritus Cornelia Kelley-LaCambria

The Boston Latin School is a public exam school founded on April 23, 1635, in Boston, Massachusetts, making it the oldest public school in the United States.[2][3][4][5] The Public Latin School was a bastion for educating the sons of the Boston Brahmin elite, enabling the school to claim many influential Bostonians as alumni. Its curriculum follows that of the 18th century Latin-school movement, which holds the Classics to be the basis of an educated mind. Four years of Latin are mandatory for all pupils that enter the school in 7th grade, three years for those who enter in 9th. In 2007 the school was named one of the top twenty high-schools in the United States by U.S. News & World Report.[6][7] For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 10 - The Académie française in Paris is expanded to become a national academy for the artistic elite. ... Educational institutions are often categorised along several dimensions. ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ... A magnet school is a public school which offers innovative courses, specialized training, et cetera in order to attract students from a broad urban area and thereby help to bring about desegregation. ... Gender in common usage refers to the sexual distinction between male and female. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... Boston Public Schools (BPS) is a school district serving the city of Boston, Massachusetts. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Accredition organization in New England. ... The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ... Look up urban in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... This article is about the color. ... This article is about the color. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A sports rivalry is intense competition between athletic teams or athletes. ... A sketch of the original Boston English School in the 1820s Founded in 1821, The English High School of Boston, Massachusetts, is the oldest public high school in America. ... For other uses, see Yearbook (disambiguation). ... // Public spending on education in 2005 Public education is education mandated for or offered to the children of the general public by the government, whether national, regional, or local, provided by an institution of civil government, and paid for, in whole or in part, by taxes. ... In the U.S. system of education, a magnet school is a public school which offers innovative courses, specialized training, etc. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 10 - The Académie française in Paris is expanded to become a national academy for the artistic elite. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Boston Brahmins, also called the First Families of Boston, are the class of New Englanders who claim hereditary and cultural descent from the English Protestants who founded the city of Boston, Massachusetts and settled New England. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... For other uses, see Classics (disambiguation). ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...

Contents

History

BLS ca. 1935, and a view of a classroom
BLS ca. 1935, and a view of a classroom

The school's first class was in single figures, but it now has 2,400 pupils drawn from all parts of Boston. It has produced four Harvard presidents, four Massachusetts governors, and five signers of the Declaration of Independence. William Lloyd Garrison, Benjamin Franklin,[8] and Louis Farrakhan[9] are its most famous dropouts. BLS 1935. ... BLS 1935. ... Harvard redirects here. ... A declaration of independence is an assertion of the independence of an aspiring state or states. ... William Lloyd Garrison William Lloyd Garrison (December 12, 1805–May 24, 1879) was a prominent United States abolitionist, journalist, and social reformer. ... Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most well known Founding Fathers of the United States. ... Louis Farrakhan (born Louis Eugene Walcott, May 11, 1933), is the acting head of the Nation of Islam (NOI) as the National Representative of Elijah Muhammad. ... Look up dropout in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The school was modeled after Boston Grammar School in Lincolnshire, UK, from where many of Boston's original settlers derived. Current students assert with pride that Harvard College, founded a year later in 1636, was created for Boston Latin's first graduates. Whether or not that is true, Boston Latin had been a top feeder school for Harvard, and has consistently sent large numbers of students to Harvard, recently averaging about twenty-five students per year. More than 99% of Boston Latin's approximately 300 annual graduates are accepted by at least one four-year college. Boston Grammar School is a selective school for boys aged 11 to 18, recently admitting girls aged 16 to 18, in Boston, Lincolnshire. ... Harvard Yard Harvard College is the undergraduate section and oldest school of Harvard University, a private university in the United States, founded in 1636 by the Massachusetts legislature. ... Year 1636 (MDCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Latin School admitted only male students and teachers from its founding in 1635. For the better part of its history female students attended Girls' Latin School. In 1967 Boston Latin school appointed Marie Frisardi Cleary[10] and Juanita Ponte[11] as the first two women in its academic faculty. In 1972 Boston Latin admitted its first co-educational class. Image:BLA.jpg Motto vita tua sit sincera. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ...


