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Encyclopedia > Boston Common
Boston Common
(U.S. National Historic Landmark District)
View of the Water Celebration, on Boston Common, October 25, 1848
Location: Boston, Massachusetts
Area: 50 acres[1]
Built/Founded: 1634
Architect: Multiple, including Augustus St. Gaudens
Designated as NHL: February 27, 1987[2]
Added to NRHP: July 12, 1972 (original, in NRHP also including Boston Public Garden)

February 27, 1987 (new, in NHL of Boston Common alone)[3] For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... Download high resolution version (1606x956, 488 KB)View of the Water Celebration, on Boston Common, October 25th 1848. ... Boston redirects here. ... Augustus Saint-Gaudens (Dublin, March 1, 1848 _ Cornish, New Hampshire, August 3, 1907), was the Irish-French American sculptor of the Beaux Arts generation who most embodied the ideals of the American Renaissance. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ...

NRHP Reference#: 72000144 (original)
87000760 (new)
Governing body: Local

Boston Common is a popular public park in Boston, Massachusetts. Dating from 1634, it is the oldest city park in the United States. Its area is 50 acres (20 ha). The Common is bounded by Tremont Street, Park Street, Beacon Street, Charles Street, and Boylston Street, and is now part of the Emerald Necklace of parks and parkways that extend from the Common south to Franklin Park in Roxbury. A visitors' center for all of Boston is on the Tremont Street side of the park. For the Korean family name Park, see Korean name. ... Boston redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the unit of measurement. ... A hectare (symbol ha) is a unit of area, equal to 10 000 square metres, commonly used for measuring land area. ... Tremont Street is a major thoroughfare in Boston, Massachusetts. ... This article refers to Park Street in Boston. ... Beacon Street is a major thoroughfare in Boston, Massachusetts and several of its western suburbs. ... Charles Street is the name of a north-south street in the city center of Boston, Massachusetts. ... Boylston and Hereford Streets, in Boston. ... Boston Public Garden, the second link of the Emerald Necklace The Emerald Necklace consists of an 1,100-acre chain of parks linked by parkways and waterways in Boston and Brookline, Massachusetts. ... Franklin Park may refer to: Franklin Park, Illinois Franklin Park, Florida Franklin Park, Pennsylvania This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Roxbury is a neighborhood within Boston, Massachusetts USA. It was one of the first towns founded in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1630 and became a city in 1846 until it was annexed to Boston on January 5, 1868. ...

Frog Pond, viewed from the west.
Boston Common Inscription
1890 Map of Boston Common and the adjacent Public Garden.

The Central Burying Ground is found on the Boylston Street side of Boston Common. There one can find the burial sites of the artist Gilbert Stuart and the composer William Billings. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (854x533, 209 KB) Summary Enhanced version of . Enhancement by President Lethe. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (854x533, 209 KB) Summary Enhanced version of . Enhancement by President Lethe. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (870x596, 123 KB) Personal photo File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (870x596, 123 KB) Personal photo File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Boston_Common_Public_Garden_1890. ... Image File history File links Boston_Common_Public_Garden_1890. ... Self portrait, 1778 Gilbert Charles Stuart (né Stewart) (December 3, 1755 - July 9, 1828) was an American painter. ... William Billings (October 7, 1746–September 26, 1800), American choral composer, is regarded as the father of American choral music and hymnody. ...

Contents

History

The Common's purpose has changed over the years. Originally it was owned by William Blaxton (often given the modernized spelling "Blackstone") until it was bought from him by the city. During the 1630s, it was used as a cow pasture by many families living in Boston. However, this only lasted for a few years, as affluent families bought additional cows which led to overgrazing.[4] Reverend William Blaxton (also spelled William Blackstone) (1595-1675) was an early British settler in New England, and the first European settler of modern day Boston and Rhode Island. ... // In the dictionary and agriculture, overgrazing is when plants are exposed to grazing for too long, or without sufficient recovery periods. ...