Cornelia Kelley, the school's first female Headmaster, served from 1998 to her retirement in 2007,[12] after which Lynne Mooney-Teta was selected to become the school's 28th Headmaster. Mooney-Teta is a 1986 graduate of Boston Latin, and was formerly an Assistant Head Master at the school.[13]


Academics

Main entrance
Main entrance

Boston Latin's motto is Sumus Primi, Latin for we are the first. This is meant as a double entendre, referring both to the school's date of founding and its academic stature. Boston Latin has a history of pursuing the same standards as elite New England prep schools while adopting the egalitarian attitude of a public school. Academically, the school regularly outperforms public schools in rich Boston suburbs, particularly as measured by the yearly MCAS assessment required of all Massachusetts public schools. In 2006, Brooklyn Latin School was founded in New York City, explicitly modeled on Boston Latin, borrowing much from its curriculum and traditions.[14] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 876 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 876 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A double entendre is a figure of speech similar to the pun, in which a spoken phrase can be understood in either of two ways. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school (usually abbreviated to preparatory school, college prep school, or prep school) is a private secondary school designed to prepare a student for higher education. ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ... MCAS can mean: The Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (a standards-based test) US Marine Corps Air Station. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The term public school has two contrary meanings: In England, one of a small number of prestigious historic schools open to the public which normally charge fees and are financed by bodies other than the state, commonly as private charitable trusts; here the word public is used much as in... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Admissions

Admission is determined by a combination of a student's score on the Independent School Entrance Examination (ISEE) and recent grades, and is limited to residents of Boston proper.[15] Although Boston Latin runs from the 7th through the 12th grade, it only admits students into the 7th and 9th grades. Consequently the higher grades have fewer students than the lower grades, as a relatively large number of students transfer out. The school has historically been described as having a sink-or-swim environment, but in recent years there have been notable efforts to create a more supportive atmosphere. The Independent School Entrance Examination, or ISEE, is an admissions test administered by the Educational Records Bureau for placement in independent schools for grades 5-12. ...


Because it is a high-performing and well-regarded school in a city school system that is among the worst in the state, Boston Latin has been at the center of controversy concerning its admissions process. Admissions are very competitive, and it is not uncommon for fewer than 20% of applicants to be admitted. Before the 1997 school year, Boston Latin set aside a 35% quota of places in its incoming class for under-represented minorities. The school was forced to drop this policy after a series of lawsuits involving non-minority girls who were not admitted despite ranking higher than admitted minorities.[16] Boston Latin subsequently defeated a legal effort to do away with its admissions process entirely and conduct admissions by blind lottery. Since 1997, the percentage of under-represented minorities at Boston Latin has fallen from 35% to under 19% in 2005, despite efforts by Boston Latin, the Boston Public Schools, and the Boston Latin School Association to recruit more minority applicants and retain more minority students. Because many of its minority students attend Boston Public Schools whereas a substantial number of its white students come from parochial schools or private schools, some advocate instituting a quota for the number of students that must be admitted from Boston's public middle schools. For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... Boston Public Schools (BPS) is a school district serving the city of Boston, Massachusetts. ... A parochial school is a type of private school which engages in religious education in addition to conventional education. ... Private schools, in the United States, Australia, Scotland, and other English-speaking countries, are schools not administered by local or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public funds. ...


Curriculum

Declamation is the most time-honored of the school's traditions. Pupils in the 7th to 10th grade are required to give an oration in their English class three times during the year. There is also Public Declamation, where pupils from all grades, or classes, are welcomed to try out for the chance to declaim a memorized piece in front of an assembly. During Public Declamation, declaimers are scored on aspects such as "Memorization" "Presentation", and "Voice and Delivery", and those who score well in three of the first four public declamations are given the chance to declaim in front of alumni judges for awards in "Prize Declamation". Declamation (also known as Oratorical Declamation or Oratorical Interpretation, commonly abbreviated to dec) is a public speaking event of the National Catholic Forensic League. ...


In addition to the well-known and time-honored tradition of declamation in English classes, recently the Modern Languages department instituted an annual "World Language Declamation" competition. Once a year, during National Foreign Language Week (usually the first week of March),[17] students from grades 8 through 12 perform orations in languages other than English. Most students choose to declaim in the modern language they are studying, though some choose Latin, Greek, or their native tongue. Judges are brought in from various institutions around the city, and mark the students in similar categories to those used in Public Declamation. Entrants are categorized by level, rather than language, such that all students declaiming at the first-year level of various languages are competing against each other, all students at the second-year level compete against each other, and so on. Students who regularly perform exceptionally well at World Language Declamation are honored at Prize Night with the Celia Gordon Malkiel Prize.[18]


In a move that was controversial among some alumni, the school decided in 2001 to decrease the requirement for students' Latin instruction by one year, starting with the class of 2006.[19] The mandatory minimum period of Latin instruction was decreased for students admitted for 7th grade from five years to four years, and for students admitted for 9th grade from four years to three years. This decision was made by the head of the school's Latin department, in recognition of the fact that the requirement was hampering students' ability to take enough courses in important modern subjects such as Physics, Chemistry, Computer Science and modern languages. However, students still retain the ability to study Latin through their sixth year, and many do so, partly in order to maximize the number of AP courses in which they are enrolled.


In a 1789 codicil to his will, Benjamin Franklin established a legacy to fund the Franklin Medals, which are awarded to the school's top-ranking pupils at graduation. The second most prestigious awards, the Dixwell Prizes, are given to pupils excelling in Latin or Greek. Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... A codicil is a document that amends, rather than replaces, a previously executed will. ...


Publications

There are currently two main publications of the Boston Latin School: The Register is the school's literary magazine, and The Argo the school newspaper. George Santayana founded The Register in 1881 to serve as the school newspaper. Over the years, however, it evolved into a purely literary magazine, publishing prose and poetry written by members of the student body, as well as artwork. There are generally two editors-in-chief, and it is published twice per year. The Argo, the school's newspaper, is far younger, having been founded after it was clear that the Register had become a purely literary magazine. As of the 2006–2007 school year, it is published seven times a year. Both the Register and the Argo are entirely student-produced, and both have won awards from the New England Scholastic Press Association. [20] George Santayana George Santayana (December 16, 1863, Madrid – September 26, 1952, Rome), was a philosopher, essayist, poet, and novelist. ...


The Boston Latin Lampoon, a humor magazine, was published only sporadically, and has not appeared since 2005. A science publication, The Catapulta, was published four times since the Spring of the 2004-2005 school year, and a new edition is planned.


In the 2003–2004 school year, a publication entitled "Plebeians Speak" appeared once. The anonymous pamphlet featured articles that might have been censored from The Argo for being controversial or inflammatory. Its title referred to its editorial belief that students (and in some cases, teachers) were considered common, insignificant folk by the administration.


Athletics

A wolf's paw is the logo for Boston Latin's athletic teams
A wolf's paw is the logo for Boston Latin's athletic teams

Boston Latin's teams are known as the Boston Latin Wolfpack; their colors are purple and white. Boston Latin has played rival Boston English in Football every Thanksgiving since 1887,[21] the oldest continuous high school rivalry in the United States.[22] Historically, Boston Latin's hockey and volleyball teams, both boys' and girls', have been very good; for the most part, however, titles have been few and far between since the school left the Boston Public Schools league in Division V which it had dominated. Boston Latin now competes in Division II Dual County League against suburban schools with better facilities and greater funding. In 1995, the girls' soccer team won their first game after 11 years of losses.The girl's hockey team won the Division 1 State Championship in 2001 and has won the Dual County League for the past 9 years. In 2001 Boston Latin Girls Tennis won their first ever Division I State Championship. They continued to dominate for the next two years and became the first team to go three seasons undefeated; gaining two more State Championships in both 2002 and 2003. In 2005 Boston Latin Boys Hockey won the schools first ever boys ice hockey Division II State Championship. Boston Latin defeated the two time defending state champion Saugus in overtime. This feat was remarkable considering Boston Latin was the first ever exam entrance school to win the State Championship. A sketch of the original Boston English School in the 1820s Founded in 1821, The English High School of Boston, Massachusetts, is the oldest public high school in America. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... For other uses, see Thanksgiving (disambiguation). ... Since 1887, the oldest school in the United States, the Boston Latin School, has faced off against the English High School of Boston, in an annual football rivalry which now takes place on Thanksgiving day at Harvard Stadium. ...


Boston Latin School is the only school in the Division II Dual County League that does not charge an Athletics Fee to students who wish to participate, and only has a budget of around two hundred thousand dollars per year, which is about half of what the other Division II DCL schools usually boast. Athletics are funded by the Boston Latin School Alumni Association, the Boston Latin School Varsity Club, and about half of the funding comes from the Boston Public Schools.