The Common was used as a camp by the British before the Revolutionary War, from which they left for the Battle of Lexington and Concord. It was used for public hangings up until 1817, most of which were from a large oak which was replaced with gallows in 1769. Mary Dyer was hanged there in 1660. A military camp or bivouac is a minor, semi-permanent facility for the lodging of an army. ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... The Battle of Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775 was the first battle of the American Revolutionary War and was described as the shot heard round the world in Emersons Concord Hymn. ... Hanging is the suspension of a person by a ligature, usually a cord wrapped around the neck, causing death. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Species See List of Quercus species The term oak can be used as part of the common name of any of several hundred species of trees and shrubs in the genus Quercus (from Latin oak tree), which are listed in the List of Quercus species, and some related genera, notably... These gallows in Tombstone Courthouse State Historic Park are maintained by Arizona State Parks. ... 1769 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Mary Dyer is led to the gallows Mary Barrett Dyer (1611? - June 1, 1660) was an English Quaker who was hanged in Boston, Massachusetts for repeatedly defying a law banning Quakers from the colony. ... // Events January 1 - Colonel George Monck with his regiment crosses from Scotland to England at the village of Coldstream and begins advance towards London in support of English Restoration. ...


On May 19, 1713, two hundred citizens rioted on the Common in reaction to a food shortage in the city. They later attacked the ships and warehouses of wealthy merchant Andrew Belcher, who was exporting grain to the Caribbean for higher profits. The lieutenant governor was shot during the riot.[5]


A hundred people gathered on the Common in early 1965 to protest the Vietnam War. A second protest happened on October 15, 1969, this time with 100,000 people protesting.[6] Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


Today the Common serves as a public park for all to use for formal or informal gatherings. Events such as concerts, protests, softball games, and ice skating (on Frog Pond) often take place in the park. Famous individuals such as Martin Luther King Jr. and Pope John Paul II have made speeches there. Judy Garland gave her largest concert ever (100,000+) on the Common, on August 31, 1967. Martin Luther King, Jr. ... Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo II, Polish: Jan PaweÅ‚ II) born   []; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of... Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 - June 22, 1969) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ...


It was declared a U.S. National Historic Landmark in 1987.[2][1] This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ...


On October 21, 2006, the Common became the site of a new world record, when 30,128 Jack-o'-lanterns were lit simultaneously around the park. The previous record, held by Keene, New Hampshire since 2003, was 28,952.[7] is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jack-o-lanterns may be carved with a friendly face, above, a menacing sawtooth scowl, or any look in between. ... Nickname: Location in Cheshire County, New Hampshire Coordinates: , Country State County Cheshire Settled 1736 Incorporated 1753 (town) Incorporated 1874 (city) Government  - Mayor Michael E.J. Blastos  - City Council Charles H. Redfern Angelo D. DiBernardo, Jr. ...


On August 27th, 2007 two teenagers were shot on the Common. One of the bullets fired during the shooting struck the Massachusetts State House.[8] A strict curfew has since been enforced, which has been protested by the homeless population of Boston.[9] [10] August 27 is the 239th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (240th in leap years), with 126 days remaining. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A homeless man pushes a cart down the street. ...


Notable features of the Common

  • The Massachusetts State House stands across Beacon Street from the northern edge of the Common.
  • The Unitarian Universalist Association, headquarters of the international, liberal religious denomination, sits next door to the Massachusetts State House facing the Common.
  • The Common forms the southern foot of Beacon Hill.
  • The monument to Robert Gould Shaw and the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry stands at Beacon and Park Streets, the northeast corner of the Common, opposite the State House.
  • The Soldiers and Sailors Monument is a victory column on Flag Staff Hill in the Common
  • The Boston Public Garden lies to the west of the Common, across Charles Street, and was originally considered an extension of the Common.
  • Frog Pond, a public ice-skating rink in winter months, is situated in the northern portion.
  • Park Street Station, the first subway station in America, stands at the eastern corner of the park.
  • Likewise, Boylston Station at the southern corner is America's second subway station.
  • Boston Common is the southern end of Boston's Freedom Trail.
  • Parkman Bandstand, in the eastern part of the park, is commonly used in musical and theatrical productions.
  • The softball fields lie in the southwest corner of the Common.
  • A grassy area forms the west part of the park, and is most commonly used for the park's largest events. A parking garage underlies this part of the Common. A granite slab there commemorates Pope John Paul II's October 1979 visit to Boston.
  • The Province of Nova Scotia has donated the annual Christmas tree to the City of Boston as an enduring thank-you for the relief efforts of the Boston Red Cross and the Massachusetts Public Safety Committee following the Halifax Explosion of 1917. In recent years the tree has been located on the Common.
  • The Masonic Grand Lodge of Massachusetts headquarters sits across from the southern corner of the Common, at the intersection of Boylston and Tremont Streets.
  • Also across from the southern corner of the Common, along Boylston and Tremont Streets, lies the campus of Emerson College.
  • In 1986, two prehistoric sites were discovered on the Common indicating Native American presence in the area as far back as 8,500 years ago.
  • A monumental inscription at the corner of Park Street and Tremont Street reads:

"In or about
the year of our Lord
One Thousand Six Hundred
thirty and four
the then present inhabitants
of the Town of Boston of whom
the Hon John Winthrop Esq
Gov of the Colony was Chiefe
did treat and agree with
Mr William Blackstone
for the purchase of his
Estate and any
Lands living within said
neck of Land called
Boston
after which purchase the
Town laid out a plan for
a trayning field for which ever
since and now is used for
that purpose and for
the feeding of cattell" This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA), in full the Unitarian Universalist Association of Congregations in North America, is a liberal religious association of Unitarian Universalist congregations formed by the consolidation in 1961 of the American Unitarian Association and the Universalist Church of America. ... Liberal religion is a religious tradition which embraces the theological diversity of a congregation rather than respecting any single creed, authority, or writing. ... For other senses of this word, see denomination. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Cutting down Beacon Hill, about 1800; a view from the north toward the Massachusetts State House. ... Robert Gould Shaw (October 10, 1837 – July 18, 1863) was the colonel in command of the all-black 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, which entered the American Civil War in 1863. ... The Storming of Fort Wagner, the most famous battle fought by the 54th Massachusetts The 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, an infantry regiment that fought in the American Civil War, was one of the first official black units in the United States armed forces. ... A Victory column is a monument in the form of a column, erected in memory of a victorious war or battle. ... Equestrian statue of George Washington. ... Park Street Station, streetcar (now Green Line) platforms, circa 1898 Park Street Station, Green Line platforms, December 2004 Park Street Under, Red Line platforms, January 2005 Park Street Station of the MBTA, located at the intersection Park Street and Tremont Street in Boston, is the main transfer point between the... Boylston Station, northbound Green Line platform. ... Bostons Freedom Trail is a red (mostly brick) path through downtown Boston which leads to sixteen significant historical sites. ... Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo II, Polish: Jan PaweÅ‚ II) born   []; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of... For other uses, see October (disambiguation). ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit (Latin: One defends and the other conquers) Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 11 Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867... For other uses, see Christmas tree (disambiguation). ... The Anarchist Black Cross was originally called the Anarchist Red Cross. The band Redd Kross was originally called Red Cross. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Halifax Explosion occurred on Thursday, December 6, 1917, when the City of Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, was devastated by the huge detonation of a French cargo ship, fully loaded with wartime explosives, that had accidentally collided with a Norwegian ship in The Narrows section of the Halifax Harbour. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... The Grand Lodge of Massachusetts (GLMA) is the main governing body of Freemasonry within Massachusetts, and maintains Lodges in certain jurisdictions overseas, namely Panama, Chile, the Peoples Republic of China and Cuba. ... Emerson College was founded in 1880 by Charles Wesley Emerson as a school of oratory, in Boston, Massachusetts. ...

Notable recurring events on the Common

The Commonwealth Shakespeare Company (CSC) was formed in 1996 by Artistic Director Steven Maler and associate Joan Moynagh to bring free, outdoor Shakespeare to the people of the city of Boston. ... Boston Lyric Opera New England (BLO) is an opera company in Boston, Massachusetts. ...

Emerald Necklace

Other parks and parkways of the Emerald Necklace: Boston Public Garden, the second link of the Emerald Necklace The Emerald Necklace consists of an 1,100-acre chain of parks linked by parkways and waterways in Boston and Brookline, Massachusetts. ...