Extracurricular activities

Boston Latin Mock Trial Team

Boston Latin has participated in the Mock Trial program sponsored by the Massachusetts Bar Association since the programs' founding in 1987. The team has since won the State Championship twice: the first in 1987 and then again in 2006. BLS went on to rank 24th in the Nationals at Oklahoma City in 2006. The team receives a mock case each year and prepares drafts of openings, directs, crosses and closings for both prosecution and defense. They then compete at regionals in order to advance to the Championship series. In 2006, the team advanced and won the State Championship with the help of three lawyer coaches who were all alumni of BLS: Lauren McDonough, Milo Tumposky and Sean Cronin.


BLSTV

The internal television station of Boston Latin School is BLSTV; it has been broadcasting since 2003. Every day BLSTV broadcasts the daily bulletin to all of BLS. All of the broadcasters are students, in either their Junior or Senior years. BLSTV also appears at most school events, filming and archiving all of their footage. Many of the producers of BLSTV who have graduated have moved on to college, where they are studying to become film and television producers.


Boston Latin Theatre Company

Boston Latin School's Theatre Company produces three to four plays per academic year, including a spring musical. Traditionally, the school also showcases a one-act play in the Massachusetts High School Drama Guild Festival. The 2007 entry, Jordan Harrison's Kid Simple: A Radio Play in the Flesh, advanced to the semi-final level of the festival where it won multiple awards for acting, lighting design, and sound design. In 2004, the student director was awarded for Excellence in Directing, for Jon Klein's Dimly Perceived Threats to the System. Other BLS entries in the MHSDG Festival have included Tristine Skyler's The Moonlight Room (2006), Craig Lucas' Reckless (2005), A.R. Gurney's The Dining Room (2003), Jean-Claude van Itallie's T.V. (2002) and Interview (2001), Elaine May's Adaptation (2000), Steve Martin's WASP (1999), Peter Shaffer's Black Comedy (1998), and The Romancers (1997). In Winter 2008, the Boston Latin Theatre Company produced Tilt Angel, which reached the State Finals of the 2008 MHSDG Festival, the first finals appearance since 2004. Tilt Angel won numerous awards for individual and ensemble acting, as well as for sound, makeup, and lighting design. Tilt Angel was also selected by the MHSDG to be one of two Massachusetts representatives at the 2008 New England Drama Festival, the first time BLS has advanced so far. In Spring 2008, the company will produce The Secret Garden. The Boston Latin Theatre Company currently has alumni studying at Emerson College, New York University's Tisch School of the Arts, Northwestern University, Boston College, Boston University, and the University of Southern California's School of Theatre. The Massachusetts High School Drama Guild is usually known as MHSDG. According to their website, the MHSDG exists for the charitable and educational purpose of promoting and strengthening excellence, access, and education in the theatrical arts for middle and secondary school students and teachers. ... Elaine May (b. ... For other uses, see Steve Martin (disambiguation). ... The MHSDG is the abbreviated name of the Massachusetts High School Drama Guild. ... The MHSDG is the abbreviated name of the Massachusetts High School Drama Guild. ... The Secret Garden is a musical based on the 1909 novel of the same name by Frances Hodgson Burnett. ... Emerson College was founded in 1880 by Charles Wesley Emerson as a school of oratory, in Boston, Massachusetts. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... Tisch School of the Arts (known more commonly as Tisch or TSOA) is one of the 15 schools that make up New York University (NYU). ... Northwestern University (NU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university with campuses located in Evanston, Illinois and downtown Chicago. ... For similarly-named academic institutions, see Education in Boston, MA. Boston College (BC) is a private university located in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, in the New England region of the United States. ... For the similarly named institution in Chestnut Hill, see Boston College. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ...


Musical arts

Boston Latin School also has an extensive music program. Introductory, Junior, and Senior Concert Bands, Concert Choir, and String Orchestras are elective classes (although these grades do not contribute to GPA). After-school musical ensembles include the a cappella Wolftones and Wolfettes, Football Pep Band, Show Choir, Chamber Choir, Big Band, Junior Big Band, Flute Ensemble, and the Honors Orchestra, among others. There are also fully academic music classes (for which grades are factored into the GPA), such as Introduction to Music Theory, and a very rigorous Advanced Placement Music Theory class. This article is about the vocal technique. ... Music theory is a field of study that investigates the nature or mechanics of music. ... The Advanced Placement Program is a program that offers college level courses at high schools across the United States and Canada. ...


Each year, all of the musical groups display their talents at Boston Latin School's Holiday Concerts and Music Nights. The former is two nights in mid-December and the latter two nights in Spring, where students perform several selections of music that they have been working on for those who wish to attend.


Musical groups from Boston Latin School also perform at the Massachusetts Instrumental & Choral Conductors Association festival in April. In 2006, the Boston Latin School Senior String Orchestra received a gold medal for the second year in a row while the Senior Concert Band and Concert Choir received bronze medals. In 2007, the Senior Strings received a gold medal while the Wind Ensemble received a silver medal. The Boston Latin Big Band has made it to the International Association for Jazz Education State Finals six years in a row and has placed as high as second in the Berklee College of Music High School Jazz Festival. In 2007, the Big Band won a gold medal at the IAJE state finals. International Associaton for Jazz Education (IAJE) is a non-profit voluntary organization that distributes student scholarships through its approved festivals program. ... Berklee College of Music, founded in 1945, is an independent music college in Boston, Massachusetts with many prominent faculty, staff, alumni, and visiting artists. ...


Visual arts

The Boston Latin School visual arts program, while not as extensively funded as the music program, still commands a viable part of the workload. Seventh and eighth grade students are expected to take regular basic art classes, meant as introductions to the visual arts. Older students then have the option of taking an elective arts course, including a regular foundations class and a rigorous two year Advanced Placement course designed to prepare students for art college and build portfolios. The Advanced Placement Program is a program that offers college level courses at high schools across the United States and Canada. ...


The Boston Latin School visual arts program boasts three large 2D art studios, a firing kiln, a computer lab, and a photography lab (although no photography classes are currently available). The program is staffed by two teachers, Mr. Stephen Harris and Mr. Carlos Byron, with additional pottery classes taught after school from alumna Kaitlyn Jolly. The art program hosts an Arts Night, similar to the Music Nights, which is dedicated to the work of students in the Advanced Placement program. Charcoal Kilns, California Gold Kiln, Victoria, Australia Hop kiln. ...


Junior Classical League

Since 2000, Boston Latin School has been an active participant on the local, state and national levels of the National Junior Classical League, formed in 1936, fostering a tradition of deeper academic study of the classics, along with creative expression through visual and creative arts. Boston Latin School hosts a certamen scrimmage (much like a quiz bowl competition) each year in late November or early December, and sends delegates to the State Convention in April, and often the National Convention, which takes places in July or August. In the past years, Boston Latin School's JCL chapter has grown substantially since its founding; Boston Latin School often contributes dedicated certamen players to represent Massachusetts on a national level in certamen. The official seal of the National Junior Classical League The National Junior Classical League, or NJCL, is an organization of fifth grade students through high school seniors sponsored by the American Classical League. ... Certamen, Latin for competition, (pl. ...


Recently, the Boston Latin School JCL sent eight delegates to the MassJCL State Convention, held at Barnstable High School. There, the advanced certamen team won 1st place, and the intermediate certamen team won 2nd place. Olivia Schwob won 1st place overall in Art, and Jacob Meister won 1st place overall in Academics; he was elected as MassJCL's 2nd Vice President for the 2007-2008 school year. On a more recent note, the Boston Latin School JCL attended the National Junior Classical League Convention, held in Knoxville, Tennessee, from July 24th to July 29th, 2007. Two Latin School delegates, Olivia Schwob and Jacob Meister, placed 10th and 3rd respectively in overall individual achievement; Olivia Schwob won 5th overall in Art, and Jacob Meister won 3rd place in Academics and creative contests.


Other activities

There are also many other extra-curricular activities, such as Wolfpack Volunteers, Youth Climate Action Network, Clay Club, Dungeons & Dragons Club, the Gay/Straight Alliance, a Robotics team, many cultural clubs such as Asian Students in Action (A.S.I.A.), a ski club and more.