Equestrian statue of George Washington. ... Commonwealth Avenue (often abbreviated Comm Ave by locals) is a road in the city of Boston, Massachusetts beginning at the western edge of the Public Garden, and continuing west through the Back Bay, Kenmore Square, and the suburbs of Brighton and Chestnut Hill. ... Sunset view of the Back Bay Fens in Boston The Back Bay Fens (also called The Fens), once a salt water shallow bay, is now a fresh water park in Boston, Massachusetts, USA designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... The Riverway ia a parkway in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Jamaicaway is a four-lane, undivided parkway in the Jamaica Plain neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts near the border of Brookline. ... Olmsted Park is a linear park in Boston and Brookline, Massachusetts, and a part of Bostons Emerald Necklace of connected parks and parkways. ... Jamaica Pond, boathouse in distance, 2005 1924 Map of Jamaica Pond Skating on Jamaica Pond, 1859 Jamaica Pond is a kettle pond surrounded by Jamaica Park, part of the Emerald Necklace of parks in Boston designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. ... The Arborway is a four-lane, divided parkway in the Jamaica Plain neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Arnold Arboretum is one of the worlds finest research arboretums. ... Franklin Park, a partially-wooded 527-acre parkland in the Jamaica Plain and Roxbury neighborhoods of Boston, Massachusetts, is maintained by the Department of Conservation and Recreation. ...

See also

Preceded by
N/A
Locations along Boston's Freedom Trail
Boston Common
Succeeded by
Massachusetts State House

Granary Burying Ground. ... Kings Chapel, Boston, with One Boston Place in the background The original Kings Chapel in Boston, Massachusetts was a wooden church built in 1688. ... Equestrian statue of George Washington. ... Bostons Freedom Trail is a red (mostly brick) path through downtown Boston which leads to sixteen significant historical sites. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

References

  1. ^ a b James H. Charleton (November, 1985), National Register of Historic Places Inventory-Nomination: Boston CommonPDF (32 KB), National Park Service  and Accompanying photos: one aerial from 1972 and three from 1985PDF (32 KB)
  2. ^ a b Boston Common. National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. Retrieved on 2008-04-16.
  3. ^ National Register Information System. National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service (2007-01-23).
  4. ^ Loewen, James. Lies Across America: What Our Historic Sites Get Wrong. New York: The New Press, 1999. p. 414 ISBN 0965003172
  5. ^ Zinn, Howard. A People's History of the United States. New York: Perennial, 2003. p.51 ISBN 0060528370
  6. ^ Zinn, Howard. p.486
  7. ^ A love in Common for pumpkins - The Boston Globe
  8. ^ Shots on Common strike teens, State House - The Boston Globe
  9. ^ Curfew targets crime on Common - The Boston Globe
  10. ^ Homeless Protest Boston Common Curfew: Park Closed After 11 P.M.. TheBostonChannel.Com (2007-08-30). Retrieved on 2008-04-16.

“PDF” redirects here. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Howard Zinn (born August 24, 1922) is an American historian, political scientist, social critic, activist and playwright, best known as author of the bestseller[5] , A Peoples History of the United States. ... A Peoples History of the United States, 2003 hardcover edition A Peoples History of the United States is a nonfiction book by American historian and political scientist Howard Zinn, in which he seeks to present American history through the eyes of groups he says are rarely heard in... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Boston Common is at coordinates 42°21′18″N 71°04′01″W / 42.355, -71.067 (Boston Common)Coordinates: 42°21′18″N 71°04′01″W / 42.355, -71.067 (Boston Common)
  • A View on Cities article on Boston Common
  • Boston National Historical Park Official Website
Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... The History of the National Register of Historic Places began in 1966 when the United States government passed the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), which created the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). ... Clockwise from bottom left: a site, a building, a structure and an object. ... Helvenston House, part of the Ocala Historic District, in Ocala, Florida. ... Broadly defined, a contributing property is any property, structure or object which adds to the historical intergrity or architectural qualities that make a historic district, listed locally or federally, significant. ... Image File history File links US-NationalParkService-ShadedLogo. ... This is a list of entries on the National Register of Historic Places. ... The National Park System of the United States is the collection of physical properties owned or administered by the National Park Service. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
City of Boston (115 words)
The Boston Common is known to be one of the oldest public parks in the country.
Today, Boston Common is the anchor for the Emerald Necklace, a system of connected parks that winds through many of Boston's neighborhoods.
British troops camped on Boston Common prior to the Revolution and left from here to face colonial resistance at Lexington and Concord in April, 1775.
Great Public Spaces: Boston Common & Public Gardens | Project for Public Spaces (PPS) - Placemaking for Communities (784 words)
While the Common and the Gardens are adjacent (bisected by Charles Street) and serve a unified purpose, the two parks spaces have vastly different characters.
Boston Common was never used exclusively for grazing, however.
Adjacent to the Common was a brackish swamp known as the Back Bay.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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