Popular culture

“The West Wing” redirects here. ... For other persons named Robert Lowe, see Robert Lowe (disambiguation). ... Samuel Norman Sam Seaborn is a fictional character played by Rob Lowe on the television serial drama The West Wing. ... Mallory OBrien is a fictional character on NBCs drama The West Wing. The character is portrayed by Allison Smith. ... The Bronx High School of Science (commonly called Bronx Science, Bronx Sci, or just Science, and officially known as H.S. 445) is a specialized New York City public high school. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... President Bush signing the bipartisan No Child Left Behind Act at Hamilton H.S. in Hamilton, Ohio. ... Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip is an Emmy Award winner and Golden Globe Award nominated American television Comedy-drama series created and written by Aaron Sorkin. ... Matthew Langford Perry (born August 19, 1969) is a Canadian-American Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated actor and comedian, best known for his role as Chandler Bing in the hugely popular television sitcom Friends, a part he played for 10 years. ... Matthew Albie is a fictional character on the U.S. TV series Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip, played by Matthew Perry. ... The initials GPA can refer, among other things, to Grade Point Average; see Grade (education) Guinness Peat Aviation General Practice Australia, a private, independent medical accreditation society Greyhound Pets of America This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Advanced Placement (AP) is the term used to describe high school classes that are taught at a college level. ...

Alumni

Main article: List of Boston Latin School alumni

Boston Latin has graduated notable Americans in the fields of politics (both local and national), religion, science, journalism, philosophy, and music. Of the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence, five were educated at Latin: Adams, Franklin, Hancock, Hooper, and Paine.[26] Graduates and students fought in the Revolutionary War, American Civil War, World War I, World War II, and the Vietnam War, and plaques and statues in the school building honor those who died. A declaration of independence is an assertion of the independence of an aspiring state or states. ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


Hall of Fame

The Hall of Fame, known casually as "The Wall," refers to the space just below the ceiling in the school's auditorium, where the last names of famous alumni are painted. These names include Adams, Bernstein, Fitzgerald, Franklin, Hancock, Hooper, Kennedy, Mather, Paine, Quincy, Santayana, Winthrop, and many others. The most recent name, Wade H. McCree Jr., was added to the frieze in 1999, and the selection of the name involved a conscious effort to choose a graduate of color.[27] There are no names of female graduates, mostly because females have attended the school for just 34 years and the honor is only bestowed posthumously. Currently there is only space for one more name, and the Head Master enjoys telling incoming students that if they work hard enough, one of their names might end up on "The Wall" some day. For other uses, see Samuel Adams (disambiguation). ... Leonard Bernstein in 1971 Leonard Bernstein (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, and pianist. ... John Francis Honey Fitz Fitzgerald (February 11, 1863 – October 2, 1950) was a politician and the maternal grandfather of President John F. Kennedy. ... Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most well known Founding Fathers of the United States. ... John Hancock (January 23 [O.S. January 12] 1737– October 8, 1793) was President of the Second Continental Congress and of the Congress of the Confederation, the first Governor of Massachusetts, and the first person to sign the United States Declaration of Independence. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Joseph Joe Patrick Kennedy, Sr. ... This article is about the 17th century Puritan minister. ... Robert Treat Paine; Signer of the Declaration of Independence Robert Treat Paine Robert Treat Paine(March 11, 1731–May 11, 1814) was a signer of the Declaration of Independence as a representative of Massachusetts. ... Josiah Quincy II (February 23, 1744 - April 26, 1775) was a famous American lawyer. ... George Santayana George Santayana (December 16, 1863, Madrid – September 26, 1952, Rome), was a philosopher, essayist, poet, and novelist. ... John Winthrop (December 19, 1714 – May 3, 1779) (not to be confused with his great-great-grandfather John Winthrop, founder of the Massachusetts Bay colony) was the 2nd Hollis Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy in Harvard College. ... Wade Hampton McCree, Jr. ... Frieze of the Tower of the Winds. ... A posthumous recognition is a ceremonial award given after the recipient has passed away. ...


Hall of Fame Alumni can be viewed here: Boston Latin School's Hall of Fame


Alumni Association

Boston Latin has benefited enormously from the efforts of the Boston Latin School Association (BLSA), a private charity dedicated to fostering involvement by and donations from the school's substantial alumni base. The BLSA recently completed its major Pons Privatus (Private Bridge) fund-raising campaign, which raised nearly $37 million in donations from alumni and an additional $20 million in planned gift intentions. At the time, it was the largest fundraising effort in the history of public secondary education. This endowment is mostly supplementary, on top of the roughly $10 million per year in untaxed operating grants the school receives from the Boston Public Schools, which covers most teacher salaries and maintenance. The school also received a $34.6 million multiyear grant in the late 1990s for a major expansion project.[28] Boston Public Schools (BPS) is a school district serving the city of Boston, Massachusetts. ...


References

  1. ^ Caldwell, Dave. "Thanksgiving Day Games: Old Rivalries, Then the Turkey", New York Times, 2006-11-10. Retrieved on 2008-01-12. 
  2. ^ "History of Boston Latin School—oldest public school in America". BLS Web Site. Retrieved on 2007-06-01.
  3. ^ "Boston Latin School". Encyclopædia Britannica Online.
  4. ^ "First Public School Site and Ben Franklin Statue". City of Boston web site.
  5. ^ "Boston Latin School". NNDB.
  6. ^ "Best High Schools 2008". U.S. News & World Report (November 29, 2007).
  7. ^ "The First-Class State—Two examples of how Massachusetts gets it right". U.S. News & World Report (November 29, 2007).
  8. ^ Benjamin Franklin. Exodus Provisions.
  9. ^ John B. Judis (August 18, 1996). "Maximum Leader". The New York Times. Retrieved on 2006-05-19.
  10. ^ Marie Frisardi Cleary (May 19, 1985). "The Halls of Boston Latin School". New York Times. Letter to the editor.
  11. ^ Bergeron, Amanda. "Juanita Ponte, 62; taught at Boston Latin", Boston Globe, July 21, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-07-21. 
  12. ^ Jan, Tracy. "Boston Latin headmaster to retire", Boston Globe, 2007-2-14. Retrieved on 2007-12-31. 
  13. ^ "Assistant head is named to Latin's top job". Boston Globe (June 26, 2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-04.
  14. ^ Jan, Tracy. "Growing a Boston Latin in Brooklyn", Boston Globe, March 4, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-08-31. 
  15. ^ Answers to Frequently Asked Questions about Entrance to Boston Latin School (PDF). Retrieved on 2007-12-31.
  16. ^ "The Boston Latin Case". Center for the Study of Testing, Evaluation, and Educational Policy. Retrieved on 2008-01-29.
  17. ^ Kate Stevenson (2008). National Foreign Language Week
  18. ^ Prizes and Scholarships, BLS Web Site
  19. ^ Vaishnav, Anand. "Boston Latin Eases Language Requirement", Boston Globe, 2001-4-13. Retrieved on 2007-12-31. 
  20. ^ "Publications—Argo". BLS Web Site. Retrieved on 2007-06-01. Includes scans of first Argo edition, 1969.
  21. ^ Werchadlo, Emily. "It's still defined by Latin and English", Boston Globe, 2005-11-24. Retrieved on 2008-01-29. 
  22. ^ Dahlbeck, Dwayne. "Latin's first conquest comes at last", Boston Globe, 2007-11-27. Retrieved on 2008-01-29. 
  23. ^ West Wing Transcript Archive. Retrieved on 2007-12-22.
  24. ^ "President Bush Speaks in Boston". CNN.com (2002-01-08).
  25. ^ The February 2007 eNewsletter of the Boston Latin School Association. blsa.org. Retrieved on 2008-01-01.
  26. ^ Rauseo-Ricupero, Ronaldo. "Bush Comes To Boston After Education Victory", Harvard Crimson, 2002-01-09. Retrieved on 2007-12-31. 
  27. ^ Hill, Tony. "To Place a Black Man in Latin's Pantheon: An Alumnus Quietly Raised to the Star-Studded Frieze", Boston Globe, 2000-11-12. Retrieved on 2007-12-31. 
  28. ^ Boston Public Schools 2006 Budget

The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The Boston Globe (and Boston Sunday Globe) is the most widely circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and New England. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Boston Globe is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Boston Globe (and Boston Sunday Globe) is the most widely circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and New England. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Boston Globe is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Boston Globe is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Boston Globe is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Harvard Crimson, of Harvard University, is the United States oldest continuously published daily college newspaper. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Boston Globe is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Image:BLA.jpg Motto vita tua sit sincera. ... The John D. OBryant School of Mathematics and Science (officially abbreviated as OB) is a public examination school in Boston Massachusetts. ... Roxbury Latin School, founded in 1645 and located at 101 Saint Theresa Avenue in West Roxbury, Massachusetts since 1927, is the oldest school in continuous existence in North America. ...

External links

Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

 
 

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